Content

CEDR (Ed.)

Agriculture and Competition

XXIX European Congress and Colloquium of Rural Law, Lille, 20-23 September 2017 / XXIXe Congrès et Colloque Européen de Droit Rural, Lille, 20-23 septembre 2017 / XXIX. Europäischer Agrarrechtskongress, Lille, 20.-23. September 2017

1. Edition 2019, ISBN print: 978-3-8487-5831-9, ISBN online: 978-3-8452-9965-5, https://doi.org/10.5771/9783845299655

Series: Schriften zum Agrar-, Umwelt- und Verbraucherschutzrecht, vol. 82

Bibliographic information
Agriculture and Competition CEDR (ed.) SCHRIFTEN ZUM AGRAR-, UMWELT- UND VERBRAUCHERSCHUTZRECHT 82 Nomos XXIX. Europäischer Agrarrechtskongress, Lille, 2017 SCHRIFTEN ZUM AGRAR-, UMWELT- UND VERBRAUCHERSCHUTZRECHT Edited by / publiée par / herausgegeben vom Institut für Landwirtschaftsrecht, Universität Göttingen Professor Dr. José MartÍnez Professor Dr. Gerald Spindler Professor Dr. Peter-Tobias Stoll Professor Dr. Barbara Veit Volume 82 COMITÉ EUROPÉEN DE DROIT RURAL EUROPEAN COUNCIL FOR AGRICULTURAL LAW EUROPÄISCHES KOMITEE FÜR AGRARRECHT Professor Dr. Dieter Schweizer, President Professor Dr. Roland Norer, General Delegate Dr. Leticia Bourges, General Secretary Geoff Whittaker, General Treasurer BUT_Norer_5831-9.indd 2 05.07.19 10:49 European Council for Agricultural Law/Comité Européen de Droit Rural/Europäisches Komitee für Agrarrecht edited by Prof. Dr. Roland Norer, General Delegate in the name of European Council for Agricultural Law Agriculture and Competition Nomos XXIX European Congress and Colloquium of Rural Law, Lille, 20-23 September 2017 XXIXe Congrès et Colloque Européen de Droit Rural, Lille, 20-23 septembre 2017 XXIX. Europäischer Agrarrechtskongress, Lille, 20.-23. September 2017 BUT_Norer_5831-9.indd 3 05.07.19 10:49 Die Bände 1 – 52 sowie die Jahrbücher Band I – VI sind erschienen bei Carl Heymanns Verlag KG, Köln Die Deutsche Nationalbibliothek verzeichnet diese Publikation in der Deutschen Nationalbibliografie; detaillierte bibliografische Daten sind im Internet über http://dnb.d-nb.de abrufbar. The Deutsche Nationalbibliothek lists this publication in the Deutsche Nationalbibliografie; detailed bibliographic data are available on the Internet at http://dnb.d-nb.de ISBN 978-3-8487-5831-9 (Print) 978-3-8452-9965-5 (ePDF) British Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library. ISBN 978-3-8487-5831-9 (Print) 978-3-8452-9965-5 (ePDF) Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data CEDR Agriculture and Competition XXIX European Congress and Colloquium of Rural Law, Lille, 20-23 September 2017 XXIXe Congrès et Colloque Européen de Droit Rural, Lille, 20-23 septembre 2017 XXIX. Europäischer Agrarrechtskongress, Lille, 20.-23. September 2017 CEDR (ed.) 504 pp. ISBN 978-3-8487-5831-9 (Print) 978-3-8452-9965-5 (ePDF) 1. Auflage 2019 © Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft, Baden-Baden 2019. Gedruckt in Deutschland. Alle Rechte, auch die des Nachdrucks von Auszügen, der fotomechanischen Wiedergabe und der Übersetzung, vorbehalten. Gedruckt auf alterungsbeständigem Papier. This work is subject to copyright. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage or retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publishers. Under § 54 of the German Copyright Law where copies are made for other than private use a fee is payable to “Verwertungs gesellschaft Wort”, Munich. No responsibility for loss caused to any individual or organization acting on or refraining from action as a result of the material in this publication can be accepted by Nomos or the editors. BUT_Norer_5831-9.indd 4 05.07.19 10:49 Contenu - Content - Inhalt Session d’ouverture – Opening – EröffnungI. Preface 11 Roland Norer Allocution d’ouverture – Opening Adress – Eröffnungsansprache 13 Dieter Schweizer Mot de Bienvenue – Welcome Address – Willkommensansprache 17 Jacques Druais Discours de Bienvenue – Welcome Speech – Grußwort 19 Jerzy Plewa Introduction scientifique – Scientific Introduction – Wissenschaftliche Einführung 23 Patrick Meunier Commission I – Kommission III. Questionnaire de la Commission I – Questionnaire of Commission I – Fragebogen der Kommission I 47 Rapport général de la Commission I – General Report of Commission I – Generalbericht der Kommission I 57 Paul Richli / Christian Busse Conclusions de la Commission I – Conclusions of Commission I – Schlussfolgerungen der Kommission I 263 5 Commission II – Kommission IIIII. Questionnaire de la Commission II – Questionnaire of Commission II – Fragebogen der Kommission II 283 Rapport général de la Commission II – General Report of Commission II – Generalbericht der Kommission II 291 Luc Bodiguel Conclusions de la Commission II – Conclusions of Commission II – Schlussfolgerungen der Kommission II 321 Commission III – Kommission IIIIV Questionnaire de la Commission III – Questionnaire of Commission III –Fragebogen der Kommission III 331 Rapport général de la Commission III – General Report of Commission III – Generalbericht der Kommission III 337 Ludivine Petetin Conclusions de la Commission III – Conclusions of Commission III – Schlussfolgerungen der Kommission III 379 Rapport de Synthese – Synthesis Report – SyntheseberichtV. Rapport de Synthese – Synthesis Report – Synthesebericht 387 Roland Norer Contenu - Content - Inhalt 6 Rapports Nationaux – National Reports – LandesberichteVI. A. Commission I – Kommission I 443 Austria 445 Anton Reinl Germany 447 Birgit Buth Italy 451 Luigi Russo Poland 461 Adam Niewiadomski / Przemysław Litwiniuk / Konrad Marciniuk United Kingdom 467 Rhodri Jones B. Commission II – Kommission II 469 Germany 471 Dieter Schweizer Romania 473 Victor Marcusohn Spain 477 Esther Muñiz Espada C. Commission III – Kommission III 481 Argentina 483 María Adriana Victoria / Nancy Lydia Malanos France 485 Christine Lebel Contenu - Content - Inhalt 7 United States of America 489 Terence J. Centner / Margaret Rosso Grossman Rapports Individuel – Individual Reports – Individuelle Berichte VII. La réglementation du contrat de bail rural dans le droit espagnol: frein ou moteur à la compétitivité de l’agriculture ? 493 Laura Zumaquero Significant current developments in rural law 497 Teresa Rodriguez Cachón Liste des Rapports nationaux – List of National Reports – Liste der Landesberichte VIII. Contenu - Content - Inhalt 8 I. Session d’ouverture – Opening – Eröffnung Preface Prof. Dr. Roland Norer General Delegate CEDR University of Lucerne The XXIX European Congress and Colloquium of Agricultural Law, held in Lille from 21 to 23 september 2017, were organized by the European Council for Rural Law (Comité Européen de Droit Rural; C.E.D.R.) in cooperation with the French Association for Agricultural Law (AFDR). The overlapping theme of the congress was “AGRICULTURE AND COMPETITION”. The academic work was developed in three separate commissions, national reports provided background information for the discussions within the commissions. All three commissions terminated their academic activities by drawing conclusions and extending recom‐ mendations to the competent authorities of the European Union, member and non-member states and international organisations. The topic for commission I was “COMPETITION RULES IN AGRI‐ CULTURE”. This commission dealt among others, with a series of ques‐ tions such as: national provisions on privileges for agriculture under antitrust law, recognition of producer organisations and their exemption from the prohibition of cartels. Commission II chose the topic “AGRICULTURAL COMPETITIVE‐ NESS: DRIVERS AND OBSTACLES IN NATIONAL LAW”. This com‐ mission dealt with the following questions: Legal provisions concerning land and property, taxes, farm operator, product marketing, agricultural workers and businesses as well as environmental regulations. Further, the national rules implementing the CAP were discussed. Commission III tackled the topic “SIGNIFICANT CURRENT DE‐ VELOPMENTS IN RURAL LAW”. It dealt with questions such as use of new technologies, Livestock in farming, Brexit and its impact on agricul‐ ture, Food security and safety, calls for CAP and agricultural reforms or TTIP and CETA. 11 This publication contains the following parts: • the opening speeches of Prof. Dr. Dieter Schweizer, President of the C.E.D.R., Jaques Druais President of the AFDR, Jerzy Plewa, Direc‐ tor-General for Agriculture and Rural Development at the European Commission; • the scientific introduction by Prof. Dr. Patrick Meunier, University of Lille; • the questionnaires and the general reports of the three commissions, written by Prof. em. Dr. Paul Richli, University of Lucerne und Dr. Christian Busse, Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture (both commission I), Dr. Luc Bodiguel, CNRS, University of Nantes (com‐ mission II) and Dr. Ludivine Petetin, University of Cardiff (commis‐ sion III); • the synthesis report of the Delegate General of the C.E.D.R., Prof. Dr. Roland Norer, University of Lucerne; • the conclusions and recommendations of the three commissions and • some summaries of the national and individual reports to the three commissions. In the spirit of the tradition of the C.E.D.R. I would like to thank the French Association for Agricultural Law (AFDR) for the successful orga‐ nisation of the congress. The congress was a great event with many partic‐ ipants and interesting presentations Scientific work has been challenging and ambitious. The general re‐ porters of the commissions and the presidents directed it efficiently and productively. Them as well as all national and individual rapporteurs de‐ serve more than a big thank for the excellent contributions to this inspiring XXIX European Congress and Colloquium of Agricultural Law. Roland Norer 12 Allocution d’ouverture – Opening Adress – Eröffnungsansprache Prof. Dr. Dr. h. c. Dieter Schweizer Ministerialrat, President of the CEDR Minister Travert, President Jacques Durais, Director-General Jerzy Plewa, Deputy Director General Dr Mögele, dear Rudolf, Members of the parliaments, Representatives of the European Union, Researchers, Legal experts, ladies and gentlemen, Welcome In my capacity as President, it is a great honour and pleasure for me to welcome you here in Lille at the 29th European Congress of Rural Law of the European Council for Rural Law (CEDR). The last European Congress of Rural Law was held in 2015 at the Uni‐ versity of Potsdam. The meeting document, comprising 560 pages, was published right on time for our anniversary celebration in Brussels. We still have fond memories of this successful event. I am confident that this Congress of Rural Law will turn out to be just as successful by discussing key topics and breaking new ground. We are meeting here to discuss agricultural and rural law, in particular the application and shaping of this legal area and thereby • the legal framework for agricultural and forestry businesses, • the living conditions of people in rural areas, • especially of farmers, and last but not least • the rights of consumers. This event has attracted a great deal of interest. Participants of this year's congress have come from all parts of the world, including Europe, North and South America, Africa and Asia. I. 13 This interest shows that the European Congress of Rural Law is a key pillar of European agricultural law and the European Council for Rural Law! You develop ideas! You set the pace! You give fresh momentum! You establish new contacts! You develop networks! In particular over the course of the last two years, many persons in South America and Africa have voiced their interest in joining the CEDR. The Board of the European Council for Rural Law has opened up membership way beyond the confines of Europe. This is why we do not only have congress participants from North and South America, Africa and Asia, but also members from these continents among us. Generally speaking, agricultural law and rural law are fascinating legal areas, being of great significance for the economy and society as a whole. Agricultural policy, ultimately implemented in the countries by agricul‐ tural law, is at the heart of society, day in, day out. Millions of people are interested in • Securing their food base • Promoting the necessary structures and supporting the holdings • Ensuring animal welfare and promoting animal ethics • Securing health and the quality of foods • Securing and shaping food trade • Creating and preserving cultural landscapes • Maintaining the natural resources • Environmental protection • Climate change • Soil protection For centuries up until today, the defining issues have been land transac‐ tions, tenancy legislation, agricultural inheritance law and cooperative law. While agricultural law was being established over the course of thousands of years by regions or nation states, legislative competence in the area of agricultural law was transferred from the nation state to the federation of Dieter Schweizer 14 states of the European Union when the European Economic Community was founded in 1957. The former French Agricultural Minister initiated the foundation of the European Council for Rural Law in Paris only a few months later in the same year. Agricultural law at a European level has flourished so far, mounting up to around 40,000 pages. Price volatility has been a recurring concern for agricultural markets and for agricultural policy over the past years. In-between this tug of war, producers were hardly able to assert their interests and often exposed to the free play of market forces. With the introduction of extensive rules on state recognition of producer organisations and associations at EU level, the cooperation between agricultural producers has seen a significant val‐ orisation over the past years. In addition, inter-branch organisations within the agricultural sector can now be recognised by the state. Competition law is expected to play a key role during the next reform of the Common Agricultural Policy, looking at the current profound discussions on the necessary strengthening of the agricultural producer's market position. In Commission I we therefore focus on agricultural competition law. 11 national reports have been prepared for Commission I. 14 national reports have been made available to Commission II. This commission examines which legal provisions promote the competitiveness of agricultural holdings and which legal provisions inhibit their competi‐ tiveness. Commission III looks at current agricultural law challenges and analy‐ ses the most important developments of rural law over the last two years. We already touched upon agricultural land transactions and tenancy law during our 60-year anniversary celebrations and in our anniversary jour‐ nal. Both are also key topics today, as well as climate protection, soil pro‐ tection, biotechnology, patentability of animals and plants, digitisation, fertiliser legislation, livestock husbandry and food safety. 10 reports have been submitted on these issues. I am convinced that all of these current and vital topics will be met with great interest and that insightful discussions will ensue. The programme offers interesting technical excursions. Even if we will only be able to appreciate the Congress' smooth operati‐ ons at the closing ceremony, already today I would like to thank Mr Ro‐ land Norer very much for the scientific preparation of this congress! Allocution d’ouverture – Opening Adress – Eröffnungsansprache 15 I would also like to thank the French Society for Agricultural Law for their outstanding organisation of the European Congress of Rural Law and for choosing the best possible setting. I would like to thank in particu‐ lar the First Chairman Jacques Durais. I am also delighted to offer a wonderful accompanying persons' pro‐ gramme in the region of Lille. We are delighted to welcome more than 150 participants from 30 coun‐ tries to our congress. Many young lawyers, in particular, have come to this congress. It offers excellent conditions for further developing agricultural law and the European Council for Rural Law whilst also providing oppor‐ tunities for face-to-face encounters and making new friends. Let us seize this opportunity over the coming days! I wish all participants and all of us an animated scientific and practiceoriented exchange, valuable ideas and a beneficial further development of European and international agricultural law for the benefit of agriculture, rural areas and the people living in rural areas. I declare the 29th European Congress of Rural Law open. Dieter Schweizer 16 Mot de Bienvenue – Welcome Address – Willkommensansprache Jacques Druais Président AFDR Après le mot du Président Dieter SCHWEIZER, Monsieur le Bâtonnier Jacques DRUAIS a tenu à remercier le Conseil d’administration du CEDR d’avoir accepté que le soixantième anniversaire de notre comité soit céléb‐ ré à Lille par son congrès bisannuel. Cela s’imposait, il est vrai. En effet, c’est en France, à Paris que s’est tenu du 28 au 30 octobre 1957 ce que l’on peut qualifier de premier congrès du CEDR, précurseur des congrès bisannuels que nous avons ensuite connus. L’organisation matérielle et scientifique de ce congrès avait été confiée à l’IHEDREA (Institut des Hautes Etudes de Droit Rural et d’Economie Agricole) créé en 1950 par Jean MEGRET, Avocat à Paris. La nécessité d’une telle rencontre s’était imposée alors que le marché commun venait d’être constitué (25 mars 1957) et que les juristes des six pays fondateurs ambitionnaient d’harmoniser leurs législations pour par‐ venir un jour à un droit agraire commun. Jean MEGRET fut la cheville ouvrière de cette grande œuvre à laquelle participèrent : • Alfred PIKALO, notaire, professeur à l’Université de Cologne • Professeur Giangastone BOLLA, Directeur de l’Institut de droit agraire à Florence • Mr JM ANDRIES Magistrat pour la Belgique • Messieurs les professeurs CERRUTTI et POLAK pour les Pays-Bas • Monsieur le Bâtonnier DELVAUX pour le Grand Duché de Luxem‐ bourg Ces agraristes venant des six pays fondateurs de l’Union Européenne for‐ mèrent la base solide du CEDR. La première réunion du Conseil de Direction eut lieu à Paris le 8 juillet 1958 et depuis 1961, le Conseil se réunit deux à trois fois par an. 17 Depuis ces premiers temps le CEDR s’est élargi dans le même temps que l’Union Européenne repoussait ses frontières, notamment vers les pays de l’est. Mais l’importance en nombre des pays membres aujourd’hui ne doit pas faire oublier les prémices et le rôle essentiel que l’Association Française et ses responsables ont joué. On a cité Jean MEGRET, bien sûr, mais il faut y associer le Bâtonnier ROZIER, le Bâtonnier DE SILGNY et bien d’autres. Que le CEDR tienne son congrès à Lille, en France, c’est un retour aux sources mais c’est aussi une reconnaissance du travail accompli par nos associations régionales et particulièrement la section Nord Pas de Calais, présidée par notre confrère et ami Vincent BUE, avocat au Barreau de Lil‐ le. Il faut le remercier lui et son équipe, comme il faut remercier Jean-Bap‐ tiste MILLARD, secrétaire général de l'AFDR. Ils ont travaillé d’arrache-pied pour que ce congrès se déroule dans les meilleures conditions. Je suis convaincu que notre congrès sera une réussite. Bon travail et bon séjour à Lille. Jacques Druais 18 Discours de Bienvenue – Welcome Speech – Grußwort Jerzy Plewa Director-General for Agriculture and Rural Development at the European Commission Opening remarks Chairman, distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen, I would like to congratulate the European Council for Rural Law on its 60th anniversary. Just like the Treaty of Rome, this is a very respectable age. Over these years, the Union and its predecessors have achieved great accomplishments and weathered storms and shocks, of which the Euro cri‐ sis and 'Brexit' are recent examples. In response to these recent shocks, the European institutions have de‐ cided on a positive agenda to make sure the Union delivers real value added for EU citizens. The Commission is taking the lead in this process with the publication of the White Paper on the Future of Europe in March of this year. The White Paper described five scenarios and has launched a broad debate among citizens about the future of the Union. In his States of the Union address of last week, President Juncker set out his ideas and a roadmap for the coming two years. In his speech, President Juncker qualified the Union as "a community of law". You know better than any of us that the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) is a tried and tested example of that legal community! The wider debate on the future of Europe is therefore very important for the future development of the CAP. Let me first recall the five objectives of the Common Agricultural Poli‐ cy as laid out in the Treaty to highlight how valid and relevant they remain today: to ensure a fair standard of living for the farming community, to as‐ sure availability of supplies, to stabilise markets and ensure reasonable prices for consumers and to increase agricultural productivity. It is also clear that the policy to deliver on those objectives constantly evolves. Indeed, the Commission is now preparing plans for the future. I. 19 Since the last reform of the CAP of 2013, the wider context for agricul‐ tural policy has changed. We have seen crises in agricultural markets, in the dairy market, for example, but also as a result of the Russian import ban of a large range of EU products. At the same time, bilateral negotia‐ tions have progressed. I would like to mention that the bilateral trade agreement with Canada enters into force provisionally today. And in July we managed to successfully agree a bilateral trade agreement with Japan, which provides tremendous opportunities for EU agricultural exports in particular. Thirdly, the EU is facing new challenges, such as the migration, the departure of the UK, and has also engaged in new commitments, most notably the Sustainable Development Goals and the COP 21 climate agreement. But there are also specific policy issues to tackle. Budgetary challenges related to Brexit and to the financing of Union policies on e.g. migration, as well as the simplification of the Common Agricultural Policy, as the 2013 reform outcome is not only perceived as, but also in practice, way too complex. All this induced the need to explore how to keep the CAP fit for pur‐ pose. We did so during the Cork 2.0 conference, celebrating 20 years of rural development progress and leading to a bottom-up declaration for the future entitled 'A Better Life in Rural Areas'. We also organised an on-line public consultation from February to May of 2017, which saw very high participation confirming the interest in EU agriculture. Over 322 000 indi‐ vidual replies were received, as well as over 1400 position papers. We dis‐ cussed the outcome of this public consultation during a large conference on the 7th of July and at the same time analytical work has been ongoing to create the necessary evidence basis for new policy proposals. The Commission will present a Communication on the "Modernisation and simplification of the CAP" to the Council and the European Parlia‐ ment by the end of the year. The Communication will contain orientations for future policy development. And while I cannot yet discuss the content of this paper, let me name four key elements: 1. Sustainability and the challenges for the environment, such as biodi‐ versity, water, soil, air and climate change. How can we build on and improve the current "greening" policy and make it simpler, while en‐ hancing its effectiveness? Jerzy Plewa 20 2. The challenges of the farm economy. How can the CAP deal in a better way with volatile markets and low income in agriculture in a market oriented policy? 3. The challenge of rural vitality. How can our policy be improved to be able to offer a better future to our rural areas, including for the next generation of farmers? 4. The challenge of simplification: how can we make the policy simpler for farmers and administrations alike and ensure it is oriented towards performance. In other words, how can we direct the policy towards a focus on results rather than merely compliance with the law? The Communication on which the Commission is working along the lines just set out, will sketch the future of the policy in broad terms, while pro‐ posals for the future financing of the CAP are expected in May 2018, when the Commission is scheduled to present its proposals for the next Multiannual Financial Framework. Finally, let me say a few words on competition law & agriculture, one of the themes of your conference. Firstly, I would like to confirm that mar‐ ket orientation and competitiveness are and will stay key components of the CAP in the future. But taking broader look at the food supply chain, the agricultural sector is generally characterised by fragmentation and – despite structural adjustments over many years – by relatively small farms. One remedy to address the negative consequences of fragmentation and to strengthen the position of farmers in the supply chain is collective ac‐ tion through the establishment of cooperatives or other forms of producer organisations. This is actively supported by the CAP, first and foremost via the Common Market Organisation, as well as through rural develop‐ ment measures. However, not even a year ago, and in the wake of the dairy crisis, the Agricultural Market Task Force (AMTF), chaired by the former Dutch agriculture minister Veerman, looked at the functioning of the food supply chain and recommended more could and should be done. Among others it recognised the need to do more to enable collective solutions of farmers working together, while also underlying the importance of not eliminating competition. The Commission is working on the follow-up to the AMTF recommen‐ dations and preparing a regulatory initiative to improve the functioning of the food supply chain to tackle the issues of unfair trading practices as well as market transparency and legal possibilities to facilitate value shar‐ Discours de Bienvenue – Welcome Speech – Grußwort 21 ing between producer organisations and other actors in the supply chain. Until 17 November a public consultation linked to this initiative is open and we would welcome contributions to this online questionnaire from your side. The Commission is considering legal proposals on this topic in the first semester of 2018 on the basis of an ongoing impact assessment. In conclusion, let me wish you a very successful congress today, where we will have ample time for debate on the future of Europe, on the future of the Common Agricultural Policy and on the functioning of the food supply chain. I look forward to hear your ideas and thank you for your at‐ tention. Jerzy Plewa 22 Introduction scientifique – Scientific Introduction – Wissenschaftliche Einführung Prof. Dr. Patrick Meunier Université de Lille Politique agricole commune et concurrence: une corrélation génétiquement modifiée « C’est la concurrence qui met un prix juste aux marchandises et qui établit les vrais rapports entre elles » Montesquieu, dans son ouvrage « De l’esprit des lois », reconnaissait ainsi à la concurrence les vertus d’établir la juste valeur des biens destinés à sa‐ tisfaire au mieux les besoins de leurs utilisateurs. Dans cette perspective, la compétition à laquelle se livrent les producteurs a essentiellement pour objectif d’obtenir la préférence du consommateur dont les exigences quan‐ titatives et qualitatives influent considérablement sur la détermination des prix. Dans cette configuration, la juste valeur d’un bien résulte de la con‐ frontation d’opérateurs qui vendent une marchandise à un niveau de quali‐ tés intrinsèques identiques. La concurrence peut également se concevoir au-delà des rapports entre produits similaires et intégrer de nouvelles di‐ mensions incarnées par la notion de marchandises substituables et présen‐ tant des alternatives de choix pour le consommateur. Ce champ concurren‐ tiel se détache nécessairement des critères objectifs permettant de compa‐ rer des marchandises identiques puisqu’il incombe de prendre en considé‐ ration la dimension subjective de l’acte d’achat. Dans sa conception globale, le droit de la concurrence veille à ce que les opérateurs ne développent, au détriment des consommateurs, des prati‐ ques neutralisant la compétition par le biais d’ententes « pacificatri‐ ces » ou d’abus de positions dominantes. Depuis l’adoption du traité CEE, « la loyauté dans la concurrence »1 repose sur un « régime » garan‐ tissant qu’elle ne soit pas « faussée »2. Le Traité sur l’Union européenne, 1 Préambule du Traité CEE. 2 Art. 3, f). 23 signé à Maastricht, a conforté le dispositif en soulignant que « l’action des Etats membres et de la Communauté comporte (…) l'instauration d'une politique économique (…) conduite conformément au respect du principe d'une économie de marché ouverte où la concurrence est libre »3. L’article 119 TFUE réitère la formule tout en l’inscrivant dans le cadre des finalités énoncées à l’article 3 TUE qui cerne la configuration économique de l’Union. En effet, celle-ci « établit un marché intérieur » et « oeuvre pour le développement durable de l'Europe fondé sur une croissance économi‐ que équilibrée et sur la stabilité des prix, une économie sociale de marché hautement compétitive, qui tend au plein emploi et au progrès social, et un niveau élevé de protection et d'amélioration de la qualité de l'environne‐ ment ». Il ressort de ces combinaisons normatives que le principe « d’une économie de marché ouverte où la concurrence est libre » s’avère borné par la poursuite d’objectifs s’analysant, implicitement, comme autant de correctifs aux effets susceptibles de résulter d’une application stricte de l’économie libérale. A cette fin, l’action normative de l’Union peut s’avé‐ rer nécessaire pour optimiser les performances de l’« économie sociale de marché » dans le cadre fondamental du développement durable. L’agriculture et le commerce des produits agricoles, au terme de l’arti‐ cle 38 § 1 TFUE, font partie intégrante du marché intérieur mais ne sont tenus d’en respecter les règles de fonctionnement qu’à l’aune des disposi‐ tions énoncées aux articles 39 à 44 TFUE, spécifiquement applicables à ce secteur. Le principe d’une économie de marché ouverte où la concurrence est libre s’avère amplement relatif sous le prisme d’une politique agricole commune dont les objectifs justifient la mise en œuvre d’un cadre inter‐ ventionniste à géométrie variable. L’article 42 TFUE énonce clairement la spécificité du secteur au sein du marché intérieur en soulignant que « Les dispositions du chapitre relatif aux règles de concurrence ne sont applica‐ bles à la production et au commerce des produits agricoles que dans la mesure déterminée par le Parlement européen et le Conseil (…) compte tenu des objectifs énoncés à l'article 39 ». Dès lors, il appartient au légis‐ lateur de l’Union de déterminer l’intensité de l’applicabilité du principe de libre concurrence au secteur agricole en fonction des objectifs recherchés. Les rédacteurs du traité ont ainsi attribué aux institutions de l’Union la mission d’évaluer le degré de primauté de la politique agricole commune 3 Titre II : Dispositions portant modification du Traité instituant la Communauté éco‐ nomique européenne en vue d'établir la Communauté européenne, Article G B. 4). Patrick Meunier 24 sur le principe de libre concurrence. La Cour de justice a précisé qu’au ter‐ me de l’article 42 TFUE « sont ainsi reconnus tout à la fois la primauté de la politique agricole par rapport aux objectifs du traité dans le domaine de la concurrence et le pouvoir du Conseil de décider dans quelle mesure les règles de concurrence trouvent à s’appliquer dans le secteur agricole. Dans l’exercice de ce pouvoir, comme dans l’ensemble de la mise en œuvre de la politique agricole, le Conseil détient un large pouvoir d’app‐ réciation »4. Celui-ci est décliné à l’article 39 § 2 TFUE comme la « né‐ cessité d’opérer graduellement les ajustements opportuns ». En effet, la politique agricole commune a pour vocation de satisfaire aux spécificités structurelles et conjoncturelles d’un secteur extrêmement imbriqué dans « l’ensemble de l’économie » des Etats membres5. A cet égard, les objectifs de la PAC, fixés à l’article 39 § 1 TFUE, reposent sur l’équilibre des intérêts des agriculteurs, des consommateurs et du marché intérieur6. L’accroissement rationnel de la productivité, l’employabilité et le niveau de vie du secteur agricole sont ainsi destinés à « stabiliser » des marchés offrant des prix raisonnables aux consommateurs tout en préservant les ap‐ provisionnements de l’Union. La finalité de la politique agricole commune s’inscrit dans la perspective des objectifs dévolus à l’Union européenne, dans la mesure où l’article 3 § 3 TUE évoque « une croissance économi‐ que équilibrée » ainsi que « la stabilité des prix, une économie sociale de marché hautement compétitive, qui tend au plein emploi et au progrès so‐ cial ». L’analyse comparative des termes des articles 3 § 3 TUE et 39 § 1 4 CJCE, 29 octobre 1980, « Maïzena Gmbh c/ Conseil », Aff. 139/79, Rec. 1980, p. 3394, point 23 ; ECLI:EU:C:1980:250. 5 Cf. art. 39 § 2 TFUE « Dans l'élaboration de la politique agricole commune et des méthodes spéciales qu'elle peut impliquer, il sera tenu compte : a) du caractère par‐ ticulier de l'activité agricole, découlant de la structure sociale de l'agriculture et des disparités structurelles et naturelles entre les diverses régions agricoles, b) de la né‐ cessité d'opérer graduellement les ajustements opportuns, c) du fait que, dans les États membres, l'agriculture constitue un secteur intimement lié à l'ensemble de l'économie. ». 6 Cf. art. 39 § 1 TFUE « La politique agricole commune a pour but : a) d'accroître la productivité de l'agriculture en développant le progrès technique, en assurant le dé‐ veloppement rationnel de la production agricole ainsi qu'un emploi optimum des facteurs de production, notamment de la main-d’œuvre, b) d'assurer ainsi un niveau de vie équitable à la population agricole, notamment par le relèvement du revenu individuel de ceux qui travaillent dans l'agriculture, c) de stabiliser les marchés, d) de garantir la sécurité des approvisionnements, e) d'assurer des prix raisonnables dans les livraisons aux consommateurs. Introduction scientifique – Scientific Introduction – Wissenschaftliche Einführung 25 TFUE fait cependant apparaître une différence substantielle. En effet, les objectifs de l’article 39 § 1 TFUE ne sont pas finalisés dans le cadre du développement durable et de niveau élevé de protection et d’amélioration de la qualité de l’environnement, sauf à considérer le critère de la rationa‐ lité référencé à l’article 39 § 1 a) comme une clef d’interprétation synony‐ me. Dans le même sillage, les objectifs de l’article 39 § 1 TFUE ne font pas référence à la protection de la santé humaine. Celle-ci, selon l’article 168 § 1 TFUE, doit atteindre un niveau élevé commandant l’instauration et l’application de toutes les politiques et actions de l’Union. Il ressort de cette analyse transversale des dispositions du Traité que la spécificité, souvent érigée au rang de principe, du secteur agricole s’avère particulièrement relative. Dans le domaine de la concurrence, le particularisme de l’agriculture est essentiellement subordonné à la définition par le législateur de l’Union du cadre réglementaire. Parallèlement, la PAC est substantiellement « con‐ currencée » par l’émergence de règles et principes conventionnels tant dans le cadre de l’Union que dans la sphère du droit international. Dès lors, la dynamique originellement élaborée entre les politiques dédiées à l’agriculture et à la concurrence semble fondamentalement remise en con‐ sidération. Dorénavant deux types d’agriculture coexistent, l’un axé sur le modèle productiviste modélisé par le droit originaire, l’autre résultant d’un remodelage de la PAC impliqué par les impératifs de protection de l’envi‐ ronnement et de la santé publique. L’agriculture intensive initialement conçue dans le traité repose sur une démarche qualitative d’efficience éco‐ nomique, tandis que l’agriculture inscrite dans le cadre normatif empreint de développement durable et de préservation de la santé publique se fonde sur des critères de qualité. A cet égard, il est symptomatique de constater que les articles du traité consacrés à l’agriculture et à la pêche ne menti‐ onnent pas explicitement la nécessité de bâtir une politique de qualité en la matière. Telle n’est pas la conception retenue en matière environnementa‐ le7, de santé publique8 et même de recherche – développement technologi‐ que9. Dans ces domaines, la qualité constitue le fondement conceptuel des politiques menées afin d’atteindre un niveau élevé de protection. L’agriculture, dans sa perspective concurrentielle, repose sur un ensem‐ ble de correctifs aux objectifs notablement distincts. La logique initiale de 7 Cf. articles 3 § 3 et 21 § 2 f) TFUE. 8 Cf. art. 165 § 1 TFUE. 9 Cf. art. 179 § 2 TFUE. Patrick Meunier 26 maintien d’un marché équilibré en dépit de ses spécificités intrinsèques (I) est désormais substantiellement reconfigurée par l’émergence d’impératifs dont la poursuite implique de borner l’application du principe de libre con‐ currence (II). L’agriculture : un marché exceptionnellement concurrentiel L’article 42 TFUE formule le principe selon lequel les règles conventi‐ onnelles relatives à la concurrence ne sont applicables qu’au regard des objectifs de l’article 39 TFUE tels qu’appréciés par le législateur de l’Uni‐ on. Cette conception marginalise notablement le principe de libre concur‐ rence qui forme, pourtant, l’un des fondements du fonctionnement du mar‐ ché intérieur. Cette spécificité se justifie au regard des particularités de la production agricole qui dépend d’éléments exogènes (le climat) et endogè‐ nes (périssabilité) qui ne permettent pas d’ajuster l’offre à la demande. Dans cette configuration, les rédacteurs du traité ont déplacé le curseur de l’intérêt à protéger visé par la concurrence. La protection du consomma‐ teur recherchée par les règles conventionnelles communes s’éclipse au profit de celle des producteurs en matière agricole. Les considérations po‐ litiques et sociales générant cette approche conceptuelle sont évoquées à l’article 39 § 2 a) TFUE et justifient les « méthodes spéciales » que peut mobiliser la PAC. Afin de réaliser les objectifs de l’article 39 TFUE, l’arti‐ cle 40 § 1 TFUE, confère au Parlement européen et au Conseil la mission de créer une organisation commune des marchés agricoles comportant des règles communes et donc spécifiques en matière de concurrence. Dans cet‐ te perspective, dès 1962, le Conseil a adopté le règlement (CEE) n° 26/62 portant application de certaines règles de la concurrence à la production et au commerce des produits agricoles10 auquel s’est substitué le règlement (CE) n° 1184/200611. Il ressort de ces dispositions que la prohibition de l’abus de position dominante énoncée à l’article 102 TFUE s’applique au secteur agricole12. En revanche, le règlement n° 1184/2006 formule le I. 10 JOCE n° 30, 20 avril 1962, p. 993. 11 Règlement du 24 juillet 2006 ; JOUE n° L 214 du 4 août 2007, p. 7. 12 Cf. en ce sens CJCE 16 décembre 1975 « Coöperatieve Vereniging "Suiker Unie" UA et autres contre Commission des Communautés européennes », Aff. jtes 40 à 48, 50, 54 à 56, 111, 113 et 114-73, Rec. CJCE 1975, p. 1668, ECLI:EU:C:1975:174 ; CJCE, 14 févr. 1978, «United Brands Company et United Introduction scientifique – Scientific Introduction – Wissenschaftliche Einführung 27 principe de l’application au secteur agricole (produits de l’annexe I du traité)13 des règles conventionnelles relatives aux accords, pratiques ou dé‐ cisions que vise l’article 101 § 1 TFUE, sauf s’ils «font partie intégrante d'une organisation nationale de marché ou (…) sont nécessaires à la réali‐ sation des objectifs énoncés à l'article 39 du traité »14. A ce titre, l’article 2 du règlement vise spécifiquement les « accords, décisions et pratiques d'exploitants agricoles, d'associations d'exploitants agricoles ou d'associations de ces associations ressortissant à un seul État membre, dans la mesure où, sans comporter l'obligation de pratiquer un prix déter‐ miné, ils concernent la production ou la vente de produits agricoles ou l'utilisation d'installations communes de stockage, de traitement ou de transformation de produits agricoles ». Sont ainsi formulées trois situati‐ ons justificatives d’exclusion du champ d’application des règles relatives aux ententes. Cependant, il ne s’agit pas d’une reconnaissance d’exclusion générale et inconditionnelle à l’égard de telles pratiques. Le législateur de l’Union confie à la Commission européenne la mission de contrôler la por‐ tée de telles mesures restrictives qui ne sauraient avoir pour effet d’annihi‐ ler toute concurrence ou de mettre en « péril » les objectifs de l’article 39 TFUE. Dans cette perspective, la Cour de justice considère que le caractè‐ re restrictif de concurrence d’un accord ne peut se justifier que s’il est « nécessaire »15, c’est à dire constitue le seul ou le plus efficace des moyens d’atteindre les objectifs de l’article 39 TFUE. Le règlement (UE) Brands Continentaal BV contre Commission des Communautés européennes. Ba‐ nanes Chiquita », Aff. 27/76, Rec. CJCE 1978, p. 207, ECLI:EU:C:1978:22. 13 La Cour de justice interprète strictement la référence aux produits de l’annexe I du traité, Cf. en ce sens : CJCE, 30 janv. 1985, « Bureau national interprofessionnel du cognac contre Guy Clair » Aff. 123/83, Rec. 1985, p. 391, ECLI:EU:C:1985:33 ; CJCE, 25 mars 1981 « Coöperatieve Stremsel- en Kleursel‐ fabriek contre Commission des Communautés européennes », Aff. 61/80, Rec. 1981, p. 851, ECLI:EU:C:1981:75. 14 Cf. art. 2 du règlement prec. 15 CJCE 15 mai 1975 « Nederlandse Vereniging voor de fruit- en groentenimporthan‐ del, Nederlandse Bond van grossiers in zuidvruchten en ander geimporteerd fruit "Frubo" contre Commission des Communautés européennes et Vereniging de Frui‐ tunie », Aff. 71/74, Rec. 1975, p. 563 ; points 24 à 26, ECLI:EU:C:1975:61 ; Cf. également CJCE 12 dec. 1995 « H. G. Oude Luttikhuis et autres contre Verenigde Coöperatieve Melkindustrie Coberco BA », Aff. C-399/93, Rec. 1995 I-04515, pts. 23 et 25, ECLI:EU:C:1995:434. Patrick Meunier 28 n° 1308/ 201316, portant organisation commune des marchés des produits agricoles, vise trois types d’ententes caractérisées par leur nature organi‐ que. Sont ainsi cernés les accords entre exploitants (art. 209 § 1), entre ex‐ ploitants et leurs associations (art. 209 § 1, al. 2), ainsi que ceux des orga‐ nismes interprofessionnels reconnus (art. 210). Les dispositions du règlement laissent, toutefois, dans l’expectative la possibilité pour les opérateurs agricoles de poursuivre des comportements qui, tout en ne s’inscrivant pas dans le cadre des trois situations justificati‐ ves définies par le règlement n° 1184/2006, pourraient néanmoins être soustraits à l’application de l’article 101 TFUE en ce qu’ils seraient rat‐ tachables aux missions qui leurs sont dévolues dans le cadre de l’organisa‐ tion commune de marché concernée. Cette problématique a été mise en exergue dans le cadre de l’affaire opposant l’association des producteurs et vendeurs d’endives (APVE) à l’Autorité française de la concurrence (ADLC) qui, en 2012, avait identifié des pratiques concertées en matière d’échanges d’information, de quantités mises sur le marché et de détermi‐ nation d’un prix minimal de revente des produits17. L’annulation par la Cour d’appel de Paris de la décision de l’ADLC a fait l’objet d’un pourvoi en cassation conduisant la Cour à solliciter l’interprétation préjudicielle de la Cour de justice. Le cadrage juridique est substantiellement exposé par l’Avocat général qui rappelle que, conformément à l’article 40 TFUE, l’organisation com‐ mune des marchés (OCM) peut établir des règlementations de prix afin de réaliser les objectifs de l’article 39 TFUE18. Dans cette perspective, une OCM peut habiliter des associations de producteurs à accomplir certaines missions impliquant certaines formes de coordination afin d’intervenir aux différents stades de la production et de la commercialisation. Cette fonc‐ tion est substantiellement définie par le règlement (CE) nº 2200/96, port‐ ant organisation commune des marchés dans le secteur des fruits et légu‐ mes19 qui précise que « les organisations de producteurs représentent les éléments de base de l'organisation commune des marchés dont elles as‐ surent, à leur niveau, le fonctionnement décentralisé ; que, face à une de‐ 16 Règlement du Parlement européen et du Conseil du 17 déc. 2013, JOUE L 347 du 20 dec. 2013, p. 671. 17 Cf. Décision n° 12-D-08 du 6 mars 2012 : http://www.autoritedelaconcurrence.fr/p df/avis/12d08.pdf. 18 Affaire C-671/15, conclusions de M. Nils Wahl présentées le 6 avril 2017. 19 Règlement du Conseil du 28 octobre 1996, JOCE n° L 297 du 21/11/1996 p.1. Introduction scientifique – Scientific Introduction – Wissenschaftliche Einführung 29 mande sans cesse plus concentrée, le regroupement de l'offre au sein de ces organisations apparaît plus que jamais comme une nécessité économi‐ que pour renforcer la position des producteurs sur le marché »20. Parmi les buts assignés aux organisations de producteurs (OP) ainsi qu’à leurs associations (AOP), la « régularisation des prix à la production » occupe une place centrale au regard de la configuration du secteur de la distributi‐ on21. Cette mission requiert inéluctablement de développer des pratiques devant être soustraites, dans le cadre fixé par le Traité et les règles de droit dérivé, à l’application de l’article 101 § 1 du TFUE. Sous le prisme des buts assignés aux OP et AOP, ces opérateurs disposent de marges de manœuvres conséquentes pour agir sur le marché et redéfinir substantielle‐ ment les règles du « jeu de la concurrence ». Cependant, sous l’angle des participants au « jeu » les pratiques développées peuvent revêtir un carac‐ tère anti-concurrentiel. A ce titre, l’Avocat général partage l’analyse pré‐ sentée par la Commission européenne et souligne que « pour pouvoir éch‐ apper à l’application de l’article 101, paragraphe 1, TFUE, il convient de s’assurer que les pratiques en cause ont effectivement été adoptées au « bon niveau » et par la « bonne entité », soit par une OP soit par une AOP en charge effective de la gestion de la production et de la commer‐ cialisation du produit concerné »22. Il en découle que les pratiques mises en œuvre entre OP, entre AOP ou même à l’égard d’opérateurs qui n’en sont pas membres ne peuvent s’inscrire dans le champ d’application des règles régissant l’OCM mais relèvent de l’article 101 § 1 TFUE. Dans cet‐ te configuration, les pratiques restrictives de concurrence sont généralisées entre des entités économiques différentes. Toutefois, afin de bénéficier du régime d’exception, il est nécessaire que les pratiques soient adoptées au sein d’une OP ou d’une AOP chargée de la mission de gestion de la pro‐ duction et de la commercialisation du produit23. Dans le cadre de l’affaire sous examen, dix OP, quatre AOP ainsi que cinq groupements non recon‐ nus étaient impliqués. Cette fragmentation structurelle a néanmoins été transcendée au moyen des pratiques initiées par les opérateurs qui ont ain‐ 20 Considérant n°7 du règlement. 21 cf. notamment l’article 122 al. 1er du Règlement (CE) n° 1234/2007 du Conseil du 22 octobre 2007 portant organisation commune des marchés dans le secteur agri‐ cole et dispositions spécifiques en ce qui concerne certains produits de ce secteur (règlement OCM unique), JOUE L 299 du 16 novembre 2007, p. 1. 22 Cf. Conclusions prec., point 93. 23 Cf. Conclusions prec., points 100 à 103. Patrick Meunier 30 si généré une unité informelle des producteurs que l’application de la ré‐ glementation sectorielle n’a aucunement édifiée. Dans son arrêt en date du 14 novembre 201724, la Cour de Justice souli‐ gne que les OP et les AOP doivent « échapper (…) à l’interdiction des en‐ tentes prévue à l’article 101 » afin d’utiliser des pratiques leur donnant les moyens nécessaires à la réalisation des objectifs qui leurs sont confiés dans le cadre de l’OCM25. La Cour considère que l’inapplicabilité de l’ar‐ ticle 101 concerne tant les pratiques explicitement visées à cet effet dans le règlement que celles destinées à réaliser les objectifs à atteindre au ter‐ me de l’OCM26. Toutefois, dans cette perspective, la Cour précise que la « portée de ces exclusions est d’interprétation stricte »27. Dans ce con‐ texte analytique, la CJUE rappelle que les OCM évoluent dans un espace concurrentiel dont l’effectivité doit, au terme des objectifs de la PAC, être maintenue28. Par voie de conséquence, les pratiques restrictives de concur‐ rence sont évaluées sous le prisme du principe de proportionnalité29 et du cadre juridique déterminé par le législateur de l’Union. A ce titre, la Cour précise que les pratiques menées par une entité non reconnue30 par un Etat membre relèvent du champ d’application de l’article 101 § 1 TFUE. De même, seules des pratiques menées au sein d’une seule OP ou d’une seule AOP échappent à l’interdiction formulée à l’article 101 § 1 TFUE. L’inter‐ prétation déclinée par la Cour conduit à considérer que des accords et pra‐ 24 CJUE, 14 novembre 2017, « Président de l’Autorité de la concurrence c/ Associa‐ tion des producteurs vendeurs d’endives (APVE), Comité économique régional agricole fruits et légumes de Bretagne (Cerafel), Fraileg SARL, Prim’Santerre SARL, Union des endiviers, anciennement Fédération nationale des producteurs d’endives (FNPE), Soleil du Nord SARL, Comité économique fruits et légumes du Nord de la France (Celfnord), Association des producteurs d’endives de France (APEF), Section nationale de l’endive (SNE), Fédération du commerce de l’endive (FCE), France endives société coopérative agricole, Cambrésis Artois-Picardie en‐ dives (CAP’Endives)société coopérative agricole, Marché de Phalempinsociété coopérative agricole, Primacoop société coopérative agricole, Coopérative agrico‐ le du marais audomarois (Sipema), Valois-Fruitsunion de sociétés coopératives agricoles, Groupe Perle du Nord SAS, Ministre de l’Économie, de l’Industrie et du Numérique », Aff. C-671/15. 25 Ibid. pt. 44. 26 Op. cit. pt. 45. 27 Op. cit. pt. 46. 28 Op. cit. pts. 47 et 48. 29 Op. cit. pt. 49. 30 Dans le cas d’espèce, il s’agit de l’APVE, la SNE et la FCE ; cf. pt. 55. Introduction scientifique – Scientific Introduction – Wissenschaftliche Einführung 31 tiques concertées entre OP ou entre AOP sont contraires au principe de proportionnalité dans la mesure où elles « excèdent ce qui est nécessaire à l’accomplissement » de leurs missions31. Sous le même prisme analytique, la Cour estime que les objectifs de régularisation des prix et de concentra‐ tion de l’offre ne peuvent justifier la fixation collective de prix minima de vente, au sein d’une OP ou d’une AOP, également imposée aux pro‐ ducteurs qui commercialisent eux-mêmes leurs productions. Une telle pra‐ tique s’avère excessive en ce qu’elle accentue les restrictions concurrenti‐ elles du marché agencées par le législateur de l’Union en autorisant les producteurs à se regrouper en OP ou en AOP et à concentrer leur offre. La spécificité du marché agricole justifie une application par exception des règles de la libre concurrence, ce particularisme ne s’attache cepen‐ dant pas uniquement à des considérations économiques mais intègre d’au‐ tres paramètres requérant une application aménagée de la politique de con‐ currence. L’agriculture : une activité d’exception en concurrence Hormis la problématique du marché, les dispositions du Titre III du Traité révèlent deux singularités de l’agriculture. Les articles 39 § 2 a) et c)32et 42 alinéa 2 TFUE33 évoquent la complexité du secteur agricole au regard de ses spécificités structurelles et naturelles ainsi que de ses interactions globales avec le système économique. Ces dispositions du Traité abordent néanmoins la problématique à des niveaux différents et avec certaines nu‐ ances. L’article 39 § 2 TFUE repose sur une approche territoriale en évo‐ quant les disparités entre les diverses régions agricoles tout en situant le questionnement économique dans le champ étatique. L’article 42 TFUE, II. 31 Op. cit. pt. 58. 32 Art. 39 § 2 TFUE : Dans l'élaboration de la politique agricole commune et des mé‐ thodes spéciales qu'elle peut impliquer, il sera tenu compte : a) du caractère parti‐ culier de l'activité agricole, découlant de la structure sociale de l'agriculture et des disparités structurelles et naturelles entre les diverses régions agricoles, (…) c) du fait que, dans les États membres, l'agriculture constitue un secteur intimement lié à l'ensemble de l'économie. 33 Art. 42 alinéa 2 TFUE : Le Conseil, sur proposition de la Commission, peut autori‐ ser l'octroi d'aides : a) pour la protection des exploitations défavorisées par des conditions structurelles ou naturelles, b) dans le cadre de programmes de dévelop‐ pement économique. Patrick Meunier 32 dans sa dimension d’octroi d’aides, se recentre sur la protection des ex‐ ploitations tout en élargissant la grille d’analyse au travers de la mise en place de programmes de développement économique qui, à défaut de pré‐ cision dans le Traité, doivent utilement se concevoir à l’échelle européen‐ ne. Il résulte de ces dispositions du Traité que l’agriculture revêt une di‐ mension structurante pour l’ensemble du système économique qui, dans le cadre du Titre III du traité, est abordée sous l’angle concurrentiel au tra‐ vers de l’allocation d’aides (A). Cependant, les diverses révisions du Trai‐ té ont agrémenté cette approche au travers des problématiques insérées au sein de dispositions conventionnelles autres que celles spécifiquement dé‐ diées à l’agriculture. La protection de la santé, de l’environnement, ainsi que la conclusion d’accords internationaux par l’Union et ses Etats mem‐ bres, génèrent des impacts notables sur la PAC (B). L’allocation d’aides : la compensation des disparités structurelles L’allocation des aides est régie par l’article 42 TFUE conformément au principe général selon lequel « les règles de concurrence ne sont applicab‐ les à la production et au commerce des produits agricoles que dans la me‐ sure déterminée par le Parlement européen et le Conseil ». De même, l’ar‐ ticle 42 alinéa 2 TFUE attribue à la Commission la mission de proposer au Conseil d’autoriser l’octroi d’aides de configurations distinctes. Celles-ci peuvent être « ciblées », afin de protéger des exploitations défavorisées par des conditions structurelles ou naturelles, ou « globalisées » de maniè‐ re à atteindre les objectifs visés dans des programmes de développement économique. Il appartient au législateur de l’Union de cerner et cadrer les interac‐ tions pouvant survenir entre la spécificité juridique formulée au terme de l’article 42 et les dispositions générales des articles 107 à 109 TFUE rela‐ tives aux aides d’Etat. En effet, l’article 107 § 1 TFUE énonce le principe d’incompatibilité avec le marché intérieur des aides d’Etats affectant les échanges entre les Etats membres. Toutefois, l’article 107 § 2 identifie, de manière dérogatoire, des aides dont la spécificité implique de les considé‐ rer comme étant compatibles avec le marché intérieur. A cet égard, l’arti‐ cle 107 § 2 b) vise des aides susceptibles de s’inscrire dans le cadre du secteur agricole en ce qu’elles sont destinées à « remédier aux dommages causés par les calamités naturelles ou par d'autres événements extraordin‐ A. Introduction scientifique – Scientific Introduction – Wissenschaftliche Einführung 33 aires ». De même, l’article 107 § 3 confère aux institutions une marge d’appréciation s’agissant d’aides qui « peuvent être considérées comme compatibles avec le marché intérieur ». Dans cette perspective, l’article 107 § 3 révèle une conception surprenante juxtaposant une approche sec‐ torielle relative au développement régional [art. 107 § 3 a) et c)] et à la conservation du patrimoine [art. 107 § 3 d)], à une démarche générale en conférant à la Commission la mission de proposer au Conseil « (d’) autres catégories d’aides » [art. 107 § 3 e)]. Il résulte de ces combinaisons normatives des articles 42 et 107 TFUE que le secteur agricole et les problématiques impliquant l’agriculture re‐ lèvent d’une dualité de régime juridique dont il appartient au législateur d’apprécier la pertinence d’application. A cet égard, bien que juridique‐ ment fondé sur l’article 42 alinéa 1er, le règlement n° 1308/2013, portant organisation commune des marchés des produits agricoles, précise qu’hor‐ mis quelques exceptions les articles 107 à 109 du TFUE s'appliquent à la production et au commerce des produits agricoles34. Dès lors, les aides na‐ tionales sont interdites pour les produits entrant dans le champ d’applicati‐ on de l’OCM unique. Les Etats ne peuvent donc plus conforter les méca‐ nismes européens d’intervention, hormis pour les paiements effectués au titre des mesures prévues par le règlement qui sont financées partiellement ou totalement par l’Union ainsi que pour les paiements nationaux visant les situations spécifiques des articles 213 à 218 du règlement35. Au titre de l’article 107 § 2 et 3 TFUE, nonobstant le respect des règles procédurales de l’article 108 § 1 et 3 TFUE, les Etats peuvent attribuer des aides dont les effets s’inscrivent dans la perspective du développement ru‐ ral. En l’occurrence, la Commission européenne, sur le fondement de l’ar‐ ticle 108 § 4 TFUE, a déclaré comme compatibles avec le marché intérieur certaines catégories d’aides dans le secteur agricole et forestier, ainsi que 34 Règlement (UE) n ° 1308/2013 du Parlement européen et du Conseil du 17 décem‐ bre 2013 portant organisation commune des marchés des produits agricoles et ab‐ rogeant les règlements (CEE) n ° 922/72, (CEE) n ° 234/79, (CE) n ° 1037/2001 et (CE) n ° 1234/2007 du Conseil, JOUE L 347 du 20 décembre 2013, p. 671 ; cf. en particulier art. 211. 35 Paiements nationaux en faveur : des rennes en Finlande et en Suède (art. 213), du secteur du sucre en Finlande (art. 214), de l'apiculture (art. 215), de la distillation de vin en cas de crise (art. 216), de la distribution de produits aux enfants (art. 217), des fruits à coque (art. 218). Patrick Meunier 34 dans les zones rurales36. De même, par son règlement (UE) n° 1408/2013, la Commission a précisé que, ne sont pas soumises à l’obligation de notifi‐ cation de l’article 108 § 3 TFUE, les aides de minimis octroyées par un Etat membre à une entreprise unique dont le montant total ne peut excéder 15 000 € sur une période de trois exercices fiscaux,37. En outre, afin de promouvoir le développement rural, le législateur de l’Union a mis en œuvre des mécanismes de soutien et envisagé leur articulation avec les ai‐ des d’Etat38. L’article 81 § 1 du règlement 1305/2013 énonce le principe d’application des articles 107 à 109 TFUE en matière d’aides d’Etat en fa‐ veur du développement rural, mais formule, dans son deuxième paragra‐ phe, une exception concernant les paiements effectués par les Etats, con‐ formément aux dispositions du règlement, ainsi qu’aux financements na‐ tionaux complémentaires s’inscrivant dans le cadre du champ d'applicati‐ on de l'article 42 TFUE. La dimension structurante de l’agriculture dépasse le cadre du dévelop‐ pement économique envisagé tant dans sa perspective rurale que globale. Les activités agricoles présentent de véritables enjeux de société qui, tou‐ tefois, ont été intégrés lors des révisions successives des traités, au sein de dispositions non spécifiquement dédiées à l’agriculture mais dont l’impact est néanmoins majeur dans ce secteur. Une synergie juridique vectrice de mutation du modèle économique agricole européen Depuis 1957, les dispositions conventionnelles relatives aux objectifs poursuivis dans le cadre de la PAC sont demeurées inchangées. Parallèle‐ B. 36 Règlement (UE) n ° 702/2014 de la Commission du 25 juin 2014 déclarant certai‐ nes catégories d'aides, dans les secteurs agricole et forestier et dans les zones rura‐ les, compatibles avec le marché intérieur, en application des articles 107 et 108 du TFUE, JOUE L 193 du 1er juillet 2014, p. 1. 37 Règlement (UE) n ° 1408/2013 de la Commission du 18 décembre 2013 relatif à l’application des articles 107 et 108 du traité sur le fonctionnement de l’Union eu‐ ropéenne aux aides de minimis dans le secteur de l’agriculture, JOUE L 352 du 24 décembre 2013, p. 9 ; cf. en particulier art. 3. 38 Règlement (UE) n ° 1305/2013 du Parlement européen et du Conseil du 17 décem‐ bre 2013 relatif au soutien au développement rural par le Fonds européen agricole pour le développement rural (Feader) et abrogeant le règlement (CE) n° 1698/2005 du Conseil, JOUE L 347 du 20 décembre 2013, p. 487. Introduction scientifique – Scientific Introduction – Wissenschaftliche Einführung 35 ment, l’Acte unique européen intègre dans la troisième partie du traité CEE un titre VII dédié à l’environnement (art. 130 R, S, T) et le traité d’Amsterdam inscrit le principe du développement durable parmi les ob‐ jectifs de la Communauté. Le TFUE, au sein du Titre XX, comporte trois dispositions (articles 191 à 193) qui cernent les principes guidant l’action de l’Union en matière de protection de l’environnement. En ce sens, l’arti‐ cle 191 § 1 TFUE énonce « l’utilisation prudente et rationnelle des res‐ sources naturelles » parmi les objectifs de la politique européenne de l’en‐ vironnement. Cette dimension est étendue à l’ensemble des politiques communes et actions de l’Union qui peut, dans la perspective du dévelop‐ pement durable et conformément à l’article 21 § 2 f), « élaborer des mesu‐ res internationales » afin de « préserver et améliorer la qualité de l'envi‐ ronnement et la gestion durable des ressources naturelles mondiales ». De surcroît, la Charte des droits fondamentaux (CDF), qui a la même valeur juridique que les traités (art. 6 TUE), précise, en son article 37, qu’un « niveau élevé de protection de l’environnement et l’amélioration de sa qualité doivent être intégrés dans les politiques de l’Union et assu‐ rés conformément au principe du développement durable ». La problématique environnementale est de plus en plus présente dans le cadre de l’agriculture par le biais de l’émergence de normes destinées à promouvoir le développement durable. Ainsi, dans le prolongement du sommet et de la déclaration de Rio sur l’environnement et le développe‐ ment39, des accords ont pu être conclus sur la diversité biologique40 et le changement climatique41. 39 La Conférence des Nations-Unies sur l’environnement et le développement s’est tenue à Rio du 3 au 14 juin 1992, elle a permis de déterminer les 27 principes con‐ tenus dans la Déclaration ; http://www.un.org/french/events/rio92/aconf15126vol1f.htm. 40 Convention adoptée lors du sommet de la Terre à Rio de Janeiro le 22 mai 1992, entrée en vigueur le 29 décembre 1993 ; https://www.cbd.int/doc/legal/cbd-fr.pdf. 41 Convention-cadre des Nations Unies sur le changement climatique adoptée le 19 mai 1992, UNTS vol. 1771 p. 107 ; http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/convkp/con vfr.pdf ; Le Protocole de Kyoto fut conclu le 11 décembre 1997 ; http://unfccc.int/r esource/docs/convkp/kpfrench.pdf ; Accord de Paris sur le climat adopté le 12 décembre 2015 par 195 Etats et signé le 22 avril 2016 à New York par 175 parties (174 Etats et l’Union européenne) ; Le Conseil de l’Union a adopté la décision de conclusion de l’accord le 5 octobre 2016 (cf. décision (UE) 2016/1841 ; JOUE L 282 du 19 octobre 2016, p. 1. Patrick Meunier 36 A titre illustratif, le règlement n° 1305/2013 du Parlement européen et du Conseil vise à soutenir un développement du secteur agricole plus équi‐ libré au niveau territorial et environnemental42. Par ailleurs, la conclusion d’accords internationaux relatifs à la protection de l’environnement génère des obligations à l’égard de l’Union et de ses Etats membres tout en créant des droits à l’égard des personnes physiques et morales invocables devant les juridictions nationales. L’amplitude des effets juridiques des engage‐ ments internationaux de l’Union a été précisée dans l’arrêt « Haege‐ man » par lequel la CJCE souligne que « les dispositions de l’accord for‐ ment partie intégrante, à partir de l’entrée en vigueur de celui-ci, de l’ordre juridique communautaire »43. Dès lors, les accords internationaux conclus par l’Union faisant partie du « bloc de légalité », la Cour de justi‐ ce ainsi que les juridictions nationales doivent en garantir le respect44, notamment en interprétant le droit dérivé de l’Union conformément aux dispositions de l’engagement convenu. Toutefois, le contrôle de la validité d’une norme de droit dérivé au regard d’un accord conclu par l’Union re‐ quiert la réalisation de conditions déterminées par la Cour. La convention ne doit pas s’opposer à une telle analyse au regard tant de sa nature que de son économie et ses dispositions doivent revêtir un caractère inconditi‐ onnel et suffisamment précis45. Or, les accords internationaux relatifs à la protection de l’environnement comportent souvent des dispositions dont la généralité ne permet pas de satisfaire aux conditions requises par la Cour pour leur conférer un effet direct46. L’absence d’effet direct n’empêche au‐ cunement le juge national d’interpréter le droit national à l’aune de l’ac‐ cord international invoqué afin de donner plein effet au principe de pri‐ mauté formulé à l’article 216 TFUE. Ainsi, sans appliquer directement les dispositions de l’engagement international conclu par l’Union, le juge na‐ tional peut, par le biais de l’interprétation, moduler la mise en œuvre du 42 Idem. 43 CJCE 30 avril 1974, Aff. 181/73, Rec. 459, prec. 44 CJCE 12 décembre 1972 « International Fruit Company », Aff. jtes 21 à 24/72, Rec. 1219 ; ECLI:EU:C:1972:115. 45 CJCE 9 septembre 2008, FIAMM et FIAMM Technologies c/ Conseil et Commis‐ sion, Aff. C-120/06/P et C-121/06/P, Rec. I-6513), ECLI:EU:C:2008:476. 46 La CJUE, a ainsi souligné que même si le Protocole de Kyoto prévoit des engage‐ ments chiffrés « les parties à ce Protocole peuvent s’acquitter de leurs obligations selon les modalités et la célérité dont elles conviennent », CJUE 21 décembre 2011 « Air Transport Association of America », Aff. C-366/10, pt. 76, Rec. 2011 - I -13755 ECLI:EU:C:2011:864. Introduction scientifique – Scientific Introduction – Wissenschaftliche Einführung 37 droit national, neutraliser les dispositions incompatibles et même con‐ traindre l’Etat à réparer les dommages causés pour violation du droit de l’Union47. L’invocabilité d’interprétation conforme permet aux justiciables de saisir le juge national afin que les objectifs de protection environne‐ mentale puissent être effectivement mis en oeuvre. Dans une autre confi‐ guration contentieuse, l’application effective des normes internationales protectrices de l’environnement peut découler d’un constat de manque‐ ment d’un Etat membre au respect de ses obligations. La jurisprudence de la Cour de justice atteste de l’ampleur et de la por‐ tée significatives des conventions conclues par l’Union. Ce processus ne peut qu’inviter le législateur de l’Union à conforter notablement le dispo‐ sitif des mesures agro-environnementales initiées par l’article 19 du règle‐ ment (CEE) 797/8548. Par ailleurs, depuis 1957, la fixité des objectifs poursuivis dans le cadre de la PAC contraste avec la multiplication des cri‐ ses sanitaires majeures au sein de l'Union européenne qui ont conduit à in‐ tégrer dans le traité de Maastricht la thématique de la protection de la san‐ té publique. L’article 39 § 1 TFUE ne mentionne toujours pas explicite‐ ment parmi les objectifs de la PAC la protection de la santé humaine, sauf à considérer que la « sécurité des approvisionnements » répond à cet im‐ pératif. Le décalage normatif peut d’ailleurs surprendre, l’article 35 de la Charte des droits fondamentaux (CDF) précisant qu’un « niveau élevé de protection de la santé humaine est assuré dans la définition et la mise en œuvre de toutes les politiques et actions de l’Union »49. Le paragraphe 1er de l’article 168 TFUE retranscrit la formulation de l’article 35 CDF et le quatrième paragraphe lettre b) de cette disposition opère une incursion dé‐ licate dans le domaine de la PAC en habilitant le législateur de l’Union à prendre des mesures en matière vétérinaire et phytosanitaire50. De même, en raison de son application intégrée dans l’ensemble du champ d’applica‐ tion du traité, la problématique de la santé humaine s’insinue dans les ob‐ jectifs de la PAC par le biais d’une politique de niveau élevé de protection des consommateurs déclinée à l’article 169 TFUE. Cette disposition con‐ 47 Cf. DENYS SIMON « Invocabilité et primauté : petite expérience de déconstruc‐ tion » in « Union européenne et droit international », Dir. Myriam BENLOLO- CARABOT, Ulaş CANDAŞ, Eglantine CUJO, Pedone, 2012, pp. 139-157. 48 Règlement du Conseil, du 12 mars 1985, concernant l'amélioration de l'efficacité des structures de l'agriculture, JOCE n° L 93 du 30. 3. 1985, p. 1. 49 Souligné par nous. 50 Cf. art. 168 § 4 b). Patrick Meunier 38 fère à l’Union la mission de protéger la santé, la sécurité ainsi que les in‐ térêts des consommateurs qui ne se cantonnent pas, à l’instar des dispositi‐ ons de l’article 39 § 1 TFUE, à la problématique de prix raisonnables. A l’évidence, l’activité agricole de type industriel initialement promue par le Traité CEE est concurrencée par les enjeux sociétaux de protection de notre environnement et de notre santé. En l’occurrence, les accords in‐ ternationaux conclus par l’Union s’inscrivent dans la perspective du déve‐ loppement durable et génèrent une véritable politique environnementale fondée « sur les principes de précaution et d'action préventive, sur le prin‐ cipe de la correction, par priorité à la source, des atteintes à l'environne‐ ment et sur le principe du pollueur-payeur » (art. 191 § 2 TFUE). Le pré‐ toire de la Cour de justice fait amplement écho à cette architecture juridi‐ que en reconnaissant aux citoyens la capacité d’invoquer des accords con‐ clus par l’Union afin de protéger leurs droits environnementaux. De sur‐ croît, la Cour, rappelant que le principe de protection juridictionnelle ef‐ fective constitue un principe général du droit communautaire51, confie aux juridictions nationales la mission de garantir le plein effet des règles euro‐ péennes protectrices de l’environnement52. A ce titre, la Convention d’Aarhus est particulièrement illustrative, son article 9 paragraphe 3 énonçant un droit d’accès à la justice afin de « contester les actes ou omis‐ sions de particuliers ou d’autorités publiques »53. La CJUE précise que l’article 9 § 3 est dépourvu d’effet direct en droit de l’Union mais estime que « ces stipulations, bien que rédigées en termes généraux, ont pour ob‐ jectif de permettre d’assurer une protection effective de l’environne‐ ment »54. Dans cette configuration, la CJUE invite le juge national à inter‐ 51 CJCE 13 mars 2007 « Unibet », C-432/05, ECLI:EU:C:2007:163, Rec. p. I-2271, pt. 37. 52 CJCE 5 octobre 2004 « Pfeiffer e.a. », C-397/01 à C-403/01, ECLI:EU:C:2004:584, Rec. p. I-8835, pt. 111. 53 la Convention d’Aarhus est relative à l’accès à l’information, la participation du public au processus décisionnel et à l’accès à la justice en matière d’environne‐ ment. La Convention a été conclue le 25 juin 1998 sous l’égide de la CEE-ONU mais ouverte à la signature d’Etats tiers, lui conférant ainsi une vocation universel‐ le. Le traité est entré en vigueur le 30 octobre 2001 (http://www.unece.org/fileadm in/DAM/env/pp/documents/cep43f.pdf). Le Conseil a conclu, au nom de la Com‐ munauté européenne, la Convention par une décision du 17 février 2005 (décision n° 2005/370/CE ; JOUE L 124 du 17 mai 2005, p. 1). 54 CJUE 8 mars 2011 (gde ch.) « Lesoochranárske zoskupenie VLK c/ Ministerstvo životného prostredia Slovenskej republiky », Aff. C/240-09, Rec. 2011 I-01255, ECLI:EU:C:2011:125, pt. 46 ; Sur la problématique des effets juridiques de la Introduction scientifique – Scientific Introduction – Wissenschaftliche Einführung 39 préter « (…) dans toute la mesure du possible, le droit procédural relatif aux conditions devant être réunies pour exercer un recours administratif ou juridictionnel conformément tant aux objectifs de l’article 9, paragra‐ phe 3, de cette convention qu’à celui de protection juridictionnelle effec‐ tive des droits conférés par le droit de l’Union, afin de permettre (...) de contester devant une juridiction une décision prise à l’issue d’une procé‐ dure administrative susceptible d’être contraire au droit de l’Union de l’environnement »55. La Cour, dans son arrêt « Lesoochranárske zoskupe‐ nie VLK contre Obvodný úrad Trenčín » du 8 novembre 201656, rappelle que les juridictions nationales, tenues de respecter le principe de coopéra‐ tion loyale formulé à l’article 4 § 3 TUE, doivent garantir « la protection juridictionnelle des droits que les justiciables tirent du droit de l’Uni‐ on »57. La Cour conforte cette dynamique juridique au moyen d’une appli‐ cation combinée de l’article 47 de la Charte des droits fondamentaux, qui consacre le droit à une protection juridictionnelle effective, et de l’article 9, paragraphes 2 et 4, de la Convention d’Aarhus. Il en résulte que les règles nationales de droit procédural doivent être interprétées de manière à permettre au justiciable de se prévaloir effectivement des droits énoncés dans l’accord international58. Les arrêts rendus en 2016 dans les affaires relatives aux pesticides attestent de l’effectivité de l’accord d’Aarhus et de sa capacité à faire respecter le droit européen de l’environnement par le biais des droits qu’il confère aux justiciables de l’Union59. Convention d’Aarhus, cf. également CJUE 13 janvier 2015 (gde. ch.) « Conseil et Commission / Stichting Natuur en Milieu et Pesticide Action Network Europe », Aff. jtes. C-404/12 P et C-405/12 P, ECLI:EU:2015:5, pts 44 à 53. 55 ibid. pt. 52. 56 CJUE 8 novembre 2016 (gde ch.), Aff. C/243-15, ECLI:EU:C:2016:838. 57 Ibid. pt. 50. 58 En l’espèce l’article 6, paragraphe 3, de la directive 92/43/CEE du Conseil, du 21 mai 1992, concernant la conservation des habitats naturels ainsi que de la faune et de la flore sauvages, telle que modifiée par la directive 2006/105/CE du Con‐ seil, du 20 novembre 2006. En l’espèce, les règles nationales ne permettaient pas de statuer définitivement sur la qualité de « partie à la procédure » de l’association requérante avant que la procédure d’autorisation administrative d’un projet poten‐ tiellement nuisible à l’environnement ne soit clôturée. 59 CJUE « Commission européenne c/Stichting Greenpeace Nederland et Pesticide Action Network Europe (PAN Europe) », Aff. C-673/13 P ; CJUE « Bayer CropScience SA-NV,Stichting De Bijenstichting c/ College voor de toelating van gewasbeschermingsmiddelen en biociden, aff. C-442/14. Dans ces arrêts, interpré‐ tant la Convention d’Aarhus, la Cour définit la notion « d’informations relatives à Patrick Meunier 40 Les considérations économiques, sociales et politiques qui avaient com‐ mandé la mise en œuvre de la PAC sont révolues, d’autres priorités ont émergé offrant à l’agriculture l’opportunité de reconfigurer son modèle économique. Le développement rural, la protection et la valorisation des paysages, la diversité biologique ainsi que la préservation des terres agri‐ coles constituent autant de missions, de valeurs nobles et dynamiques dans un contexte où la proximité s’avère un véritable avantage comparatif. En ce sens, l’agriculture est une activité dont le caractère exceptionnel ne sau‐ rait être réduit à une logique de marché concurrentiel. Les travaux actuel‐ lement en cours au sein de la Commission européenne60 ainsi que le rap‐ port sur le « verdissement de la PAC » publié par la Cour des comptes eu‐ ropéennes61 exposent les difficultés rencontrées au sein d’un secteur agri‐ cole en profonde mutation qui requiert une substantielle reconfiguration de son modèle économique et social originel. La prochaine réforme de la PAC mériterait assurément de reposer sur la sage pensée du philosophe Francis Bacon soulignant que « la nature, pour être commandée, doit être obéie »62. des émissions dans l’environnement » afin de cerner l’étendue du droit d’accès à celles-ci et d’en garantir l’effectivité, notamment au regard de la protection du se‐ cret commercial et industriel qui ne saurait être opposée à la divulgation de telles informations. 60 Communication de la Commission au Parlement européen, au Conseil, au Comité économique et social européen et au Comité des régions sur « l’avenir de l’alimen‐ tation et de l’agriculture », COM (2017) 713 final du 29 novembre 2017. 61 Cour des Comptes européenne, rapport spécial n°21/2017, « Le verdissement : complexité accrue du régime d’aide au revenu et encore aucun bénéfice pour l’en‐ vironnement », décembre 2017, 59 pages et annexes, https://www.eca.europa.eu/L ists/ECADocuments/SR17_21/SR_GREENING_FR.pdf. 62 Novum Organum, 1620. Introduction scientifique – Scientific Introduction – Wissenschaftliche Einführung 41 II. Commission I – Kommission I President: Prof. Dr. Rudolf Mögele, Europäische Kommission General Reporters: Prof. em. Dr. Paul Richli, Universität Luzern Dr. Christian Busse, Bundesministerium für Ernährung und Landwirtschaft Règles de concurrence en agriculture Competition rules in agriculture Wettbewerbsregeln in der Landwirtschaft I Questionnaires – Fragebogen II Rapport général – General Report – Generalbericht III Conclusions de la Commission I – Conclusions of Commission I – Schlussfolgerungen der Kommission I Questionnaires – Fragebogen – Commission I – Kommission I Version française – French version – Französische Version Version anglaise – English version – Englische Version Version allemande – German version – Deutsche Version Questionnaire de la Commission I – Questionnaire of Commission I – Fragebogen der Kommission I Questions – Fragen Version française – French version – Französische Version Droit de la concurrence nationale 1. Votre pays dispose-t-il d’un droit national général en matière de cartels connaissant des normes légales propres à l’interdiction des cartels, à la surveillance d'abus éventuels de la part des entreprises dominantes du marché ainsi qu’au contrôle des fusions ? 2. La constitution de votre pays permet-elle de privilégier les cartels dans le domaine de l’agriculture ? Si oui, que contient cette réglementation ? 3. Votre pays dispose-t-il d’un droit national spécial en matière de cartels propre au domaine de l’agriculture ? Si oui, que contient ce droit et dans quels actes législatifs trouve-t-on ces règles ? 4. Votre pays dispose-t-il d'autorités particulières chargées de l’applicati‐ on du droit des cartels dans le domaine de l'agriculture ? 5. Durant la dernière décennie, votre pays était-il confronté à des procé‐ dures administratives ou judiciaires d’importance particulière en matiè‐ re de droit des cartels dans le domaine de l’agriculture (interdiction des cartels, surveillance des abus, contrôle des fusions) ? Si oui, sur quelles thématiques portaient ces procédures et ont-elles été décidées selon le droit national ou celui de l’Union ? 6. Votre pays dispose-t-il de normes juridiques ou d’un code de com‐ portement non contraignant relatifs aux pratiques déloyales dans le do‐ maine de la chaine alimentaire (p.ex. par rapport à la détermination des prix des produits agricoles) ? Considérez-vous qu'une réglementation à de telles pratiques déloyales comme utile et si oui, que devrait contenir cette réglementation ? A. I. 47 Droit des cartels de l’Union Européenne 1. De combien d'organisations de producteurs reconnues, d’associations d'organisations de producteurs et d’organisations interprofessionnelles reconnues, au sens du Règlement (UE) n° 1308/2013, dispose votre pays ? (le cas échéant, détaillez par secteurs) Existe-il des statistiques officielles ou un registre public les concer‐ nant ? 2. Au sens du Règlement (UE) n° 1308/2013, jugez-vous les organisati‐ ons de producteurs reconnues comme libérées seulement de l’interdic‐ tion des cartels selon article 101 TFUE ou également libérées de leur interdiction nationale ? Admettons qu’elles ne soient pas libérées de l’interdiction nationale, dans ce cas-là est-ce que cela constitue un problème, et si oui, que pro‐ pose votre droit national comme solution ? 3. 2Jugez-vous les limites supérieures, au sens des articles 149, 169, 170 et 171 du Règlement (UE) n° 1308/2013, comme judicieuses ? Est-ce que les dispositions sur les quantités arrêtées et communiquées sont appliquées dans la pratique, avant tout par la communication des quantités concentrées ? 4. Comment appréciez-vous les mesures particulières que contiennent les Règlements (UE) 2016/558 ainsi que 2016/559 permettant, dans le do‐ maine du lait, des ententes cartellaires de durée limitée ? Estimez-vous que ces mesures temporaires représentent un instrument approprié pour contenir rapidement des crises du marché ? 5. Dans votre pays fait-on usage de l’instrument attribuant d’une part la force obligatoire des organisations de producteurs reconnues par tous les acteurs et, d’autre part, la participation contraignante de tous les acteurs au financement des organisations de producteurs reconnues au sens des articles 164 et 165 du Règlement (UE) n° 1308/2013 ? Jugez-vous cet instrument comme utile et apte aux besoins de la prati‐ que ? 6. À côté des organisations de producteurs reconnues, les coopératives agricoles et les autres groupements agricoles ne devaient-t-ils pas être également investis de privilèges en matière de droit des cartels. Si oui, jugez-vous la réglementation de l’article 209 alinéa 1 sous-ali‐ néa 2 du Règlement (UE) n° 1308/2013 comme suffisante ? 7. Dans votre pays, comment comprend-t-on l’interdiction des ententes en matière de prix, au sens de l’article 209 alinéa 1 sous-alinéa 3 du II. Questions – Fragen 48 Règlement (UE) n° 1308/2013 et, selon vous, devait-elle être davanta‐ ge clarifiée ? 8. Dans votre pays, comment comprend-t-on l’interdiction de l’exclusion du marché, au sens de l’article 209 alinéa 1 sous-alinéa 3 du Règle‐ ment (UE) n° 1308/2013 et, selon vous, devrait-elle être davantage cla‐ rifiée ? 9. Dans votre pays fait-on usage de l’instrument de régulation des con‐ trats au sens des articles 148 et 168 du Règlement (UE) n° 1308/2013 ? Si oui, pour quels produits agricoles est-elle prévue ? Quelle utilité attribuez-vous à cet instrument ? Concernant les rapports provenant des pays non membres de l'Union: si votre pays disposait d'instruments et de réglementations comparables à ceux traités au point 2 ci-avant, donnez alors vos réponses de manière correspondante. Questions générales 1. Votre pays a-t-il connu une discussion publique portant sur la question relative au renforcement de la position juridique de l’agriculture dans la chaine du marché propre à l’écoulement des produits agricoles ? Si oui, sur quel contenu se concentrait ou se concentre cette discus‐ sion ? A-t-elle abouti à des réformes ou des propositions de réformes ? 2. Si vous appréciez, dans leur ensemble, le droit de la concurrence natio‐ nale respectivement de l’UE dans le domaine de l’agriculture, pensezvous qu’il nécessite une réforme ? Si oui, quels devraient en être les points principaux ? Version anglaise – English version – Englische Version National competition law 1. Are there in your country general national anti-trust provisions with re‐ gard to the prohibition of cartels, the control of abuse of dominant pos‐ itions and merger control? 2. Does your country's Constitution contain provisions on privileges for agriculture under anti-trust law? III. B. I. Questions – Fragen 49 If yes, what is the content of these provisions? 3. Is there in your country a specific national anti-trust law for the agri‐ cultural sector? If yes, what is the content of these provisions and where are they laid down? 4. Is in your country the application of agricultural anti-trust law entrust‐ ed to specific authorities? 5. Were there in your country in the last decade particularly important na‐ tional administrative or judicial procedures underpinning agricultural anti-trust law (prohibition of cartels; control of misuse of dominant positions; merger control)? If yes, what was the content of these procedures and were the decisions taken on the basis of national or Union law? 6. Are there in your country legal provisions or a non-binding code of conduct on unfair trading practices in the food chain (for example with regard to the pricing of agricultural products)? Would you consider it reasonable to regulate such unfair practices and if yes, what should be the content of such regulation? EU anti-trust law 1. In your country how many producer organisations, associations of pro‐ ducer organisations and interbranch organisations have been recog‐ nised in accordance with Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 (broken down by sectors, as appropriate)? Are there official statistics or a publicly accessible register on such recognised agricultural organisations? 2. Do you consider that agricultural organisations recognised in accor‐ dance with Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 are only exempted from the prohibition of cartels under Article 101 TFEU or are they also exempt‐ ed from any national prohibition of cartels? If they are not exempted from national prohibitions of cartels, does this pose a problem and if yes, how is this issue addressed by national law? 3. Do you consider the quantitative ceilings in Articles 149, 169, 170 and 171 of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 to be reasonable? Are these provisions used in practice in the sense that the jointly man‐ aged volumes are actually reported as required in the said provisions? II. Questions – Fragen 50 4. What is your assessment of the specific time-limited exemptions of cartels in the dairy sector as provided for by Regulation (EU) No 2016/558 and by Regulation (EU) No 2016/559? Do you consider such exemptions to be an appropriate instrument for dealing with market crises? 5. Is there exercise in your country of the option to make decisions of recognised agricultural organisations extended to non-members and to provide for obligatory contributions of non-members to the financing of agricultural organisations (Articles 164 and 165 of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013)? Do you consider this instrument to be reasonable and fit for application in practice? 6. Should, in addition to recognised agricultural organisations, agricultur‐ al cooperatives and other agricultural groupings also enjoy privileges under anti-trust law? If yes, do you consider the provisions in the second subparagraph of Article 209(1) of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 to be sufficient? 7. What is the understanding in your country of the meaning of the provi‐ sion in relation to charge an identical price in the third subparagraph of 209(1) of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 and do you see a need for further clarification? 8. What is the understanding in your country of the meaning of the provi‐ sion in relation to the exclusion of competition in the third subpara‐ graph of 209(1) of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 and do you see a need for further clarification? 9. Is the option to regulate contractual relations (Articles 148 and 168 of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013) used in your country? If yes, which agricultural products are subject to such regulation? Do you consider this instrument to be useful? For reports from non-EU countries : Should there be instruments or regu‐ lation in your country comparable to those mentioned in section 2 of this questionnaire? Please answer the questions mutatis mutandis. Questions – Fragen 51 General questions 1. Has in the last decade a public discussion taken place in your country regarding the question as to whether the legal position of agriculture in the marketing chain should be strengthened? If yes, what was or is the content of this discussion? Did it lead to re‐ forms or reform proposals? 2. When you look at your national agricultural competition law or EU agricultural competition law as a whole, do you consider that there is a need for reform? If yes, which points should the reform concentrate on? Version allemande – German version – Deutsche Version Nationales Wettbewerbsrecht 1. Gibt es in Ihrem Land zum Kartellverbot, zur Missbrauchsaufsicht über marktbeherrschende Unternehmen und zur Fusionskontrolle allge‐ meines nationales Kartellrecht? 2. Ist in Ihrem Land die Möglichkeit einer kartellrechtlichen Privilegie‐ rung der Landwirtschaft in der Verfassung angesprochen? Wenn ja, welchen Inhalt hat diese Regelung? 3. Existiert in Ihrem Land spezielles nationales Kartellrecht für den Agrarbereich? Wenn ja, welchen Inhalt hat dieses Recht und wo ist es geregelt? 4. Gibt es in Ihrem Land spezielle Behörden, die das Agrarkartellrecht durchführen? 5. Gab es im letzten Jahrzehnt besonders wichtige nationale behördliche oder gerichtliche Verfahren im Agrarkartellrecht in Ihrem Land (Kar‐ tellverbot; Missbrauchsaufsicht; Fusionskontrolle)? Wenn ja, welchen Inhalt hatten diese Verfahren und wurden sie nach nationalem Recht oder Unionsrecht entschieden? 6. Gibt es in Ihrem Land eine rechtliche Regelung oder einen unverbind‐ lichen code of conduct über unfaire Praktiken in der Lebensmittelkette (z.B. hinsichtlich der Preisgestaltung bei landwirtschaftlichen Erzeug‐ nissen)? Sehen Sie eine Regulierung solcher unfairer Praktiken als sinnvoll an und wenn ja, was sollten Inhalte einer Regulierung sein? III. C. I. Questions – Fragen 52 Kartellrecht der Europäischen Union 1. Wie viele nach der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 anerkannte Erzeu‐ gerorganisationen, Vereinigungen von Erzeugerorganisationen und Branchenverbände sind in Ihrem Land vorhanden (gegebenenfalls auf‐ gegliedert nach Sektoren)? Gibt es eine amtliche Statistik oder ein öffentlich zugängliches Regis‐ ter über solche anerkannten Agrarorganisationen? 2. Sind nach der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 anerkannte Agrarorga‐ nisationen gemäß Ihrer Ansicht nur von dem Kartellverbot des Artikel 101 AEUV oder auch von einem nationalen Kartellverbot befreit? Wenn sie nicht vom nationalen Kartellverbot befreien, stellt dies ein Problem dar und wenn ja, wie wird dies im nationalen Recht gelöst? 3. Sehen Sie die in Artikel 149, 169, 170 und 171 der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 enthaltenen Bündelungsobergrenzen als sinnvoll an? Werden diese Bestimmungen in der Praxis genutzt, indem die in diesen Bestimmungen vorgesehenen Meldungen über die gebündelten Men‐ gen abgegeben werden? 4. Wie bewerten Sie die besonderen befristeten Kartellfreistellungen, die die Verordnung (EU) 2016/558 und die Verordnung (EU) 2016/559 für den Milchbereich enthalten? Halten Sie solche Kartellfreistellungen für ein geeignetes Instrument, um kurzfristig Marktkrisen zu begegnen? 5. Wird in Ihrem Land das Instrument der Allgemeinverbindlichkeitser‐ klärung von Beschlüssen anerkannter Agrarorganisationen und der zu‐ gehörigen zwangsweisen Beteiligung an der Finanzierung von Agrar‐ organisationen (Artikel 164 und 165 der Verordnung [EU] Nr. 1308/2013) genutzt? Sehen Sie dieses Instrument als sinnvoll und praxistauglich an? 6. Sollten neben den anerkannten Agrarorganisationen auch generell landwirtschaftliche Genossenschaften und sonstige landwirtschaftliche Zusammenschlüsse kartellrechtliche Privilegien besitzen? Wenn ja, ist Ihrer Ansicht nach die Regelung des Artikels 209 Absatz 1 Unterabsatz 2 der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 ausreichend? 7. Wie wird in Ihrem Land das in Artikel 209 Absatz 1 Unterabsatz 3 der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 enthaltene Verbot der Preisbindung verstanden und sehen Sie Klärungsbedarf? II. Questions – Fragen 53 8. Wie wird in Ihrem Land das in Artikel 209 Absatz 1 Unterabsatz 3 der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 enthaltene Verbot des Wettbewerbs‐ ausschlusses verstanden und sehen Sie Klärungsbedarf? 9. Wird in Ihrem Land das Instrument der Vertragsregulierung (Art. 148 und 168 der Verordnung [EU] Nr. 1308/2013) genutzt? Wenn ja, für welche landwirtschaftlichen Erzeugnisse besteht es? Welchen Nutzen sehen Sie in diesem Instrument? Für Berichte aus Nicht-EU-Mitgliedstaaten : Falls in Ihrem Land Instru‐ mente bzw. Regelungen bestehen, die mit denen in Abschnitt 2 vergleich‐ bar sind, beantworten Sie bitte die Fragen entsprechend. Allgemeine Fragen 1. Gab es in Ihrem Land im letzten Jahrzehnt eine öffentliche Diskussion über die Frage, ob die rechtliche Stellung der Landwirtschaft in der Vermarktungskette verstärkt werden soll? Wenn ja, welchen Inhalt hatte oder hat diese Diskussion? Hat sie zu Reformen oder Reformvorschlägen geführt? 2. Wenn Sie das nationale Agrarwettbewerbsrecht bzw. das EU-Agrar‐ wettbewerbsrecht insgesamt betrachten, ist dieses Ihrer Ansicht nach reformbedürftig? Wenn ja, was sollten die Schwerpunkte der Reform sein? III. Questions – Fragen 54 Rapport général de la Commission I – General Report of Commission I – Generalbericht der Kommission I Version française – French version – Französische Version Version anglaise – English version – Englische Version Version allemande – German version – Deutsche Version Rapport général de la Commission I* Version française – French version – Französische Version Prof. em. Dr. Paul Richli Université de Lucerne Dr. Christian Busse Ministère fédéral de l'Alimentation et de l'Agriculture Rapports d'État et rapporteurs d'État Bulgarie Minko Georgiev/Henrich Meyer-GerbauletChristina Yancheva/Dimitar Grekov/ Dafinka Grozdanova/Aneta Roycheva Allemagne RAin Birgit Buth, Deutscher Raiffeisenverband, Berlin (Association allemande Raiffeisen, Berlin) France Catherine del Cont, enseignant-chercheur, Université de Nantes Royaume-Uni RA Rhodri Jones, Cardiff Italie Prof. Dr. Luigi Russo, Université de Ferrara Pays-Bas Mr. H.C.E.P.J. Janssen; advocaat of cousel, Kneppelhout & Korthal N.V. Autriche Dr. Anton Reinl, Landwirtschaftskammer Österreich (Chambre d’agriculture d’Autriche) Pologne Dr. Przemysław Litwiniuk; Dr. Konrad Marciniuk; Dr. Adam Niewiadomski Suisse RA Jürg Niklaus, Niklaus Rechtsanwälte, Dübendorf (Schweiz) (Avocats, Dü‐ bendorf) Espagne Prof. Dr. José Maria de la Cuesta Saenz Traitement des rapports nationaux : Christian Busse : Royaume-Uni, Italie, Pays-Bas, Pologne. Paul Richli : Allemagne, Autriche, Bulgarie, Espagne, France, Italie, Suis‐ se. Indication de lecture : Pour les pays qui ne sont pas mentionnés dans l'aperçu ci-dessous pour les questions individuelles, les rapports nationaux ne contiennent aucune in‐ formation sur les questions respectives. * Traduction de l’allemand en français par Kim Lemmenmeier, MLaw, Université de Lucerne. 57 Préface Conception du rapport général Dans le cadre du XXIXe Congrès européen de droit rural du C.E.D.R., qui s'est tenu du 21 au 23 septembre 2017 à Lille (France), la Commission I a traité le thème « règles de concurrence dans le domaine de l’agriculture ». Ce rapport général, établi en commun par les deux rapporteurs généraux, reflète le travail de la Commission I et est divisé en quatre sections, qui sont structurées comme suit : La première section se réfère aux deux congrès antérieurs du C.E.D.R., ceux-ci ayant déjà traité la relation entre le droit de la concurrence et le droit rural. L'une des conséquences de cette situation est qu’un premier dé‐ bat majeur a eu lieu en 1967 (point I.2). Dans le cadre de la thématique de la Commission I, celle-ci est suivie d'un bref, mais important, exposé des marchés agricoles. Il a été jugé nécessaire de démontrer sommairement les raisons pour lesquelles les marchés agricoles occupent une position parti‐ culière dans le droit de la concurrence de L’UE et des États (point I.3). L’introduction de la première section s’achève par un court aperçu de la procédure Endives devant la Cour de justice de l’Union européenne (CJUE) et du projet dénommé Règlement Omnibus de la Commission eu‐ ropéenne. Il s'agit de deux événements importants qui ont eu lieu au sein de l'UE au cours de la préparation et des délibérations de la Commission I et qui ont eu une incidence sur la compréhension du travail de la Commis‐ sion I (point I.4). Dans la deuxième partie du rapport général, essentielle en termes de contenu, les rapports des pays sont présentés sous forme de résumé. Ceuxci sont subdivisés dans l'ordre et sur la base des questions soumises aux rapporteurs du pays durant la période précédant le congrès. Le questionn‐ aire est joint au livre du Congrès (voir page 47). La présentation des ré‐ ponses aux questions individuelles se termine par une courte synthèse des rapporteurs généraux. Comme il est d’usage, la Commission I a formulé des conclusions et des recommandations à la fin de son travail de recherche. Il en sera briève‐ ment rendu compte dans la troisième section et il en est également réfé‐ rencé dans la publication séparée au livre du Congrès. La quatrième et der‐ nière section reprend l’aperçu de la fin de la première section. Il est, en effet, exceptionnel que les recommandations d’une Commission lors d’un Congrès européen de droit rural soient directement incorporées dans les I. A. Rapport général de la Commission I 58 travaux législatifs de l’UE et deviennent pertinentes dans le contexte d’un récent arrêt de la CJUE. Il est donc souhaitable d’élargir la perspective temporelle du Congrès européen de droit rural et de comparer brièvement les recommandations de la Commission I avec l'arrêt de la CJUE dans la procédure Endives lequel a seulement été formulé après le Congrès, ainsi qu’avec la modification de l’ordonnance (UE) 2017/2393, entré en vi‐ gueur le 1er janvier 2018, qui résulte du projet du Règlement Omnibus. Étude antérieure du C.E.D.R. au titre du droit de la concurrence dans le domaine de l’agriculture Le C.E.D.R. a traité pour la première fois du droit de la concurrence dans le domaine de l’agriculture lors du IVème Congrès européen de droit ru‐ ral, qui s'est tenu du 25 au 28 octobre 1967 à Bad Godesberg (Allemagne). La Commission I du Congrès de l'époque a abordé le sujet des « dispositi‐ ons spéciales du droit des cartels pour l'agriculture dans le droit concer‐ nant la CEE, avec une attention particulière aux réglementations nationa‐ les ». Le débat sur ce sujet se trouvait à l’origine du droit de la concur‐ rence dans le domaine de l’agriculture de l'UE, qui a été réglementée pour la première fois par le Règlement N° 26 en 1962. Il n'est donc pas sur‐ prenant que l'interprétation de ce règlement ait été au cœur du travail de la Commission. Le questionnaire d’alors contenait quatre questions, notamment celles de savoir : jusqu’où l’exemption de cartel, compte tenu de son extension, s’étendait aussi à certains produits manufacturés dans des usines de pro‐ duction primaire, quelle était l’importance de la fixation des prix et si des accords entre les secteurs de la production primaire et du commerce ou de la transformation étaient également autorisés. À l'issue de ses discussions, la Commission I a noté que plusieurs points devaient être rapidement éclaircis. Elle a, en outre, mentionné la problématique que le Règlement N° 26 ne s'appliquait qu'aux faits entre Etats. Pour les faits purement na‐ tionaux, il serait nécessaire d’harmoniser le droit de la concurrence dans le domaine de l’agriculture « pour éliminer la possibilité de distorsions de B. Rapport général de la Commission I 59 concurrence »1. L’aperçu des délibérations de l'époque met clairement en évidence que les problèmes d’alors sont encore controversés actuellement. Par la suite, le sujet a été relégué à l’arrière-plan de la C.E.D.R., en ef‐ fet la réglementation du marché dans le cadre de la politique agricole com‐ mune (PAC) de l'UE laissait peu de place à la concurrence. Ce n'est seule‐ ment qu’après le début de la libéralisation du marché agricole de l'UE que le droit de concurrence dans le domaine de l’agriculture est revenu au centre des préoccupations de la C.E.D.R. Le thème traité par la Commissi‐ on II du XXIIème Congrès européen de droit rural, qui s'est réunie à Al‐ merimar (Espagne) du 23 au 25 octobre 2003, avait pour sujet : « Le sec‐ teur agricole à la lumière du droit européen et national du droit de la con‐ currence »2. À ce stade, il est instructif de se rappeler les recommandati‐ ons de la Commission II qui ont été émises : « A la lumière de ces particularités agricoles, la Commission II propose les orientations suivantes : Considérant l’importante contribution des organisations communes de marché, dans l’amélioration des relations contractuelles sur la base des‐ quelles sont vendus les produits agricoles ; considérants aussi que les par‐ ticularités identifiées sont communes à tous les agriculteurs de l’UE ; les efforts doivent porter sur le développement de standards contractuels pour les produits agricoles assurant un équilibre entre les intérêts des pro‐ ducteurs et ceux des consommateurs. Considérant l’expérience positive des organisations de producteurs au‐ torisés par le droit communautaire (art. 11, Règlement n° 2200/96 sur l’OCM fruits et légumes) et certains droits de la concurrence nationaux qui ont permis l’élaboration d’accords horizontaux (producteurs, coopéra‐ tives) et parfois verticaux (interprofessions en France dans les situations de crise), les autorités nationales sont invitées à examiner de plus près les possibilités permettant d’introduire et d’encadrer de telles organisations. 1 Voir le rapport du congrès de Winkler, Der Europäische Agrarrechtskongress in Bad Godesberg vom 25. bis 28. Oktober 1967, Recht der Landwirtschaft 1967, 312– 318; cf. aussi le programme du Congrès, Recht der Landwirtschaft 1967, 275–276, et le Arbeitsbericht der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Agrarrecht (edit.), Die kartell‐ rechtliche Regelung für die Landwirtschaft im EWG-Recht unter besonderer Be‐ rücksichtigung der nationalen Regelungen (1970). 2 Cf. C.E.D.R. (edit.), Le droit rural face à trois défis majeurs (2005), 123-201. Rapport général de la Commission I 60 Des efforts doivent être faits pour redonner de la vigueur au règlement n° 26/62 qui conformément à l’article 81(3) prend pleinement en compte la spécificité de l’agriculture. Sur un plan européen, des moyens doivent être trouvés pour traiter le problème commun à tous les Etats-membres de la revente à perte de pro‐ duits agricoles. »3 Ces recommandations démontrent que, d'une part, les problèmes qui avaient déjà été soulevés en 1967 n’ont pas encore trouvé une solution sa‐ tisfaisante et que, d'autre part, de nouvelles questions s’y sont ajoutées comme celles de la réglementation des traités et de la gestion des crises. La Commission I du XXIXe Congrès européen du droit rural a donc es‐ sayé d’utiliser un questionnaire suffisamment large pour aborder et discu‐ ter l'ensemble des sujets d'une manière cohérente. Les caractéristiques des marchés agricoles en tant que lien pour le droit de la concurrence dans le domaine de l’agriculture Remarque préliminaire La littérature de base traitant des caractéristiques des marchés agricoles dans le domaine de la classification de droit de la concurrence est peu étendue. Elle est surtout américaine. Cela est probablement dû au fait que le droit américain de la concurrence, pour autant que l'on puisse en juger, détient la plus longue tradition de traitement propre à l'agriculture. Le sta‐ tut spécial remonte aux années 1920 et est surtout entériné dans une loi, toujours en vigueur, le Capper-Volstead Act. Caractéristiques des marchés agricoles Les caractéristiques spécifiques des marchés agricoles peuvent être décri‐ tes comme suit : (1) Tout d'abord, l'évaluation économique de la situation du marché des producteurs de produits agricoles se définit par leur large homogénéi‐ té (dit produits de base), par exemple le blé, les pommes de terre, le C. 1. 2. 3 C.E.D.R. (note 2), 200 s. Rapport général de la Commission I 61 lait, les œufs, la viande, les fruits ou les légumes. Dans ces cir‐ constances, il y a peu de possibilité de différencier les produits pour que les prix puissent être variés sensiblement4. En fin de compte, il y a une tendance croissante vers une certaine différenciation des produ‐ its, déclenchée, entre autre, par les exigences en matière de sécurité alimentaire et d'écologie5. (2) Selon le segment de produit, le nombre de producteurs est alors sou‐ vent très important par rapport au nombre de clients. Quantité d’éta‐ blissements producteurs sont confrontés à quelques gros clients. Il y a un déséquilibre entre le pouvoir de l’offre et le pouvoir d’achat, ce qui signifie que les producteurs sont régulièrement des preneurs et non des fixateurs de prix6. (3) A part la structure défavorable du marché pour les producteurs de produits agricoles, il faut tenir compte des facteurs environnementaux qui font peser une charge plus lourde sur l'agriculture que sur la plu‐ part des autres secteurs de l'économie. Le sol, l'eau et le rayonnement solaire sont trois des facteurs de production les plus importants. Même avec la technologie moderne, ils ne peuvent qu’être imparfai‐ tement maîtrisés7. (4) De surcroît, les conditions climatiques et les problèmes météorologi‐ ques ainsi que les dommages causés par les événements naturels et les maladies des plantes et des animaux causent des problèmes à l'agri‐ culture8. (5) Contrairement à de nombreux autres secteurs de l'économie, la pro‐ duction ne peut être reconvertie ou arrêtée qu'après un très long délai. 4 Bernadette Andreosso-O’Callighan, The Economics of European Agriculture (2003), 59. 5 Andreosso-O’Callighan (note 4), 59. 6 Voir John B. Penson jr./Oral Capps jr./C. Parr Rosson III/Richard D. Woodward, Introduction to Agricultural Economics, 6e éd. (2015), 148 s.; cf. aussi Christian Busse, in: Jan Busche/Andreas Röhling (Hrsg.), Kölner Kommentar zum Kartell‐ recht, Band 1 (2017), § 28 GWB, n. 4, sous référence particulière à la part en baissse constante de l’agriculture de la valeur ajoutée brute, à l’exemple de l’Alle‐ magne ; Patrik Ducrey, Marktmacht und schweizerische Landwirtschaft – Kartell‐ recht als Korrektiv?, Blätter für Agrarrecht 2008, 123–136, 134.; Paul Richli, Um‐ setzung der «idealen» Lösung – Handlungsbedarf aus rechtlicher Sicht, Blätter für Agrarrecht 2006, 163–177, 165 s. 7 Penson jr./Capps jr./Rosson III/Woodward (note 6), 174 ss. 8 Andreosso-O’Callighan (note 4), 49 ss. et 66 s. Rapport général de la Commission I 62 Ceci s'applique, en particulier, aux cultures maraîchères et céréalières ainsi que fruitières et viticoles (une seule récolte par an), à la produc‐ tion de viande (les animaux ont un cycle de vie à prendre en considé‐ ration) et à la production de lait (le nombre de vaches laitières ne peut être augmenté ou réduit à court terme)9. (6) Enfin, l'élasticité-prix de la demande de produits agricoles est généra‐ lement faible et a un impact négatif sur une offre en expansion. Dans le cas d'une faible élasticité-prix de l'offre, le rendement total diminue avec une augmentation en volume10. Par exemple, un accroissement en volume de certains produits homogènes (aliments crus et produits à base de fibres) de un pour cent peut entraîner une réduction de prix de cinq pour cent11, bien que cela soit, en grande partie, du secteur de production et de la structure actuelle du marché et de la valeur ajou‐ tée. (7) De plus, l'agriculture est un secteur économique ayant un besoin d'in‐ vestissement par travailleur très élevé, notamment en ce qui concerne les opportunités de revenu. Aux Etats-Unis, on s’attend même à ce que l’agriculture atteigne les besoins d’investissement les plus élevés par travailleur12. (8) Par ailleurs, il convient de préciser que, si un producteur agricole doit se réorienter, il doit surmonter des obstacles de sortie du marché rela‐ tivement élevés. Généralement, le sol ne peut être utilisé que pour l’agriculture. Ensuite, les bâtiments ne peuvent avoir un autre usage en raison des réglementations techniques de construction et – selon la législation de l'État – en raison des règles d'utilisation de l'espace13. (9) Alors que les coûts de production agricoles tendent à augmenter à long terme, c'est l’opposé pour les prix des produits agricoles. Ces derniers, diminuent, à long terme par rapport aux produits industriels, ce qui aboutit à une lente érosion des revenus agricoles comparative‐ 9 Ulrich Koester, Grundzüge der landwirtschaftlichen Marktlehre, 4e ed. (2010), 94 s.; Andreosso-O’Callighan (note 4), 56 s. 10 Penson jr./Capps jr./Rosson III/Woodward (note 6), 201 ss.; Andreosso-O’Callig‐ han (note 4), 44 ss. 11 Penson jr./Capps jr./Rosson III/Woodward (note 6), 71 ss., 219 ; Koester (n. 9), 35 ss., 52 ss. et 216. 12 Penson jr./Capps jr./Rosson III/Woodward (note 6), 219. 13 Voir Roger Zäch, Schweizerisches Kartellrecht, 2e ed., (2005), n. 111 ss.; Richli (note 6), 166. Rapport général de la Commission I 63 ment aux autres revenus. Cela semble être le vrai « problème de la ferme »14. (10) À ces aspects économiques s’ajoutent des raisons politico-stratégi‐ ques afin de justifier l'intervention de l'État sur les marchés agricoles. Depuis l’époque des pharaons15, le problème de la sécurité alimen‐ taire justifie constamment l'intervention de l'État16. Aperçu sur l'origine de la réglementation du droit de la concurrence dans le domaine de l’agriculture : le Capper-Volstead Act et les lois subséquentes aux États-Unis. En 1922, le Capper-Volstead Act17 constituait pour les coopératives18, une exception aux dispositions de la législation antitrust, c’est-à-dire du Sher‐ man Antitrust Act de 1890 et du Clayton Act de 1914, ceci à la suite de déséquilibres importants du marché aux États-Unis. Il s'agit, probable‐ ment, de la plus ancienne réglementation d’exception à l'interdiction des cartels dans le domaine du droit rural, en vigueur depuis près de 100 ans. Il faut souligner que seule la conduite à l’intérieur de la coopération est privilégiée, et non pas celle limitant la concurrence à travers des accords avec des partenaires extérieurs19. 3. 14 Andreosso-O’Callighan (n. 4), 58 s. 15 Genèse 41:1. 16 Andreosso-O’Callighan (note 4), p. 62 et 66; Koester (note 9), p. 216; Peter C. Carstensen, Agricultural Cooperatives and the Law: Obsolete Statutes in a Dy‐ namic Economy, Legal Studies Research Paper Series, Paper No. 1245, 58 South Dakota Law Review 463 (2013), 462–498, 462. 17 Carstensen (note 16), 482 ss. donne un bon aperçu de ce décret et sa pratique; détails sur l’histoire du Capper-Volstead Act: Donald A. Frederick, Antitrust Sta‐ tus of Farmer Cooperatives: the story of Capper Volstead Act, USDA Cooperative information report, n° 59, September 2002, U.S. Department of Agriculture; cf. Margerite Zoeteweij-Turhan, The Role of Producer Organizations on the Dairy Market (2012), 131 ss. 18 Carstensen (note 16), 472 ff. présente une bonne typologie des coopératives con‐ cernées ; des exemples de coopératives peuvent être trouvés dans: Sarah Servin, Agricultural Cooperatives in the 21st Century: The progression towards local and regional food systems in the United States (2015). 19 Penson jr./Capps jr./Rosson III/Woodward (note 6), 165 ; Busse (note 6), n. 44 ss. Rapport général de la Commission I 64 En particulier, les lois suivantes, ont pour but d’affaiblir la législation antitrust20: (1) le Packers and Stockyard Act de 1921, qui a renforcé la législation antitrust concernant les mesures de commercialisation du bétail ; (2) le Cooperative Marketing Act de 1926, qui permettait aux agricult‐ eurs ou à leurs organisations d'acquérir, d'échanger et de diffuser des informations sur les prix et sur le marché ; (3) le Robinson Patman Act de 1936, qui concerne principalement la dis‐ crimination par les prix ; (4) le Agricultural Marketing Act de 1937. Toutes ces mesures juridiques sont conçues pour permettre de développer un pouvoir compensateur (countervailing power) à l’encontre des gros cli‐ ents21. Cette structure de développement est autorisée jusqu'à une part de marché de cent pour cent à condition que cette position soit atteinte uni‐ quement par le résultat de sa propre performance ou par des pratiques gé‐ néralement admises. L'exploitation abusive du monopole ne sera pas ac‐ ceptable22. Dans la pratique, il semble également y avoir des coopératives qui ont une position supérieure envers les partenaires commerciaux en ter‐ mes de pouvoir de marché. Ceci a également incité des voix critiques à ré‐ clamer une révision du Capper-Volstead Act23. Basé sur l’Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act de 1937, un durcisse‐ ment de l'idée de développer un pouvoir compensateur existe lorsque des concurrents sont contraints de participer à des mesures de coopératives à l’aide d'un « ordre » de l'Etat24. Cet ordre signifie que le gouvernement impose une sorte d'obligation générale d'empêcher les « parasites » de bé‐ néficier de prix plus élevés et de faire baisser les prix en augmentant les volumes25. Il ne s'agit pas moins que de créer des cartels « sponsori‐ 20 Penson jr./Capps jr./Rosson III/Woodward (note 6), 166. 21 Carstensen (note 16), 465 s., et références. 22 Voir Werner Klohn, Die Farmer-Genossenschaften in den USA – Eine agrargeo‐ graphische Untersuchung (1990), 51. 23 Carstensen (note 16), 462 et 479 ss.; Anne McGinnis, Ridding the Law of Outdat‐ ed Statutory Exemptions to Antitrust Law: A Proposal for Reform, University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform 47(2014), 529–554. 24 Carstensen (note 16), 469 s. 25 American Bar Association, Section of Antitrust Law, Federal Statutory Exemption of Antitrust Law, Monograph 24, 2007, 36 ss.; Penson jr./Capps jr./Rosson III/ Woodward (n. 6), 166. Rapport général de la Commission I 65 sés » par l'État sur les quantités et les prix pour certaines zones définies, et non pour l'ensemble des États-Unis26. Les « ordres » les plus répandus se trouvent dans les coopératives laitières du secteur laitier; il y a peu d'ex‐ emples dans d'autres zones de production27. Étant donné que la réglemen‐ tation du droit coopératif relève de la compétence des États fédéraux, les possibilités d’ « ordres » ne sont pas identiques dans l'ensemble des États- Unis28. Contrairement aux critiques, un rapport gouvernemental conclut que la concentration des coopératives laitières est justifiée, particulièrement dans l'industrie laitière, afin de pouvoir maintenir une certaine position sur le marché29. Le fait qu'entre 1950 et 2000, le nombre de coopératives s’est abaissé de 10 035 à 3 346, alors que le chiffre d'affaires total de ces coopé‐ ratives est passé de 8,7 milliards de dollars à près de 100 milliards de dol‐ lars, n'est pas considéré comme problématique30. Les recommandations à la fin du rapport gouvernemental ne visent pas à la scission des sociétés coopératives, mais soulignent la nécessité de mettre en place un leadership compétent31. Par ailleurs, le Capper-Volstead Act n'est pas un certificat de non-culpa‐ bilité pour tout comportement interdit par le droit de la concurrence. En particulier, dans le cadre de la concurrence déloyale, les sociétés coopéra‐ tives ont interdiction de vendre à un prix inférieur au prix de revient32. Dans l'ensemble, il serait peut-être utile d'examiner de plus près le dé‐ veloppement des coopératives agricoles aux États-Unis et l'influence du Capper-Volstead Act au vu de la relation entre le droit de la concurrence et le droit rural. Il semble qu'un traitement privilégié peut également aboutir à des excès si les processus de croissance côté fournisseurs conduisent à la création de monopoles fournisseurs. Une telle orientation des intérêts pro‐ 26 American Bar Association (note 25), 94 et 114 ss. 27 American Bar Association (note 25), 95 et 116 s.; Carstensen (n. 16), 476. 28 Carstensen (note 16), 478 s. 29 Sur la question de savoir si le Capper-Volstead Act couvre également les restric‐ tions de production pour des coopérations, voir Yulyia Bolotova, Agricultural Pro‐ duction Restrictions and Market Power: An Antitrust Analysis, Selected Paper prepared for presentation at the Southern Agricultural Economics Association’s 2015 Annual Meeting (2015). 30 United States Departement of Agriculture, Agricultural Cooperatives in the 21st Century, November 2002, 20. 31 Agricultural Cooperatives (note 30), 30 ss. 32 Klohn (note 22), 50. Rapport général de la Commission I 66 voquerait un retour d’une situation comparable à celle qui s’est produit en Allemagne lors de l'adoption de la GWB (loi contre les restrictions de con‐ currence). Dans les années cinquante, un groupe d'étude a été créé sous la direction de Franz Böhm, qui avait effectué un voyage d'étude aux Etats- Unis33. Le contexte spécifique des délibérations de la Commission I Comme indiqué dans l'introduction du questionnaire de la Commission I, la préparation et les discussions de la Commission I se sont déroulées dans un contexte particulier, dont la connaissance est nécessaire pour com‐ prendre pleinement les délibérations. Il s'agit, premièrement, de la procédure préjudicielle devant la CJUE dans l'affaire C-671/15 (APVE), relative à un accord de cartel entre des opérateurs sur le marché français de l’Endive. En 2012, l'autorité de la concurrence française a classé l'entente comme non couverte par une ex‐ emption au profit de cartels d'agricole et a donc prononcé des sanctions fi‐ nancières. La Cour d'appel de Paris, autorité de première instance, auprès de qui a été fait appel contre cette décision, a contredit ce point de vue. Ensuite, en 2015, la Cour de cassation (deuxième instance) a posé deux questions préjudicielles à la CJUE afin de clarifier le champ d'application des exemptions de cartel dans la législation relative au marché agricole de l’UE. Ainsi, c'est la première fois que des questions spécifiques sur les régle‐ mentations antitrust agricoles de la libéralisation de l'organisation du mar‐ ché agricole de l'UE ont été soulevées devant la CJUE, bien que ce ne soit pas la version actuelle, mais la version en vigeur jusqu'en 2013 et le règle‐ ment précédent dans le secteur des fruits et légumes, qui ont trouvé appli‐ cation. M. Wahl, avocat général, a présenté ses conclusions en avril 2017. Elles traitent en profondeur de la question et donnent lieu à des observa‐ tions fondamentales34. La CJUE n'a rendu son arrêt qu'après le XXIXe Congrès européen de droit rural, de sorte que seules les conclusions de l’avocat général ont pu être discutées dans le cadre des rapports nationaux D. 33 Busse (note 6), n. 44. 34 Avocat général Wahl, conclusions présentées le 6.4.2017, affaire C-671/15 (APVE), ECLI:EU:C:2017:281, n. 28 ; voir également le point II.1.5.3. ci-après. Rapport général de la Commission I 67 et des délibérations de la Commission I. Le jugement à rendre était donc attendu avec impatience. Deuxièmement, en mai 2017, en prenant pour base le rapport final de la Task Force sur les « marchés agricoles », le Parlement européen a deman‐ dé que des changements majeurs soient apportés aux réglementations ré‐ gissant les organisations agricoles reconnues. Ces modifications seront ap‐ portées dans le contexte du Règlement Omnibus, que la Commission euro‐ péenne a présenté en septembre 2016 sous la forme d'une proposition lé‐ gislative. Dans ses délibérations, la Commission I a tenu compte des pro‐ positions du Parlement européen. Au cours de la session de la Commissi‐ on I, la phase finale du trilogue soi-disant informel sur le Règlement Om‐ nibus entre le Parlement européen, le Conseil de l'UE et la Commission européenne a eu lieu. La thématique de la Commission I avait donc une pertinence législative directe. La Commission européenne était également représentée lors de la manifestation inaugurale du XXIXe Congrès europé‐ en de droit rural et elle a parlé du Règlement Omnibus. À cet égard, les participants de la Commission I attendaient avec curiosité le résultat des négociations au niveau de l'UE. Questions pour les rapports nationaux et leurs réponses, y compris une synthèse des rapporteurs généraux. Le droit national de la concurrence dans le domaine de l’agriculture Droit de la concurrence générale Votre pays dispose-t-il d’un droit national général en matière de cartels connaissant des normes légales propres à l’interdiction des cartels, à la surveillance d'abus éventuels de la part des entreprises dominantes du marché ainsi qu’au contrôle des fusions ? Bulgarie La Loi de 2008 sur la protection de la concurrence traite des cartels, des fusions entre entreprises et des positions dominantes. Allemagne La loi contre les restrictions de la concurrence (GWB), promulguée en 1957 et révisée en 2013, contient des dispositions dans les trois domaines. II. A. 1. Rapport général de la Commission I 68 France Le droit national antitrust est inscrit dans le Livre IV du Code de commer‐ ce. Il ne s'agit pas d'une législation avec des interdictions per se, mais d'une solution médiane qui règlemente légalement les accords et com‐ portements anticoncurrentiels (abus de pouvoir de marché) (art. L420-1 et art. L420-2) si cela peut affecter le marché (effets réels et potentiels). D'après le rapport national, la surveillance des abus n'a pas d'effet. Le Code de commerce contient également un contrôle des fusions comparable au règlement de l’UE (art. L430-1 et suivants). Les justifications des re‐ strictions de concurrence et les exceptions individuelles aux dispositions relatives à la concurrence sont importantes (art. L420-4). Royaume-Uni Le Competition Act de 1998 (CA 1998) traite des accords restrictifs, des ententes et des abus de position dominante. Il s'inspire des articles 101 et 102 du TFUE. L’Enterprise Act de 2002 (EA 2002) contient des règlemen‐ tations sur les fusions. Italie La loi N° 287/1990 sur les ententes est applicable (Legge 10 ottobre 1990, no. 287 – Norme per la tutela della concorrenza e del mercato). Pays-Bas Le Dutch Competition Act (Mededingingswet) de 1998 est applicable. Autriche La loi fédérale contre les cartels et autres restrictions de la concurrence (Kartellgesetz 2005 – KartG 2005) est applicable. Pologne Le Competition and Consumer Protection Act de 2007 s'applique. Suisse Contrairement au droit de l'UE, la loi sur les cartels de 1995 ne repose pas sur le principe de l'interdiction, mais sur celui de l'abus, bien qu'une pré‐ somption s'applique à l'inadmissibilité des « cartels durs » (accords sur les prix, les territoires et les quantités). Par conséquent, la pratique du princi‐ pe de l'abus se rapproche du principe de l'interdiction. Rapport général de la Commission I 69 Espagne La loi 15/2007 sur la défense de la compétition (Defensa de la competen‐ cia) s'applique, et a remplacé les règlements précédents. Synthèse des rapporteurs généraux Tous les pays représentés ont leur propre législation antitrust. Tout comme le droit de la concurrence de l'UE, les législations se basent principalement sur le principe d'interdiction en ce qui concerne les accords restreignant la concurrence et intègrent un contrôle des abus et des fusions. Le droit de la concurrence de la France et de la Suisse ne mentionnent pas formellement l’interdiction des cartels, mais reposent sur le principe de l'abus. Les résul‐ tats ne sont toutefois pas fondamentalement différents de ceux de la règle‐ mentation fondée sur le principe d'interdiction. Privilèges antitrust pour l'agriculture dans la Constitution La constitution de votre pays permet-elle de privilégier les cartels dans le domaine de l’agriculture ? Si oui, que contient cette règlementation ? La situation du droit national Les constitutions de la Bulgarie, de l'Allemagne, de la France, de l'Italie, des Pays-Bas, de l'Autriche et de la Pologne ne contiennent aucune dis‐ position qui privilégie l'agriculture en ce qui concerne le droit de la con‐ currence. L'art. 104, al. 2 de la Constitution fédérale de la Suisse prévoit, qu’en plus de mesures d'entraide raisonnable pour l'agriculture et, en dérogeant, au besoin, au principe de la liberté économique, la Confédération encoura‐ ge les exploitations paysannes cultivant le sol. Sur cette base, l'agriculture peut être privilégiée dans le domaine de la politique de concurrence. L'art. 130 de la Constitution de l’Espagne engage l'agriculture à la mo‐ dernisation et au développement. Bien que cette disposition soit sans effet direct, elle peut servir de base aux dispositions relatives aux organisations agricoles intersectorielles et aux codes de bonne conduite. 2. Rapport général de la Commission I 70 Synthèse des rapporteurs généraux Comme il s'agit d'un sujet très particulier, il n'est guère surprenant que les constitutions des États ne règlent pas directement la position de l'agricul‐ ture dans le droit de la concurrence. Elles ne contiennent que des stipulati‐ ons indirectes ou des règlements, plus particulièrement des mandats pour agir qui, s'ils sont correctement interprétés, peuvent avoir un impact sur le droit de la concurrence. Cet aspect est très étendu en Suisse. Loi de la concurrence spécifique au secteur agricole Votre pays dispose-t-il d’un droit national spécial en matière de cartels propre au domaine de l’agriculture ? Si oui, que contient ce droit et dans quels actes législatifs trouve-t-on ces règles ? Allemagne Il n'existe pas de loi spécifique pour la législation antitrust dans le secteur agricole. Le GWB prévoit dans le cadre de l’interdiction des cartels une exception pour l'agriculture. En particulier, § 28 du GWB prévoit que les accords conclus par les producteurs agricoles, les accords et les décisions prises par les associations de ces exploitations et les groupements de ces associations concernant la production ou la vente de produits agricoles et l'utilisation d'installations communes pour le stockage, le traitement ou la transformation de produits agricoles soient exemptés de l'interdiction des ententes, à condition qu'ils ne contiennent pas de prix fixes ou qu'ils n'ex‐ cluent pas la concurrence. Le § 5 de la loi sur la structure du marché agricole (AgrarMSG) prévoit également une exception à l'interdiction des cartels pour les organisations reconnues de producteurs, pour les organisations reconnues d’organisati‐ ons reconnues de producteurs et pour les associations professionnelles re‐ connues, à savoir dans le domaine de la reconnaissance. France Des dispositions spéciales pour l'agriculture avec possibilités de bénéficier d'une exemption se trouvent dans l'art. L. 420-4 al. I, 2 du Code de com‐ merce, en liaison avec Titre III du livre VI du Code rural. À cet égard, les bénéficiaires sont essentiellement les accords interprofessionnels. Il est important de mentionner l'art. L420-1 al. 2, selon lequel les règles de con‐ 3. Rapport général de la Commission I 71 currence ne sont pas applicables si des restrictions de concurrence peuvent être justifiées par le progrès économique. Ceci à condition que les con‐ sommateurs participent de manière appropriée à l'avantage et que la con‐ currence ne soit pas exclue pour une partie substantielle des produits. La pratique qui consiste à restreindre les règles de concurrence a un caractère très restrictif, de sorte qu'il n'y a pas d'allègement significatif des règles de concurrence pour l'agriculture. Les lois suivantes méritent également d'être mentionnées : La Loi du 27 juillet 2010 de modernisation de l'agriculture et de la pêche (LMAP), modifiée par la Loi d'avenir du 13 octobre 2014, codifiée dans le Code rural. Cet article L632-24 et suivants sur la contractualisation sont liés au paquet laitier de l'UE de 2012. Au titre de cet article, et en ver‐ tu du droit de la concurrence, le rapport national indique la présence d’un risque que la garantie de prix minimum par les associations professionnel‐ les ne soit pas licite. Les indicateurs de référence qui tendent à fixer des prix recommandés sont également sensibles. Les producteurs devraient rester libres pour la fixation des prix. Cette attitude crée une insécurité ju‐ ridique et est responsable du fait que la contractualisation n'a été établie que dans quelques secteurs de production. Bien que la contractualisation argumente la transparence, elle n’entraîne pas une augmentation des reve‐ nus dans l'agriculture. La Loi N° 2016-1691 (dite Loi Sapin 2) vise à renforcer la position des agriculteurs dans la chaîne alimentaire en équilibrant l'asymétrie de pou‐ voir entre les producteurs et les étapes en aval. Instrumentalement, il s'agit surtout de la contractualisation. Par conséquent, les contrats doivent être fondés sur divers critères de référence. Royaume-Uni Le CA de 1998 contient des exceptions de la loi de la concurrence généra‐ le en ce qui concerne les accords de coopération entre les agriculteurs et leurs associations. Ces exceptions concernent la production et la vente de produits agricoles et l'utilisation d'installations communes. Certaines con‐ ditions restrictives doivent être respectées, comme le fait que les accords ne doivent être conclus qu'entre agriculteurs (et donc pas, par exemple, entre transformateurs) et ne doivent pas obliger les agriculteurs à exiger un prix uniforme pour leurs produits agricoles. Par ailleurs, il existe très peu de lois spécifiques au titre de la concurrence. Rapport général de la Commission I 72 Pays-Bas Il n'existe qu'un manuel du Ministère de l'Économie en 2015 qui explique les possibilités de coopération entre les organisations de producteurs re‐ connues, les associations reconnues d'organisations de producteurs et les associations professionnelles reconnues dans le secteur agricole, et ce sans violer la loi de la concurrence générale. Selon le rapport du pays, le manu‐ el est superflu et ne contient aucune nouveauté. Autriche Le KartG contient dans le § 2 al. 2 n° 5 de dispositions juridiques exclusi‐ ves pour l'agriculture. Elle exempte les accords, décisions et pratiques des producteurs agricoles, des associations de producteurs agricoles ou des as‐ sociations de ces associations de producteurs, notamment en ce qui con‐ cerne la production ou la commercialisation des produits agricoles, à con‐ dition qu'ils ne contiennent pas de prix fixes et qu'ils n'excluent pas la con‐ currence. Suisse À l'exception de l'art. 171a de la loi sur l'agriculture du 29 avril 1998 (LAgr) sur les échanges dits de contrepartie des entreprises dominantes sur le marché, il n'existe pas de loi nominale dans le droit de la concur‐ rence dans le domaine de l'agriculture. La loi des cartels contient une base juridique pour le mécanisme de coordination entre le droit agricole et le droit de la concurrence. Ainsi, selon l'art. 3 al. 1, d'autres dispositions sont réservées dans la mesure où elles ne permettent pas la concurrence sur un marché. Il s'agit, notamment, des dispositions qui établissent un marché d'État ou une réglementation de prix (lettre a), ou qui accordent à des en‐ treprises individuelles des droits spécifiques pour l'exécution de tâches pu‐ bliques (lettre b). De telles dispositions particulières se retrouvent égale‐ ment dans le droit agricole. À cet égard, il convient de souligner en parti‐ culier les dispositions suivantes : La LAgr contient des dispositions sur l'entraide des organisations agri‐ coles, sur la publication de prix de référence des organisations agricoles et sur le soutien de la Confédération aux mesures d'entraide de ces organisa‐ tions (art. 8 et suiv.). La Suisse connaît deux formes d’organisations agri‐ coles : l’interprofession et l'organisation de producteurs. L’interprofession est l'association de producteurs de produits individuels ou de groupes de produits avec les transformateurs et, dans la mesure du possible, avec le commerce (art. 8, al. 2). Rapport général de la Commission I 73 Selon les mesures d'entraide de l'art. 8 al. 1 LAgr, la promotion de la qualité et de la vente, ainsi que l’adaptation de la production et de l'offre aux exigences du marché relèvent de la responsabilité de l’interprofession ou des organisations de producteurs. Selon l'art. 8 al. 1bis LAgr, l’interpro‐ fession peut conclure des contrats types. Un régime spécial s'applique aux contrats d'achat de lait (cf. art. 37 LAgr). L’interprofession et l’organisation de producteurs peuvent également fi‐ xer des prix de référence convenus entre les fournisseurs et les acheteurs (art. 8a LAgr). Le législateur suisse donne ainsi aux organisations agri‐ coles la possibilité de se coordonner dans un domaine où la politique de concurrence est extrêmement sensible. Les entreprises ne peuvent pas, comme c'est le cas pour les prix de référence, être obligées de s'y confor‐ mer. Aucun prix de référence ne peut être fixé pour les prix appliqués aux consommateurs. De plus, le Conseil fédéral est autorisé à étendre les mesures d'entraide aux non-membres (soi-disant parasites) dans les domaines de la promotion de qualité et des ventes ainsi que dans les domaines de l'adaptation de la production et de l'offre aux exigences du marché suite à des demandes des interprofessions et des organisations de producteurs. Cette disposition fi‐ gure à l'art. 1 de l'ordonnance du 30 octobre 2002 (OIOP) sur les interpro‐ fessions et les organisations de producteurs. Synthèse des rapporteurs généraux Dans la mesure où les rapports nationaux contiennent des informations, il existe des dispositions spéciales directes ou indirectes pour l'agriculture dans les lois ou règlements de la concurrence des États. Elles visent à pri‐ vilégier certains accords ou pratiques qui restreignent la concurrence. L'accent est mis sur l'action collective au sein des organisations de pro‐ ducteurs et de leurs associations en ce qui concerne la production et la vente de produits agricoles, à l'exception de la fixation des prix et des quantités. On observe également une tendance de contractualisation. Les conditions d'exception à l'interdiction des cartels et des abus ne sont pas tout à fait cohérentes. Dans de nombreux cas, elles sont fondées sur l'ex‐ emption de l'UE en matière du droit de la concurrence dans le domaine agricole. Les rapports nationaux n'ont pas tous les mêmes attentes en ma‐ tière d'exception. Le rapport français, en particulier, regrette la possibilité que la garantie de prix minimum par les associations professionnelles ne soit pas admise. La publication de prix de référence est expressément au‐ torisée en Suisse. Rapport général de la Commission I 74 Autorités spéciales pour la législation sur les cartels dans le domaine de l’agriculture Votre pays dispose-t-il d'autorités particulières chargées de l’application du droit des cartels dans le domaine de l'agriculture ? Dans aucun des dix pays représentés par les rapports de la Commission I, il n'existe une autorité spéciale pour l'application de la législation sur les cartels dans le domaine de l'agriculture. Les autorités générales de la con‐ currence sont responsables. Procédures dans le droit des cartels dans le domaine agricole au cours de la dernière décennie Durant la dernière décennie, votre pays était-il confronté à des procédures administratives ou judiciaires d’importance particulière en matière de droit des cartels dans le domaine de l’agriculture (interdiction des cartels, surveillance des abus, contrôle des fusions) ? Si oui, sur quelles thémati‐ ques portaient ces procédures et ont-elles été décidées selon le droit natio‐ nal ou celui de l’Union ? Bulgarie Quatre procédures en matière de droit de la concurrence dans le domaine de l'agriculture sont présentées à titre d'exemple : (1) En 2011, la Commission a découvert des cartels pour le sucre, l'huile de cuisson, la farine et les œufs afin de protéger la concurrence. (2) En 2013, des procédures en matière d’ententes ont été engagées pour des fournisseurs d'huile de cuisson. L'ordonnance du droit de la con‐ currence a été confirmée par la plus haute Cour administrative en 2014. (3) La Commission pour la protection de la concurrence a pris l'engage‐ ment volontaire de lutter contre la concurrence déloyale concernant les laboratoires accrédités pour le contrôle de la composition et la qualité du lait. La raison en est l'obligation de respecter le principe de proportionnalité (décision N° ACT 962-10.08.2017). (4) La décision N° ACT 940-10.08.2017 a conclu à une concurrence dé‐ loyale dans la production et la vente de fromage. 4. 5. Rapport général de la Commission I 75 Allemagne Le rapport de l'État décrit les activités particulièrement importantes du Bu‐ reau fédéral de la concurrence (Bundeskartellamt) : (1) Enquête du secteur du lait Au cours de la dernière décennie, le secteur laitier a fait l'objet d'une vaste étude de marché, qui s'est terminé par un rapport final en jan‐ vier 201235. Au cours de cette enquête, le Bundeskartellamt a exami‐ né l'ensemble du marché national du lait et, en particulier, la concen‐ tration des laiteries, les relations contractuelles sur le marché du lait cru et les systèmes d'information du marché, y compris les systèmes de prix de référence. (2) Procédures pilotes dans une laiterie concernant les relations de livrai‐ son En 2016, le Bundeskartellamt s'est à nouveau penché sur le marché du lait dans une procédure pilote impliquant une laiterie privée. Il s'agissait d'une enquête sur les relations de livraison du lait. En mars 2017, le Bundeskartellamt a publié un rapport de situation sur ce su‐ jet, qui est perçu de manière extrêmement critique par l'industrie lai‐ tière. De nombreux points discutés interfèrent fortement dans le droit des sociétés et les relations contractuelles sans qu'une violation de la loi de la concurrence ne soit évidente. On a plutôt l'impression que le Bundeskartellamt poursuit des préoccupations de politique agricole et de marché, en particulier, en ce qui concerne les relations entre les producteurs de lait et les laiteries. La procédure est toujours en cours36. Le Bundeskartellamt critique, plus particulièrement, l'obligation des producteurs de lait de le livrer dans son intégralité, y compris l'obliga‐ tion pour les laiteries d'accepter le lait dans son intégralité, car, de l'avis de l'autorité, elles encouragent la surproduction. De plus, sont 35 Voir le lien suivant: http://www.bundeskartellamt.de/SharedDocs/Publikation/DE/ Sektoruntersuchungen/ Sektoruntersuchung%20Milch%20%20Abschlussbe‐ richt.pdf?__blob=publicationFile&v=4. 36 Le rapport d'évaluation peut être consulté à partir du lien suivant : http://www.bun deskartellamt.de/Shared Docs/Publikation/DE/Berichte/Sachstand_Milch.pdf?__blob=publicationFi‐ le&v=3; pour une expertise du rapport de situation voir Christian Busse, Der Sach‐ standsbericht des Bundeskartellamtes vom 13.3.2017 zu dem Verfahren "Lieferbe‐ dingungen für Rohmilch", Agrarrecht – Annuaire 2018 (en parution). Rapport général de la Commission I 76 également discutés les délais de préavis, généralement de deux ans, considérés comme trop longs par le Bundeskartellamt, et la fixation rétroactive des prix du lait. Le Bundeskartellamt examine également le découplage des obligations de livraison et de l'adhésion. Selon le rapport de l'État, les laiteries coopératives soulèvent les ob‐ jections suivantes aux arguments avancés par le Bundeskartellamt : La coopérative enregistrée est une société à structure personnelle dont le nombre de membres n'est pas limité. Au cœur de la coopérative se trouve l'objectif de financement défini au § 1 al. 1 de la Loi sur les coopératives. L'objectif de la coopérative est précisément de promou‐ voir le fonctionnement économique individuel du membre agricole. Dans ce contexte, il est important que le membre producteur de lait ait volontairement choisi la structure d'une coopérative en tant qu’as‐ socié afin de travailler dans et avec elle selon des principes démocra‐ tiques. L'exploitation des possibilités offertes par le droit des sociétés ne constitue pas une violation des règles de concurrence. En ce qui concerne l'exclusivité, l'obligation de livraison intégrale et l'obligation de réception intégrale, celles-ci peuvent être justifiées en vertu du droit des sociétés. Les membres de la coopérative ont la pos‐ sibilité d'ajuster leurs obligations de livraison à tout moment par des décisions à la majorité démocratique. De surcroît, le délai de préavis de deux ans est tout à fait justifiable. Étant donné que des relations d'approvisionnement fiables et un approvisionnement constant en ma‐ tières premières entre les producteurs agricoles et les coopératives lai‐ tières sont des points essentiels, qui résultent également de l'objectif de l'aide, certains délais sont nécessaires. Le découplage des relations d'approvisionnement et des adhésions aux coopératives suggéré par le Bundeskartellamt contredit l'objectif même de la coopérative laitière. Elle a été créée – et cela a été explicitement souligné par les pro‐ ducteurs agricoles bénévoles – pour promouvoir la situation économi‐ que et les activités de ses membres. Si la relation de livraison et la re‐ lation d'affiliation sont découplées, la réalisation de l'objectif de l'en‐ treprise sera également remise en question. Le Bundeskartellamt critique également la fixation ultérieure des prix au lieu d'accords de prix fixé à l'avance. En vertu du droit des socié‐ tés, il est d'usage de générer d'abord le bénéfice, et d'ensuite, le distri‐ buer. Afin de fournir au producteur agricole de lait les moyens de pro‐ duction correspondants sur une base continue, des acomptes sont gé‐ Rapport général de la Commission I 77 néralement effectués dans le secteur coopératif et suivi d’un paiement final en fin d'année s'il le montant réel du bénéfice est clair. La référence aux possibilités de contrôle des quantités par la laiterie n'est pas fondée sur une éventuelle violation de la loi de la concur‐ rence. La question des mesures de contrôle interne des quantités de produits laitiers n'est pas une question du droit de la concurrence qui peut être abordée par le Bundeskartellamt. Cela devrait donc rester du domaine de décision de chaque laiterie. La dernière indication du Bundeskartellamt, qui concerne les garan‐ ties des organisations de producteurs, ne tient pas compte du fait que, d'un point de vue historique, avec ou sans reconnaissance officielle, la coopérative est une association de producteurs classique. Par consé‐ quent, dans le passé, certaines coopératives laitières ont été reconnues en vertu de l'ancienne loi régissant la structure du marché. Cependant, cette reconnaissance n'a souvent pas été maintenue sur la base de l'AgrarMSG révisée en raison de l’absence de nécessité. La raison principale en était la suppression des aides publiques destinées aux organisations reconnues de producteurs. Les producteurs agricoles sont toujours libres de créer de nouvelles organisations de pro‐ ducteurs. Il est également possible, pour les coopératives laitières existantes, de demander le statut d'une organisation de producteurs re‐ connue. Il ne s’agit pas de violations du droit de la concurrence ou de nécessités du droit de la concurrence. Des exceptions au droit de la concurrence existent dans les deux cas, à savoir, sans reconnaissance étatique de l'organisation de producteurs au § 28 GWB ou avec une telle reconnaissance au § 5 AgrarMSG. (3) Procédures de sanctions administratives En outre, dans le secteur agricole, il y a eu un certain nombre de pro‐ cédures de sanctions administratives pour violation de l'interdiction des ententes, en particulier pour fixation illicite de prix. Il s'agit géné‐ ralement de secteurs en aval de la production primaire, par exemple les céréales/moulins, les usines de sucre, etc. Un autre exemple est la procédure des sanctions administratives dans le secteur du sucre, qui a conduit à des amendes élevées en 2014 pour des allégations d'en‐ Rapport général de la Commission I 78 tente régionale37. En principe, seul le droit national de la concurrence a été appliqué dans ces procédures. France L'Autorité de la concurrence (ADLC) a mené des activités consultatives intensives, soit de sa propre initiative ou, soit à la demande des autorités et des organisations professionnelles. Elle a été en faveur de recours plus fré‐ quents à des instruments juridiques pour renforcer la position des pro‐ ducteurs dans la chaîne alimentaire, en particulier pour plus de solutions contractuelles, de fusions et de structures communautaires pour le déve‐ loppement de labels de qualité. Dans ce contexte, les accords sur les prix sont également tabous. Les producteurs sont décrits comme des acteurs économiquement et juridiquement indépendants, c'est pourquoi ils doivent fixer leurs propres prix. Dans le domaine du contrôle des fusions, l'ADLC a toujours approuvé les fusions dans le secteur agricole, en particulier dans le domaine des coopératives, afin de renforcer le pouvoir de négociation des producteurs vis-à-vis de leurs acheteurs. Des intégrations verticales ont également été approuvées, en particulier dans le secteur laitier. Comme il a déjà été mentionné, la pratique est très restrictive en ce qui concerne l'analyse des ententes de la concurrence. En particulier, l'ADLC a interdit les ententes dans les litiges de farines et de l’endive. L'affaire Endives38 mérite une attention particulière car elle a été portée avec succès devant la Cour d'appel de Paris39. L'ADLC a fait appel de cette décision devant la Cour de cassation. Cette dernière a renvoyé l'affaire devant la CJUE pour une décision préliminaire. L'avocat général Wahl a présenté ses conclusions le 6 avril 201740. L'arrêt de la CJUE devrait être d'une grande importance, car il pourrait déterminer la portée des exceptions du 37 Voir sous le lien suivant : http://www.bundeskartellamt.de/Shared Docs/ Meldung/DE/Pressemitteilungen/2014/18_02_2014_Zucker.html. 38 Décision de l’ADLC 12-D-08 du 6 mars 2012, Secteur de la production et de la commercialisation des endives. 39 Arrêt du 15 mai 2014 de la Cour d’appel de Paris, Pôle 5 – Chambre 5-7, http://w ww. autoritedelaconcurrence.fr/doc/ca_12d08.pdf – voir Catherine Del Cont, L’arrêt de la Cour d’appel de Paris du 14 mai 2014, « l’affaire endives » : quels enseignements pour l’avenir de la « relation spéciale » entre agriculture et concur‐ rence ?, Rivista di diritto agrario 2015, Fascicolo II, S. 84-109. 40 Voir aussi I.4 et IV du rapport présent. Rapport général de la Commission I 79 droit rural dans le cadre du droit de la concurrence. Cela implique aussi que les organisations de producteurs aient la possibilité ou l'impossibilité d'améliorer leur position sur le marché. Dans l’affaire Endives, les réactions des parties concernées à la décision de l'ADLC sont d'un intérêt particulier. Des arguments critiques ont été avancés par le secteur agricole : La production de légumes et de fruits tra‐ verse une crise considérable, notamment en raison de la pression sur les prix exercés par les acheteurs. La décision a été prise à un moment inop‐ portun car la position des organisations de producteurs devait être ren‐ forcée dans le cadre de la réforme de la PAC. La décision contredit les ef‐ forts visant à renforcer la position des organisations communes des mar‐ chés (OCM) du Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013. La Cour d'appel de Paris a pris une position contraire à celle de l'ADLC. Elle a placé la poursuite des objectifs de l'art. 39 du TFUE audessus de la poursuite des objectifs de la politique des consommateurs et de la politique de concurrence. Elle a annulé la décision de l'ADLC et donc également les amendes de 3,6 millions d'euros dans son arrêt du 6 mars 2012. Selon le rapport français, la Cour d'appel de Paris a pris posi‐ tion contre l'avis des organes de l'UE, qui considèrent que le droit de la concurrence prime sur le droit agricole à la lumière de l'art. 42 du TFUE et du Règlement (CE) N° 1184/2006. Il s'agit d'un changement de paradigme par rapport au principe de l'applicabilité du droit de la concurrence, limitée par des exceptions de politique agricole. Pour justifier la fixation du prix minima, la Cour d'appel de Paris s'est fondée sur une loi française de 1962 et sur des règlementations antérieures de l'UE, compte tenu du droit tem‐ porellement applicable au litige. Selon le rapport national, l'argument le plus intéressant et le plus inhabituel est que l'objectif d'une sécurité de re‐ venu adéquate conformément à l'art. 39, al. 1, let. b, du TFUE peut en soi justifier la fixation de prix minima. Ce point de vue contredit l'application antérieure du droit et de la jurisprudence au niveau de l'UE. Sur le recours de l'ADLC, la Cour de Cassation a dû traiter la décision de la Cour d'appel de Paris. Un arrêt a été rendu le 8 décembre 2015, par lequel la Cour a renvoyé une demande de décision préliminaire à la CJUE41. La deuxième question essentielle est de savoir si les règles établies dans les différents règlements de l'UE concernant les organisations de producteurs, les orga‐ 41 Décision N° 1056 du 8.12.2015 (disponible sous le lien : www.autoritedelaconcurr ence.fr/doc/ cass_endives_12d08.pdf). Rapport général de la Commission I 80 nisations interprofessionnelles et les organisations d'opérateurs (notam‐ ment le Règlement (CE) N° 11822007 et le Règlement (CE) N° 1234/2007) qui ont des objectifs pour ces organisations agricoles, et qui comprennent la règlementation des prix de la production et l'adaptati‐ on de l'offre à la demande quantitative, doit être interprétée de telle sorte que les pratiques de fixation de prix minima collectifs et les ententes re‐ strictives sur les quantités de produits à mettre sur le marché et l'échange d'informations stratégiques, échappent à l'interdiction des ententes de la concurrence lorsqu'ils servent à la poursuite de ces objectifs. Les conclusions de l'avocat général Wahl du 6 avril 201742 sur la deu‐ xième question décisive peuvent être résumées comme suit : les ententes de la concurrence concernant le prix sont anticoncurrentiels, ils nuisent au bon fonctionnement de la concurrence et sont donc en principe illicites. En ce qui concerne le groupage de quantités pour stabiliser les prix, ce dernier est autorisé dans la mesure où il a lieu dans le cadre d'une entente interne, mais pas dans le cadre d'une entente de la concurrence avec des tiers. L'échange d'informations stratégiques est admis sous certaines conditions, notamment lorsque le marché est peu concentré, lorsque l'information est publique et agrégée, qu'elle n'est pas liée à la formation de prix et qu'elle ne permet pas de déterminer indirectement les frais du fournisseur. Le rapport national porte un regard critique sur la prise de position de l'avocat général Wahl, car il n'apporterait pas de clarification définitive. Il critique, en particulier, le fait que l'avocat général reprend la doctrine de la fixation des prix indépendamment de la situation propre au droit rural. Se‐ lon lui, l'art. 209 du Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013 n'interdit que les prix fixes, mais pas les prix minima, qui permettent des prix plus élevés et ne conduisent donc pas à des prix uniformes. Dans ces circonstances, les me‐ sures relatives aux prix ont été limitées à tort aux secteurs du lait, de l'hui‐ le d'olive et de la viande de bœuf. Le rapport national porte également un regard critique sur la distinction entre le regroupement interne et externe des quantités. Royaume-Uni Les exploitations agricoles atteignent très rarement des parts de marché si‐ gnificatives (à l'exception des productions spécialisées de céréales). Il n'y a donc pratiquement pas de problèmes antitrust au niveau des producteurs 42 Avocat général Wahl (note 34). Rapport général de la Commission I 81 dans le cadre de la coopération. Dans un document de l'OFT (Office of Fair Trading) de 2011, il n’est pas fait référence à des affaires de concur‐ rence liées à des opérations agricoles depuis l'introduction du CA (Compe‐ tition Act) en 1998, ce qui justifie en soi la conclusion que les exploitati‐ ons agricoles, qui sont dans leur ensemble petites, n'ont pas d'impact signi‐ ficatif sur le marché. Ces dernières années, la fusion prévue entre Dairy Crest et Muller a donné lieu à des enquêtes de l'Autorité de la concurrence et des marchés (Competition and Markets Authority; CMA). Une deuxième étape de l'en‐ quête était envisagée si Muller n'avait pas pris les mesures appropriées. Il y avait des craintes que Muller et Arla soient les seuls acheteurs de lait ap‐ rès leur fusion qui atteindrait une taille suffisante pour approvisionner les supermarchés. Cela aurait pu entraîner une hausse des prix pour les con‐ sommateurs. La contrepartie de cet argument est que ce changement pour‐ rait conduire à la stabilité et à un marché laitier plus durable au Royaume- Uni. Après avoir accepté de transformer du lait pour un plus petit concur‐ rent, le long processus a été terminé. Muller a acquis l'entreprise laitière de Dairy Crest. Cette acquisition suit l'achat de Robert Wiseman Dairies par Muller en 2012. Il faut également mentionner que la coopérative laitière Arla couvre plusieurs États membres. Celle-ci a acquis Milk Link, une société coopé‐ rative créée pour développer une activité principalement coopérative au Royaume-Uni. Au départ, la Commission européenne s'inquiétait de la ré‐ duction de la concurrence à long terme. Lorsque ce problème a été clarifié, la fusion a pu être réalisée. Arla et Muller sont, sans aucun doute, les deux principaux acteurs qui ont consolidé le marché du lait au Royaume-Uni, ce qui explique pourquoi la CMA et la Commission européenne ont vu des problèmes en matière de concurrence. Bien qu'Arla détienne une part significative de propriété qui se trouve entre les mains des producteurs, le défi consiste en ce que les producteurs de lait ont une position faible sur le marché et qu'Arla influ‐ ence le prix des produits de ceux-ci. Pays-Bas Le rapport du pays met en évidence le nombre relativement élevé de pro‐ cédures et mentionne spécifiquement les cas suivants : • les procédures administratives et civiles antitrust concernant le paprika, les oignons grelot, les pépinières et le cas Greenery/Oussoren ; Rapport général de la Commission I 82 • les procédures de contrôle des fusions : Bloemenveiling Aalsmeer/ FloraHolland ; Tradition – WestVeg – Unistar – Brassica-Group ; Van Drie/Alpuro ; • les procédures d'information informelles : Kompany ; FresQ ; Van Na‐ ture & Best of Four ; • cas dans le domaine de la durabilité : accord sur la résistance aux anti‐ biotiques en élevage animal ; castration des porcs sous anesthésie ; Chicken of Tomorrow. (1) D'après le rapport néerlandais, le cas du poivron, cas qui s’est pour‐ suivi sur une longue période, présente un intérêt particulier : L'affaire a commencé en 2009 avec une demande de clémence et s'est terminée, en 2016, par un compromis. Il concernait la coordination des prix quotidiens et hebdomadaires, le partage du marché et l'éch‐ ange de données sensibles entre trois organisations de producteurs re‐ connues dans le secteur des fruits et légumes. L'autorité néerlandaise de la concurrence (Autoriteit Consument en Markt ; ACM) a conclu que les organisations de producteurs ont violé à la fois l'interdiction de cartels néerlandais et l'interdiction de cartels de l'UE. Cette opini‐ on a été confirmée par le tribunal de district de Rotterdam. Quatre aspects rendent ce cas particulièrement intéressant. Première‐ ment, les trois organisations de producteurs ont utilisé les services d'une société de conseil agricole pour coordonner leur conduite. Cette société a été classée, en vertu de l’arrêt fiduciaire de la CJUE, comme faisant partie de l'entente cartellaire. Deuxièmement, deux des organi‐ sations de producteurs ont fait valoir qu'elles avaient en fait agi en tant qu'association d'organisations de producteurs et avaient donc été exemptées de l'interdiction de l'entente cartellaire. L'ACM ne l'a pas suivi parce qu'il ne s'agissait pas d'une association reconnue par le droit de l'UE. Troisièmement, l'ACM a limité le marché en question en tant que marché néerlandais des poivrons pendant la « saison néer‐ landaise ». En raison de cette définition plutôt étroite du marché, le comportement en cause a eu un impact significatif sur la concurrence. Quatrièmement, ACM a fondé le calcul des amendes de l'entente sur l'agrégation du chiffre d'affaires des membres individuels et des orga‐ nisations de producteurs concernés. Au cours de la procédure, ACM a dû réduire le montant des amendes parce qu’elles n'auraient pas pu être payées. Les producteurs avaient tous quitté les organisations de producteurs pénalisées, de sorte que les organisations de producteurs Rapport général de la Commission I 83 ne disposaient plus de ressources financières. ACM a alors exigé que les anciens producteurs participent aux amendes payées par les orga‐ nisations de producteurs. (2) Le rapporteur se penche plus en détail sur le cas d’oignon grelot : Sur la base de soupçons officiels initiaux, ACM a conclu que cinq en‐ treprises néerlandaises qui produisaient, commercialisaient et vendai‐ ent des oignons grelots, ont violé l'interdiction de l'entente néerlandai‐ se et l'interdiction de l'entente de l'UE en parvenant à un accord sur la superficie de terre cultivable maximale des oignons grelots. Cette en‐ tente cartellaire, originellement, a été conclu au sein de la Silver Oni‐ on Growers' Cooperative. Après la dissolution de cette coopérative en 2003, l'entente cartellaire a été reconduite par ses anciens membres. En outre, les membres de l'entente ont repris les installations des pro‐ ducteurs d'oignons grelots qui avaient cessé leur production. De cette manière, l'entrée sur le marché de nouveaux producteurs a été empêchée et l'accord sur les superficies cultivées a été renforcé. De plus, pendant plusieurs années, les entreprises concernées se sont in‐ formées mutuellement concernant les prix qu'elles demandaient à leurs acheteurs pour les oignons grelots. L'une des sociétés concernées a invoqué l'exemption de l'entente de la concurrence dans le domaine de l'agriculture. Cet argument a été reje‐ té parce que les conditions de l'exception n'étaient pas remplies. L'ac‐ cord n'est donc pas nécessaire pour atteindre les objectifs de la PAC. En particulier, l'objectif de parvenir à des prix à la consommation rai‐ sonnable a été compromis. Les sociétés ont également souligné que la coopérative avait agi comme organisation de producteurs au sens de l'organisation du marché commun de l'agriculture. Mais, la coopérati‐ ve n’ayant pas été reconnue par l’État comme organisation de pro‐ ducteurs, cet argument ne s’appliquait également pas. Suisse Dans l'ensemble, la Suisse dispose d'une vaste expérience en matière de droit de la concurrence dans le domaine de l'agriculture. Elle remonte es‐ sentiellement à plus de dix ans43. Depuis 2007, la priorité est accordée aux affaires de contrôle des fusions. On trouvera ci-après une affaire qui a dé‐ 43 Voir la vue d'ensemble de la pratique antitrust dans le domaine de l'agriculture en Suisse par Jürg Niklaus/Benjamin Zünd, Flurbegehung durch das schweizerische Rapport général de la Commission I 84 clenché une intervention de l'autorité de la concurrence (Migros/Denner AG). Préalablement, un cas sur le contrôle du pouvoir de marché est pré‐ senté (commerce des œufs). (1) commerce des œufs Suite à une plainte déposée par la productrice de fourrage Egli AG en 2008, le Secrétariat de la Commission de la concurrence a traité le commerce des œufs dans le cadre d'une enquête préliminaire44. Celleci a révélé que Lüchinger + Schmid AG ne détenait une position do‐ minante au sens de l'art. 7 LCart, ni seule, ni collectivement avec d'autres distributeurs d'œufs, à savoir Frigemo AG et Ei AG. L'autori‐ té a justifié la décision par des symétries insuffisantes, un manque de transparence du marché et les stratégies différentes des trois sociétés. Cette constatation s'applique même si l'existence d'une concurrence sur le marché du commerce de détail en aval est niée. De plus, l'ac‐ cord entre Lüchinger + Schmid SA et les producteurs d'œufs sur l'ali‐ mentation animale n'a pas été qualifié d’entente irrecevable de la con‐ currence au sens de l'art. 5 LCart. (2) Migros/Denner AG En 2007, Migros a notifié à la Commission de la concurrence le pro‐ jet de fusion avec Denner AG45. L'enquête préliminaire de la Com‐ mission prévoyait un affaiblissement substantiel de la concurrence à la suite de la fusion. Une perspective globale n'a pas fourni de preu‐ ves suffisantes de l'existence d'une position dominante des parties. Bi‐ en que l'analyse de marché de Migros/Denner AG et Coop ait abouti à une position dominante collective, l'autorité de concurrence a autorisé la fusion sous réserve de conditions basées sur le principe de la pro‐ Agrarkartellrecht, Schweizerische Juristen-Zeitung (SJZ) 2015, 1–10, 5 ss. La sur‐ veillance des marchés agricoles en vertu de la législation antitrust traite générale‐ ment le problème de la supervision des fournisseurs et clients dominants dans l'agriculture ou du contrôle des efforts de regroupement des paysans. La vue d’en‐ semble est donc divisée en deux parties : d'une part, la surveillance antitrust des étapes amont et aval de l'agriculture et, d'autre part, la surveillance antitrust de l'agriculture. 44 Recht und Politik des Wettbewerbs (RPW) 2011/2, 230. 45 RPW 2008/1, 129; cf. Bischofszell Nahrungsmittel AG/Weisenhorn Food Specia‐ lities GmbH, RPW 2010/1, 184. Rapport général de la Commission I 85 portionnalité. Celles-ci devraient garantir l'indépendance opérati‐ onnelle et la marque Denner pendant une certaine période de temps. Espagne Au cours des dix dernières années, il y a eu principalement des procédures administratives. En vertu du droit national de la concurrence, le Conseil du marché et de la concurrence (Consejo de los Mercados y de la Competen‐ cia ; CNMC) a notamment statué sur la production laitière (arrêt du 3 mars 2015) et sur la viande de lapin (arrêt du 14 juin 2011). En vertu du droit de l'UE de la concurrence, une fusion dans l'industrie sucrière, en particulier, a été décidée46. Synthèse des rapporteurs généraux Les rapports nationaux montrent que le nombre de procédures administra‐ tives et judiciaires en matière de droit de la concurrence dans le domaine de l'agriculture varie considérablement, bien qu’elles aient été particulière‐ ment importantes au cours des dix dernières années. Le plus grand nombre d'affaires sont décrites dans le rapport néerlandais, tandis que le rapport britannique se contente de mentionner les procédures de fusion. Certaines de ces procédures ont été menées en vertu de la législation antitrust natio‐ nale et d'autres en vertu de la législation antitrust de l'UE. Dans ces procé‐ dures la loi de la concurrence dans le domaine de l'agriculture a, à plu‐ sieurs reprises, joué un rôle. L'accent est mis sur les entente de la concurence qui conduisent à une restriction de la concurrence, dont la plupart ont été déclarés illicites, en particulier lorsqu'ils sont en rapport avec la fixation des prix. En revanche, les procédures de contrôle des fusions n'ont guère entraîné d'interdictions. Les autorités de concurrence ont principalement considéré que les fusions étaient justifiées pour renforcer la position concurrentielle des partenaires de la fusion. Au Royaume-Uni, cela s'applique notamment aux fusions entre Crest et Muller et entre Arla et Milk Link, qui ont entraîné l'acquisi‐ tion des activités laitières, ce qui a conduit à une certaine consolidation du marché laitier. En Suisse, l'accent a été mis sur les projets de fusion dans le commerce des œufs et entre Migros, le plus grand détaillant, et Denner AG, le discounter. Dans quelques cas de fusion, au moins certaines condi‐ tions devaient être remplies. 46 TJUE Aa. c.415/2001, décision du 20.11.2003. Rapport général de la Commission I 86 L'affaire Endives en France est particulièrement importante. En effet, contrairement à l'autorité de la concurrence, le tribunal de première instan‐ ce français a estimé que la réalisation de l'objectif d'une sécurité adéquate des revenus dans le cadre de la politique agricole de l’UE (art. 34 al. 1 let. b TFUE) pourrait également justifier des accords sur les prix et les quantités. La Cour de cassation, auprès de qui a été fait recours de la déci‐ sion de la Cour d'appel de Paris, a introduit une procédure préjudicielle devant la CJUE pour clarifier des questions. L'avocat général n'a pas pu suivre sans distinction les conclusions de la Cour d'appel. Il n'a considéré comme légal que le regroupement de l'offre au sein des coopératives (cf. également ch. I.4 ci-avant et ch. IV ci-après pour l'arrêt de la CJUE). Le rapport national de l'Allemagne présente le cas du processus pilote dans une laiterie dans le domaine des relations d'approvisionnement. La position du Bundeskartellamt est particulièrement controversée. Selon cet office, les relations exclusives, c'est-à-dire l’obligation que les producteurs livrent le lait dans son intégralité et l'obligation pour les laiteries d'accep‐ ter le lait dans son intégralité, sont trop restrictives en vertu du droit de la concurrence, ainsi que les délais de préavis de deux ans pour le retrait des coopératives de producteurs. Le secteur s'oppose à ce point de vue et se montre convaincu que ces ententes de la concurrence peuvent être con‐ sidérées comme licites parce ce que les arguments de droit agraire ont priorité sur les arguments de droit de la concurrence. Aux Pays-Bas, le cas du poivron est mis en évidence. L'autorité natio‐ nale de la concurrence a conclu que les organisations de producteurs avai‐ ent passé des accords de prix illicites. En particulier, l'autorité a rejeté l'ar‐ gument avancé par les organisations de producteurs selon lequel elles avaient, en fait, agi en tant qu'association d'organisations de producteurs, de sorte que l'interdiction des ententes de la concurrence ne s'appliquerait pas. De même, l'autorité n'a pas accepté l'argument selon lequel le marché concerné était trop étroitement défini en se limitant au territoire des Pays- Bas. D'un autre point de vue, également remarquable, dans le cas de l'oignon grelot, l'autorité de la concurrence considère contraire à la législa‐ tion antitrust, la poursuite des accords de coopération sur les surfaces ma‐ ximales des anciens membres de la coopérative après la dissolution de la coopérative. Rapport général de la Commission I 87 Règlementation et projets sur les pratiques déloyales dans le domaine de la chaîne alimentaire Votre pays dispose-t-il de normes juridiques ou d’un code de comporte‐ ment non contraignant relatifs aux pratiques déloyales dans le domaine de la chaîne alimentaire (p.ex. par rapport à la détermination des prix des produits agricoles) ? Considérez-vous qu'une règlementation à de telles pratiques déloyales comme utile et si oui, que devrait contenir cette règlementation ? Bulgarie La loi sur la protection du consommateur couvre les pratiques commercia‐ les déloyales. Un long chemin a été parcouru en vue de la protection des droits des consommateurs. Depuis 2003, l'ensemble de la législation de l'UE a été adopté successivement. Le comportement antidumping est cou‐ vert par la loi sur la protection de la concurrence. Aucun cas d'infraction agricole n'est apparu au cours des dix dernières années. Allemagne La GWB et la loi sur la concurrence déloyale (UWG) contiennent toutes deux des dispositions sur les pratiques injustes. Dans le cadre de la sur‐ veillance des abus, le § 20 de la GWB règlemente les comportements illi‐ cites pour les entreprises ayant un pouvoir relatif ou supérieur sur le mar‐ ché. Cela inclut également l'interdiction de vendre des aliments à un prix inférieur au prix coûtant (§ 20 al. 3 GWB). Une telle vente n'est autorisée que si une justification factuelle – par exemple le caractère périssable de l'aliment – peut être prouvée. La loi UWG contient des dispositions ex‐ haustives d'interdiction s’appliquant à l'ensemble des activités commercia‐ les déloyales, agressives ou trompeuses. Celles-ci établissent également des règlements sur l'application des réclamations ainsi que des dispositi‐ ons sur les amendes et même pénales. Ces règles s'appliquent à toutes les entreprises, quelle que soit leur activité, il n’en est pas de spécifiques à l'agriculture. Cela n'est pas nécessaire en raison de l'ensemble des disposi‐ tions légales. Selon le rapport allemand, il ne faut pas de règlementations supplémentaires. Cependant, il faut veiller à ce qu'il n'y ait pas de distorsi‐ ons de concurrence dans le commerce international en raison de l'absence de règlementations volontaires ou légales. 6. Rapport général de la Commission I 88 Royaume-Uni Un apport important, en particulier pour les producteurs, est le Code ali‐ mentaire et le bureau de l'arbitre pour le Code alimentaire. Bien avant la création de cette institution en 2013, les grands supermarchés ont fait l'ob‐ jet d'importantes critiques à l'égard du traitement des fournisseurs – sou‐ vent de nombreuses petites entreprises. Des faits sont apparus, tels que les retards de paiement et les escomptes de livraison. L'arbitre a été créé pour superviser les relations entre les supermarchés et leurs fournisseurs conformément au Code alimentaire. Cette règlemen‐ tation n'affecte pas directement les producteurs, car il est rare qu'ils appro‐ visionnent directement les revendeurs. Néanmoins, une consultation a été menée en janvier 2017, afin d'étendre le mandat de l'arbitre aux petits pro‐ ducteurs. Les réponses sont au stade de l'évaluation. L'arbitre, Mme Chris‐ tine Tacon CBE, a mis en garde contre des attentes trop ambitieuses comp‐ te tenu des préoccupations identiques des fournisseurs. Le traitement des plaintes concernant les prix est hors de sa compétence. Elle ne peut que vérifier les termes du contrat. La formation des prix est laissé au marché. Nous attendons avec impatience les prochaines étapes pour voir comment les règles affecteront non seulement les producteurs, les transformateurs et les détaillants, mais aussi les nombreuses entreprises qui opèrent entre les producteurs et les consommateurs finaux. Suite à la récente crise dans le secteur laitier, un code a été introduit dans ce secteur visant à établir des règles de base en accord avec les pro‐ ducteurs et les transformateurs. Cependant, le fait que le code est volon‐ taire démontre que malgré les lacunes existantes, le gouvernement n'est pas disposé à intervenir dans le marché libre. Italie Il est fait référence à l'art. 62 du Law Decree 1/2012. Cette règlementation de la chaîne alimentaire va au-delà de la règlementation contractuelle de l'organisation commune de marché et n'est donc pas entièrement compati‐ ble avec celle-ci. Pays-Bas Il n'existait qu'une seule procédure pilote visant à élaborer un code de pra‐ tiques commerciales équitables pour les produits agricoles (Gedragscode eerlijke handelspraktijken agrofood). Selon le ministre des affaires écono‐ miques, le projet pilote n'a pas révélé de problèmes sérieux. Rapport général de la Commission I 89 Autriche En Autriche, il n'existe pas de règlementation spécifique au sujet de la chaîne alimentaire. Les règles générales du droit antitrust, de la concur‐ rence et de la loyauté commerciale s'appliquent. Le rapport autrichien sa‐ lue le règlementation-cadre de l’UE sur les pratiques commerciales dé‐ loyales. Un « code de conduite » devrait en particulier contenir les élé‐ ments suivants : transfert de risques, pratiques commerciales, atteinte non objective à la liberté de décision, interdiction de l'exploitation abusive. Pologne La Pologne dispose d'une loi de 2006, sur des mesures contre l’exploitati‐ on déloyale des avantages contractuels dans le commerce avec les produits agricoles et alimentaires. La loi interdit aux acheteurs et aux fournisseurs d'utiliser les avantages contractuels de manière déloyale. Le législateur po‐ lonais considère que l'exploitation des avantages contractuels est injuste si elle porte atteinte aux bonnes mœurs et met en danger ou viole les intérêts essentiels de l'autre partie. L'art. 7 al. 3 de la loi traite l'exploitation dé‐ loyale des pratiques contractuelles. Le comportement concurrentiel déloy‐ al est enregistrés par le président de l'Office de la concurrence et de la pro‐ tection des consommateurs. Suisse La Suisse n'a pas de règlementation légale contre les pratiques déloyales dans la chaîne alimentaire. La loi fédérale contre la concurrence déloyale de 1986 (LCD) est applicable. Cependant, il existe des approches en vue d'un code de conduite non contraignant comme le démontre la fondation de l'Association pour la promotion de la stratégie qualité pour l'agriculture et l'industrie alimentaire le 24 novembre 201647. Les acteurs signataires sont convaincus que l'alimentation suisse doit être de qualité intégrale. C'est la seule façon de répondre aux besoins des consommateurs et de réa‐ lisier le positionnement des produits sur les marchés. Selon l'association, cet objectif est plus facilement atteint si des partenariats sont conclus et maintenus au sein de la chaîne de valeur. Les membres soussignés ont si‐ gné une charte qui fait certaines déclarations de base visant à un leader‐ ship fort et, en matière de qualité, à un réel partenariat et à une offensive commune sur le marché. Une certaine réglementation des pratiques dé‐ 47 Pour plus d’informations, voir : www.qualitaetsstrategie.ch. Rapport général de la Commission I 90 loyales semble raisonnable. Des approches prudentes peuvent être trou‐ vées dans la réglementation des contrats (cf. art. 8 al. 1bis et art. 37 LAgr). Espagne La loi (12/2013) sur les mesures vise à améliorer le fonctionnement de la chaîne alimentaire (ley para medidas para la mejora para la mejora del funcionamiento de la cadena alimentaria ; LMFCA). Elle identifie les pra‐ tiques commerciales déloyales et prévoit également des mesures adminis‐ tratives en plus des sanctions civiles. Cette loi est concrétisée par un décret et un code de bonne conduite. Il s'agit notamment d'un accord-cadre. L'AI‐ CA, un Bureau du Ministère de l'Agriculture, de l'Alimentation et de l'En‐ vironnement (Ministerio de Agricultura, Alimentación y Medio Ambien‐ te ; MAPAMA), est responsable de son application. Dans la pratique, on s'attend à des effets très positifs sur le fonctionnement de la chaîne alimen‐ taire. Jusqu'à présent, seul un rapport sur les inspections et les contrôles est disponible jusqu'au 30 juin 2017. Synthèse des rapporteurs généraux Les rapports des différents États montrent que les règlementations spécifi‐ ques à la chaîne alimentaire ne sont pas très répandues. La Pologne et l'Es‐ pagne, en particulier, disposent d'une loi à cet effet, qui est concrétisée par un code de bonne conduite. Les rapports des autres pays se réfèrent princi‐ palement au droit antitrust et au droit de la concurrence déloyale, qui rè‐ glementent les pratiques commerciales déloyales en général, et non uni‐ quement dans l'agriculture. Les institutions juridiques spéciales contre les pratiques commerciales déloyales comprennent l'interdiction des ventes à perte (particulièrement soulignée dans le rapport national allemand) et le Code alimentaire en collaboration avec l'arbitre alimentaire, qui est chargé de surveiller les relations entre les fournisseurs et les grands supermarchés (Royaume-Uni). Le sens ou la nécessité d'une règlementation de l'UE sur la question en l'espèce n'est que rarement salué (Autriche). En Suisse, on s'efforce d'éta‐ blir un code de conduite non contraignant de droit privé. Rapport général de la Commission I 91 Droit des cartels agricoles de l’Union Européenne Nombre d'organisations de producteurs reconnues, leurs groupements, et associations professionnelles De combien d'organisations de producteurs reconnues, d’associations d'organisations de producteurs et d’organisations interprofessionnelles re‐ connues, au sens du Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013, dispose votre pays ? (le cas échéant, détaillez par secteurs) Existe-il des statistiques officielles ou un registre public les concernant ? Allemagne Les organisations de producteurs et leurs associations ainsi que les organi‐ sations interprofessionnelles reconnues en vertu du Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013 peuvent être consultées dans le registre des organisations agricoles sous le lien https://aoreg.ble.de/agrarorganisationen/. Ce lien permet d’identifier les organisations agricoles reconnues dans leur ensem‐ ble ou par secteur. D'après ces données, 642 organisations agricoles sont actuellement re‐ connues en Allemagne. Les chiffres suivants sont spécifiques à des domai‐ nes de produits sélectionnés : lait 163 ; céréales 138 ; vin 99 ; pommes de terre 52 ; bœuf 43 ; fruits et légumes 31. Le registre contient également les associations d'organisations de producteurs reconnues. Une seule associa‐ tion industrielle est reconnue en Allemagne laquelle se situe dans le sec‐ teur du sucre. Dans les secteurs du lait et du vin, la création d'associations professionnelles a jusqu'à présent été discutée sans succès. Royaume-Uni Dans le domaine de la production animale, peu d'efforts ont été faits jus‐ qu'à maintenant pour mettre en place des organisations de producteurs. Aucune organisation de producteurs de ce type ne figure dans les statisti‐ ques officielles et les registres des organisations agricoles. Le rapport na‐ tional mentionne un cas dans lequel le rapporteur a été chargé par un grou‐ pe de producteurs de lait de préparer la création d'une organisation de pro‐ ducteurs. Finalement, les producteurs de lait ont décidé que la tâche com‐ plexe de créer une organisation de producteurs ne serait pas suffisamment bénéfique. L'une des premières organisations de producteurs à avoir été créées était Dairy Crest Direct. Elle a été officiellement reconnue en 2015 et représen‐ B. 1. Rapport général de la Commission I 92 tait 1 050 producteurs de lait. Suite à la fusion du département lait de Dairy Crest avec Muller, il y a eu alors scission en deux organisations de producteurs. L'un fournit du lait cru à Muller, tandis que l'autre livre du lait cru pour la transformation au sein de Dairy Crest. Les organisations de producteurs dans le secteur de la pêche et, en par‐ ticulier dans le secteur des céréales et des fleurs, ont plus de succès. Le site web gov.uk répertorie 33 organisations de producteurs actifs dans ces secteurs pour 2015. Il est probablement plus facile de créer une organisati‐ on de producteurs basée sur le partage de machines spéciales, la standardi‐ sation des procédures ou la commercialisation conjointe de céréales que d'essayer d'en créer une dans le domaine des différents systèmes d'élevage. Italie Ces organisations sont répertoriées sur le site web du ministère italien de l'agriculture. Pays-Bas Il y a 14 organisations de producteurs et 9 organisations interprofessi‐ onnelles. Cependant, il n'y a pas d'associations. Il n'existe pas de statisti‐ ques officielles ni de registre accessible au public. Autriche Les organisations de producteurs reconnues suivantes existent : Fruits/ légumes 10, céréales 4, céréales et pommes de terre 2, pomme de terre 1, porcs 5, bovins 8, ovins et caprins 1, volaille 1, fleurs 1, œufs 1, vin 1. Aucune association professionnelle reconnue n'a été créée jusqu'à présent. Cependant, une association dans le secteur des fruits et légumes est en cours de création. Pologne Il existe différents registres publics d'organisations agricoles reconnues. Jusqu'à la fin août 2017, l'Agence pour la restructuration et la modernisati‐ on de l'agriculture (Agency for Restructuring and Modernization of Agri‐ culture) était responsable de la gestion des registres. Depuis le 1er septem‐ bre 2017, le président de cette agence est responsable de la tenue des re‐ gistres. Il existe également une liste de 341 organisations et groupements de producteurs pré audités. Rapport général de la Commission I 93 Suisse La Suisse n’est pas membre de l'UE et ne dispose pas d'un système com‐ parable pour les organisations agricoles reconnues. Il n'existe pas de systè‐ me de reconnaissance au sens d'un examen ex ante. Par conséquent, il n’y a pas de statistiques ni de registre officiels du nombre d'organisations de producteurs et d'organisations sectorielles présentes. Espagne Le nombre d'organisations de producteurs reconnues, de leurs associations et d'organisations interprofessionnelles varie selon les secteurs de produits. Il existe des réglementations et des registres publics dans le MAPAMA pour les organisations agricoles dans les secteurs des fruits et légumes, du lait et du tabac. Synthèse des rapporteurs généraux Certains pays ont des registres officiels ou des statistiques sur les organi‐ sations agricoles reconnues qui sont accessibles au public. Dans ces pays, le nombre d'organisations agricoles et leur répartition est donc relative‐ ment facile à déterminer, même si, dans certains cas, seuls quelques secteurs ou types d'organisations agricoles sont couverts. Plusieurs autres pays ne disposent pas de tels instruments, de sorte qu'il n'est pas possible de donner une vue d'ensemble précise du nombre. Ceci s'applique égale‐ ment aux associations de producteurs et branches existantes en Suisse. Dérogation à l'interdiction des cartels pour les organisations agricoles reconnues Au sens du Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013, jugez-vous les organisations de producteurs reconnues comme libérées seulement de l’interdiction des cartels selon article 101 TFUE ou également libérées de leur interdiction nationale ? Admettons qu’elles ne soient pas libérées de l’interdiction nationale, dans ce cas-là est-ce que cela constitue un problème, et si oui, que propose vot‐ re droit national comme solution ? Allemagne L'exemption des organisations agricoles reconnues en vertu des articles 152 et suivants du Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013 de l'interdiction des en‐ 2. Rapport général de la Commission I 94 tentes et abus de position dominante de l'UE constitue également une ex‐ emption en droit national, car les exigences des règlements juridiques sont largement identiques. L'exemption est également considérée comme une lex specialis en vertu du droit de l'UE. Afin d'assurer le parallélisme de l'exemption, une clarification est ancrée dans le cadre de la réglementation nationale du § 5 AgrarMSG. Pour le secteur des fruits et légumes, un lien correspondant est établi par l’ordonnance d'application des dispositions communautaire concernant les organisations de producteurs dans le sec‐ teur des fruits et légumes (Obst-Gemüse-Erzeugerorganisationendurchfüh‐ rungsverordnung –OGErzeugerOrgDV). Royaume-Uni En ce qui concerne la dérogation à l'interdiction nationale des ententes (chapitre 1 CA 1998), l'annexe 3 assure la protection qui a toujours existé pour les agriculteurs et leurs associations. Toutefois, la CA 1998 n'a pas encore été explicitement adaptée au règlement sur les organisations de producteurs en vertu du droit communautaire. Par contre, l'exception pré‐ vue à l'annexe 3 devrait également s'appliquer à cette constellation. Le Rè‐ glement (UE) N° 1308/2013 est directement applicable au Royaume-Uni et la section 60 de la CA 1998 vise à minimiser les différences entre la lé‐ gislation antitrust de l'UE et la législation antitrust nationale. Dans le con‐ texte du soutien aux organisations de producteurs dans l'UE, il semble dif‐ ficile pour les tribunaux britanniques de compromettre la position antitrust des organisations de producteurs. Italie La dérogation à l'interdiction des ententes est susceptible de résulter du droit communautaire. Il n'y a pas de disposition explicite dans le droit na‐ tional. Pays-Bas L'exemption est fondée sur le droit de l'UE, bien que cela ne soit pas exp‐ licitement réglementé. Il existe également deux autres exceptions de mini‐ mis. Autriche La position particulière découle de l'exception générale de l'entente agri‐ cole du § 2 al. 2 n° 5 KG. Rapport général de la Commission I 95 Pologne L'exemption est obtenue par le biais du droit communautaire. Il n'existe pas d'exemption nationale spécifique. Espagne L'exemption des organisations agricoles reconnues sur la base du Règle‐ ment (UE) 1308/2013 s'applique également au niveau national. L'interpré‐ tation de ce droit par les organes de l'UE est prise en compte. Malheureu‐ sement, l'accent serait mis sur les effets quantitatifs des perspectives des consommateurs plutôt que sur les effets qualitatifs. Synthèse des rapporteurs généraux Ce n'est qu'en Allemagne qu'il existe une exemption nationale explicite des organisations agricoles reconnues. En Autriche et au Royaume-Uni, l'exemption de l'entente découle d'un privilège général de l'entente dans le secteur agricole. Dans les autres pays, le droit de l'UE est appliqué de la même manière, bien qu'une partie de ce droit ne soit pas particulièrement sécurisé du point de vue juridique. Les limites supérieures Jugez-vous les limites supérieures, au sens des articles 149, 169, 170 et 171 du Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013, comme judicieuses ? Est-ce que les dispositions sur les quantités arrêtées et communiquées sont appliquées dans la pratique, avant tout par la communication des quantités concentrées ? Bulgarie Par rapport à l'art. 149 (lait), la limite supérieure est considérée comme in‐ suffisante. La limite supérieure par rapport à l'art. 169 (produits oléicoles) n'est pas pertinente car ces produits sont absents. Il en est de même pour la limite supérieure de l'art. 170 (viande bovine), dont la production est très faible. En ce qui concerne l'art. 171 (grandes cultures), il est indiqué que la production est deux fois plus importante que les besoins de la Bulgarie. Les accords auraient donc un impact très important sur la concurrence. Les instruments visant à éviter la concentration et la domination du mar‐ ché sont également mentionnés. Ils sont utilisés par le biais de mécanis‐ mes procéduraux spéciaux pour les facteurs de production primaire indivi‐ 3. Rapport général de la Commission I 96 duels (en particulier les terres cultivées). L'art. 37 de la loi sur la propriété et l'utilisation des terres rurales (ALOUA) est cité en particulier. Allemagne Les limites supérieures prévues dans les articles 149, 169, 170 et 171 sont appropriées et également recommandées afin d'éviter que des produits spécifiques soient regroupés dans une seule main. Le respect de la limite supérieure dans le secteur laitier (art. 149) fera l'objet d'un contrôle spéci‐ fique. Cela vient du fait que les organisations de producteurs reconnues font un rapport sur les quantités groupées de lait cru. Dans les autres secteurs, la pratique à moins de signification. Cependant, d’après l'avis du rapport de pays, une limite supérieure spécifique à un produit a, en princi‐ pe, du sens. Royaume-Uni La limite supérieure de l'art. 149 (lait) n'est pas difficile à atteindre car les organisations de producteurs du secteur laitier sont très petites. En princi‐ pe, la limite spéciale de 33 pour cent permet d'obtenir une part importante de marché. Toute organisation de producteurs détenant une telle part de marché sera en mesure d'obtenir une augmentation de prix spécifique ou au moins un prix plus élevé. En raison de la nature spécifique du produit – en particulier au Royaume-Uni, où environ la moitié du lait cru est trans‐ formée en lait de consommation – il est difficile de dicter le prix d'un pro‐ duit aussi périssable, même dans le cadre d’une grande organisation de producteurs. L'art. 169 (huile d'olive) n'est pas pertinent au Royaume-Uni. En ce qui concerne l'art. 170 (viande bovine), il n'est pas non plus évident que la li‐ mite de 15 pour cent puisse être bientôt atteinte. Il n'existe actuellement aucune grande organisation de producteurs dans ce domaine. Il est donc difficile d'évaluer si la limite pourrait créer des problèmes. Il en va de même pour la limite supérieure de l'art. 171 (grandes cultures). Aujourd’hui, l’avenir de ce secteur est encore plus incertain compte tenu du Brexit et donc de l'abandon de la PAC qui en résulte. Reste à savoir alors comment les objectifs et le concept d'organisations de pro‐ ducteurs s'intégreront dans le futur marché agricole britannique. Selon le rapport national, le Royaume-Uni doit trouver sa propre façon d'améliorer la situation des petits producteurs et agriculteurs. Compte tenu de ces in‐ certitudes, il est peu probable qu'un groupement de producteurs soit alors prêt à créer une organisation de producteurs avec tous les coûts et les con‐ Rapport général de la Commission I 97 ditions à remplir. Il semble plus intéressant de coopérer d'une autre maniè‐ re, plus facile à mettre en œuvre, et qui se baserait sur le chapitre 1 de l'ex‐ emption générale de l'entente cartellaire dans le domaine agricole. Italie Ces dispositions soulèvent de nombreuses questions en Italie. Les lignes directrices de la Commission européenne pour la mise en œuvre des arti‐ cles 169 à 171 ne sont pas un instrument utile d'après le rapport national. Pays-Bas Les articles 149, 169, 170 et 171 sont compris comme une restriction et non comme une extension des dérogations à l'interdiction des ententes car‐ tellaires. Ils ne sont donc pas utilisés. Autriche Les dispositions ne s'appliquent pas : la limite supérieure est trop basse. Avant tout, elle ne crée pas de contrepoids à la concentration dans le com‐ merce de détail alimentaire. Pologne L'art. 149 (lait) perd progressivement de l'importance à la suite de l'aboliti‐ on du système de quotas laitiers de l'UE. La limite supérieure de négocia‐ tion est suffisante. Toutefois, l'application du régime ne semble pas être tout à fait claire. L'art. 169 (huile d'olive) n'a pas d’intérêt. Cependant, l'art. 170 (viande bovine) est une disposition très importante pour le fonc‐ tionnement de ce secteur dont les limites supérieures semblent actuelle‐ ment suffisantes. En revanche, la limite supérieure de l'art. 171 (grandes cultures), nécessiterait une augmentation. Cela pourrait constituer une in‐ citation à créer de plus grandes organisations de producteurs afin de four‐ nir un revenu plus élevé à leurs membres. Suisse En matière de politique de concurrence, il semble souhaitable que les ef‐ forts de regroupement d'organisations agricoles, qui peuvent, par le biais des accords bilatéraux entre la Suisse et l'UE, également gagner en import‐ ance pour la Suisse, ne puissent pas éliminer complètement la concurrence sur le marché concerné. Cela suppose qu'une concurrence résiduelle suffi‐ sante subsiste en plus de l'offre groupée. Cette concurrence résiduelle peut se manifester soit sous forme d'une concurrence externe (par exemple, par Rapport général de la Commission I 98 l'offre de concurrents qui ne sont pas impliqués), soit sous forme d'une concurrence interne (par exemple, le conseil, le service ou la concurrence de qualité entre les partenaires du groupement eux-mêmes). En plus des concurrents réels, une certaine pression concurrentielle peut également être exercée par des concurrents potentiels48. L'objectif de la limite supéri‐ eure est d'assurer une concurrence externe suffisante à travers une appro‐ che quantitative (basée sur la part de marché). Le rapport national se de‐ mande, comment on pourrait également renforcer la concurrence interne. L'accent est mis ici sur le conseil, le service et la concurrence en matière de qualité entre les partenaires du groupement eux-mêmes. Espagne Les limites supérieures sont considérées comme raisonnables et ne prêtent pas à controverse. L'application est principalement basée sur la notificati‐ on des quantités groupées. Synthèse des rapporteurs généraux L'importance des limites supérieures varie considérablement d'un pays à l'autre, en fonction de la production nationale. Certaines d'entre elles sont classées comme appropriées. Lorsqu'ils sont jugés inappropriés, il n'y a pas de recours aux limites supérieures. Il apparaît que les organisations de producteurs concernées et leurs associations agissent alors sur la base de l'exemption générale des ententes agricoles. L'utilisation exacte du systè‐ me d'établissement de rapports n'est généralement pas claire. Dans certains cas, des incertitudes dans l'application des dispositions sont signalées. Pour l'Italie, les lignes directives de la Commission européenne sur les ar‐ ticles en question ne sont pas considérées comme utiles. Compte tenu du Brexit, la Royaume-Uni est actuellement très réticente à utiliser l'instru‐ ment. La Suisse se demande si les accords bilatéraux entre la Suisse et l’UE dans le secteur agricole auront un impact sur le marché agricole suis‐ se. 48 En ce qui concerne les concurrents potentiels, voir : Zäch (note. 13), n. 13. Rapport général de la Commission I 99 Ententes cartellaires de durée limitée Comment appréciez-vous les mesures particulières que contiennent les Rè‐ glements (UE) 2016/558 ainsi que 2016/559 permettant, dans le domaine du lait, des ententes cartellaires de durée limitée ? Estimez-vous que ces mesures temporaires représentent un instrument ap‐ proprié pour contenir rapidement des crises du marché ? Bulgarie Contrairement à la tendance du marché mondial, très peu de lait est pro‐ duit. La production nationale ne couvre que 15 pour cent de ses propres besoins. La consommation n'augmente presque plus. Les exemptions des dispositions antitrust ne sont donc pas pertinentes pour la planification de la production laitière. Allemagne En principe, les instruments de crise offrent aux entreprises une plus gran‐ de marge de manœuvre pour faire face à la concurrence sont considérés positivement. Une application efficace des mesures de crise échoue sou‐ vent en raison de l'évolution rapide des marchés. La mesure ne sera pas utilisée aussi rapidement que nécessaire en raison des décisions officielles à prendre avant sa publication au Journal officiel. Elle n'est donc que parti‐ ellement adaptée pour faire face avec succès aux crises. Pays-Bas Ces possibilités n'ont pas été utilisées aux Pays-Bas. On peut également se demander si l'instrument est approprié. En règle générale, la production est planifiée bien à l'avance. Après la phase de planification, la production ne peut pas être arrêtée à court terme. Les plantes continuent de croître. Il ne s'agit pas d'une production industrielle où les machines peuvent être tem‐ porairement arrêtées sans problème. Autriche En principe, l'instrument est adapté. Toutefois, la période prévue est jugée trop courte pour une évaluation finale. Pologne De tels instruments ne sont que temporaires et ne peuvent garantir le déve‐ loppement à long terme de la politique laitière de l'UE. Le secteur laitier 4. Rapport général de la Commission I 100 doit être évalué à long terme. Ce marché a besoin d'instruments puissants. Les exemptions temporaires d’ententes cartellaires ne sont pas suffisam‐ ment claires. Suisse Les privilèges de la politique de concurrence dans des conditions claire‐ ment définies constituent généralement un instrument approprié pour con‐ trer les risques de marché à court terme. Le Conseil fédéral peut donc éga‐ lement soutenir des mesures d'entraide en cas de développements excepti‐ onnels qui ne sont pas dus à des problèmes structurels, ceci afin d'adapter la production et l'offre aux exigences du marché conformément à l'art. 9, al. 3 LAgr. La limitation à des situations anormales vise à prévenir les dé‐ veloppements structurels indésirables causés par l'intervention de l'État. Espagne Les mesures appropriées sont efficaces pour répondre aux crises. Néan‐ moins, la réponse du marché reste à voir. Synthèse des rapporteurs généraux La majorité des rapports sont critiques à l'égard de l'instrument, car il n'est pas approprié pour provoquer des changements de marché à court terme. Si l'instrument est considéré comme utile, une évaluation est nécessaire. La Suisse fait valoir qu'il existe un instrument similaire pour les situations exceptionnelles de marché. Déclaration de force obligatoire générale Dans votre pays fait-on usage de l’instrument attribuant d’une part la force obligatoire des organisations de producteurs reconnues par tous les acteurs et, d’autre part, la participation contraignante de tous les acteurs au financement des organisations de producteurs reconnues au sens des articles 164 et 165 du Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013 ? Jugez-vous cet instrument comme utile et apte aux besoins de la prati‐ que ? Bulgarie L'instrument de la déclaration de force obligatoire générale pourrait être utilisé pour transférer les coûts de transaction des grandes unités coopéra‐ 5. Rapport général de la Commission I 101 tives vers des unités plus petites si cela correspond aux conditions du mar‐ ché et à l'environnement institutionnel. Allemagne L'instrument de la déclaration de force obligatoire générale et la participa‐ tion imposée associée au financement des organisations agricoles n'est pas actuellement utilisé. En outre, la libre concurrence devrait être préférée à un élément de régulation de la concurrence. Par conséquent, son applicabi‐ lité générale est limitée. Royaume-Uni L'instrument de la déclaration de force obligatoire générale n'est pas utili‐ sé. Italie L'instrument de la déclaration de force obligatoire générale est utilisé, l'art. 3 du décret-loi 51/2015 est appliqué. Le domaine d'application est li‐ mité aux associations industrielles et requiert l'approbation de 85 pour cent des membres. Les contributions financières ne sont pas réalisées par des impôts, mais par un « prêt privé ». Il y a une sanction de 1 000 à 5 000 euros. Le rapport mentionne des cas du secteur du kiwi en 2014/15 et du secteur du tabac de 2015 à 2017. Pays-Bas L'instrument de la déclaration de force obligatoire générale est utilisé. La base en est le règlement sur les producteurs et les organisations interpro‐ fessionnelles (Regeling producenten en branchenorganisaties). Les organi‐ sations de producteurs et les associations d'organisations de producteurs dans le secteur des fruits et légumes en sont exclues. Le règlement rem‐ place les associations de produits (productschappen) qui ont fonctionné jusqu'en 2014. En 2016, les associations interprofessionnelles dans les do‐ maines des céréales, du sucre et des pommes de terre ont été acceptées, mais uniquement dans le domaine de la recherche. Un certain nombre d'autres demandes ont déjà été faites. Le rapport estime que l'instrument est bon. Cependant, sa sphère d'activité est limitée. Pologne L'instrument n'est pas utilisé. Toutefois, il pourrait s'avérer utile à l'avenir. Il s'agit notamment de l'élaboration et du contrôle des contrats types, de Rapport général de la Commission I 102 l'élaboration et de la diffusion d'informations statistiques et des tendances du marché, des décisions sur les règles relatives au marquage d'origine et de l'élaboration de campagnes de commercialisation. Suisse L'art. 9, al. 1, de LAgr, en référence à l'art. 8, al. 1, ouvre de vastes possi‐ bilités de mesures d'entraide des organisations agricoles à l'égard des nonmembres (soi-disant parasitisme) dans les domaines de la qualité et de la promotion des ventes et de l'adaptation de la production et de l'offre aux exigences du marché. Le Conseil fédéral peut également obliger les nonmembres d'une organisation à contribuer au financement de mesures d'en‐ traide au sens de l'art. 8 al. 1 LAgr. Toutefois, l'organisation doit répondre à des exigences assez strictes, notamment en matière de représentativité. La possibilité d'étendre les mesures d'entraide aux « parasites » est ac‐ tivement utilisée dans la pratique, par exemple pour l'organisation profes‐ sionnelle du lait (contrat type et règlements pour la segmentation du mar‐ ché du lait), pour Emmentaler Suisse (contributions marketing), pour l'In‐ terprofession du Vacherin Fribourgeois (contributions marketing), pour l'Association suisse des agriculteurs (contributions marketing), pour les producteurs de lait suisses (contributions marketing) et pour GalloSuisse (contributions marketing)49. D'autres demandes sont en instance auprès du Conseil fédéral. Espagne La possibilité de la déclaration de force obligatoire générale est utilisée depuis plusieurs années. Il en va de même pour le partage obligatoire des coûts des acteurs du financement des organisations. Le Règlement MAPAMA est particulièrement important pour son application. Synthèse des rapporteurs généraux Alors que certains pays n'utilisent pas l'instrument de la déclaration de force obligatoire générale et de la participation au financement pour diver‐ ses raisons, il est utilisé à plus grande échelle dans d'autres pays. Cepen‐ dant, il n'y a pratiquement aucune déclaration sur l'aptitude de la pratique. 49 Schweizerisches Handelsamtsblatt vom 8.9.2015; cf. aussi : Medienmitteilung des Bundesamtes für Landwirtschaft vom 8.9.2015: Selbsthilfemassnahmen Landwirt‐ schaft: Begehren von sechs Organisationen publiziert. Rapport général de la Commission I 103 La Suisse, qui possède une vaste expérience de l'instrument, mérite une mention spéciale. Privilèges en matière de droit des cartels pour des associations non reconnues À côté des organisations de producteurs reconnues, les coopératives agri‐ coles et les autres groupements agricoles ne devaient-t-ils pas être égale‐ ment investis de privilèges en matière de droit des cartels. Si oui, jugez-vous la règlementation de l’article 209 alinéa 1 sous-alinéa 2 du Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013 comme suffisante ? Bulgarie Les privilèges ne devraient pas être étendus. Allemagne À côté des organisations agricoles reconnues, les coopératives agricoles et autres associations agricoles doivent généralement bénéficier de privilèges antitrust, déjà réglementés par les dérogations du Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013, complétées par le Règlement (UE) N° 1184/2006. Comme les dispositions nationales du § 28 GWB, § 5 AgrarMSG et les règlements de l'UE sont largement identiques, l'Art. 209 al. 1 s.-al. 2 du Règlement (UE) 1308/2013 est suffisant. Il en va de même pour le Règlement (UE) 1184/2006, à moins que les organisations de producteurs reconnues ou non reconnues soient déjà couvertes par l'art. 209 du Règlement (UE) 1308/2013. Royaume-Uni Compte tenu de la faible part de marché de la grande majorité des pro‐ ducteurs et des producteurs du secteur agricole, il est souhaitable de sim‐ plifier au maximum l'amélioration de la coopération. Tant que le pouvoir de marché de ces entreprises communes n'aura pas augmenté de manière significative, la coopération devrait être encouragée et simplifiée. Cette coopération peut même avoir une longueur d'avance sur la concurrence ré‐ elle si elle a un lien avec l'efficacité de la chaîne d'approvisionnement. Une conséquence malheureuse du droit général de la concurrence et de la forte protection des consommateurs est que les grands revendeurs peuvent dominer les petits fournisseurs. Comme il s'agit d'un faible risque pour le 6. Rapport général de la Commission I 104 consommateur, cette question devrait être abordée afin d'améliorer la dura‐ bilité et l'efficacité. L'art. 209, al. 1, s.-al. 2, du Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013 soutient cet objectif. Toutefois, il limite la coopération entre les différents types d'en‐ treprises, ce qui nuit à la réalisation de gains d'efficacité. Par exemple, il n'est pas possible d'utiliser l'exemption pour la coopération entre les pro‐ ducteurs, les transformateurs et les abattoirs. L'exemption de cartel n'offre donc pas la sécurité juridique nécessaire dans les situations où les pro‐ ducteurs tentent de générer des revenus plus élevés en contrôlant la chaîne de transformation en aval. Il est vrai que l'on parle souvent d'obtenir une valeur plus élevée pour un produit. Dans ce cas, la dérogation ne devrait pas prendre fin au moment où le produit d'origine quitte l'exploitation agricole. Elle devrait plutôt inclure l'étape de transformation suivante et permettre, au côté de la production primaire, de coopérer avec les entrepri‐ ses ayant l’expérience de la prochaine étape. Pays-Bas Étant donné que l'art. 209 du Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013 a un champ d'application très large, le règlement semble suffisant à première vue. Cela dit, il est assez difficile de satisfaire les conditions de l'exception. Autriche Afin de développer la part de l'agriculture dans la chaîne de valeur, d'au‐ tres exemptions du droit de la concurrence au-delà des articles 206 et 209 du Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013 sont nécessaires. Une décision préjudi‐ cielle des autorités de concurrence en vertu de l'art. 209, al. 2, du Règle‐ ment (UE) N° 1308/2013 devrait également être considérée. Pologne Les groupements aux fins d'activités conjointes et organisées des pro‐ ducteurs agricoles agissant dans l'intérêt de leurs membres, sont considé‐ rés égaux, quelle que soit leur forme juridique. Les dispositions de l'art. 209, al. 1, du Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013 sont suffisantes à cet égard et ne devraient pas être modifiées. Suisse Dans le contexte déjà décrit de la situation juridique de la coopération ent‐ re producteurs et secteurs qui s'écartent du droit de l'UE, la question ne se pose pas avec la même urgence. Le privilège général des mesures d'entrai‐ Rapport général de la Commission I 105 de dans le secteur agricole, qui figure dans le LAgr, qui est basé sur la Constitution fédérale, ne fait pas de distinction entre les organisations agricoles reconnues et non reconnues50. Espagne Il devrait y avoir une égalité. Toutefois, on peut se demander si l'art. 209, al. 1, s.-al. 1 du Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013, est suffisant pour atteind‐ re cet objectif. Synthèse des rapporteurs généraux La nécessité d'assurer l'égalité le traitement général, d’une part, des coopé‐ ratives agricoles, et d’autre part, des autres associations agricoles d'organi‐ sations agricoles reconnues, est incontestée. L'art. 209, al. 1, s.-al. 2, du Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013 bénéficie donc du soutien correspondant. Mais plusieurs rapports soulignent en même temps que le champ d'appli‐ cation et l'interprétation de la disposition pourraient être améliorés. Interdiction des ententes en matière de prix Dans votre pays, comment comprend-t-on l’interdiction des ententes en matière de prix, au sens de l’article 209 alinéa 1 sous-alinéa 3 du Règle‐ ment (UE) N° 1308/2013 et, selon vous, devait-elle être davantage clari‐ fiée ? Bulgarie Le prix d'un produit est une source principale d'information. Mais, même si les prix des matières premières ne font pas l'objet d'un accord, il existe des possibilités d'accès à certains marchés en raison de l'asymétrie de l'in‐ formation. Cela peut donner l'apparence de concurrence et conduire à des « avantages déloyaux » dans le cadre de contrats conclus sur cette base d'information. De telles situations ne sont pas exclues, en particulier sur les marchés locaux. 7. 50 Cf. les conditions à remplir par l’organisation agricole en cas de demande de prorogation des règlements, die Verordnung über die Branchen- und Produzenten‐ organisationen (VBPO). Rapport général de la Commission I 106 Allemagne L'interdiction des prix fixes est en principe identique à la dérogation de la législation nationale. Il convient toutefois de préciser que la fixation des prix au sein des groupements de producteurs (par exemple au sein d'une coopérative ou d'une organisation de producteurs) est légalement autori‐ sée. De même, les accords de prix entre organisations de producteurs re‐ connues sont favorisés. Les négociations de prix entre des organisations de producteurs reconnues ou des associations reconnues avec des tiers ne sont pas non plus illicites. Par conséquent, seuls les prix fixes avec des tiers en dehors du groupement de producteurs et en dehors des négociati‐ ons de prix mentionnées ci-dessus entre dans le cadre visé par l'interdic‐ tion. Royaume-Uni En l'absence de jurisprudence dans ce domaine et en l'absence d'organisa‐ tions de producteurs, il n'existe aucune preuve permettant d'interpréter plus avant le contenu de la disposition. Italie Cette disposition n'est pas fondée car, dans le cas de la coopération des producteurs, c'est précisément le maintien des prix qui est en jeu. Pour les organisations de producteurs reconnues, la question est clarifiée par l'art. 206 du Règlement (UE) 1308/2013. Pays-Bas Dans le Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013, la version néerlandaise semble avoir été calquée sur la version anglaise. Il n'y a pas d'affaires judiciaires concernant cette disposition aux Pays-Bas. Si l'on suppose que la jurisprudence concernant l'art. 176, al. 1, s.-al. 2, du Règlement (CE) N° 1234/2007 peut être utilisée il convient de prévoir rapidement la condition de l'interdiction des prix fixes. Une aussi large in‐ terprétation peut être trouvée, par exemple, dans la décision d'ACM dans le cas décrit de l'oignon grelot. Il serait souhaitable de préciser la portée de la disposition. Autriche Il faudrait supprimer cette disposition. Rapport général de la Commission I 107 Pologne Les accords en vertu desquels les agriculteurs vendent leurs produits par l'intermédiaire d'une coopérative commune et atteignent le prix du marché réalisable pour eux, devraient être autorisés. Des éclaircissements supplé‐ mentaires semblent nécessaires dans le domaine des organisations de pro‐ ducteurs reconnues. Suisse En vertu du principe de l'abus, le droit suisse de la concurrence contient une présomption d'élimination de la concurrence effective dans le cas d'ac‐ cords horizontaux sur la fixation directe ou indirecte des prix. Si cette pré‐ somption ne peut être détruite (par la preuve d'une concurrence externe ou interne), l'objection d'efficacité est alors interdite et l'accord devient illici‐ te. Le droit rural apporte une certaine relativisation. En effet, les organisa‐ tions de producteurs et les organisations professionnelles suisses peuvent fixer des prix d'orientation conformément à l'art. 8a LAgr. En revanche, les prix à la consommation sont exclus. Espagne Une clarification de la disposition est nécessaire. Synthèse des rapporteurs généraux Cette disposition est largement considérée comme peu claire. La jurispru‐ dence n’a qu’une portée limitée. Il existe un accord sur la nécessité d'ex‐ clure au moins les activités internes de coopération des producteurs. L’interdiction de l’exclusion du marché Dans votre pays, comment comprend-t-on l’interdiction de l’exclusion du marché, au sens de l’article 209 alinéa 1 sous-alinéa 3 du Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013 et, selon vous, devrait-elle être davantage clarifiée ? Bulgarie Il ne devrait y avoir aucune exception à l'interdiction d'exclusion du mar‐ ché. 8. Rapport général de la Commission I 108 Allemagne Il est nécessaire de clarifier la définition de l'exclusion du marché. Une li‐ mite de pourcentage fixe doit être rejetée parce qu'elle est trop rigide. La concurrence peut déjà exister si seulement deux entreprises sont actives sur le marché. Par conséquent, l'interprétation d'une exclusion du marché devrait tenir compte, de manière plus souple, des considérations individu‐ elles concernant le marché. Royaume-Uni Comme pour la question de l'interdiction des prix fixes, il y a un manque de pratique pour discuter plus en détail de cette disposition. Pays-Bas Il n'existe pas de jurisprudence en ce qui concerne cette disposition. La pratique jurisprudentielle concernant la disposition précédente de l'art. 176, al. 1, s.-al. 2, du Règlement (CE) N° 1234/2007 est peu claire. Cependant, dans le cas des oignons grelots, la disposition est interprétée de façon très large. Pour la pratique au quotidien, il serait utile que ce con‐ cept soit décrit plus explicitement. Autriche Cette disposition devrait être supprimée. Compte tenu de l'énorme concen‐ tration dans le commerce de détail alimentaire, le côté producteur doit être renforcé. En Autriche, par exemple, les trois plus grandes entreprises du commerce de détail alimentaire détiennent une part de marché de 86 pour cent. Pologne La disposition est interprétée très généreusement. Néanmoins, des éclair‐ cissements supplémentaires sont nécessaires dans le contexte des organi‐ sations de producteurs. Suisse Selon l'art. 5 al. 1 LCart, sont illicites les accords, qui entravent de maniè‐ re significative la concurrence sur un marché de certains biens ou services s’ils ne peuvent être justifiés par l'efficacité économique ou, s’ils condui‐ sent à l'élimination d'une concurrence effective. Tandis que des accords si‐ gnificativement restrictifs peuvent être justifiés par l'objection d'efficacité, ceux qui éliminent la concurrence effective ne peuvent en aucun cas être Rapport général de la Commission I 109 justifiés. Les dispositions spéciales du droit rural l'emportent sur cette si‐ tuation juridique dans la mesure où le Conseil fédéral est compétent en vertu de l'art. 8 al. 1 LAgr pour étendre les mesures d'entraide des organi‐ sations agricoles aux non-membres. Une telle extension peut entraîner l'élimination de la concurrence. Espagne Il est nécessaire de clarifier la disposition, et de tenir compte non seule‐ ment des aspects quantitatifs, mais aussi d'autres aspects. Synthèse des rapporteurs généraux La majorité des rapports veulent s'en tenir à cette disposition, mais voit un besoin de clarification quant à son application concrète. Au vu de la forte concentration dans la vente au détail de produits alimentaires, certains plaident en faveur de la suppression de cette disposition. Le concept suisse a une orientation différente. Régulations des contrats Dans votre pays fait-on usage de l’instrument de régulation des contrats au sens des articles 148 et 168 du Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013 ? Si oui, pour quels produits agricoles est-elle prévue ? Quelle utilité attribuez-vous à cet instrument ? Bulgarie La réglementation des contrats pourrait être utile pour améliorer le partage des risques entre les producteurs et l'industrie alimentaire. Toutefois, il n'est pas approprié de réglementer les contrats entre les producteurs euxmêmes afin d'améliorer l'intégration et de réduire les coûts. Allemagne En Allemagne, les relations d’approvisionnement sont généralement réglées par des conventions écrites. Dans le cas des coopératives, celles-ci sont en principe contenues dans un ensemble de règles de droit des socié‐ tés qui correspondent à un statut type et sont complétées par des règles de livraison, de sorte qu'un contrat supplémentaire en vertu du droit des con‐ trats est superflu. 9. Rapport général de la Commission I 110 La liberté contractuelle doit être respectée. Il faut donc éviter autant que possible les interventions de l'État dans la souveraineté contractuelle entre les parties contractantes. À tout le moins, elles doivent être mises en ques‐ tion, car elles risquent de miner une économie de marché libre. À cet égard, les règlements mentionnés ci-dessus ne présentent pas de grands avantages. Par conséquent, à l'heure actuelle, elles ne sont pas appliquées à l'échelle nationale. France La réglementation des contrats est fortement soutenue par la loi depuis 2010, en particulier par la loi sur la modernisation de l'agriculture et le Code rural. L'objectif est de renforcer l'influence des producteurs sur le marché à la suite des crises qui ont touchées les secteurs des produits lai‐ tiers, des fruits et légumes et de la viande. Italie L'instrument de régulation des contrats est utilisé pour tous les secteurs dans le contexte des pratiques commerciales déloyales. Cependant, il y a beaucoup d'ambiguïtés. Pologne L'instrument est utilisé. La base juridique est la loi du 10 juillet 2015 mo‐ difiant la loi sur l'Autorité du marché agricole et l'organisation de certains marchés agricoles ainsi que certaines autres lois introduisant des contrats écrits pour toutes les livraisons de produits agricoles à l’acheteur initial. À cela s'ajoute la loi du 15 décembre 2016 relative à la prévention des avan‐ tages contractuels abusifs dans la vente de produits agricoles et de produits alimentaires, qui modifie également la loi du 11 mars 2014 relative à l'au‐ torité de marché agricole et à l'organisation de certains marchés agricoles. Cela permet de pénaliser des acheteurs de produits agricoles qui n’auraient pas de contrat écrit avec le producteur. Toutefois, l'utilisation de l'instru‐ ment a jusqu'à présent été rare car les producteurs sont en position de fai‐ blesse vis-à-vis des clients. Suisse L'instrument de régulation des contrats existe sous une forme générale dans l'art. 8 al. 1bis LAgr et sous une forme spéciale pour le secteur laitier dans l'art. 37 LAgr. LAgr confie essentiellement aux organisations sectori‐ elles la tâche de réglementer les contrats dans le secteur laitier. À la de‐ Rapport général de la Commission I 111 mande d'une organisation industrielle, le Conseil fédéral peut déclarer que le contrat-type est généralement contraignant à tous les stades de l'achat et de la vente de lait cru. À titre subsidiaire, le Conseil fédéral est compétent pour édicter lui-même un tel règlement. Un contrat type de l'organisation du secteur laitier doit répondre à un certain nombre d'exigences de fond. En ce qui concerne la politique de concurrence, LAgr stipule que les dis‐ positions du contrat type ne doivent pas porter atteinte de manière signifi‐ cative à la concurrence. Les parties contractantes restent compétentes pour la détermination des prix et des quantités. Espagne L'instrument sera utilisé non seulement pour le secteur laitier, mais aussi pour tous les autres contrats alimentaires au sens de l'art. 5 de la loi 12/2013. Il s'est avéré très utile pour contrôler l'équilibre entre les intérêts des parties contractantes. Royaume-Uni, Pays-Bas et Autriche L'instrument de régulation des contrats n'est pas utilisé dans ces pays. Synthèse des rapporteurs généraux Alors que dans un tiers des pays, l'instrument n'est pas utilisé du fait d'un manque de pertinence pratique ou pour des raisons réglementaires, les au‐ tres pays, y ont recours dans tous les secteurs. Il est critiqué quant à son application que les règles ne sont pas assez claires et qu’il est difficile à les faire respecter. Questions générales Discussion publique sur la position juridique de l’agriculture dans la chaîne du marché Votre pays a-t-il connu une discussion publique portant sur la question re‐ lative au renforcement de la position juridique de l’agriculture dans la chaîne du marché propre à l’écoulement des produits agricoles ? Si oui, sur quel contenu se concentrait ou se concentre cette discussion ? A-t-elle abouti à des réformes ou des propositions de réformes ? C. 1. Rapport général de la Commission I 112 Bulgarie La discussion sur le renforcement de l'agriculture dans la chaîne du mar‐ ché est toujours en cours. L'un des textes juridiques (raisin et vin) a été modifié 122 fois au cours des deux dernières années. Malgré ces change‐ ments, la concentration dans certains secteurs de produits est très élevée, ce qui montre qu'ils sont soumis à une forte pression. Il est possible qu'une polarisation se produise en raison du déséquilibre en termes de taille et de type existant entre les organisations. Allemagne En principe, le renforcement de la position de l'agriculture a été discuté l'année dernière. Dans ce contexte, le commerce alimentaire, qui est puis‐ sant sur le marché et concentré sur quelques entreprises, est important. À cet égard, le Bundeskartellamt a mené une enquête sectorielle et publié un rapport complet en septembre 201451. L'un des résultats de la discussion a été la levée du délai d'interdiction de vente sous le prix coûtant. Royaume-Uni Les turbulences du marché laitier au cours des dernières années ont servi de catalyseur à un débat public, notamment sur ce que les agriculteurs reçoivent en échange de leurs produits. Toutefois, l'ampleur de ce débat ne doit pas être surestimée, en particulier du côté agricole. Au moins, elle a fait prendre conscience que le prix perçu par les agriculteurs pour leurs produits n'est souvent que légèrement supérieur, voire inférieur à leurs coûts de production. Selon des sondages, la majorité des consommateurs seraient prêts à payer plus cher pour le lait, par exemple, si les agriculteurs recevaient un prix équitable pour le lait cru. Les supermarchés prétendent cependant qu’ils sont sous la pression des consommateurs. En outre, étant donné les bas prix alimentaires, le gouvernement pourrait avoir peu d'in‐ térêt à évoquer la question de la production durable. À la lumière du Brexit et du danger de tarifs douaniers et compte tenu du désintéressement du gouvernement, il y a certainement un risque que certains aspects de l’approvisionnement alimentaire et la durabilité de la production devien‐ nent un problème réel et urgent dans les années à venir. 51 Voir le site : www.bundeskartellamt.de/Sektoruntersuchung_LEH.pdf%3F__blob %3DpublicationFile%26v%3D7. Rapport général de la Commission I 113 L'arbitre du Code alimentaire apporte un développement positif et l'ex‐ tension possible de ses compétences en est un signe concret. Cependant, peu de choses sont faites au sujet des réformes juridiques concernant la si‐ tuation sur le marché. On compte sur la pression que les chaînes de super‐ marchés et les autres acteurs « agissent correctement ». L'un des objectifs du Code laitier est d'essayer de créer une période plus appropriée durant laquelle les producteurs pourront réagir à la baisse des prix du lait. L'arbit‐ re n’est établi que sur une base purement volontaire. Bien sûr, l'image est plus importante que jamais pour les grandes mar‐ ques. Il existe donc quelques exemples positifs de coopération au sein de la chaîne alimentaire. Mais il semble que toute activité visant à thématiser l'aspect de la durabilité et à renforcer la confiance au sein de la chaîne ali‐ mentaire soit contrecarrée par un mouvement délibérément opposé. La méfiance demeure donc. La pratique récente de plusieurs supermarchés d'étiqueter les produits avec de fausses fermes est un exemple d'un recul malheureux. Pays-Bas Le 24 mai 2016, le Parlement a adopté une résolution demandant au gou‐ vernement, en collaboration avec l'ACM, d'enquêter sur les abus du pou‐ voir de la demande et de lutter contre ceux-ci. Cela n'a conduit ni à des réformes, ni même à des propositions de réforme. Autriche Un tel débat a eu lieu, au cours duquel il a été démontré que l'agriculture est le maillon le plus faible de la chaîne alimentaire. Elle se situe entre un secteur amont très concentré (produits phytosanitaires, engrais, semences, industrie des machines agricoles) et un secteur aval très concentré (com‐ merce de détail alimentaire). Une réponse à ce défi aboutirait à une plus grande concentration dans le domaine de la transformation sous forme de coopératives et d'organisations de producteurs. Une association industriel‐ le est en cours de création dans le secteur des fruits et légumes. La créati‐ on d'un médiateur et des règles contraignantes sur les pratiques commer‐ ciales déloyales seront ensuite discutées. Pologne Le débat a été déclenché suite aux alertes envoyées par la situation très difficile des producteurs comparativement aux autres opérateurs du mar‐ ché. Les réformes discutées comprenaient un délai maximum de paiement Rapport général de la Commission I 114 et la possibilité pour les agriculteurs de déposer des plaintes anonymes contre les chaînes alimentaires. À l'issue de ce débat, les lois mentionnées au point 2.9 ont été adoptées. Suisse Après le changement de paradigme de la politique agricole au début des années 1990 (découplage des politiques des prix et des revenus agricoles, libéralisation des marchés agricoles, introduction des paiements directs, etc.), la discussion autour de la question de la place de l'agriculture dans la chaîne de valeur ajoutée s'est intensifiée. Depuis lors, le niveau d'interven‐ tion de l'État dans le secteur agricole a été réduit par étapes. En consé‐ quence, la question de la politique du marché est désormais traitée au sein des organisations sectorielles, des producteurs et des interprofessions. Ce‐ ci est particulièrement vrai en ce qui concerne le marché du lait, suite de la suppression du contingentement. La structure de la réglementation des contrats demeure controversée. Espagne La discussion s'est surtout développée suite à la présentation du projet de loi sur la chaîne alimentaire. Le Conseil national de la concurrence (Con‐ sejo Nacional de la Competencia ; CNC) qui a depuis lors été dissout, et le Conseil économique et social (Consejo económico y social ; CES) ont été particulièrement critiques à l'égard de ce projet de loi jugé comme trop bu‐ reaucratique et restreignant la concurrence. Synthèse des rapporteurs généraux Les rapports montrent que les producteurs de produits agricoles de pres‐ que tous les pays subissent une forte pression et dans certain cas ont des difficultés à couvrir leurs frais. Ils sont pris en sandwich entre, en amont, le marché très concentré des fournisseurs (machines agricoles, semences, engrais, produits phytosanitaires) et, en aval, le commerce de détail ali‐ mentaire très concentré et l’industrie de transformation. En d'autres ter‐ mes, les déséquilibres importants du marché au détriment de l'agriculture sont diagnostiqués de manière assez cohérente. La situation précaire a conduit à un débat public assez large et à la prise de certaines mesures comme suit : l'enquête sectorielle du Bundeskartellamt et la levée du délai d'interdiction des ventes à perte en Allemagne ; l'introduction de l'arbitre du Code alimentaire en Royaume-Uni; la création d'un médiateur et de règles contraignantes sur les pratiques commerciales déloyales en Autri‐ Rapport général de la Commission I 115 che ; l'introduction d'une autorité du marché agricole et d'un modèle con‐ tractuel pour l'approvisionnement en produits agricoles en Pologne. En France et en Suisse, les mesures prises par l'agriculture elle-même dans le cadre d'organisations sectorielles, constituent un autre modèle de soluti‐ ons. Nécessité d’une réforme du droit de la concurrence dans le domaine de l’agriculture ? Si vous appréciez, dans leur ensemble, le droit de la concurrence nationa‐ le respectivement de l’UE dans le domaine de l’agriculture, pensez-vous qu’il nécessite une réforme ? Si oui, quels devraient en être les points principaux ? Bulgarie Les points forts d'une réforme seraient la limitation des possibilités d'achat sans restriction des terres cultivées et la limitation de la distribution asy‐ métrique des subventions en faveur de l'agriculture. Allemagne En principe, il n'est pas nécessaire de procéder à une réforme globale de la législation de la concurrence dans le domaine de l’agriculture, car les ré‐ glementations existantes offrent un champ d'application suffisant. Une in‐ terprétation moins restrictive de la part des autorités de la concurrence se‐ rait néanmoins souhaitable. Dans cette optique, il conviendrait de clarifier certaines dispositions du droit de l'UE et du GWB : notamment dans les domaines précis touchant – y compris la question du maintien des prix de revente – la marge de manœuvres des organisations reconnues et non re‐ connues de producteurs, la définition des marchés des acquisitions, l'inter‐ prétation du critère d’exclusion de la concurrence et la prise en compte de la contrepartie du marché. France Le rapport national présente une critique qui fait référence, d'une part, aux pratiques nationales et, d'autre part, aux pratiques de l'UE. Il en résulte des besoins pour les deux cercles de régulation, impliquant en particulier : L'interprétation restrictive des dérogations en faveur de l'agriculture par l'ADLC et les organes de l'UE mène à la surcharge des dispositions du 2. Rapport général de la Commission I 116 TFUE en matière de concurrence. La spécificité de la législation rurale est donc négligée. Le Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013 n'a pas modifié cette tendance et produit toujours un résultat contraire à l'art. 42 du TFUE. Le principe de primauté du droit rural sur le droit de la concurrence ne s'ap‐ pliquant plus, ce dernier devient dominant. Les organisations de pro‐ ducteurs, les associations d'organisations de producteurs et la réglementa‐ tion contractuelle ne peuvent pas se développer suffisamment pour se do‐ ter d'un contre-pouvoir suffisant vis-à-vis des étapes en aval. Dans l'en‐ semble, une meilleure définition de la portée des exemptions à l'interdic‐ tion générale des ententes cartellaieres est nécessaire. La pratique française s’appuie trop sur l’interprétation restrictive des organes de l'UE, comme le démontre l’affaire Endives. La réglementation des contrats inscrits dans la législation française (loi N° 2010-874 du 27 juillet 2010 sur la modernisation de l'agriculture et de la pêche) n'est pas suffisante pour améliorer la situation difficile de l'agriculture française et pour répondre à l'objectif de l'art. 39 du TFUE, en particulier la mise à disposition d'un revenu adéquat. Il n'est pas possible de faire des accords de prix ou de fixer des prix minimums. Il convient également de critiquer le fait que les prix communs ne sont approuvés que si les producteurs ont précédemment opéré un transfert de propriété des produits. Seule une concentration de l'offre au sens de l'art. 152 et un redimensi‐ onnement de l'art. 209 du Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013 au sens de la suppression de l'interdiction des clauses contractuelles à prix fixes serait pertinente. La clarification des tâches des organisations de producteurs (OP) est également centrale, car il existe une incertitude juridique à cet égard. La solution devrait au moins consister à étendre l'art. 149 du Règle‐ ment (UE) N° 1308/2013 au-delà du secteur laitier et à permettre des né‐ gociations de prix entre les membres des organisations de producteurs, in‐ dépendamment du fait que les marchandises soient ou non transférées à l'organisation avant la vente. La fixation des prix ne devrait être interdite que si les producteurs vendent directement à des prix fixes aux clients in‐ dividuels. La loi suédoise sur la concurrence de 2008 (Loi suédoise sur la concurrence – 2008:579 ; Chapitre 1 Art. 4) sert de modèle pour cette ré‐ glementation. Pour appuyer ses préoccupations, le rapport français fait ré‐ férence à la législation américaine (Capper-Volstead Act ; voir point I.3.3) Rapport général de la Commission I 117 et aux études économiques américaines52. Il est important de souligner l'énoncé suivant53: « In the case of a classic cartel, the adverse market ef‐ fects are a lower output quantity, which further increases a dead-weight loss due to the seller market power, and additional price increase imposed on consumers. In contrast, agricultural output control allows agricultural producers to eliminate unnecessary commodity losses due to agricultural over -supply and also to decrease (and ideally eliminate) the costs of pro‐ ducing the volume that cannot be absorbed by the market at the acceptable price level. Consequently, this helps agricultural producers attain a fair level of price, which is the level of price that covers their production costs. The overall societal benefit is maintaining a viable agricultural produc‐ tion. » Royaume-Uni La part de marché de la grande majorité des agriculteurs individuels est si réduite que, même au sein de petits groupes, ils ne peuvent influencer no‐ tablement le marché. La majeure partie du droit commun de la concur‐ rence actuellement en vigueur n'est donc pas pertinente pour les décisions des agriculteurs. Toutefois, cela ne signifie pas que l'attitude des autorités de la concurrence est favorable à de réels progrès sur des marchés frag‐ mentés tels que le marché agricole. Sur ces marchés, il est nécessaire d'en‐ courager la coopération entre petites entreprises et de définir clairement les exceptions appropriées en vertu du droit de la concurrence. Le droit de la concurrence ne devrait pas traiter des activités commerciales de ces pe‐ tites entreprises. Un tel soutien ne soulèverait pas de problèmes de concur‐ rence, mais renforcerait la coopération et améliorerait sensiblement leur pérennité. Outre le soutien des autorités, les producteurs eux-mêmes devraient prendre conscience des avantages de la coopération afin de renforcer leur pouvoir de négociation. À moins que cela ne se fasse par un changement d'attitude et une volonté de coopérer, il serait peu logique au Royaume- Uni de réclamer des exemptions supplémentaires ou d'autres changements juridiques importants. 52 Carstensen (note 16), 465; E. V. Jesse/B. W. Marion/A. C. Manchester/A. C. John‐ son, Interpreting and Enforcing Section of the Capper-Volstead Act, American Journal of Agricultural Economy, Volume 64, Issue 3, 1 August 1982, p. 431–443; Frederick (note 17). 53 Bolotova (note 29), p. 9 s. Rapport général de la Commission I 118 Dans ce contexte, il convient de souligner le rôle primordial de l'infor‐ mation sur les questions et la fonctionnalité de chaque marché, en particu‐ lier au niveau de la production primaire après la vente. Ceci est d'autant plus vrai au regard des dangers et des opportunités apportés par le Brexit. Toutefois, le rapport national craint que, rendus isolés, les agriculteurs au Royaume-Uni aient moins d'influence sur leur gouvernement que les agri‐ culteurs de l'UE regroupés dans les organes de l'UE. Selon lui, il aurait été préférable de réformer l'UE de l'intérieur. Pour avoir une chance de suc‐ cès, même après un Brexit, un changement de position est nécessaire tant pour les régulateurs que pour les réglementés. Cela s'applique, non seule‐ ment, au domaine du droit de la concurrence au sens étroit du terme, mais aussi, de manière générale, à la compétitivité du secteur agricole. Trois points doivent être pris en considération pour améliorer le pouvoir de négociation des agriculteurs au Royaume-Uni : (1) Éducation Le fait d'être un producteur primaire est devenu beaucoup plus com‐ plexe. Les forces du marché qui déterminent le prix de production d'origine continueront à changer et sont soumises à des influences de plus en plus globales. De nombreux agriculteurs en sont déjà consci‐ ents. Toutefois, l'amélioration de l'information et de leur formation leur permettrait de prendre des décisions plus éclairées lorsqu'ils en ont l'occasion. (2) Options de vente Dans des pays, il existe d'autres possibilités de vendre les produits en dehors des ventes aux enchères. Au Royaume-Uni, la chaîne alimen‐ taire devrait être mieux intégrée pour assurer la sécurité alimentaire et un avenir stable. Les ventes directes par les coopératives et l'accord sur les prix à l'avance devraient être pris en considération et encoura‐ gés. (3) Coopération Indépendamment de l’organisation de la coopération par des pro‐ ducteurs partageant les mêmes idées – en tant que coopérative, en tant qu'organisation de producteurs ou en tant que tierce partie – elle sert toujours dans le plus grand intérêt de toutes les parties en cause. Italie Outre le fait qu'une grande partie de la réglementation existant n’est pas claire et devrait donc être rendue plus explicite, il convient de mettre da‐ Rapport général de la Commission I 119 vantage l'accent sur les conditions de concurrence dans la chaîne alimen‐ taire et surtout sur la forte pouvoir de demande. Pays-Bas Du point de vue de la pratique, plus de précision et de sécurité juridique sont nécessaires. La législation de la concurrence dans le domaine de l'agriculture de l'UE n'est ni claire et transparente, ni compréhensible pour les agriculteurs et leurs organisations. Une procédure telle que celle pré‐ vue à l'art. 210, al. 2, du Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013 ou la possibilité d'informations informelles ou d'une « comfort letter » devrait être enga‐ gée. Autriche La démarcation entre le droit général de la concurrence de l'UE et la PAC est à réformer d'urgence. Il s’agirait de renforcer la position des agricult‐ eurs dans la chaîne alimentaire. En particulier, les articles 152, 206, 209 et 210 du Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013 doivent être radicalement révisés. Les objectifs de la réforme consisteraient notamment à : • garantir le statut particulier de l'agriculture, notamment grâce aux ex‐ ceptions prévues par la loi de la concurrence dans le domaine de l'agri‐ culture et ses coopératives (art. 206) ; • exempter les associations d'agriculteurs (sous forme de coopératives et d'organisations de producteurs) du droit de la concurrence (art. 209) et permettre aux autorités de la concurrence de statuer à titre préjudiciel ; • renforcer les possibilités juridiques des associations professionnelles (art. 210) ; • établir une obligation de rapporter sur les prix tout au long de la chaîne d’approvisionnement ; • adopter un cadre communautaire au sujet des pratiques commerciales déloyales ; • interdire à l'échelle de l'UE, des ventes à des prix inférieurs au prix de revient ; • maintenir la possibilité de mesures de crise applicables à tout moment ; • développer le caractère régional et la protection de l'origine ; • définir correctement le « marché concerné » du côté des producteurs pour contrebalancer la concentration du marché du côté des détaillants en alimentation. Rapport général de la Commission I 120 Pologne L'état actuel de la législation nationale semble suffisant et toute évolution future devrait se calquer rigoureusement sur celle de l'UE. Deux princi‐ paux facteurs sont à considérer : (1) La nécessité, d'une part, d'assurer des conditions stables pour les ac‐ tivités agricoles et, d'autre part, de maintenir le principe général de la concurrence, clé non seulement de la productivité, mais aussi de la qualité des produits. (2) L'impact de circonstances extérieures sur le fonctionnement de la PAC ne doit pas être négligé. L'agriculture de l'UE subit déjà une pression concurrentielle considérable générée par les échanges agri‐ coles avec des pays non-membres de l’UE. Suisse Globalement, le mécanisme de coordination entre le droit agraire et le droit antitrust s'est avéré praticable. Le degré relativement élevé de com‐ plexité du règlement et l'incertitude juridique qui en résulte sont certaine‐ ment préjudiciables. Cependant, en la matière, des solutions tout à fait pragmatiques peuvent être trouvées en fonction des particularités empiri‐ ques et normatives des différents marchés agricoles. La question de savoir si et comment le droit de la concurrence dans le domaine de l'agriculture doit être développé plus avant, dépendra également de l'évolution de la po‐ litique agricole dans l'UE. Quoi qu'il en soit, le rapport du Task Force sur les marchés agricoles propose des approches intéressantes. Il faut s’assurer que le potentiel des moyens efficaces pour renforcer l'influence du marché agricole soit pleinement exploité, avant d'introduire de nouveaux privilèges en matière de politique de concurrence pour l'agri‐ culture. Ces moyens englobent l'amélioration du profil du marché des agriculteurs en tant qu'acteurs du marché, la création d'options alternatives avec les partenaires du marché et, la concentration au sein de structures agricoles saines et axées sur le marché54. Espagne Le droit national de la concurrence a besoin d'être réformé et de devenir plus sensible aux aspects qualitatifs de la protection des consommateurs. 54 Voir Niklaus/Zünd (note 43), p. 9 s. Rapport général de la Commission I 121 Jusqu'à présent, seule une évaluation quantitative a été à tort à l'avantplan. Synthèse des rapporteurs généraux Dans l’ensemble, les rapports nationaux reconnaissent la nécessité d'une réforme, ce qui signifie que, dans le domaine agricole, le droit national de la concurrence et le droit communautaire de la concurrence sont actuelle‐ ment jugés inadéquats. Le rapport allemand adopte une position opposée. Ce ne sont pas tant de nouvelles normes et institutions juridiques qui sont nécessaires, mais un traitement plus généreux ou une meilleure utilisation de la portée du droit existant. Le rapport suisse soutient la même chose. Le rapport français préconise également – outre des mesures supplémentaires – une meilleure exploitation des marges, notamment par une véritable mi‐ se en œuvre de la primauté du droit rural sur le droit de la concurrence dans l'UE. Aujourd'hui, à l'inverse, les règles de concurrence du TFUE prévalent sur les dérogations en faveur de l'agriculture55. Les négociations et la fixation des prix devraient également être autorisées. Le rapport britannique soutient que le droit de la concurrence ne serait pas du tout tenu de s'appliquer aux petits producteurs qui n'auraient qu'une influence négligeable sur le marché. L’agriculture devrait plutôt être invi‐ tée à intensifier la coopération afin de renforcer son pouvoir de négociati‐ on. On trouve également l'avis que les dispositions existantes en partie floues doivent être transposées en termes législatifs en vue du nécessaire renforcement de l'agriculture (Italie ; Pays-Bas avec la demande d'intro‐ duction d'un « confort letter »). Le rapport autrichien contient la plus longue liste de demande de nou‐ velles règles et la spécification des normes juridiques existantes. Outre les mesures déjà mentionnées, il est de l’avis qu’il est particulièrement im‐ portant de fixer des prix contractuels tout au long de la chaîne d'approvisi‐ onnement, de maintenir la possibilité de mesures de crise à tout moment et d’élargir le caractère régional et la protection de l'origine. 55 L'opinion selon laquelle, en réalité, la politique agricole n'a pas la primauté sur la politique de concurrence est sporadiquement présente, du moins dans la littérature commentée ; voir Georg-Klaus de Bronett, in: Josef L. Schulte/Christoph Just (edit.), Kartellrecht – GWB, Kartellvergaberecht, EU-Kartellrecht (2016), Art. 101 AEUV, n. 134. Rapport général de la Commission I 122 Le rapport polonais souligne que l'agriculture de l'UE subit une import‐ ante pression concurrentielle suite aux échanges agricoles avec des pays non-membres de l’UE. Selon le rapport espagnol, il faut mettre davantage l'accent sur les as‐ pects qualitatifs de l'agriculture. Conclusions et recommandations de la Commission I Les conclusions et recommandations de la Commission I ont été rédigées avant le Congrès dans le cadre des travaux conjoints du Président de la Commission (Prof. Dr Rudolf Mögele) et des deux rapporteurs généraux (Dr Christian Busse et Prof. em. Dr Paul Richli). Ce projet a été discuté lors de la réunion finale de la Commission – puis modifié et complété sur des points particuliers à la suite de la présentation et de la discussion des rapports nationaux. Comme il est d’usage, les conclusions et recommanda‐ tions, dans leur version finale, ne sont pas intégrées dans le rapport des rapporteurs généraux, mais seront présentées séparément dans le volume du Congrès (voir plus bas p. 263). Les conclusions de la Commission I à la lumière de l'arrêt de la CJUE sur l’affaire de l’Endives et du règlement modificatif (UE) 2017/2393. Après la conclusion du XXIXe Congrès du droit agricole européen, la Cour de justice des Communautés européennes a rendu son arrêt dans l'af‐ faire C-671/15 en novembre 201756. Conformément aux objectifs des re‐ commandations de la Commission I, la CJUE a confirmé, non seulement, le principe selon lequel la législation de l'UE relative au marché agricole prime sur l'interdiction générale de l'UE en matière antitrust, mais aussi, en particulier, l'exemption des dispositions antitrust des organisations de producteurs reconnues et de leurs associations. Dans le même temps, la CJUE a statué que les accords dans le domaine de la concurrence dans le secteur agricole, qui vont au-delà des exceptions explicites et implicites, sont soumis au droit général antitrust. En particulier, selon la CJUE, les III. IV. 56 CJUE, décision du 14.11.2017, affaire C-671/15 (APVE), ECLI:EU:C:2017:860. Rapport général de la Commission I 123 accords de prix entre des formes reconnues et non reconnues de coopérati‐ on entre producteurs et branches ne sont pas privilégiés. Par conséquent, la CJUE a clarifié des points importants. En même temps, l'arrêt a également créé des ambiguïtés, car il n'est pas clair si les déclarations de la CJUE concernant, entre autre l'interdiction de fixer des prix minimaux, doivent être comprises en général ou uniquement pour le secteur des fruits et légumes, qui se distingue par certaines caractéristiques particulières. Il y a également le problème du fait que – comme cela a déjà été mentionné – l'arrêt ne concernait pas la législation antitrust dans le do‐ maine de l’agriculture de l'UE actuellement applicable et que la CJUE ne donne aucune indication quant à la mesure où l'arrêt peut être appliqué dans la situation juridique actuelle57. Également en novembre 2017, les trois organes de l'UE se sont mis d'accord pour apporter des modifications de la législation antitrust dans le domaine de l'agriculture dans le cadre du Règlement Omnibus. Une gran‐ de partie des préoccupations du Parlement européen a été prise en compte. Il a alors été décidé de séparer la partie agricole du Règlement Omnibus et de décider son entrée en vigueur sous la forme d'un règlement distinct. Ce‐ la a abouti à la modification du Règlement (UE) 2017/2393 en décembre 201758. En particulier, le Règlement (UE) N° 1308/2013, ainsi révisé, pré‐ voit désormais une exemption explicite de l'entente pour les organisations de producteurs reconnues et leurs associations. En même temps, les limit‐ es spéciales de regroupement ont été largement modifiées et le soi-disant test d'efficacité éliminé. Dans l’ensemble, les résultats du règlement modi‐ ficatif (UE) 2017/2393 sont conformes, sur des points importants, avec les recommandations de la Commission I59. Au final, le thème de la Commission I reste important pour le droit rural et la politique agricole. Tant l'arrêt de la CJUE que les discussions sur le règlement modificatif (UE) 2017/2393 ont largement démontré que de nombreux points restent ouverts et que les recommandations de la Com‐ 57 Cf. pour une analyse détaillée de la décision Christian Busse, Klarheit oder nicht Klarheit – Das Urteil des EuGH vom 14.11.2017 zu den Kartellverbotsausnahmen im EU-Agrarmarktrecht, Wirtschaft und Wettbewerb 2018 (en parution), 438-444. 58 ABl. EU Nr. L 350 du 29.12.2017, 15. 59 Cf. pour une comparaison plus détaillée des recommandations de la Commission I et du règlement modificatif (EU) 2007/2393 Christian Busse, Der GMO-Abschnitt der Verordnung (EU) 2017/2393 im Lichte der Schlussfolgerungen der Kommissi‐ on I des Liller CEDR-Kongresses, Agrarrecht – Annuaire 2018 (en parution), 137-147. Rapport général de la Commission I 124 mission I peuvent servir de lignes directives à cet égard. Les préparatifs sont en cours pour les négociations en vue de la prochaine réforme de la PAC, qui devrait entrer en vigueur en 2021. Le domaine des « règles de concurrence dans l'agriculture » jouera certainement un rôle non néglige‐ able à cet égard. Sur l'insistance du Parlement européen, la Commission européenne a l'intention de présenter une proposition législative pour com‐ battre les pratiques commerciales déloyales d'ici la fin mars 2018. La Commission I a également abordé cette question, car un traitement équita‐ ble des uns et des autres au sein de la chaîne alimentaire est une condition préalable importante pour maximiser la valeur ajoutée des produits agri‐ coles. Rapport général de la Commission I 125 General Report of Commission I* Version anglaise – English version – Englische Version Prof. em. Dr. Paul Richli University of Lucerne Dr. Christian Busse Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture National reports and national rapporteurs Bulgaria Minko Georgiev/Henrich Meyer-GerbauletChristina Yancheva/Dimitar Grekov/Dafinka Grozdanova/Aneta Roycheva Germany RAin Birgit Buth, Deutscher Raiffeisenverband, Berlin France Catherine del Cont, enseignant-chercheur, University Nantes United Kingdom RA Rhodri Jones, Cardiff Italy Prof. Dr. Luigi Russo, University Ferrara Netherlands Mr. H.C.E.P.J. Janssen; advocaat of cousel, Kneppelhout & Korthal N.V. Austria Dr. Anton Reinl, Landwirtschaftskammer Österreich Poland Dr. Przemysław Litwiniuk; Dr. Konrad Marciniuk; Dr. Adam Niewiadoms‐ ki Switzerland RA Jürg Niklaus, Niklaus Rechtsanwälte, Dübendorf (Switzerland) Spain Prof. Dr. José Maria de la Cuesta Saenz Processing of the national reports: Christian Busse: United Kingdom, Italy, Netherlands, Poland Paul Richli: Bulgaria, Germany, France, Italy, Austria, Spain, Switzerland Reading notice: For countries which are not mentioned in the following overview for indi‐ vidual questions, the national reports do not contain any information on the respective questions. * Translation from German into English by Kim Lemmenmeier, MLaw, University of Lucerne. 126 Preface Conception of the general report Within the framework of the XXIX European Congress of Agricultural Law of the C.E.D.R., held from 21 to 23 September 2017 in Lille (France), the Commission I dealt with the theme "Competition rules in agriculture". This general report, written jointly by the two general rapporteurs, reflects the work of Commission I and is divided into four sections, which are structured as follows: The first section refers to the two previous C.E.D.R. congresses, which have already dealt with the relationship between competition law and rural law. One of the consequences of this situation is that the first significant dispute took place as early as 1967 (Point I.2). It follows a brief but, re‐ garding the topic of Commission I, important outline of the agricultural markets to order to understand the reasons why agricultural markets occu‐ py a special position in EU and national competition law (Point I.3). The introductory first section ends with a short overview of the Endives proce‐ dure before the European Court of Justice (ECJ) and the project of the socalled Omnibus Regulation prepared by the European Commission. These are two important events that took place within the EU during the prepara‐ tion and deliberations of Commission I and which had an impact on the understanding of the work of Commission I (Point I.4). In the second part of the general report, which is central in terms of ex‐ tent, the national reports are presented in summary form. This is subdivid‐ ed in order and on the basis of the questions submitted to the national rap‐ porteurs in the period preceding the Congress. The questionnaire is at‐ tached to this edition of the Congress proceedings (see page 47). The pre‐ sentation of the individual questions is concluded by a short synthesis of the general rapporteurs. As is customary, Commission I formulated conclusions and recommen‐ dations at the end of its scientific work. They are briefly reported in the third section and reference will also be made to the separate publication in this Congress volume. The fourth and last section takes up again the out‐ line at the end of the first section because it is a rare coincidence that rec‐ ommendations of a Commission at a European Congress of Rural Law are directly incorporated into the EU's legislative work and become relevant in the light of a recent ECJ ruling. It seems therefore advisable to broaden the temporal perspective of the European Congress of Agricultural Law in I. A. General Report of Commission I 127 order to briefly compare the recommendations of Commission I with the judgment of the ECJ in the Endives procedure delivered only after the Congress and also with the amending regulation (EU) 2017/2393. The lat‐ ter was the result of the project of the Omnibus Regulation and entered in‐ to force on January, 1st 2018. Previous occupation of the C.E.D.R. with agricultural competition law The C.E.D.R. dealt for the first time with competition law in agriculture at the IVth European Congress of Agricultural Law, which took place from 25 to 28 October 1967 in Bad Godesberg (Germany). Commission I of the then Congress addressed the subject of "Special agricultural competition rules in EEC law, with special consideration of national regulations". This discussion of the subject was at the beginning of the EU's agricultural an‐ titrust law, which was first regulated by Regulation No 26, in 1962. It is therefore not surprising that the interpretation of this regulation was at the heart of the Commission's work. The questionnaire at that time contained four questions, including how far the cartel exemption extended to certain manufactured goods and thereby went beyond primary production, the significance of the price control ban and whether agreements between the primary production and the trade or processing side were also permitted. At the end of its discus‐ sions, Commission I concluded that several points needed to be clarified quickly. One of these was the problem that Regulation No 26 applied only to intergovernmental circumstances. For purely national cases, it would be necessary to harmonise agricultural competition law "in order to eliminate the possibility of distortions of competition"1. The overview of the deli‐ berations at the time clearly shows how early the problems still under dis‐ cussion today were recognised. Subsequently, the subject was relegated to the background of the C.E.D.R, as market regulation within the framework of the EU's Common B. 1 See the conference report of Winkler, Der Europäische Agrarrechtskongress in Bad Godesberg vom 25. bis 28. Oktober 1967, Recht der Landwirtschaft 1967, 312– 318; see also the programme of the Congress conference, Recht der Landwirtschaft 1967, 275–276, und den Arbeitsbericht der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Agrarrecht (Ed.), Die kartellrechtliche Regelung für die Landwirtschaft im EWG-Recht unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der nationalen Regelungen (1970). General Report of Commission I 128 Agricultural Policy (CAP) left little room for competition. Only after the start of the liberalisation of the EU agricultural market did agricultural competition law again return to the focus of the C.E.D.R. The topic dealt with by Commission II of the XXII European Congress of Agricultural Law, which was held in Almerimar (Spain) from 23 to 25 October 2003, was: "The agricultural sector in the light of European and national compe‐ tition law"2. At this point, it is instructive to recall the recommendations of Commission II that were issued at that time: "With regard to this special position of agriculture, it is proposed: Taking into account the important contribution of common market orga‐ nisations to improving the contractual conditions under which agricultural products are sold, and because agriculture has a similar special position in all EU countries, work on European contractual clauses for agricultural products which strike a balance between the interests of producers and consumers must be continued. Considering the positive experience of pro‐ ducer organisations in Community law (e.g. Article 11 of Regulation (EC) No 2200/96 on the common organisation of the market in fruit and vegeta‐ bles) as well as in national competition law, which allows exceptions from the ban on cartels (e.g. for producer groups, organisations and coopera‐ tives) and vertical agreements (e.g. in France for inter-professional organi‐ sations in times of crisis), officials should examine in detail the possibility of introducing and regulating such organisations. Efforts should be made to give full effect to Regulation (EEC) No 26/62, which is justified by Article 81 par. 3 of the EC-Treaty. The appli‐ cation of the Regulation should take into account the special position of agriculture. It would be necessary to find resources at European level to solve the problem of `sales below cost price´ that exists in all Member States."3 These recommendations indicate that, on the one hand, the problems that had already been discussed in 1967 have not yet been satisfactorily re‐ solved and, on the other hand, new issues such as contract regulation and crisis management, have emerged. Commission I of the XXIX European Congress of Agricultural Law has therefore attempted, by means of a comprehensive questionnaire to cover and discuss the full range of topics in a coherent way. 2 See C.E.D.R. (Ed.), Le droit rural face à trois défis majeurs (2005), 123-201. 3 C.E.D.R. (note 2), 200 p. General Report of Commission I 129 The characteristics of agricultural markets as a link for agricultural competition law Preliminary remark The basic literature dealing with the characteristics of agricultural markets with regard to their classification under competition law seems to be not very extensive. There exists, however, some, mainly American, literature. This is probably due to the fact that US competition law, as far as can be seen, has the longest tradition of special treatment of agriculture. The spe‐ cial status dates back to the 1920s and is mainly enshrined in a law that is still in force, the Capper-Volstead Act. Characteristics of agricultural markets The specific characteristics of agricultural markets can be outlined as fol‐ lows: (1) First of all, the economic assessment of the market situation of pro‐ ducers of agricultural products is characterized by their large homo‐ geneity (known as commodities), for example wheat, potatoes, milk, eggs, meat, fruit or vegetables. Under these circumstances, there is comparatively little scope for price-relevant profiling of offer through the differentiation of offers4. After all, there is an increasing tendency towards a certain product differentiation, triggered, among other things, by requirements for food safety and ecology5. (2) Depending on the product segment, the number of producers is often very large in relation to the number of customers. A large number of small producers are confronted with a small number of large cus‐ tomers. There is an imbalance between the power of supply and the power of demand, which means that producers are regularly price tak‐ ers and not price setters respectively quantity adjusters and not quan‐ tity providers6. C. 1. 2. 4 Bernadette Andreosso-O’Callighan, The Economics of European Agriculture (2003), 59. 5 Andreosso-O’Callighan (note 4), 59. 6 See John B. Penson jr./Oral Capps jr./C. Parr Rosson III/Richard D. Woodward, In‐ troduction to Agricultural Economics, 6th ed. (2015), 148 p.; see also Christian General Report of Commission I 130 (3) Apart from the unfavourable market structure for producers of agri‐ cultural products, environmental factors must be taken into account, which place a heavier burden on agriculture than on most other sec‐ tors of the economy. Soil, water and solar radiation are three of the most important input factors of production. Even with modern tech‐ nology, these can only be imperfectly mastered7. (4) Furthermore, agriculture has to cope with climatic conditions and weather problems, as well as damage caused by natural events and diseases of plants and animals8. (5) Unlike many other sectors of the economy, production can only be converted or stopped within a considerably long timeframe. This ap‐ plies, in particular, to vegetable and grain farming as well as fruit growing and viticulture (only one harvest per year), meat production (animals have a considerable life cycle) and milk production (the number of dairy cows cannot be increased or reduced in the short term)9. (6) Finally, the price elasticity of demand for agricultural products is gen‐ erally low and has a special negative impact in an environment of ex‐ panding supply. In the case of low price elasticity of supply, the total yield decreases with an increase in volume10. For example, an in‐ crease in volume of one percent for certain homogeneous products (raw foods and fibre products) can lead to a five percent price reduc‐ tion11, although this depends largely on the respective production sec‐ tor and the current market and value-added structure. Busse, in: Jan Busche/Andreas Röhling (Hrsg.), Kölner Kommentar zum Kartell‐ recht, Band 1 (2017), § 28 GWB, n. 4, with special reference to the permanent de‐ creasing share of agriculture in the gross value of e.g. Germany; further on Patrik Ducrey, Marktmacht und schweizerische Landwirtschaft – Kartellrecht als Korrek‐ tiv?, Blätter für Agrarrecht 2008, 123–136, 134.; Paul Richli, Umsetzung der «idea‐ len» Lösung – Handlungsbedarf aus rechtlicher Sicht, Blätter für Agrarrecht 2006, 163–177, 165 p. 7 Penson jr./Capps jr./Rosson III/Woodward (note 6), 174 pp. 8 Andreosso-O’Callighan (Fn. 4), 49 ff. und 66 p. 9 Ulrich Koester, Grundzüge der landwirtschaftlichen Marktlehre, 4. Aufl. (2010), 94 p.; Andreosso-O’Callighan (note 4), 56 p. 10 Penson jr./Capps jr./Rosson III/Woodward (note 6), 201 pp.; Andreosso-O’Callig‐ han (note 4), 44 pp. 11 Penson jr./Capps jr./Rosson III/Woodward (note 6), 71 pp., 219 ; Koester (note 9), 35 pp., 52 pp. and 216. General Report of Commission I 131 (7) In addition, agriculture is an economic sector with a very high invest‐ ment need per worker, particularly in terms of revenue opportunities. In the USA, agriculture is even meant to achieve the highest invest‐ ment needs per worker12. (8) It should also be specified that an agricultural production a farm has comparatively high market exit barriers to overcome if it has to reori‐ ent itself. Generally, the soil can only be used for agricultural purpos‐ es. The buildings cannot easily be used for any other purpose because of constructional regulations and – depending on national law – be‐ cause of space utilisation regulations13. (9) While input costs for agriculture tend to increase in the long term, the opposite is true for agricultural commodity prices. The latter decrease over the long term compared to industrial products, resulting in a slow erosion of agricultural income compared to other income. This seems to be the real "farm problem"14. (10) In addition to these economic aspects, there are political and strategic reasons cited to justify state intervention in agricultural markets. Since the time of the Pharaohs15, the concern of food security has constantly motivated state intervention16. 12 Penson jr./Capps jr./Rosson III/Woodward (note 6), 219. 13 See Roger Zäch, Schweizerisches Kartellrecht, 2. Ed., (2005), point 111 pp.; Richli (note 6), 166. 14 Andreosso-O’Callighan (note 4), 58 p. 15 Genesis 41:1. 16 Andreosso-O’Callighan (note 4), page 62 and 66; Koester (note 9), page 216; Pe‐ ter C. Carstensen, Agricultural Cooperatives and the Law: Obsolete Statutes in a Dynamic Economy, Legal Studies Research Paper Series, Paper No. 1245, 58 South Dakota Law Review 463 (2013), 462–498, 462. General Report of Commission I 132 Overview of the origin of agricultural antitrust regulations: The Capper-Volstead Act and subsequent laws in the United States. Following significant market imbalances, the Capper-Volstead Act17 for cooperatives18 in the United States made as early as 1922 an exception to provisions of antitrust legislation for cooperatives, i.e. the Sherman An‐ titrust Act of 1890 and the Clayton Act of 1914. This is probably the old‐ est exception of the ban on cartels in the field of agricultural law, beeing in force for almost 100 years. It should be emphasised that only conduct within cooperations is privileged, whereas limiting competition through agreements with external partners still is prohibited19. The following laws in particular were intended to limit the conse‐ quences of antitrust legislation20: (1) The Packers and Stockyard Act of 1921, which eased antitrust legisla‐ tion in the field of marketing measures for livestock; (2) The Cooperative Marketing Act of 1926, which allowed farmers and their organisations to acquire, exchange and disseminate prices and market information; (3) The Robinson Patman Act of 1936, which mainly concerns price dis‐ crimination; (4) The Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937. All these legal measures are designed to develop a countervailing power against large customers21. This structure is even permissible up to a mar‐ ket share of one hundred percent, provided that this position is achieved solely by the result of own performance or by generally permitted 3. 17 A good overview of this decree and the practice in it offers Carstensen (note 16), 482 pp.; in detail about the story of the Capper-Volstead Act: Donald A. Frederick, Antitrust Status of Farmer Cooperatives: the story of Capper Volstead Act, USDA Cooperative information report, n° 59, September 2002, U.S. Department of Agri‐ culture; see also Margerite Zoeteweij-Turhan, The Role of Producer Organizations on the Dairy Market (2012), 131 pp. 18 A good typology of the relevant cooperatives is presented by Carstensen (note 16), 472 pp. Examples of cooperatives can be found under: Sarah Servin, Agricul‐ tural Cooperatives in the 21st Century: The progression towards local and regional food systems in the United States (2015). 19 Penson jr./Capps jr./Rosson III/Woodward (note 6), 165; Busse (note 6), point 44 pp. 20 Penson jr./Capps jr./Rosson III/Woodward (note 6), 166. 21 Carstensen (note. 16), 465 p., and references. General Report of Commission I 133 practices. The inadmissibility would then start not until the abusive ex‐ ploitation of the monopoly22. In practice, there appear to be cooperatives which are superior to the market counterparts in terms of market power. This has prompted some critical voices to call for a review of the Capper- Volstead Act23. Based on the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Agreement Act of 1937, a strengthening of the idea of developing countervailing power ex‐ ists when outsiders are forced to participate in cooperative measures by means of a state "Order"24. The Order means that the government imposes a kind of general obligation to prevent "free riders" benefiting from higher prices and by increasing volumes, from lower prices again25. This is about no less than the creation of state-sponsored cartels about quantities and prices for certain defined areas, not for the whole United States26. "Or‐ ders" are most common among dairy cooperatives in the dairy sector; there are few examples in other production areas27. Since the regulation of cooperative law is the responsibility of the states, the possibilities for "Or‐ ders" are not identical throughout the United States28. Contrary to criticism, a state report concludes that the concentration of dairy cooperatives is justified, particularly in the dairy industry, in order to maintain a certain market position29. It is not considered problematic that between 1950 and 2000, the number of cooperatives decreased from 10,035 to 3,346 while the total turnover of these cooperatives increased 22 See Werner Klohn, Die Farmer-Genossenschaften in den USA – Eine agrargeogra‐ phische Untersuchung (1990), 51. 23 Carstensen (note 16), 462 and 479 pp.; Anne McGinnis, Ridding the Law of Out‐ dated Statutory Exemptions to Antitrust Law: A Proposal for Reform, University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform 47(2014), 529–554. 24 Carstensen (note 16), 469 p. 25 American Bar Association, Section of Antitrust Law, Federal Statutory Exemption of Antitrust Law, Monograph 24, 2007, 36 pp.; Penson jr./Capps jr./Rosson III/ Woodward (note 6), 166. 26 American Bar Association (note 25), 94 and 114 pp. 27 American Bar Association (note 25), 95 and 116 p.; Carstensen (note 16), 476. 28 Carstensen (note 16), 478 p. 29 On the question of whether the Capper-Volstead Act also covers cooperative re‐ strictions on production, see Yulyia Bolotova, Agricultural Production Restrictions and Market Power: An Antitrust Analysis, Selected Paper prepared for presenta‐ tion at the Southern Agricultural Economics Association’s 2015 Annual Meeting (2015). General Report of Commission I 134 from 8.7 billion dollars to nearly 100 billion dollars30. The recommenda‐ tions at the end of this report do not aim to promote the demerger of coop‐ eratives, but at the need to establish competent management31. Moreover, the Capper-Volstead Act is not a free pass for any conduct prohibited by competition law for all other companies. In particular, in the context of unfair competition, the selling below cost price is generally in‐ terdicted32. Overall, it may be worthwhile to take a closer look at the development of agricultural cooperatives in the United States and the influence of the Capper-Volstead Act in light of the relationship between competition law and rural law. It seems that privileged treatment can also lead to excesses if growth processes on the supplier side lead to the creation of supplier monopolies. With such a turn of interests one would lead to a reversal of the situation as it occurred in Germany when the GWB (Act against Re‐ straints of Competition) was adopted. In the 1950s, a study group was set up under the direction of Franz Böhm, who had carried out a study tour to the United States33. The specific background of the deliberations of Commission I As indicated in the introduction to the Commission I questionnaire, the preparation and discussions of Commission I took place in a specific con‐ text, the knowledge of which is useful to fully understand the delibera‐ tions. First, there is the preliminary ruling procedure before the ECJ in Case C-671/15 (APVE), concerning a cartel agreement between market players on the French endive market. In 2012, the French competition authority classified the cartel as not covered by an agricultural cartel exemption and therefore imposed financial penalties. The Paris Court of Appeal, the first instance authority, to which this decision was appealed, contradicted this view. Then, in 2015, the Court of Cassation (second instance) referred two D. 30 United States Departement of Agriculture, Agricultural Cooperatives in the 21st Century, November 2002, 20. 31 Agricultural Cooperatives (note 30), 30 pp. 32 Klohn (note 22), 50. 33 Busse (note 6), point 44. General Report of Commission I 135 questions to the ECJ for a preliminary ruling in order to clarify the scope of cartel exemptions in EU agricultural market law. This was the first time that specific questions on the agricultural an‐ titrust regulations of the liberalised EU agricultural market organisation had been put before the ECJ, although not the current version, but the ver‐ sion in force until 2013 and its forerunner in the fruit and vegetable sector. Advocate General Wahl presented his Opinion in April 2017. It dealt in detail with the matter and reached fundamental conclusions34. The ECJ delivered its judgment only after the XXIX European Congress of Agri‐ cultural Law, so that merely the Opinion could be discussed in the context of the national reports and the deliberations of Commission I. The judg‐ ment to be rendered was therefore eagerly awaited. Secondly, in May 2017, on the basis of the final report of the Task Force on "Agricultural Markets", the European Parliament called for im‐ portant changes to the rules regulating recognised agricultural organisa‐ tions. These amendments should be made in the context of the Omnibus Regulation, which the European Commission presented in the form of a legislative proposal in September 2016. The Commission I included the proposals of the European Parliament in its deliberations. During the ses‐ sion of Commission I, the final phase of the so-called informal trialogue on the Omnibus Regulation between the European Parliament, the EU Council and the European Commission took place. The topic of Commis‐ sion I was therefore of direct legislative relevance. The European Com‐ mission was also represented at the inaugural event of the XXIX European Congress on Agricultural Law and discussed the Omnibus Regulation. Therefore, the participants of Commission I also awaited the outcome of the negotiations at EU level with curiosity. 34 Advocate General Wahl, conclusions of the 6.4.2017, C-671/15 (APVE), ECLI:EU:C:2017:281, point 28 ; see also below, point II.1.5.3. General Report of Commission I 136 Questions for the national reports and their replies, including a summary of the general rapporteurs. National antitrust law for the agricultural sector General antitrust law Are there in your country general national antitrust provisions with regard to the prohibition of cartels, the control of abuse of dominant positions and merger control? Bulgaria The Protection of Competition Act from 2008 deals with cartels, mergers between companies and dominant positions. Germany The Act against Restraints of Competition (GWB), enacted in 1957 and revised in 2013, contains provisions on all three areas. France National antitrust law is enshrined in Book IV of the French Commercial Code (code de commerce). This is not a legislation with prohibitions per se, but a middle ground solution (Article L420-1 and Article L420-2) that legally regulates anti-competitive agreements and behaviour (abuse of market power) if it affects the market (actual and potential effects). Ac‐ cording to the national report, abuse control is ineffective in the end. The French Commercial Code also contains a merger control system, compara‐ ble to the EU law (Article L430-1 et seq.). Important are the justifications for restrictions of competition and the individual exceptions to the compe‐ tition provisions (Article L420-4). United Kingdom The Competition Act of 1998 (CA 1998) deals with anticompetitive agree‐ ments, cartels and abuses of a dominant position. It patters Articles 101 and 102 of the TFEU. The Enterprise Act of 2002 (EA 2002) contains pro‐ visions on mergers. II. A. 1. General Report of Commission I 137 Italy The Antitrust Law No 287/1990 is applicable (Legge 10 ottobre 1990, no. 287 – Norme per la tutela della concorrenza e del mercato). Netherlands The Dutch Competition Act (Mededingingswet) of 1998 is applicable. Austria The Federal Law against Cartels and Other Restrictions of Competition (Kartellgesetz 2005 – KartG 2005) is applicable. Poland The Competition and Consumer Protection Act of 2007 applies. Switzerland Unlike EU law, the Cartel Act of 1995 is not based on the principle of pro‐ hibition, but on the principle of abuse, although a presumption applies to the inadmissibility of "hard cartels" (agreements on prices, territories and quantities). In practice the principle of abuse has a similar effect as the principle of prohibition. Spain The Law 15/2007 for the Protection of Competition (Defensa de la compe‐ tencia) applies, and has replaced the previous regulations. Synthesis by the general rapporteurs All the countries represented have their own antitrust legislation. Like EU competition law, these are mainly based on the principle of prohibition with regard to agreements restricting competition and incorporate an abuse and merger control. The competition laws of France and Switzerland do not formally prohibit cartels, but are based on the principle of abuse. How‐ ever, the results are not fundamentally different from those based on the regulation of the principle of prohibition. Antitrust Privileges for Agriculture in the Constitution Does your country's Constitution contain provisions on privileges for agriculture under anti-trust law? 2. General Report of Commission I 138 If yes, what is the content of these provisions? The situation under national law The constitutions of Bulgaria, Germany, France, Italy, the Nether‐ lands, Austria and Poland do not contain any provisions privileging agri‐ culture with regard to antitrust law. Article 104 par. 2 of the Federal Constitution of the Swiss Confedera‐ tion provides that, in addition to a reasonable degree of self-help in the agricultural sector and, derogating, if necessary, from the basic principle of economic freedom, the Confederation shall support land-based agricul‐ tural farms. On this basis, agriculture can be privileged in terms of compe‐ tition policy. Article 130 of the Spanish Constitution states that agriculture is obliged to modernise and develop. Although this provision has no direct effect, it can serve as a basis for provisions on agricultural inter-branch or‐ ganisations and codes of good conduct. Synthesis by the general rapporteurs As this is a very special subject, it is not surprising that state constitutions do not directly regulate the position of agriculture in competition law. They contain only indirect stipulations or regulations, respectively man‐ dates to act, which, if interpreted accordingly, may have an impact on competition law. This aspect is very far-reaching in Switzerland. Special antitrust law for the agricultural sector Is there in your country a specific national antitrust law for the agricultu‐ ral sector? If yes, what is the content of these provisions and where are they laid down? Germany In the agricultural sector, there is no specific law for antitrust legislation. However, the GWB contains an exception for agriculture from the ban on cartels. In particular, § 28 GWB regulates that agreements concluded by agricultural producers and also agreements and decisions taken by asso‐ ciations of such undertakings and groups of such associations concerning the production or sale of agricultural products and the use of common fa‐ 3. General Report of Commission I 139 cilities for the storage or processing of agricultural products are exempted from the prohibition of cartels, provided that they do not contain price-fix‐ ing or exclude competition. § 5 of the Agricultural Market Structure Act (AgrarMSG) also provides for an exception from the ban of cartels for recognised producer organisa‐ tions, recognised associations of recognised producer organisations and recognised inter-branch associations. France Special provisions for agriculture with specific possibilities of justification are found in Article L. 420-4 par. I, 2 of the French Commercial Code, in conjunction with Title III of Book VI of the Rural Code. Particularly ad‐ dressed in this respect are the sectorial contracts. It is also important to mention Article L420-1 par. 2, according to which competition rules are not applicable if restrictions of competition can be justified by economic progress, it is provided that consumers appropriately participate in the ad‐ vantage and competition is not excluded for a substantial part of the prod‐ ucts. The practice of restaining competition rules is very restrictive, result‐ ing in no significant discharge for the agriculture sector of the competition rules. In addition, the following laws are worth mentioning: The Law of 27 July 2010 on the modernisation of agriculture and fish‐ ing (Loi du 27 juillet 2010 de modernisation de l'agriculture et de la pêche, LMAP), amended by the Law on the future of 13 October 2014 (Loi d’avenir du 13 octobre 2014), codified in the Rural Code. These Arti‐ cle L632-24 et seq. on contractualisation are linked to the EU dairy pack‐ age of 2012, on which the national report indicates the following risk: the minimum price guaranteed by inter-branch associations could be inadmis‐ sible under competition law. Reference indicators that tend to set recom‐ mended prices are also sensitive. Producers should remain free to set prices. This attitude creates legal uncertainty and is responsible for the fact that contractualisation has only been established in a few production sec‐ tors. Although contractualisation would improve transparency, it does not lead to an increase in income in agriculture. Law No. 2016-1691 (known as Loi Sapin 2) aims to strengthen the pos‐ ition of farmers in the food chain by balancing the power asymmetry be‐ tween producers and downstream stages. Regarding the instruments, it deals mainly with contractualisation. According to it, contracts must be based on various benchmarks. General Report of Commission I 140 United Kingdom The 1998 CA contains exceptions to general antitrust law with regard to cooperation agreements between farmers and their associations. These ex‐ ceptions concern the production and sale of agricultural products and the use of common facilities. Certain restrictive conditions must be respected, such as the fact that agreements are only concluded between farmers (and therefore not, for example, between processors) and must not oblige farm‐ ers to charge a uniform price for their agricultural products. Apart from that, there are very few specific antitrust laws in the area of agriculture. Netherlands There is only a Ministry of Economy handbook from 2015, which ex‐ plains the possibilities for cooperation between recognised producer orga‐ nisations, recognised associations of producer organisations and recog‐ nised inter-branch associations in the agricultural sector, without infring‐ ing general antitrust law. According to the country report, the manual is superfluous and contains nothing new. Austria The KartG contains in its § 2 Paragraph 2 No. 5 special rules for agricul‐ ture. It exempts agreements, decisions and practices of agricultural pro‐ ducers, associations of agricultural producers or associations of such asso‐ ciations of producers, in particular on the production or marketing of agri‐ cultural products, provided that they do not contain pricefixing and do not exclude competition. Switzerland With the exception of Article 171a of the Agriculture Act of 29 April 1998 (LwG) on the so-called countertrades of dominant companies on the mar‐ ket, there is no nominal competition law in the agricultural sector. How‐ ever, the Cartel Act contains a legal basis for the coordination mechanism between agricultural law and antitrust law. Thus, according to Article 3 par. 1, other provisions are reserved insofar as they do not allow competi‐ tion in a market. These include i.a. provisions which establish an official market or price system (lit. a), or which grant specific undertakings special rights to enable them to fulfil public duties (lit. b). Such reserved provi‐ sions are just also found in agricultural law. In this respect, the following provisions in particular must be pointed out: General Report of Commission I 141 The LwG contains provisions on self-help by agricultural organisations, on the publication of the reference prices of agricultural organisations and on the Confederation's support for the self-help measures by such organi‐ sations (Article 8 et seq.). Switzerland has two forms of agricultural orga‐ nisation: inter-branch organisations and producer organisations. A branch organisation is an association of producers of individual products or prod‐ uct groups with processors and, possibly, with traders (Article 8, par. 2). The promotion of quality and sales, as well as the adaptation of produc‐ tion and supply to the requirements of the market, are concerns of the in‐ ter-branch organisation or producer organisations according to the selfhelp measures of Article 8 par. 1 LwG. According to Article 8 para. 1 bis LwG, the inter-branch organisations may draw up standard contracts. A special regime applies to milk purchase contracts (cf. Article 37 LwG). The inter-branch and producer organisations may also publish guideline prices to which suppliers and buyers have agreed (Article 8a LwG). The Swiss legislator thus gives agricultural organisations the opportunity to co‐ ordinate themselves in an extremely sensitive area of competition policy. Companies cannot, as is the usual case for guideline prices, be obliged to comply with them. No guideline price may be fixed for the prices applied to consumers. In addition, the Federal Council is authorised to extend self-help mea‐ sures to non-members (so-called free riders) in the areas of quality and sales promotion as well as in the areas of adaptation of production and supply to market requirements upon a corresponding application from the inter-branch and producer organisations. The extension of guideline prices to non-members is excluded. This provision can be found in Article 1 of the Ordinance on the Extension of Self-help Measures of Inter-branch and Producer Organisation of 30 October 2002 (VBPO). Synthesis by the general rapporteurs As far as the national reports contain information, there are direct or indi‐ rect special provisions for agriculture in the antitrust laws or regulations of the very countries. Their aim is to favour certain agreements or practices that restrict competition. The focus is mainly on collective action in pro‐ ducer organisations and their associations with regard to the production and sale of agricultural products, with the exception, however, of fixing prices and quantities. There is also a tendency towards contractualisation. The conditions for exemptions from the prohibition of cartels and abuses are not entirely consistent. In many cases, they lean upon on the exemp‐ General Report of Commission I 142 tion of the EU from agricultural antitrust law. Not all national reports have the same expectations regarding the derogations. The French report, in particular, regrets the possibility that minimum price guarantees by interbranch organisations could be inadmissible. In Switzerland, the publica‐ tion of reference prices is expressly permitted. Special authorities for agricultural antitrust law Is in your country the application of agricultural antitrust law entrusted to specific authorities? There is in none of the ten countries represented by the reports in Com‐ mission I a special authority for the enforcement of agricultural antitrust law. The general competition authorities are responsible. Procedures in agricultural antitrust law during the last decade In your country were there, in the last decade particularly important na‐ tional administrative or judicial procedures underpinning agricultural an‐ titrust law (prohibition of cartels; control of misuse of dominant positions; merger control)? If yes, what was the content of these procedures and were the decisions ta‐ ken on the basis of national or Union law? Bulgaria Four procedures in agricultural antitrust law are cited as examples: (1) In 2011, in order to protect competition, the Commission discovered cartels for sugar, cooking oil, flour and eggs. (2) In 2013, antitrust procedures were initiated against suppliers of cook‐ ing oil. The antitrust order was confirmed by the highest Administra‐ tive Court in 2014. (3) The Commission for the Protection of Competition initiated a volun‐ tary commitment against unfair competition concerning laboratories accredited to control the composition and quality of milk. The reason for this is the obligation to respect the principle of proportionality (Decision No ACT 962-10.08.2017). 4. 5. General Report of Commission I 143 (4) Decision No ACT 940-10.08.2017 concluded that there was unfair competition in the production and sale of cheese. Germany The national report describes particularly important activities of the Fed‐ eral Cartel Office (BKartA): (1) Milk Sector Inquiry Over the last decade, the milk sector has been the subject of a broad market investigation, which was concluded in a final report in Jan‐ uary 201235. During this investigation, the BKartA examined the en‐ tire national milk market and, in particular, the concentration of dairies, contractual relations on the raw milk market and market in‐ formation systems, including reference price systems. (2) Pilot process concerning delivery relationships of a certain dairy In 2016, the BKartA again turned its attention to the milk market dur‐ ing a pilot process involving a private dairy. This was an examination of milk delivery relationships. In March 2017, the BKartA published a progress report on this subject, which is viewed extremely critically by the dairy industry. Many of the points discussed strongly interfere with company law and contractual relations, without an obvious vio‐ lation of competition law. Rather, it gives the impression that the BKartA is pursuing agricultural and market policy concerns, particu‐ larly with regard to the relationship between milk producers and dairies. The procedure is still ongoing36. The BKartA criticises, in particular, the milk producer’s obligation to deliver in its entirety, including the associated obligation of dairies to accept the milk in its entirety, because, in the opinion of the authority, they encourage overproduction. In addition, the BKartA discusses the notice periods, generally two years, considered too long by the BKar‐ 35 See the following link: http://www.bundeskartellamt.de/SharedDocs/Publikation/ DE/Sektoruntersuchungen/ Sektoruntersuchung%20Milch%20%20Abschlussbe‐ richt.pdf?__blob=publicationFile&v=4. 36 The progress report can be consulted under the following link: http://www.bundes kartellamt.de/SharedDocs/Publikation/DE/Berichte/Sachstand_Milch.pdf?blob= publicationFile&v=3; for a critical evaluation of the progress report see Christian Busse, Der Sachstandsbericht des Bundeskartellamtes vom 13.3.2017 zu dem Ver‐ fahren "Lieferbedingungen für Rohmilch", Agrarrecht – Annuaire 2018, 167-180. General Report of Commission I 144 tA, and the retroactive fixing of milk prices. The BKartA is also checking a decoupling of delivery obligations and membership. According to the national report, the cooperative dairies raise the fol‐ lowing objections to the arguments put forward by the BKartA: The registered cooperative is a company with a personal structure and an unlimited number of members. At the heart of the cooperative is its main objective, to be defined according to § 1 par. 1 of the German Cooperatives Act. The objective of the cooperative is precisely to promote the single holding of the agricultural member. In this con‐ text, it is important that the milk-producing member has voluntarily chosen the structure of a cooperative as a partner in order to work in and with it according to democratic principles. The exploitation of possibilities provided by company law does not constitute a violation of competition rules. As far as exclusivity, the obligation of full delivery and the obligation of full acceptance of the delivery are concerned, these can be justified under company law. The members of the cooperative have the possi‐ bility to adjust their delivery obligations at any time by democratic majority decisions. Furthermore, the two-year notice period is well justifiable. Because reliable supply relationships and a constant sup‐ ply of raw materials between agricultural producers and dairy cooper‐ atives are essential points, which also result from the funding objec‐ tive, certain maturities are required. The decoupling of supply rela‐ tions and cooperative memberships suggested by the BKartA contra‐ dicts the very purpose of the dairy cooperative. It was created – and this has been explicitly underlined by agricultural producers who act voluntarily in the management of the cooperative – to promote the ac‐ quisition and economic situation of its members. If delivery relation‐ ship and membership relationship are decoupled, the fulfilment of the company's objective would also be questioned. The BKartA also criticises retroactive fixing of price instead of predetermined price agreements. Under company law, it is customary to generate the profit first and then distribute it. In order to provide the agricultural milk producer continuously with the corresponding means of production, advance payments are generally made in the co‐ operative sector and a final payment is made at the end of the year when the actual amount of the annual profit is set. The reference to the possibility of quantity control of the dairy is not based on a possible violation of competition law. The issue of internal General Report of Commission I 145 control measures for the quantities of dairy products is not a competi‐ tion law issue that can be addressed by the BKartA. This should therefore remain a matter for each dairy to decide. The BKartA’s last indication, which concerns the protection through producer organisations, disregards the fact that, from a historical point of view, the cooperative is a classic producer association with or without official recognition. In the past, some dairy cooperatives have been recognised under the former Market Structure Act. However, this recognition has often not been maintained on the base of the re‐ vised AgrarMSG due to a lack of necessity. The main reason for this was the loss of public support funds for recognised producer organi‐ sations. Agricultural producers are always free to create new producer organisations. It is also possible for existing dairy cooperatives to seek for the status of a recognised producer organisation. These are again not violations of competition law or necessities of competition law. Exceptions to antitrust law exist in both cases, i.e. without state recognition of the producer organisation in § 28 GWB as well as with such a recognition in § 5 AgrarMSG (3) Penalty proceedings In addition, there have been a number of penalty proceedings for vio‐ lations of the prohibition of cartels in the agricultural sector, particu‐ larly for illegal price-fixing. These are generally sectors downstream of the primary production, such as cereals/mills, sugar factories, etc. An example is the penalty proceeding in the sugar sector, which led to high fines in 2014 for allegations of creating regional cartels. Only national competition law was applied in these proceedings37. France The Competition Authority (autorité de la concurrence – ADLC) has car‐ ried out intensive consultative activities, either on its own initiative or at the request of the authorities and professional organisations. It advocated increased use of legal instruments to strengthen the position of producers in the food chain, in particular for more contractual solutions, mergers and common structures to develop quality labels. In this context, price agree‐ 37 See under the following link: http://www.bundeskartellamt.de/Shared Docs/ Meldung/DE/Pressemitteilungen/2014/18_02_2014_Zucker.html. General Report of Commission I 146 ments are also taboo. Producers are described as economically and legally independent actors, which is why they must set prices individually. In the field of merger control, the ADLC has constantly approved merg‐ ers in the agricultural sector, particularly in the field of cooperatives, in or‐ der to strengthen the bargaining power of producers towards their buyers. Vertical integrations have also been permitted, particularly in the dairy sector. As already mentioned, the practice is very restrictive as far as the as‐ sessment of restrictions of competition through agreements is concerned. In particular, the ADLC has prohibited agreements in Farines (flour) and Chicorée (endive) disputes. The Endives case38 deserves special attention because it was successfully brought before the Paris Court of Appeal39. The ADLC appealed this decision to the Court of Cassation. The latter re‐ ferred the case to the ECJ for a preliminary ruling. Advocate General Wahl delivered his conclusions on April 6, 201740. The ECJ ruling may become of great importance, as it could determine the scope of the excep‐ tions in rural law from competition law in a fundamental manner. This is also accompanied by the possibilities or impossibilities for producer orga‐ nisations to improve their market position. In the Endives case, the reactions of the parties concerning the ADLC's decision are of particular interest. The following arguments against the de‐ cision have been put forward by the agricultural sector: vegetable and fruit production is going through a considerable crisis, partly due to price pres‐ sure emanating from the customer side. The decision was taken at an inop‐ portune moment because the CAP reform was intended to strengthen the position of producer organisations. The decision contradicts efforts to strengthen the position of the common market organisations (organisations communes des marchés; OCM) of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013. The Paris Court of Appeal took a position contrary to that of the ADLC. It placed the pursuit of the objectives of Article 39 TFEU above the pur‐ 38 Decision of the ADLC 12-D-08 of March 6, 2012, Secteur de la production et de la commercialisation des endives. 39 Decision of May 15, 2014 of the Paris Court of Appeal, Pôle 5 – Chambre 5-7, http://www. autoritedelaconcurrence.fr/doc/ca_12d08.pdf – see Catherine Del Cont, The decision of the Paris Court of Appeal of May 14, 2014, «l’affaire endi‐ ves»: quels enseignements pour l’avenir de la « relation spéciale » entre agricul‐ ture et concurrence ?, Rivista di diritto agrario 2015, Fascicolo II, page 84-109. 40 See also I.4 and IV of the present report. General Report of Commission I 147 suit of the objectives of consumer and competition policy. It overturned the ADLC decision and therefore also the fines of 3.6 million euros in its ruling of 6 March 2012. According to the French report, the Paris Court of Appeal took a position contrary to the opinion of the EU institutions, which consider that competition law takes precedence over agricultural law in the light of Article 42 TFEU and Regulation (EC) No 1184/2006. This is a paradigm shift from the principle of the applicability of competi‐ tion law, restricted by agricultural policy exceptions. In order to justify the fixing of the minimum price, the Paris Court of Appeal relied on a French law from 1962 and previous EU regulations, taking into account the law applicable to the dispute at that time. According to the national report, the most interesting and unusual argument is that the objective of adequate in‐ come guarantees in accordance with Article 39 par. 1 lit. b TFEU may in itself justify the fixing of minimum prices. This view contradicts the pre‐ vious application of law and jurisprudence at the EU level. On the ADLC's appeal, the Court of Cassation had to review the judge‐ ment of the Paris Court of Appeal. A judgment was issued on December 8, 2015, in which the Court referred to the ECJ a request for a preliminary ruling41. The essential second question is whether the rules laid down in the various EU regulations concerning producer organisations, interbranch organisations and operators' organisations (in particular Regulation [EC] No 1182/2007 and Regulation [EC] No 1234/2007) which set objec‐ tives for these agricultural organisations, and which include the regulation of producer prices and the adaptation of supply demand, must be interpret‐ ed in such a way that practices to fix collective minimum pricing as well as agreements on the quantities of products to be placed on the market and the exchange of strategic information escape the prohibition of competi‐ tion arrangements when they serve to pursue these objectives. The conclusions of Advocate General Wahl's on April 6, 201742 regard‐ ing the decisive second question can be summarised as follows: collective price agreements are anti-competitive, harm the proper functioning of competition and are therefore in principle inadmissible. As regards to the bundling of quantities to stabilise prices, the latter is authorised insofar as it takes place under an internal agreement, but not in an agreement with third parties. The exchange of strategic information is allowed under cer‐ 41 Decision No 1056 of the 8.12.2015 (available under the link: www.autoritedela‐ concurrence.fr/doc/ cass_endives_12d08.pdf). 42 Advocate General Wahl (note 34). General Report of Commission I 148 tain conditions, namely where the market is not very concentrated, the in‐ formation is public and aggregated, there is no link to price bilding and when it is not possible to indirectly determine the supplier's costs. The national report has a critical view of the approach of Advocate General Wahl, as it would not provide a definitive clarification. In particu‐ lar, the report criticises the fact that the Advocate General had adopted the doctrine of price fixing regardless of the special situation of rural law. Ac‐ cording to the national report, Article 209 of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 prohibits only fixed prices, but not minimum prices, which allow higher prices and therefore do not lead to uniform prices. Under these circumstances, the price-related measures were wrongly limited to the milk, olive oil and beef sectors. The national report also takes a critical look at the distinction between internal and external bundling of quanti‐ ties. United Kingdom Farms very rarely attain significant market shares (except for specialised cereal growers). There are therefore hardly any antitrust issues at the pro‐ ducer level in connection with cooperation. In a 2011 OFT (Office of Fair Trading) document, no reference is made to competition cases related to agricultural operations since the introduction of the CA (Competition Act) in 1998, which in itself justifies agricultural holdings, which are small overall and have no significant impact on the market. In recent years, the planned merger between Dairy Crest and Muller has provided grounds for investigations by the Competition and Markets Au‐ thority (CMA). A second phase of the investigation was envisaged if Muller had not taken appropriate measures. There were concerns that Muller and Arla would, after their merger, be the only milk purchasers with sufficient size to supply the supermarkets. This could lead to higher prices for consumers. The inverse of this argument, however, is that this change could lead to stability and a more sustainable dairy market in the United Kingdom. After agreeing to process milk for a smaller competitor, the long procedure was completed. Muller acquired Dairy Crest's dairy business. This follows Muller's acquisition of Robert Wiseman Dairies in 2012. The Arla cooperative diary, which covers several Member States, should also be mentioned. It acquired Milk Link, a cooperative company created to develop a mainly cooperative business in the United Kingdom. Initially, the European Commission was concerned about the reduction of General Report of Commission I 149 competition that would occur in a long-term perspective. When this matter had been clarified, the merger could be effected. Arla and Muller are, without doubt, the two main players who have consolidated the milk market in the United Kingdom, which explains why CMA and the European Commission have seen problems regarding com‐ petition. Although there is a significant share of ownership in the hands of producers at Arla, the challenge remains that milk producers have a weak market position and Arla influences the pricing of their products. Netherlands The country report highlights the comparatively high number of proce‐ dures and specifically mentions the following cases: • Administrative and civil antitrust procedures in the sectors paprika, pearl onions, tree nurseries and the Greenery/Oussoren case; • Merger control procedures: Bloemenveiling Aalsmeer/FloraHolland; Tradition – WestVeg – Unistar – Brassica-Group; Van Drie/Alpuro; • Informal information procedures: Kompany; FresQ; Van Nature & Best of Four; • Cases concerning sustainability: agreement on antibiotic resistance in the livestock farming sector; castration of pigs under anaesthesia; Chicken of Tomorrow. (1) According to the national report, the long-time pepper case, on which the following is highlighted, is of particular interest: The case started in 2009 with an application to the leniency pro‐ gramme and ended with a settlement in 2016. It concerned a combi‐ nation of coordination of daily and weekly prices, market sharing and the exchange of sensitive data between three recognised producer or‐ ganisations in the fruit and vegetable sector. The Dutch competition authority (Autoriteit Consument en Markt; ACM) concluded that the producer organisations violated both the Dutch and EU antitrust law. This opinion was confirmed by the Rotterdam District Court. Four aspects make this case particularly interesting. Firstly, all three producer organisations used the services of an agricultural consulting firm to coordinate their behaviour with one another. This firm was classified as part of the cartel, in accordance with the ECJ's trust rul‐ ing. Secondly, two of the producer organisations claimed that they acted in a factual manner as an association of producer organisations and had therefore been exempted from the prohibition on cartels. The General Report of Commission I 150 ACM did not follow that argument, because it was not an association recognised under EU law. Thirdly, the ACM limited the relevant mar‐ ket to the Dutch pepper market during the "Holland season". Due to this rather narrow market definition, the behaviour in question has had a significant impact on competition. Fourthly, the ACM based the calculation of the cartel's fines on the aggregation of the turnover of the individual members and the concerned producer organisations. During the proceedings, the ACM had to reduce the fines, because otherwise they could not have been paid. All producers had left the penalised producer organisations, so that the producer organisations no longer had any financial resources at their disposal. The ACM then requested that the former producers participate in the payment of fines of the producer organisations. (2) The rapporteur goes into more detail in the pearl onion case: Based on an initial suspicion by the authorities, the ACM concluded that five Dutch companies that produced, marketed and sold pearl onions violated Dutch and EU antitrust law by agreeing on the maxi‐ mum cultivation area for pearl onions. This agreement was originally concluded within the Pearl Onion Growers' Cooperative. After this cooperative was dissolved in 2003, the agreement was maintained by its former members. In addition, the cartel members took over the fa‐ cilities of the pearl onion producers who had ceased production. This prevented new producers form entering the market and supported the agreement on areas under cultivation. Furthermore, the companies concerned informed each other for several years about the prices they charged their customer for pearl onions. One of the concerned companies invoked the agricultural cartel ex‐ emption. This argument was rejected because the conditions of the exception were not met. Thus, the agreement was not necessary to at‐ tain the objectives of the CAP. The objective of achieving reasonable consumer prices has, in particular, been compromised. The com‐ panies also pointed out that the cooperative had acted as a producer organisation within the meaning of the common organisation of agri‐ cultural market. However, since the State had not recognised the co‐ operative as a producer organisation, this argument did not apply ei‐ ther. General Report of Commission I 151 Switzerland Overall, Switzerland has an extensive experience in agricultural antitrust law, though most of which goes back for more than ten years43. Since 2007, merger control cases have been in the foreground. The following is a case that led to an intervention by the competition authority (Migros/ Denner AG). Beforehand, a case on market power control will be present‐ ed (egg trade). (1) Egg trade Following a complaint filed by feedstuff producer Egli AG in 2008, the Secretariat of the Competition Commission dealt with the egg trade as part of a preliminary investigation44. The preliminary investi‐ gation revealed that, pursuant to Article 7 CartA, Lüchinger + Schmid AG did not hold a dominant position, either on its own or collectively with other egg distributors, namely Frigemo AG and Ei AG. The au‐ thority stated that the decision was based on insufficient symmetries, lack of market transparency and different strategies of the three com‐ panies. This applies even if the existence of competition in the down‐ stream retail market is denied. In addition, the agreement between Lüchinger + Schmid AG and egg producers concerning feedstuff was not qualified as an inadmissible agreement on competition pursuant to Article 5 CartA. (2) Migros/Denner AG In 2007, Migros notified the Competition Commission of its intention to merge with Denner AG45. The Commission's preliminary investi‐ gation predicted a substantial weakening of competition as a result of the merger. However, an overall assessment did not provide sufficient evidence of the existence of a dominant position of the parties. Al‐ 43 See the overview of antitrust practice in agriculture in Switzerland by Jürg Ni‐ klaus/Benjamin Zünd, Flurbegehung durch das schweizerische Agrarkartellrecht, Schweizerische Juristen-Zeitung (SJZ) 2015, 1–10, 5 pp. Agricultural market surveillance under antitrust legislation generally addresses the problem of super‐ vising dominant suppliers and customers in agriculture or controlling farmers' grouping efforts. The overview is therefore divided into two parts: on the one hand, antitrust surveillance of the upstream and downstream stages of agriculture and, on the other hand, antitrust surveillance of agriculture. 44 Recht und Politik des Wettbewerbs (RPW) 2011/2, 230. 45 RPW 2008/1, 129; see Bischofszell Nahrungsmittel AG/Weisenhorn Food Specia‐ lities GmbH, RPW 2010/1, 184. General Report of Commission I 152 though the market analysis resulted in a collective dominant position for Migros/Denner AG and Coop, the competition authority autho‐ rised the merger based on the principle of proportionality with condi‐ tions. These conditions should guarantee operational independence and the brand Denner for a certain period of time. Spain Over the past ten years, there have mainly been administrative procedures. Under national competition law, the Market and Competition Council (Consejo de los Mercados y de la Competencia; CNMC) has ruled in par‐ ticular on milk production (judgment of March 3, 2015) and rabbit meat (judgment of June 14, 2011). Due to EU competition law, mainly, a merg‐ er in the sugar industry has been decided on46. Synthesis by the general rapporteurs The national reports show that the number of administrative and judicial procedures in agricultural antitrust law, which have been particularly im‐ portant over the last ten years, varies considerably. The Dutch report has the largest number of cases listed, while the British report only mentions merger procedures. Some of these proceedings were conducted under na‐ tional antitrust law and others under EU antitrust law. In these proceed‐ ings, agricultural competition law has, on several occasions, played a role. The focus is on anti-competitive agreements, most of which have been declared illegal, in particular when they are relevant to price fixing. In contrast, merger control procedures have hardly led to prohibition orders. The competition authorities mainly considered that the mergers were justi‐ fied in order to strengthen the competitive position of the merger partners. In the United Kingdom, this applies in particular to the mergers between Crest and Muller and between Arla and Milk Link, which led to the acqui‐ sition of the dairy activities, leading to a certain consolidation of the dairy market. In Switzerland, the focus was put on merger activities in the egg trade and between Migros, the largest retailer, and Denner AG, the dis‐ counter. In some merger cases, after all, certain conditions had to be met. The Endives case in France is particularly outstanding. Unlike the com‐ petition authority, the French court of first instance held that the achieve‐ ment of the objective of adequate income support for European agricultur‐ 46 TJUE Aa. c.415/2001, decision of the 20.11.2003. General Report of Commission I 153 al policy (Article 34 par. 1 lit. b TFEU) could also justify agreements on prices and quantities. The Court of Cassation, to which the decision of the Paris Court of Appeal was appealed, referred questions to the ECJ in a preliminary ruling procedure. The Advocate General could not follow the Court of Appeal's conclusions in an undifferentiated manner. He essential‐ ly only judged the bundling of the offer within cooperatives to be lawful (cf. also point I.4 on the procedure and point IV on the subsequent judg‐ ment of the ECJ). Germany's national report refers to the pilot procedure concerning sup‐ ply relations in a dairy. Some of the positions of the BKartA are particu‐ larly controversial: the exclusive relationships, i.e. the obligation for pro‐ ducers to deliver milk in its entirety and the obligation for dairies to accept milk in its entirety, should be too restrictive under competition law, as might be the two-year notice periods for the withdrawal of producer coop‐ eratives. The sector is opposed to this approach under competition law and asserts the view under cooperative law, which represents the legality of these regulations and must prevail. In the Netherlands, the pepper case is highlighted. The national compe‐ tition authority concluded that, in particular, the producer organisations had agreed to illegal price fixing. The authority rejected, notably, the argu‐ ment put forward by the producer organisations that they had, in fact, act‐ ed as an association of producer organisations, so that therefore the prohi‐ bition of cartels would not be applicable. Similarly, the authority did not accept the argument that the relevant market was too narrowly defined by limiting itself to the territory of the Netherlands. It is also noteworthy that, in the pearl onion case, the competition authority considers that the contin‐ uation of cooperation agreements, after the dissolution of the cooperative, on maximum cultivation areas among former cooperation members in‐ fringes antitrust law. Regulations and projects on unfair food chain practices In your country, are there legal provisions or a non-binding code of con‐ duct on unfair trading practices in the food chain (for example with re‐ gard to the pricing of agricultural products)? Would you consider it rea‐ sonable to regulate such unfair practices and if yes, what should be the content of such regulation? 6. General Report of Commission I 154 Bulgaria The Consumer Protection Act covers unfair business practices. A long journey has been undertaken to protect consumer rights. From 2003 on‐ wards, all EU legislation has been adopted successively. Anti-dumping be‐ haviour is covered by the Protection of Competition Act. There have been no cases of agricultural infringements in the last ten years. Germany Both the GWB and the Unfair Competition Act (UWG) contain provisions on unfair practices. In the context of abuse control, § 20 GWB regulates prohibited conduct for companies with relative or superior market power. This also includes the prohibition on selling food at a price below the cost price (§ 20 par. 3 GWB). Such a sale is only permitted if a factual justifi‐ cation – for example the perishability of the food – can be proven. The UWG contains comprehensive prohibitions that apply to all unfair, aggres‐ sive or deceptive commercial activities. It also deals with enforcement of claims as well as with fines and even criminal penalties. These rules apply to all companies, regardless of their activities. Hence, there exist no spe‐ cific rules for agriculture. But they are not necessary due to the overall le‐ gal framework. According to the country report, no additional regulations are needed. However, care must be taken to ensure that there are no distor‐ tions of competition in international trade due to the absence of voluntary or legal regulations. United Kingdom An important development, particularly for producers, is the Grocery Code and the Arbiter’s Office of the Grocery Code. Long before this insti‐ tution was created in 2013, large supermarkets were subject to significant criticism regarding the treatment of suppliers – often many smaller com‐ panies. Missconduct, such as late payments and delivery discounts, has come to daylight. The arbitrator was appointed to oversee relations between supermarkets and their suppliers in accordance with the Grocery Code. These regula‐ tions do not directly affect producers, as producers rarely supply retailers directly. Nevertheless, a consultation was conducted in January 2017 to extend the arbitrator's mandate to small producers. The answers are in the evaluation stage. The arbitrator, Mrs. Christine Tacon CBE, warned against overly ambitious expectations given the basically identical con‐ cerns of the suppliers. Dealing with complaints concerning pricing is be‐ General Report of Commission I 155 yond her jurisdiction. She can only check the terms of the contract. Pricing is left to the market. One has to look forward to the next steps to see how the rules will affect not only producers, processors and retailers, but also the many companies that operate between producers and end consumers. Following the recent crisis in the dairy sector, a code has been intro‐ duced in this sector to establish basic rules in agreement with producers and processors. However, the fact that the code is voluntary demonstrates that despite existing shortcomings, the government is not willing to inter‐ vene in the free market. Italy Reference is made to Article 62 of Law Decree 1/2012. This food chain regulation goes beyond the contractual regulation of the Common Market Organisation and is therefore not fully compatible with it. Netherlands There was only one pilot procedure to develop a code of fair trade practices for agricultural products (Gedragscode eerlijke handelspraktijken agrofood). According to the Minister of Economic Affairs, the pilot project did not reveal any serious problems. Austria In Austria, there are no specific food chain regulations. The general rules of antitrust, competition and fair trade law apply. A regulatory framework on an EU level dealing with unfair commercial practices is welcomed in the national report. A "code of conduct" should in particular contain the following elements: transfer of risk, trading practices, non-objective in‐ fringement of freedom of decision, abuse of exploitation. Poland Poland has a law from 2006 on measures against unfair trade in agricultur‐ al and food products. Buyers and suppliers are prohibited by law from us‐ ing contractual advantages unfairly. The Polish legislator considers that the exploitation of contractual advantages is unfair if it damages principles of morality and endangers or violates the essential interests of the other party. Article 7 par. 3 of the Act deals with the unfair exploitation of con‐ tractual practices. Unfair competitive behaviour is recorded by the Presi‐ dent of the Office of Competition and Consumer Protection. General Report of Commission I 156 Switzerland Switzerland has no legal regulations against unfair practices in food chain. The Federal Law against Unfair Competition of 1986 (UWG) is applica‐ ble. However, some approaches to a non-binding code of conduct exist. The Association for the Promotion of the Quality Strategy for the Swiss Agriculture and Food Industry was founded on the 24th of November 201647. The signatories are of the conviction that Swiss food must be char‐ acterised by high quality. This is the only way to meet the needs of con‐ sumers and position products successfully on the market. According to the association, this objective is easier to achieve if partnerships are entered into and maintained within the value chain. The undersigned members have signed a charter which contains certain basic statements on strong quality leadership and partnership as well as a common market offensive. The regulation of unfair practices to some extent seems sensible. Cautious approaches can be found in the regulation of contracts (cf. Article 8 par. 1bis and Article 37 LwG). Spain It exists he Act (12/2013) on measures to improve the functioning of the food chain (ley para medidas para la mejora para la mejora del fun‐ cionamiento de la cadena alimentaria; LMFCA) which identifies unfair commercial practices and also provides for administrative measures in ad‐ dition to civil sanctions. This law is concretized by a decree and a code of good conduct. This includes, among other things, a framework agreement. The AICA, an office of the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Environ‐ ment (Ministerio de Agricultura, Alimentación y Medio Ambiente; MAPAMA), is responsible for its implementation. In practice, very posi‐ tive effects on the functioning of the food chain are expected. It is still too early for an evaluation. So far, only one report on inspections and controls up to the 30th June 2017 is available. Synthesis by the general rapporteurs The reports from the various countries show that specific food chain regu‐ lations are not very widespread. Poland and Spain, in particular, have such a law in place, which is substantiated by a code of good conduct. The re‐ ports of the other countries refer mainly to antitrust and unfair competition 47 For more information see: www.qualitaetsstrategie.ch. General Report of Commission I 157 law, which regulates unfair commercial practices in general, and not only those in agriculture. Other special legal institutions regulating unfair commercial practices include the prohibition of sales below cost (particularly highlighted in the German national report) and the Grocery Code in collaboration with the food arbitrator, who is responsible for monitoring relations between sup‐ pliers and large supermarkets (United Kingdom). The meaning or necessity of an EU regulation on the matter is only spo‐ radically approved (Austria). In Switzerland, efforts are being made to es‐ tablish a non-binding code of conduct under civil law. Agricultural antitrust law in the EU Number of recognised producer organisations, their associations and inter-branch organisations In your country, how many producer organisations, associations of produ‐ cer organisations and inter-branch organisations have been recognised in accordance with Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 (broken down by sectors, as appropriate)? Are there official statistics or a publicly accessible register on such re‐ cognised agricultural organisations? Germany The producer organisations, their associations and inter-branch organisa‐ tions recognised under Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 can be found in the register of agricultural organisations at https://aoreg.ble.de/agrarorganisa‐ tionen/. This link allows the public to search for recognized agricultural organizations as a whole or on a sector-specific basis. According to this, there are currently 642 recognised agricultural orga‐ nisations in Germany. The following figures are specific to selected prod‐ uct areas: milk 163; cereals 138; wine 99; potatoes 52; beef 43; fruit and vegetables 31. The register also contains recognised associations of pro‐ ducer organisations. So far, there is only one recognised inter-branch orga‐ nisation in Germany, namely in the sugar sector. In the milk and wine sec‐ tors, the creation of inter-branch organisations has so far been discussed without success. B. 1. General Report of Commission I 158 United Kingdom In the field of livestock production, little effort has been made so far to form producer organisations. The official statistics and registers on agri‐ cultural organisations do not record such producer organisations. The na‐ tional report mentions a case, in which the rapporteur was commissioned by a group of milk producers to prepare the creation of a producer organi‐ sation. Finally, milk producers decided that the complex task of creating a producer organisation would not be matched by sufficient benefits. One of the first producer organisations to be created was Dairy Crest Direct. It was officially recognized in 2015 and represented 1’050 milk producers. Following the merger of Dairy Crest's milk department with Muller, there was a split into two producer organisations. One supplies raw milk to Muller, while the other provides raw milk for processing with‐ in Dairy Crest. Producer organisations in the fish sector and, in particular in the cereals and flowers sector, are more successful. The website gov.uk lists 33 pro‐ ducer organisations for 2015, which are active in the latter sectors. It may be easier to set up a producer organisation based on the sharing of special machinery, the standardisation of procedures or the joint marketing of ce‐ reals than to try to create one in the field of the different systems of farm livestock production. Italy The relevant organisations are listed on the website of the Italian Ministry of Agriculture. Netherlands There are 14 producer organisations and 9 inter-branch organisations. However, there are no associations. There are no official statistics or pub‐ licly accessible registers. Austria The following recognised producer organisations exist: Fruits/vegetables 10, cereals 4, cereals and potatoes 2, potatoes 1, pigs 5, cattle 8, sheep/ goats 1, poultry 1, flowers 1, eggs 1, wine 1. No recognized professional association has been set up yet. However, an association is currently being set up in the fruit and vegetable sector. General Report of Commission I 159 Poland There are various public registers of recognised agricultural organisations. Until the end of August 2017, the Agency for Restructuring and Moderni‐ sation of Agriculture was responsible for the management of the registers. Since September 1, 2017, the president of this agency has been responsi‐ ble for managing the registers. There is also a list of 341 pre-audited orga‐ nisations and producer groups. Switzerland Switzerland is a not a member of the EU and does not have a comparable system for recognised agricultural organisations. There is no system of recognition in the form of an ex ante examination. As a result, there are no official statistics or records of the existing number of producer and interbranch organisations. Spain The number of recognised producer organisations, their associations and inter-branch organisations varies depending on the product sector. There are public regulations and registers in MAPAMA for agricultural organisa‐ tions in the fruit and vegetable, milk and tobacco sectors. Synthesis by the general rapporteurs Some countries have official registers or statistics on recognised agricul‐ tural organisations that are publicly accessible. In these countries, the number of agricultural organisations and their distribution is therefore rel‐ atively easy to determine, although in some cases only a few sectors or types of agricultural organisations are covered. Several other countries do not have such instruments, so that no precise overview of the number can be given. The latter also applies to existing producer associations and in‐ ter-branch organisations in Switzerland. Exemption from the prohibition of cartel for recognised agricultural organisations Do you consider that agricultural organisations recognised in accordance with Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 are only exempted from the prohibiti‐ on of cartels under Article 101 TFEU or are they also exempted from any national prohibition of cartels? 2. General Report of Commission I 160 If they are not exempted from national prohibitions of cartels, does this pose a problem and if yes, how is this issue addressed by national law? Germany The exemption of recognised agricultural organisations under Article 152 et seq. of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 from the EU prohibition of car‐ tels and abuses of dominant positions is also an exemption under national law, because the requirements of the legal regulations are largely identical. The exemption would also be considered a lex specialis under EU law. In order to ensure the parallelism of the exemption, a clarification is en‐ shrined in the national regulation of § 5 AgrarMSG. For the fruit and veg‐ etable sector, a corresponding link is established by the Regulation imple‐ menting the Unions regulations concerning producer organisations in the fruit and vegetable sector (Obst-Gemüse-Erzeugerorganisationen‐ durchführungsverordnung – OGErzeugerOrgDV). United Kingdom With regard to the derogation from the national prohibition of cartels (Chapter 1 CA 1998), Schedule 3 provides the very protection which has always been available for farmers and their associations. However, the CA 1998 has not yet been explicitly adapted to regulations on Producer Organisations under EU law. But the exception provided in Schedule 3 should also apply to this constellation. Regulation (EU) No. 1308/2013 is directly applicable in the United Kingdom and section 60 of the 1998 CA seeks to minimise the divergence between EU and national antitrust law. Against the background of support for producer organisations in the EU, it seems difficult for UK courts to undermine the antitrust position of pro‐ ducer organisations. Italy The exemption from the prohibition of cartels is likely to result from EU law. There is no explicit regulation in national law. Netherlands The exemption is based on EU law, although this is not explicitly regulat‐ ed. There are also two alternative de minimis exceptions. General Report of Commission I 161 Austria The special position of antitrust law derives from the general agricultural cartel exception in § 2 par. 2 No. 5 KG. Poland The exemption is obtained through EU law. There is no specific national exemption. Spain The exemption of agricultural organisations recognised on the base of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 also applies on a national level. The EU institutions take the interpretation of this law into account. Unfortunately, the focus would rather be on the quantitative effects of consumer perspec‐ tives than on the qualitative effects. Synthesis by the general rapporteurs Only Germany knows an explicit national exemption. In Austria and the United Kingdom, the exemption from the cartel is derived from a general cartel privilege in the agricultural sector. In other countries, EU law is ap‐ plied in an analogous manner, although this is partly classified as not par‐ ticularly legally secure. Quantitative ceilings Do you consider the quantitative ceilings in Articles 149, 169, 170 and 171 of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 to be reasonable? Are these provisions used in practice in the sense that the jointly managed volumes are actually reported as required in the said provisions? Bulgaria The quantitative ceiling of Article 149 (milk) is considered insufficient. The quantitative ceiling of Article 169 (olive products) is not relevant due to a lack of corresponding products. The same applies to the quantitative ceiling of Article 170 (beef and veal) because of a very small production. With regard to Article 171 (field crops), it is indicated that production is twice as high as Bulgaria's needs. The agreements would therefore have a very significant impact on competition. Instruments to avoid concentration and market dominance are also mentioned. They are used through special 3. General Report of Commission I 162 procedural mechanisms for individual primary production factors (in par‐ ticular cultivated land). In particular, Article 37 of the Act on Farm Prop‐ erty and Land Use (ALOUA) is cited. Germany The quantitative ceilings provided for in Article 149, 169, 170 and 171 are appropriate and also recommended in order to avoid that all products of a certain sector are grouped together. The compliance of the quantitative ceilings in the dairy sector (Article 149) will be subject to a specific con‐ trol. This is because the recognised producer organisations report on the grouped quantities of raw milk. In other sectors, there is less practical sig‐ nificance. However, according to the opinion of the national report, a product-specific quantitative ceiling is in principle sensible. United Kingdom The quantitative ceiling of Article 149 (milk) does not cause any difficul‐ ties because producer organisations in the dairy sector are very small. Principally, the quantitative ceiling of 33 per cent allows a significant mar‐ ket share. Any producer organisation with such a market share will be able to obtain a special price increase or at least a higher price. Due to the spe‐ cific nature of the product – particularly in the United Kingdom, where about half of the raw milk is processed into drinking milk –, it is difficult even as a large producer organisation to dictate the price of such a perish‐ able product. Article 169 (olive oil) is not relevant in the United Kingdom. Article 170 (beef and veal), on the other hand, does not indicate that the 15 per‐ cent limit could soon be reached. There is currently no major producer or‐ ganisation in this area. It is therefore difficult to assess whether the limit could create problems. The same applies to the quantitative ceiling of Ar‐ ticle 171 (field crops). At the present time, the future of this sector is even more uncertain due to Brexit and therefore the departure from the CAP. It remains to be seen how the objectives and the concept of producer organisations will fit into the future British agricultural market. According to the national report, the United Kingdom must find its own way to improve the position of small producers and farmers. In view of these uncertainties, it is unlikely that a producer group would be prepared to create a producer organisation with all the costs involved and conditions to be met. It seems more interesting General Report of Commission I 163 to cooperate in another way, which is easier to implement and based on the general agricultural cartel exemption in Chapter 1. Italy These provisions raise many questions in Italy. The European Commis‐ sion's guidelines on the implementation of Articles 169 to 171 are not a useful instrument according to the national report. Netherlands Articles 149, 169, 170 and 171 are understood as a restriction and not as an extension of the derogations to the prohibition of cartels. They are therefore not used. Austria The provisions do not apply: the quantitative ceiling is too low. They do not create a counterweight to the concentration in the food retail sector. Poland Article 149 (milk) is gradually losing importance due to the abolition of the EU milk quota system. The volume of the negotiation ceiling is suffi‐ cient. However, the application of the regulation does not seem to be very clear. Article 169 (olive oil) is not relevant. However, Article 170 (beef and veal) is a very important provision for the functioning of this sector, the quantitative ceiling of which, currently, seem sufficient. On the other hand, the quantitative ceiling of Article 171 (field crops) would require an increase. This could provide an incentive to create larger producer organi‐ sations in order to provide a higher income for their members. Switzerland From a competition policy point of view, it seems desirable that efforts to bundle agricultural organisations, which may become important for Switzerland through bilateral agreements between Switzerland and the EU, should not completely eliminate competition in the relevant market. This presupposes that sufficient residual competition remains in addition to the bundled offer. This residual competition may take the form of either external competition (e.g. by the offer of non-involved competitors) or in‐ ternal competition (e.g. consulting, service or quality competition among the bundling partners themselves). In addition to actual competitors, a po‐ General Report of Commission I 164 tential competitor can also exert a certain competitive pressure48. The ob‐ jective of the quantitative ceiling is to ensure sufficient external competi‐ tion through a quantitative approach (based on market share). The national report wonders how internal competition could also be strengthened. The focus here is on the previously mentioned advice, service and quality com‐ petition between the bundling partners themselves. Spain The quantitative ceilings are considered reasonable and are not controver‐ sial. The application is mainly based on the notification of grouped quanti‐ ties. Synthesis by the general rapporteurs The importance of quantitative ceilings varies considerably from one country to another, depending on the respective national production. Some of them are classified as appropriate. If they are considered inappropriate, no use is made of the quantitative ceilings. It appears that the concerned producer organisations and their associations operate on the basis of the general agricultural cartel exemption. The exact use of the reporting sys‐ tem remains unclear in most cases. In some cases, uncertainties in the ap‐ plication of the provisions are reported. For Italy, the European Commis‐ sion's guidelines on the articles in question are not considered to be useful. In view of Brexit, the United Kingdom is currently very reluctant to use the instrument. Switzerland wonders whether the bilateral agreements in the agricultural sector will have an impact on the Swiss agricultural mar‐ ket due to the bundling possibilities. Time-limited exemptions of cartels What is your assessment of the specific time-limited exemptions of cartels in the dairy sector as provided for by Regulation (EU) No 2016/558 and by Regulation (EU) No 2016/559? Do you consider such exemptions to be an appropriate instrument for dea‐ ling with market crises? 4. 48 For potential competitors see instead of many: Zäch (note 13), point 13. General Report of Commission I 165 Bulgaria Contrary to the trend on the world market, very little milk is produced. Domestic production covers only 15 per cent of its own needs. Consump‐ tion is hardly increasing. Exemptions from cartels are therefore not rele‐ vant for the planning of milk production. Germany In principle, crisis instruments which offer companies more flexibility to face competition are to be viewed positively. However, an effective appli‐ cation of crisis instruments often fails due to rapid market developments. The instrument will not be used as quickly as necessary because of official decisions that have to be taken before its publication in the Official Jour‐ nal. It is therefore only suitable to a limited extent to successfully over‐ come crises. Netherlands These possibilities have not been used in the Netherlands. It is also ques‐ tionable whether the instrument is appropriate. As a general rule, produc‐ tion is planned well in advance. After the planning phase, production can‐ not be stopped at short notice. Plants continue to grow. This is not an in‐ dustrial production where machines can temporarily be shut down without any problems. Austria In principle, the instrument is appropriate. However, the envisaged period is considered too short for a final evaluation. Poland Such instruments are only of temporary help and cannot guarantee the long-term development of EU dairy policy. The dairy sector must be eval‐ uated in the long term. This market needs powerful instruments. Time-li‐ mited exemptions from cartels are not sufficiently clear. Switzerland Competition policy privileges under clearly defined conditions are gener‐ ally an appropriate instrument to counter short-term market risks. In accor‐ dance with Article 9 par. 3 LwG, the Swiss Federal Council can therefore also support self-help measures, in order to adapt production and supply to market requirements in the case of exceptional developments that are not General Report of Commission I 166 caused by structural problems. The limitation to exceptional situations is intended to prevent undesirable structural developments caused by state intervention. Spain These measures are effective in responding to crises. Nevertheless, the market response remains to be seen. Synthesis by the general rapporteurs The majority of reports are critical of the instrument, as it is not suitable to bring about sufficient short-term market changes. If the instrument is con‐ sidered useful, an evaluation seems to be necessary. Switzerland explains that there exists a similar instrument for exceptional market situations. Declaration of general application In your country, is there exercise of the option to make decisions of re‐ cognised agricultural organisations extended to non-members and to pro‐ vide for obligatory contributions of non-members to the financing of agri‐ cultural organisations (Articles 164 and 165 of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013)? Do you consider this instrument to be reasonable and fit for application in practice? Bulgaria The instrument of the declaration of general applicability could be used to transfer transaction costs from large cooperative units to smaller units, if this corresponds to market conditions and the institutional environment. Germany The instrument of the declaration of general applicability and the associat‐ ed imposed participation in the financing of agricultural organisations is currently not used. In addition, free competition should be preferred to regulated competition. Therefore, its practical suitability is limited. United Kingdom The instrument of the declaration of general applicability is not used. 5. General Report of Commission I 167 Italy The instrument of the declaration of general applicability is used, with Ar‐ ticle 3 of Decree-Law 51/2015 being decisive. The range of application is limited to inter-branch organisations and requires the approval of 85 per‐ cent of their members. Financial contributions are not made through taxes, but through a "private loan". There is a penalty of 1,000 to 5,000 EUR. The report mentions cases from the kiwi sector 2014/15 and the tobacco sector from 2015 to 2017. Netherlands The instrument of the declaration of general applicability is used, based on the Regulation on producers and inter-branch organisations (Regeling pro‐ ducenten en branchenorganisaties). Producer organisations and asso‐ ciations of producer organisations in the fruit and vegetable sector are ex‐ cluded. The Regulation replaces the product associations (productschap‐ pen) which operated until 2014. In 2016, inter-branch organisations in the fields of cereals, sugar and potatoes were accepted, but only in relation to research. A number of other requests have already been submitted. The national report considers the instrument to be useful. However, it has a li‐ mited sphere of activity. Poland The instrument is not used. However, it could prove useful in the future. Examples include the drafting and monitoring of standard contracts, the development and dissemination of statistical information and market trends, decisions on rules on origin marking and the development of mar‐ keting campaigns. Switzerland Article 9 par. 1 LwG, with reference to Article 8 par. 1, opens up extensive possibilities for agricultural organisations to take self-help measures to‐ wards non-members (so-called free-riders) in the areas of quality and sales promotion and the adaptation of production and supply to market require‐ ments. The Federal Council may also oblige non-members of an organisa‐ tion to contribute to the financing of self-help measures in accordance with Article 8 par. 1 LwG. However, the organization must meet fairly strict requirements, particularly in terms of representativeness. The possibility of extending self-help measures to "free-riders" is lively used in practice, for example for the inter-branch organisation in the milk General Report of Commission I 168 sector (standard contract and regulations for the segmentation of the milk market), for Emmentaler Switzerland (marketing contributions), for the Interprofession du Vacherin Fribourgeois (marketing contributions), for the Swiss Farmers Association (marketing contributions), for Swiss milk producers (marketing contributions) and for GalloSuisse (also marketing contributions)49. Further requests are pending before the Federal Council. Spain The possibility of a declaration of general applicability has been used for several years. The same applies to the mandatory sharing of the costs of the actors involved in financing the organisations. A MAPAMA regulation is of particular importance for the application of the instrument. Synthesis by the general rapporteurs While some countries do not use the instrument of the declaration of gen‐ eral applicability and participation in financing for various reasons, it is used to a greater extent in other countries. However, there is hardly any statement on its suitability for practical use. Switzerland, which has exten‐ sive experience with the instrument, deserves a special mention. Antitrust privileges for non-recognized organisations In addition to recognised agricultural organisations, should agricultural cooperatives and other agricultural groupings also enjoy privileges under antitrust law? If yes, do you consider the provisions in the second subparagraph of Arti‐ cle 209(1) of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 to be sufficient? Bulgaria The privileges should not be extended. Germany In addition to the recognised agricultural organisations, agricultural coop‐ eratives and other agricultural associations must generally enjoy privileges 6. 49 Schweizerisches Handelsamtsblatt of 8.9.2015; see also press release of the Fed‐ eral Office for Agriculture of 8.9.2015: Selbsthilfemassnahmen Landwirtschaft: Begehren von sechs Organisationen publiziert. General Report of Commission I 169 under antitrust law, as already provided for in the derogations of Regu‐ lation (EU) No 1308/2013, supplemented by Regulation (EU) No 1184/2006. Since the national provisions of § 28 GWB, § 5 AgrarMSG and the EU regulations largely correspond each other, Article 209(1) sub‐ par. 2 of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 is sufficient. The same applies to Regulation (EU) No 1184/2006 insofar as recognised or non-recognised producer organisations are not already covered by Article 209 of Regu‐ lation (EU) No 1308/2013. United Kingdom In view of the small market share of the vast majority of producers and growers in the agricultural sector, it is desirable to simplify the improve‐ ment of cooperation as much as possible. As long as the market power of such joint ventures has not significantly increased, cooperation should be encouraged and simplified. Such cooperation may even be one step ahead of actual competition if it concerns efficiencies in the supply chain. An un‐ fortunate consequence of general competition law and strong consumer protection is that large resellers may dominate small suppliers. As this is a small risk to the consumer, this issue should be addressed to improve sus‐ tainability and efficiency. Article 209(1) subpar. 2 of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 supports this objective. However, it limits cooperation between different types of com‐ panies, which is not conducive to the attainment of efficiencies. For exam‐ ple, it is not possible to use the exemption for cooperation between pro‐ ducers, processors and slaughterhouses. The cartel exemption therefore does not provide the necessary legal certainty in situations where produc‐ ers try to generate higher incomes by controlling the downstream process‐ ing chain. There is often talking of achieving a higher value for a product. In this case, the exception should not end when the original product leaves the farm. Rather, it should include the next processing step and allow the primary production side to cooperate with companies that have experience of the next step. Netherlands Since Article 209 of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 has a very broad scope, the Regulation seems sufficient at first sight. However, it is quite difficult to fulfil the conditions of the exemption. General Report of Commission I 170 Austria In order to increase the share of agriculture in the value chain, further ex‐ emptions from competition law, beyond Articles 206 and 209 of Regu‐ lation (EU) No 1308/2013, are necessary. A preliminary ruling by the competition authorities under Article 209(2) of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 should also be considered. Poland Concentrations for the purpose of common and organised activities of agricultural producers acting in the interest of their members shall be treat‐ ed equally, irrespective of their legal form. The provisions of Article 209(1) of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 are sufficient in this respect and should not be amended. Switzerland Against the background already described of the Swiss legal situation on producers and inter-branch cooperation which is deviating from EU law, the issue does not arise with the same urgency. The general privilege of self-help measures in the agricultural sector, which is contained in the LwG, on the basis of the Federal Constitution, does not distinguish be‐ tween recognised and non-recognised agricultural organisations50. Spain Equality should be achieved. However, it is questionable whether Article 209(1) subpar. 1 of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 is sufficient for achieving that objective. Synthesis by the general rapporteurs The need for equal general treatment of agricultural cooperatives on the one hand and other agricultural associations of recognised agricultural or‐ ganisations on the other is affirmed by the majority. Article 209(1) subpar. 2 of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 is therefore also supported. However, several reports stress that the scope and interpretation of the provision could be improved. 50 For more details on the requirements to be met by the agricultural organisation in question in the event of a request for extension of the rules, see the "Verordnung über die Branchen- und Produzentenorganisationen (VBPO)". General Report of Commission I 171 Prohibition of price binding What is the understanding in your country of the meaning of the provision in relation to charge an identical price in the third subparagraph of Arti‐ cle 209(1) of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 and do you see a need for further clarification? Bulgaria The price of a good is the main source of information. But even if the price of a commodity is not subject of an agreement, there is the possibili‐ ty to access some markets due to asymmetric information. This may create the appearance of competition and lead to "unfair advantages" in contracts concluded on this information basis. Such conditions are not out of question, in particular in local markets. Germany The prohibition of retail price maintenance is in principle the same as the reverse exception in national legislation. However, it should be clarified that price fixing within producer associations (e.g. within a cooperative or producer organisation) is already legally permitted. Similarly, price agree‐ ments between recognised producer organisations are favoured. Price ne‐ gotiations between recognised producer organisations or recognised asso‐ ciations and third parties are also not a case of prohibited price fixing. Consequently, only price maintenance with third parties outside the pro‐ ducer association and outside the named price negotiations falls within the scope of the prohibition. United Kingdom In the absence of case law in this area and in the absence of producer orga‐ nisations, there is no indication to further interpret the content of the pro‐ vision. Italy This provision is not consistent because, in the case of producer coopera‐ tion, it is precisely the maintenance of prices that is at stake. For recog‐ nised producer organisations, the question is clarified by Article 206 of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013. 7. General Report of Commission I 172 Netherlands In Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013, the Dutch version seems to have been adapted to the English version. There are no court cases concerning this provision in the Netherlands. Assuming that the case law of Article 176 (1) subpar. 2 of Regulation (EC) No 1234/2007 may be used, the condition of the prohibition of price fixing is likely to be presumed quickly. Such a broad interpretation can be found, for example, in the decision of the ACM in the spring onion case, described above. It would make sense to clarify how much scope is of‐ fered by the provision. Austria The provision should be deleted. Poland Agreements under which farmers sell their products through a joint coop‐ erative and obtain the achievable market price, should be allowed. Further clarification seems necessary in the area of recognised producer organisa‐ tions. Switzerland Swiss antitrust law contains a presumption of eliminating effective compe‐ tition under the abuse principle in horizontal agreements on direct or indi‐ rect price fixing. If this presumption cannot be refuted (by proof of exter‐ nal or internal competition), then the efficiency defence is removed and the agreement becomes inadmissible. Rural law brings a certain relativiza‐ tion because Swiss producer and inter-branch organisations may issue guide prices in accordance with Article 8a LwG. However, consumer prices are excluded from that exemption. Spain A clarification of the provision is necessary. Synthesis by the general rapporteurs The provision is widely considered to be unclear. Case law exists only to a limited extent. There is agreement on the demand to exclude at least the internal activities of producer cooperation. General Report of Commission I 173 Prohibition of exclusion of competition In your country, what is the understanding of the meaning of the provision in relation to the exclusion of competition in the third subparagraph of 209(1) of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 and do you see a need for fur‐ ther clarification? Bulgaria There should be no exceptions to the prohibition of exclusion from com‐ petition. Germany It is necessary to clarify the definition of the exclusion from competition. A fixed percentage limit must be rejected because it is too rigid. Competi‐ tion can already exist if only two companies are active on the market. Therefore, individual market considerations should be included with more flexibility in the interpretation of a market exclusion. United Kingdom As with the issue of the prohibition of price fixing, there is a lack of prac‐ tice to discuss this provision in more detail. Netherlands There is no case law regarding the provision. Case practice concerning the previous provision of Article 176(1) 1 subpar. 2 of Regulation (EC) No 1234/2007 is unclear. However, in the case of pearl onions, the provi‐ sion is interpreted very broadly. It would be useful for everyday practice if this concept were to be described more explicitly. Austria This provision should be deleted. Given the enormous concentration in the food retail sector, the producer side needs to be strengthened. In Austria, for example, the three largest food retail companies have a market share of 86 percent. Poland The provision is interpreted very generously. However, further clarifica‐ tion is needed at the level of producer organisations. 8. General Report of Commission I 174 Switzerland According to Article 5(1) LwG, agreements that significantly impair com‐ petition in a market are inadmissible if they cannot be justified by reasons of economic efficiency or if they lead to the elimination of effective com‐ petition. While agreements that significantly restrict the competition may be in the sphere of the effectiveness argument, those that eliminate effect‐ ive competition can under no circumstances be justified. The special pro‐ visions of rural law supersede this legal situation insofar as the Federal Council is competent under Article 8(1) LwG to extend the self-help mea‐ sures of agricultural organisations to non-members. Such an extension may result into the elimination of competition. Spain It is necessary to clarify the provision, and to take into account not only quantitative aspects, but also other aspects. Synthesis by the general rapporteurs The majority of the national reports want to maintain the provision, but ask for clarification as to its practical application. In view of the high con‐ centration in the retail sale of food products, some argue in favour of abol‐ ishing this provision. The Swiss concept has a different approach. Contract regulation Is the option to regulate contractual relations (Articles 148 and 168 of Re‐ gulation (EU) No 1308/2013) used in your country? If yes, which agricultural products are subject to such regulation? Do you consider this instrument to be useful? Bulgaria Contract regulation could be useful to improve risk sharing between pro‐ ducers and the food industry. However, it is not appropriate to regulate contracts between producers for the purpose of improving integration and reducing costs. Germany In Germany, supply relationships are generally based on written regula‐ tions. In the case of cooperatives, these are usually contained in a set of 9. General Report of Commission I 175 rules under company law, which corresponds to a model statute and is sup‐ plemented by a delivery regulation, so that an additional contract under obligation law is unnecessary. Moreover, freedom of contract must be preserved. State interventions in the contractual sovereignty between the contracting parties should there‐ fore be avoided as far as possible. At the very least, they must be critically questioned, as they could undermine a free market economy. In this re‐ spect, the above-mentioned regulations do not have significant advan‐ tages. As a result, they are not currently applied at national level. France The regulation of contracts has been strongly supported by the law since 2010, in particular by the Law on the Modernisation of Agriculture and the Rural Code. The aim is to strengthen the influence of producers on the market following the crises that have affected the dairy, fruit and vegetable as well as the meat sectors. Italy The instrument of contract regulation is used in the context of unfair com‐ mercial practices in all sectors. However, there are many uncertainties. Poland The instrument is used. The legal basis is the Law of July 10, 2015 amending the Law on the Agricultural Market Agency and organisation of certain agricultural markets and certain other laws introducing written contracts for all deliveries of agricultural products to the first purchaser. In addition, there is the Law of December 15, 2016 on preventing dishonest contractual advantages while sailing agricultural products and foodstuff, which also amends the Law of March 11, 2014 on the Agricultural Market Agency and organisation of certain agricultural markets. This makes it possible to penalise purchasers of agricultural products who do not have a written agreement with the manufacturer. However, the use of the instru‐ ment has so far been limited because manufacturers are in a weak position vis-à-vis purchasers. Switzerland The instrument of contract regulation exists in a general form in Article 8(1)bis LwG and in a special form for the dairy sector in Article 37 LwG. The main task of regulating contracts in the dairy sector is entrusted to General Report of Commission I 176 sectoral organisations by the LwG. At the request of an inter-branch orga‐ nisation, the Federal Council may declare the standard agreement general‐ ly binding at all stages of the purchase and sale of raw milk. The Federal Council has the subsidiary competence to issue such a regulation itself. A standard agreement of the inter-branch organisation of the dairy sector must meet a number of substantive requirements. With regard to competi‐ tion policy, the LwG stipulates that the provisions of the standard agree‐ ment must not significantly impair competition. The contracting parties re‐ main responsible for determining prices and quantities. Spain The instrument is used not only for the dairy sector, but also for all other contracts in the food sector within the meaning of Article 5 of the Law 12/2013. It has proved to be very useful for monitoring the balance be‐ tween the interests of the contracting parties. United Kingdom, Netherlands and Austria The instrument of contract regulation is not used in these countries. Synthesis by the general rapporteurs While in one third of the countries, the instrument is not used due to lack of practical relevance or for regulatory reasons, the other countries mostly use it in all sectors. However it is criticised for its application: the rules are not clear enough and difficult to enforce. General questions Public discussion regarding the legal position of agriculture in the marketing chain Has in the last decade a public discussion taken place in your country re‐ garding the question as to whether the legal position of agriculture in the marketing chain should be strengthened? If yes, what was or is the content of this discussion? Did it lead to reforms or reform proposals? C. 1. General Report of Commission I 177 Bulgaria The discussion on strengthening agriculture in the market chain is still on‐ going. One of the legal texts (grapes and wine) has been amended 122 times in the last two years. Despite these changes, the concentration in some product areas is very high, which shows that they are under strong pressure. Polarisation may occur due to the imbalance in size and type be‐ tween organisations Germany In principle, the strengthening of the position of agriculture was dis‐ cussed last year. In this context, the food trade side, which is powerful on the market and focused on a few companies, is important. In this regard, the BKartA a sector inquiry and published a comprehensive report in September 201451. One of the outcomes of the discussion is the removal of the temporal limitation which was originally set for the validity of the prohibition for selling below cost. United Kingdom The turmoil seen in the dairy market in recent years was a catalyst for some public discussion about, in particular, the returns to farmers for the goods they produce. However, the scope of this discussion should not be overestimated, particularly from the agricultural side. At the very least, it has raised awareness that often the price received by the primary producer for their products is only slightly above the cost of production and some‐ times below it. According to surveys, the majority of consumers would be prepared to pay more for milk, for example, if farmers received a fair price for raw milk. The supermarket side says, however, that they are driven by consumers. Moreover, in view of low food prices, the government may have little incentive in raising the issue of production sustainability. Partic‐ ularly with Brexit and the associated risks of tariffs and the government's lack of attention in aspects of food supply and production sustainability, there is the danger it will become a real and urgent concern in the years to come. The Grocery Adjudicator is a cheering development and the potential widening of his responsibilities is a positive indication. However, little is 51 Available under www.bundeskartellamt.de/Sektoruntersuchung_LEH.pdf%3F__bl ob %3 DpublicationFile%26v%3D7. General Report of Commission I 178 being done in terms of legal reforms regarding the market. The only pres‐ sure being put on supermarket chains and other players is to "do the right thing". One of the objectives of the Dairy Code is to try to provide a rea‐ sonable period during which milk farmers will be able to react to lower milk prices. The establishment of the Adjudicator is on a purely voluntary basis. Image is, of course, more important than ever for large brands. There are therefore some positive examples of cooperation within the food chain. But it seems that any move to address the sustainability issues and build‐ ing trust within the food chain is being followed by a move seemingly de‐ signed to worsen the relationship. Mistrust therefore remains. The recent practice of several supermarkets to label products with fake farms is an‐ other example of a step backwards. Netherlands On May 24, 2016 the Parliament adopted a motion, inviting the govern‐ ment to consult together with the ACM on how to detect and combat the abuse of purchasing power by supermarkets. This has not led to reforms or even reform proposals. Austria Such a discussion took place, during which it has been demonstrated that agriculture is the weakest link in the food chain. It is located between a highly concentrated upstream sector (plant protection products, fertilizers, seeds, agricultural machinery industry) and a highly concentrated down‐ stream sector (food retailing). One response to this challenge is to have a greater concentration in the processing sector in the form of cooperatives and producer organisations. An inter-branch organisation is being in cre‐ ation in the fruit and vegetable sector. The creation of an ombudsman and binding rules on unfair business practices are also been discussed. Poland The discussion was directly triggered by signals emanating from the alarming situation of producers in comparison with other market players. The draft reforms discussed included a maximum payment deadline and the possibility for farmers to file anonymous complaints against the food chains. As a result of the discussion, the laws mentioned in point 2.9 were adopted. General Report of Commission I 179 Switzerland After the paradigm shift in agricultural policy in the early 1990s (decou‐ pling of agricultural price and income policies, liberalisation of agricultur‐ al markets, introduction of direct payments, etc.), the discussion surround‐ ing the question of the position of agriculture in the value chain has inten‐ sified. Since then, the level of State intervention in the agricultural sector has been reduced in several agricultural policy stages. As a result, the is‐ sue of market policy is now being addressed within inter-branch, producer and sectorial organisations. This applies, in particular, for the milk market, following the abolition of the milk quota system. The design of the con‐ tract regulation remains controversial. Spain The discussion developed mainly after the presentation of the draft law on the food chain. The National Competition Council (Consejo Nacional de la Competencia; CNC) which has since been dissolved, and the Economic and Social Council (Consejo económico y social; CES) were particularly critical of this draft. For them, the proposal was too bureaucratic and re‐ strictive for competition. Synthesis by the general rapporteurs The reports show that producers of agricultural goods are under great pres‐ sure in almost all countries and in some cases have difficulty covering their costs. They are sandwiched between highly concentrated upstream market suppliers (agricultural machinery, seeds, fertilizers, plant protec‐ tion products) and highly concentrated downstream food retailers or pro‐ cessors. In other words, significant market imbalances to the detriment of agriculture are diagnosed in a relative consistent way. The precarious situ‐ ation has led to a fairly broad public discussion and to the adoption of cer‐ tain measures or at least starting a discussion and the examination of cer‐ tain measures as follows: the BKartA's sector inquiry and the removal of the time restraint on the prohibition for selling below cost in Germany; the introduction of the Grocery Adjudicator in the United Kingdom; the cre‐ ation of an ombudsman and binding rules on unfair business practices in Austria; the introduction of an Agricultural Market Authority and a con‐ tract model for the supply of agricultural products in Poland. In France and Switzerland, measures taken by the agricultural sector itself within the framework of inter-branch organisations are another solution pattern. General Report of Commission I 180 Need for a reform of agricultural competition law? When you look at your national agricultural competition law or EU agri‐ cultural competition law as a whole, do you consider that there is a need for reform? If yes, which points should the reform concentrate on? Bulgaria Strong points of a reform would be the prevention of the possibility of un‐ limited purchase of cultivated land and to restrict the asymmetric distribu‐ tion of agricultural subsidies. Germany In principle, there is no need for a reform of agriculture competition law, as existing regulations provide sufficient scope. However, a less restrictive interpretation by the competition authorities would be desirable. To this end, certain provisions of EU law and the GWB should be clarified. Ex‐ amples are the leeway– including the question of price fixing – for recog‐ nised and non-recognised producer organisations, the definition of markets acquisition, the interpretation of the competition exclusion criteria and the consideration of the opposite market side. France The national report presents a critique which refers, on the one hand, to national practices and, on the other hand, to EU practices. This results in demands for both regulatory bodies, involving in particular: The restrictive interpretation of the derogations in favour of agriculture by the ADLC and EU institutions leads to a predominance of the TFEU's competition provisions. The specificity of rural law has too little effect. Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 has not changed this trend and therefore still transforms Article 42 TFEU into its opposite. The principle of the pri‐ macy of rural law over competition law is no longer being applied; it is the opposite that is pursued. Producer organisations, associations of producer organisations and contractual regulation cannot develop sufficiently to provide sufficient countervailing power to the downstream stages. Overall, a better definition of the scope of exceptions to the general ban on cartels is needed. French practice is too strongly based on the restrictive interpretation of EU institutions, as demonstrated by the Endives case. The regulation of contracts enshrined in French law (Law No 2010-874 of 27 July 2010 on 2. General Report of Commission I 181 the modernisation of agriculture and fisheries) is not sufficient to improve the difficult situation of French agriculture and to meet the objective of Article 39 TFEU, in particular the achievement of an adequate income. There is no possibility of concluding price agreements or fixing minimum prices. It is also to be criticised that joint selling prices are only approved if producers have previously transferred ownership of the products. Only a concentration of the offer within the meaning of Article 152 and a resizing of Article 209 of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 in the sense of removal of the prohibition of contractual clauses with fixed prices would be relevant. A clarification of the tasks of producer organisations (organi‐ sations de producteurs; OP) is also central, as there is legal uncertainty in this respect. The solution should at least consist in extending Article 149 of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 beyond the dairy sector and to allow price negotiations between members of producer organisations, irrespec‐ tive of whether the goods are transferred to the organisation before sale or not. Price fixing should only be prohibited if producers directly sell indi‐ vidually to customers at fixed prices. The Swedish Competition Act of 2008 (Swedish Competition Act – 2008:579; Chapter 1 Article 4) may serve as a model for such a regulation. To support its concerns, the national report refers to the US legislation (Capper-Volstead Act; see point I.3.3) and US economic studies52. The following statement should be emphasised53: "In the case of a classic car‐ tel, the adverse market effects are lower output quantity, which further in‐ creases a dead-weight loss due to the seller market power, and additional price increase imposed on consumers. In contrast, agricultural output con‐ trol allows agricultural producers to eliminate unnecessary commodity losses due to agricultural over -supply and also to decrease (and ideally eliminate) the costs of producing the volume that cannot be absorbed by the market at the acceptable price level. Consequently, this helps agricul‐ tural producers attain a fair level of price, which is the level of price that covers their production costs. The overall societal benefit is maintaining a viable agricultural production." 52 Carstensen (note 16), 465; E. V. Jesse/B. W. Marion/A. C. Manchester/A. C. John‐ son, Interpreting and Enforcing Section of the Capper-Volstead Act, American Journal of Agricultural Economy, Volume 64, Issue 3, 1 August 1982, page 431– 443; Frederick (note 17). 53 Bolotova (note 29), page 9 p. General Report of Commission I 182 United Kingdom The market share of the vast majority of individual farmers is so minor that, even within small groups, they cannot cause a significant impact on the market. The majority of competition laws currently in force therefore do not have an impact on farmers' decisions. However, this does not mean that the attitude adopted by the competition authorities can deter real progress in fragmented markets such as agriculture. In these markets, it is necessary to encourage collaboration between small businesses and to clearly define the appropriate competition exceptions. Competition law should not concern itself with the commercial activities of businesses of such small size. Such encouragement would not lead to competition con‐ cerns, but would increase cooperation and improve their sustainability considerably. In addition to the encouragement from the authorities, producers them‐ selves should be made aware of the benefits of cooperation in order to strengthen their bargaining power. Unless this is done by changing atti‐ tudes and creating a desire to cooperate, it would make little sense for the UK to seek for further exemptions or significant law changes. In this context, it is important to stress the important role of information on the issues and functionality of each market, particularly after the sale on the primary production side. This is particularly true in view of the threats and opportunities that Brexit entails. However, the national report is concerned that, farmers acting alone in the UK may have less influence on their government than EU farmers have as a group on EU institutions. In his view, it would have been preferable to reform the EU from within. To have a chance of success, even after the Brexit, a change of attitude is required from both the regulators and the regulated parties. This applies not only to the area of competition law in the narrower sense, but also, in general, to competitiveness in the agricultural sector. Three points should be taken into account to improve the bargaining power of farmers in the UK: (1) Education Being a primary producer has become much more complex. The mar‐ ket forces that determine the farm gate price will continue to change and are subject to increasingly global influences. Many farmers are already aware of this. However, improved information and education would allow more informed decisions when opportunities present themselves. General Report of Commission I 183 (2) Selling options In other countries, there are more options for selling products than only at auctions. In the UK, the food chain should be better integrated to ensure food supply and a sustainable future. Direct sales by coop‐ eratives and the introduction of agreements on price beforehand should be considered and encouraged. (3) Cooperation Regardless in which way cooperation is organised by like-minded producers – as a cooperative, as a producer organisation or in another form –, it always serves the best interests of all parties involved. Italy In addition to the fact that much of the existing regulation is unclear and should therefore be regulated more explicitly, more emphasis should be placed on the conditions of competition in the food chain and especially on the strong demand side. Netherlands From a practical point of view, more clarity and legal certainty are needed. EU agricultural competition law is not clear, transparent or understandable to farmers and their associations. A procedure such as that contained in Article 210(2) of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 or the possibility of in‐ formal opinion or a comfort letter should be introduced. Austria The demarcation between the general EU competition law and the CAP is in urgent need of reform. The aim is to strengthen the position of farmers in the food chain. In particular, Articles 152, 206, 209 and 210 of Regu‐ lation (EU) No 1308/2013 need to be revised fundamentally to this end. The objectives of the reform should include: • ensuring the special status of agriculture, through exceptions in an‐ titrust law for agriculture and its cooperatives (Article 206); • to exempt associations of farmers (in the form of cooperatives and pro‐ ducer organisations) from competition law (Article 209) and to allow preliminary rulings by the competition authorities; • strengthening the legal possibilities of inter-branch organisations (Arti‐ cle 210); • introducing binding price reports throughout the supply chain; General Report of Commission I 184 • the adoption of an EU framework on unfair commercial practices; • an EU-wide ban on sales below cost price; • the continuation of the possibility of crisis measures at any time; • developing regionality and protection of origin; • a sufficient definition of the "relevant market" on the producer side to counterbalance the concentration on the food retail side. Poland The current state of national legislation seems sufficient and any future de‐ velopments should be in tight connection with EU law provisions. Two factors are to be taken into consideration: (1) The need, on the one hand, to ensure stable conditions for agricultural activities and, on the other hand, to maintain the general principle of competition, which is key not only to production growth but also to maintain the appropriate quality. (2) The impact of external circumstances on the functioning of the CAP should not be overlooked. EU agriculture is already under strong competitive pressure from agricultural trade with non-EU countries. Switzerland Overall, the coordination mechanism between agricultural law and an‐ titrust law has proved to be applicable. The relatively high degree of com‐ plexity of the regulation and the resulting legal uncertainty are certainly detrimental. However, in this respect, rather pragmatic solutions can be found depending on the empirical and normative particularities of the dif‐ ferent agricultural markets. Whether and how agricultural competition law is to be further developed will also depend on the developments in agricul‐ tural policy in the EU. In any case, the report of the Agricultural Markets Task Force offers interesting approaches. It is necessary to ensure that the potential of efficient possibilities for strengthening agricultural market influence are fully exploited before in‐ troducing new competition policy privileges for agriculture. These include improving the market profile of individual farmers as market players, cre‐ ating alternative opportunities for market partners and focusing on healthy and market-oriented farm structures54. 54 More in detail Niklaus/Zünd (note 43), page 9 p. General Report of Commission I 185 Spain National competition law needs to be reformed and become more sensitive to the qualitative aspects of consumer protection. So far, a quantitative as‐ sessment has been wrongly placed in the foreground. Synthesis by the general rapporteurs Mainly, the national reports acknowledge the need for reform, which means that the existing national agricultural competition law and EU agri‐ cultural competition law are currently considered in an inadequate shape. The German report takes the opposite position. It is not so much new legal norms and legal institutions that are needed, but a more generous treatment or better use of the scope of existing law. The Swiss report has a similar argument. The French report also advocates – apart from addi‐ tional measures – better use of margins, in particular through a true imple‐ mentation of the primacy of rural law over competition law in the EU. Vice versa, today, the competition rules of the TFEU prevail over the derogations in favour of agriculture55. Price negotiations and fixing should also be allowed. The UK report argues that competition law should not be applied at all to small-structured producers who would have only minimal influence on the market. Instead, the market partners should be encouraged to intensify cooperation in order to strengthen its bargaining power. It exists also the opinion that the current, partly unclear provisions re‐ quire legislative concretisation with regard to the necessary strengthening of agriculture (Italy; Netherlands with the demand for the introduction of a "comfort letter"). The Austrian report contains the longest list of demands for new rules and the concretisation of existing legal norms. In addition to the measures already mentioned, it is particularly important to set binding price report‐ ing throughout the supply chain, to maintain the possibility of crisis mea‐ sures at any time and the expansion of regionality and protection of origin. 55 The view that, in reality, agricultural policy does not take precedence over compe‐ tition policy is sporadically present, at least in the commented literature; see Ge‐ org-Klaus de Bronett, in: Josef L. Schulte/Christoph Just (Ed.) Kartellrecht – GWB, Kartellvergaberecht, EU-Kartellrecht (2016), Article 101 AEUV, point 134. General Report of Commission I 186 The Polish report draws attention to the fact that EU agriculture is fac‐ ing significant competitive pressure from agricultural trade with non-EU member states. According to the Spanish report, more emphasis must be placed on the qualitative aspects of agriculture. Conclusions and recommendations of the Commission I The conclusions and recommendations of Commission I had already been drafted before the Congress as joint work of the President of the Commis‐ sion (Prof. Dr Rudolf Mögele) and the two general rapporteurs (Dr Chris‐ tian Busse and Prof. em. Dr Paul Richli). This draft was discussed at the final session of the Commission – then amended and completed on specif‐ ic points following the presentation and discussion of the national reports. As is customary, the final version of the conclusions and recommendations is not included in the report of the general rapporteurs, but will be printed separately in this Congress volume (see below p. 263). The conclusions of Commission I in the light of the ECJ ruling on the Endives case and the amending Regulation (EU) 2017/2393 Following the conclusion of the XXIX Congress of European Agricultural Law, the ECJ delivered its ruling in Case C-671/15 in November 201756. In accordance with the objectives of the Commission I recommendations, the ECJ confirmed not only the principle that EU agricultural market law has priority over the general EU antitrust ban, but also, in particular, the exemption under cartel law of recognised producer organisations and their associations. At the same time, the ECJ ruled that competition-relevant agreements in the agricultural sector, which go beyond explicit and im‐ plicit exceptions, are subject to general antitrust law. In particular, accord‐ ing to the ECJ, price agreements between recognised and non-recognised forms of cooperation between producers and inter-branch cooperation are not privileged. III. IV. 56 EuGH, Judgment of 14.11.2017, case C-671/15 (APVE), ECLI:EU:C:2017:860. General Report of Commission I 187 As a result, the ECJ has clarified important points. However, at the same time, the ruling created ambiguities, as it is not clear whether the ECJ's statements concerning, inter alia, the prohibition on fixing minimum prices, should be understood in general or only for the fruit and vegetable sector, which is distinguished by certain characteristics. There is also the problem that – as already mentioned – the ruling did not concern the cur‐ rently applicable EU agricultural antitrust law and the ECJ gives no indi‐ cation as to the extent to which the ruling can be applied to the current le‐ gal situation57. Also in November 2017, the three EU institutions agreed to make amendments to agricultural antitrust law within the framework of the Om‐ nibus Regulation. A large part of the European Parliament's concerns has been taken into account. It was then decided to separate the agricultural part of the Omnibus Regulation and allow it to enter into force as a sepa‐ rate regulation. This resulted in the amending Regulation (EU) 2017/239358 of December 2017. In particular, Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013, as amended, now provides for an explicit cartel exemption for recognised producer organisations and their associations. At the same time, the special grouping ceilings were largely replaced and the so-called efficiency test eliminated. Overall, the results of the amending Regulation (EU) 2017/2393 correspond in important aspects to the recommendations of Commission I59. In the end, the issue of Commission I remains relevant to rural law and agricultural policy. Both the ECJ ruling and the discussions on the amend‐ ing Regulation (EU) 2017/2393 have clearly demonstrated that many points remain open and that the recommendations of Commission I can serve as guidelines in this respect. Preparations are underway for negotia‐ tions on the next CAP reform, which is expected to enter into force in 2021. The area of "competition rules in agriculture" will certainly play a significant role in this respect. At the insistence of the European Parlia‐ 57 For a detailed analysis of the judgment, see Christian Busse, Klarheit oder nicht Klarheit – Das Urteil des EuGH vom 14.11.2017 zu den Kartellverbotsausnahmen im EU-Agrarmarktrecht, Wirtschaft und Wettbewerb 2018, 438-444. 58 ABl. EU Nr. L 350 of 29.12.2017, 15. 59 For a more detailed comparison of the recommendations of Commission I and the amending regulation (EU) 2007/2393, see Christian Busse, Der GMO-Abschnitt der Verordnung (EU) 2017/2393 im Lichte der Schlussfolgerungen der Kommissi‐ on I des Liller CEDR-Kongresses, Agrarrecht – annual 2018, 137-147. General Report of Commission I 188 ment, the European Commission intends to present a legislative proposal to combat unfair commercial practices by the end of March 2018. Com‐ mission I also addressed this issue, as fair treatment with one another in the food chain is an important prerequisite for achieving the highest possi‐ ble added value of agricultural products. General Report of Commission I 189 Generalbericht der Kommission I Version allemande – German version – Deutsche Version Prof. em. Dr. Paul Richli Universität Luzern Dr. Christian Busse Bundesministerium für Ernährung und Landwirtschaft Landesberichte sowie Landesberichterstatterinnen und Landesbe‐ richterstatter Bulgarien Minko Georgiev/Henrich Meyer-GerbauletChristina Yancheva/Dimitar Gre‐ kov/Dafinka Grozdanova/Aneta Roycheva Deutschland RAin Birgit Buth, Deutscher Raiffeisenverband, Berlin Frankreich Catherine del Cont, enseignant-chercheur, Universität Nantes Großbritannien RA Rhodri Jones, Cardiff Italien Prof. Dr. Luigi Russo, Universität Ferrara Niederlande Mr. H.C.E.P.J. Janssen; advocaat of cousel, Kneppelhout & Korthal N.V. Österreich Dr. Anton Reinl, Landwirtschaftskammer Österreich Polen Dr. Przemysław Litwiniuk; Dr. Konrad Marciniuk; Dr. Adam Niewiadomski Schweiz RA Jürg Niklaus, Niklaus Rechtsanwälte, Dübendorf (Schweiz) Spanien Prof. Dr. José Maria de la Cuesta Saenz Verarbeitung der Landesberichte: Christian Busse: Großbritannien, Italien, Niederlande, Polen Paul Richli: Bulgarien, Deutschland, Frankreich, Italien, Österreich, Spa‐ nien, Schweiz Lesehinweis: Zu Ländern, die in der nachfolgenden Übersicht bei einzelnen Fragen nicht erwähnt werden, enthalten die Landesberichte unter den jeweiligen Fragen keine Angaben. 190 Einleitung Konzeption des Generalberichts Im Rahmen des XXIX. Europäischen Agrarrechtskongresses des C.E.D.R., der vom 21. bis 23. September 2017 in Lille (Frankreich) durchgeführt wurde, hat die Kommission I das Thema "Wettbewerbsre‐ geln in der Landwirtschaft" bearbeitet. Der vorliegende Generalbericht, der von den beiden Generalberichterstattern gemeinsam verfasst wurde, gibt die Arbeit der Kommission I wieder und gliedert sich in vier Ab‐ schnitte, die die folgende Konzeption aufweisen: Im ersten Abschnitt wird ein Blick auf zwei frühere Kongresse des C.E.D.R., die bereits das Verhältnis zwischen Wettbewerbsrecht und Agrarrecht zum Gegenstand hatten, geworfen. Daraus ergibt sich unter an‐ derem, dass eine erste bedeutende Auseinandersetzung schon 1967 statt‐ fand (Ziff. I.2). Es folgt eine knappe, aber in solcher Weise für die Thema‐ tik der Kommission I wichtige Exposition der Agrarmärkte. Denn es soll‐ ten die Gründe, weshalb die Agrarmärkte im Wettbewerbsrecht der EU und der Länder eine Sonderstellung einnehmen, mindestens summarisch aufgezeigt werden (Ziff. I.3). Den einführenden ersten Abschnitt schließt eine kurze Skizzierung des Chicorée-Verfahrens vor dem EuGH und des Projektes der so genannten Omnibus-Verordnung der Europäischen Kom‐ mission ab. Denn dabei handelt es sich um zwei bedeutsame Vorgänge, die sich auf EU-Ebene während der Vorbereitung und der Beratungen der Kommission I abspielten und die für das Verständnis der Arbeit der Kom‐ mission I relevant sind (Ziff. I.4). Im hinsichtlich des Umfangs zentralen zweiten Abschnitt des General‐ berichts werden die Länderberichte zusammenfassend präsentiert, dies aufgegliedert in der Reihenfolge und anhand der Fragen, die den Landes‐ berichterstatterinnen und Landesberichterstattern im Vorfeld des Kongres‐ ses unterbreitet wurden. Der Fragebogen findet sich im vorliegenden Kon‐ gressband separat mitgeteilt (siehe vorn S. 47). Die Darstellung zu den einzelnen Fragen wird jeweils durch eine kurze Synthese der Generalbe‐ richterstatter abgeschlossen. Wie üblich hat die Kommission I am Ende ihrer wissenschaftlichen Ar‐ beit Schlussfolgerungen und Empfehlungen formuliert. Darüber wird im dritten Abschnitt kurz berichtet und auf die ebenfalls separate Veröffentli‐ chung im vorliegenden Kongressband hingewiesen. Der abschließende vierte Abschnitt greift die Skizzierung am Ende des ersten Abschnittes I. A. Generalbericht der Kommission I 191 wieder auf, da es ein seltenes Zusammentreffen darstellt, dass Empfehlun‐ gen einer Kommission an einem Europäischen Agrarrechtskongress un‐ mittelbar in legislatorische Arbeiten der EU einfliessen sowie im Hinblick auf ein neuestes Urteil des EuGH relevant werden. Mithin empfiehlt es sich, die zeitliche Sicht über den Europäischen Agrarrechtskongress aus‐ zuweiten und eine knappe Gegenüberstellung der Empfehlungen der Kommission I mit dem erst nach dem Kongress ergangenen Urteil des EuGH im Chicorée-Verfahren und der aus dem Projekt der Omnibus-Ver‐ ordnung hervorgegangenen und am 1.1.2018 in Kraft getretenen Ände‐ rungsverordnung (EU) 2017/2393 vorzunehmen. Frühere Beschäftigung des C.E.D.R. mit dem Agrarwettbewerbsrecht Ein erstes Mal beschäftigte sich das C.E.D.R. auf dem IV. Europäischen Agrarrechtskongress, der vom 25. bis. 28. Oktober 1967 in Bad Godes‐ berg (Deutschland) stattfand, mit dem Agrarwettbewerbsrecht. So behan‐ delte die Kommission I des damaligen Kongresses das Thema "Kartell‐ rechtliche Sonderregelung für die Landwirtschaft im EWG-Recht unter besonderer Berücksichtigung nationaler Regelungen". Diese Auseinander‐ setzung mit dem Thema stand am Beginn des EU-Agrarkartellrechts, das 1962 erstmals mit der Verordnung Nr. 26 geregelt worden war. Daher ver‐ wundert es nicht, dass die Auslegung dieser Verordnung den Mittelpunkt der Kommissionsarbeit bildete. Der damalige Fragebogen enthielt vier Fragen, darunter die Fragen, in‐ wieweit die Kartellbefreiung angesichts ihrer Erstreckung auch auf gewis‐ se Verarbeitungserzeugnisse über die Betriebe der Urproduktion hinaus‐ reichte, welche Bedeutung dem Preisbindungsverbot zukam und ob auch Absprachen zwischen der Urerzeugungsseite und der Handels- oder Verar‐ beitungsseite gestattet waren. Am Ende ihrer Beratungen stellte die Kom‐ mission I fest, dass mehrere Fragestellungen dringlich zu klären seien. Darunter wurde auch das Problem genannt, dass die Verordnung Nr. 26 nur auf zwischenstaatliche Sachverhalte Anwendung fand. Für rein inner‐ staatliche Sachverhalte sei eine Vereinheitlichung des Agrarkartellrechts erforderlich, "um die Möglichkeit von Wettbewerbsverzerrungen auszu‐ B. Generalbericht der Kommission I 192 schalten"1. Die Skizzierung der damaligen Beratungen zeigt deutlich, wie früh die noch heute diskutierten Probleme erkannt wurden. Anschließend trat das Thema im C.E.D.R in den Hintergrund, da die Marktregulierung im Rahmen der Gemeinsamen Agrarpolitik der EU (GAP) kaum Spielraum für Wettbewerb beließ. Erst nach dem Beginn der Liberalisierung des EU-Agrarmarktes geriet das Agrarkartellrecht wieder in das Blickfeld des C.E.D.R. So lautete das Thema, das die Kommission II des XXII. Europäischen Agrarrechtskongresses, der vom 23. bis 25. Oktober 2003 in Almerimar (Spanien) tagte, behandelte: "Die Agrarwirtschaft im Lichte des europäischen und nationalen Wettbewerbs‐ rechts"2. Es ist aufschlussreich, sich an dieser Stelle die damaligen Emp‐ fehlungen der Kommission II in Erinnerung zu rufen: "Im Hinblick auf diese Sonderstellung der Landwirtschaft wird vorge‐ schlagen: Unter Berücksichtigung des wichtigen Beitrags der Gemeinsamen Marktorganisationen zur Verbesserung von Vertragsbedingungen, zu de‐ nen landwirtschaftliche Produkte verkauft werden und weil die Landwirt‐ schaft in allen EU-Ländern eine ähnliche Sonderstellung aufweist, sollte weiter an europäischen Vertragsklauseln für landwirtschaftliche Produkte gearbeitet werden, die ein Gleichgewicht zwischen den Interessen der Er‐ zeuger und der Verbraucher herstellen. Unter Berücksichtigung der positiven Erfahrungen mit Erzeugerorgani‐ sationen sowohl im Gemeinschaftsrecht (z.B. Artikel 11 der Verordnung (EG) Nr. 2200/96 über die Gemeinsame Marktorganisation für Obst und Gemüse) als auch im nationalen Wettbewerbsrecht, welches Ausnahmen vom Kartellverbot (z.B. für Erzeugergemeinschaften und Organisationen und Genossenschaften) sowie vertikale Absprachen zulässt (z.B. in Frank‐ reich bei interprofessionellen Organisationen in Krisenzeiten), sollten die Verantwortlichen die Möglichkeit der Einführung und Regulierung solcher Organisationen eingehend prüfen. 1 So der Tagungsbericht von Winkler, Der Europäische Agrarrechtskongress in Bad Godesberg vom 25. bis 28. Oktober 1967, Recht der Landwirtschaft 1967, 312– 318; vgl. auch das Tagungsprogramm des Kongresses, Recht der Landwirtschaft 1967, 275–276, und den Arbeitsbericht der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Agrarrecht (Hrsg.), Die kartellrechtliche Regelung für die Landwirtschaft im EWG-Recht unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der nationalen Regelungen (1970). 2 Vgl. C.E.D.R. (Hrsg.), Le droit rural face à trois défis majeurs (2005), 123-201. Generalbericht der Kommission I 193 Anstrengungen sollten unternommen werden, um der Verordnung (EWG) Nr. 26/62, die durch Artikel 81 Abs. 3 EGV gerechtfertigt ist, zur vollen Geltung zu verhelfen. Die Anwendung der Verordnung sollte be‐ rücksichtigen, dass die Agrarwirtschaft eine Sonderstellung genießt. Auf europäischer Ebene sollten Mittel gefunden werden, um dem in al‐ len Mitgliedstaaten bestehenden Problem des `Verkaufs unter Einstands‐ preis´ zu begegnen."3 Aus diesen Empfehlungen wird ersichtlich, dass einerseits die Proble‐ me, die bereits 1967 diskutiert worden waren, noch keine zufriedenstellen‐ de Lösung gefunden hatten, und andererseits neue Fragen wie die der Ver‐ tragsregulierung und des Krisenmanagements hinzukamen. Die Kommis‐ sion I des XXIX. Europäischen Agrarrechtskongresses hat daher versucht, mittels eines umfassenden Fragebogens die gesamte Themenpalette aufzu‐ greifen und zusammenhängend zu diskutieren. Eigenarten der Agrarmärkte als Anknüpfung für das Agrarwettbewerbsrecht Vorbemerkung Die Grundlagenliteratur, die sich mit den Eigenarten der Agrarmärkte im Hinblick auf die wettbewerbsrechtliche Einordnung beschäftigt, scheint nicht sehr umfangreich zu sein. Es gibt aber doch einige, vorwiegend ame‐ rikanische Literatur. Dies dürfte nicht zuletzt damit zusammenhängen, dass das US-Wettbewerbsrecht, soweit ersichtlich, die längste Tradition hinsichtlich einer Sonderbehandlung der Landwirtschaft aufweist. Der Sonderstatus geht auf die zwanziger Jahre des letzten Jahrhunderts zurück und ist vor allem in einem Gesetz verankert, das immer noch in Geltung steht, dem Capper-Volstead Act. C. 1. 3 C.E.D.R. (Fn. 2), 200 f. Generalbericht der Kommission I 194 Eigenarten der Agrarmärkte Die Besonderheiten der Agrarmärkte lassen sich wie folgt umreissen: (1) Zunächst ist für die ökonomische Beurteilung der Marktsituation der Produzentinnen und Produzenten landwirtschaftlicher Erzeugnisse charakteristisch, dass diese zum grossen Teil homogen sind (so ge‐ nannte commodities), so z.B. grundsätzlich Weizen, Kartoffeln, Milch, Eier, Fleisch, Früchte oder Gemüse. Unter diesen Umständen gibt es vergleichsweise wenig Möglichkeiten zur preisrelevanten Pro‐ filierung des Angebots über die Ausdifferenzierung des Angebots4. Immerhin gibt es eine steigende Tendenz zu einer gewissen Produkt‐ differenzierung, ausgelöst u.a. durch Anforderungen an die Nah‐ rungsmittelsicherheit und die Ökologie5. (2) Die Zahl der Produzentinnen und Produzenten ist sodann im Verhält‐ nis zur Zahl der Abnehmerinnen und Abnehmer je nach Produktseg‐ ment häufig sehr gross. Zahlreiche kleine Erzeugerbetriebe stehen wenigen grossen Abnehmerbetrieben gegenüber. Es herrscht ein Un‐ gleichgewicht zwischen Angebots- und Nachfragemacht, was bedeu‐ tet, dass die Produzentinnen und Produzenten regelmäßig Preisneh‐ mer und nicht Preismacher bzw. Mengenanpasser und nicht Mengen‐ geber sind6. (3) Ausser der für die Produzentinnen und Produzenten landwirtschaftli‐ cher Erzeugnisse ungünstigen Marktstruktur sind Umweltfaktoren zu veranschlagen, welche die Landwirtschaft mehr belasten als die meis‐ ten anderen Wirtschaftszweige. Boden, Wasser und Sonneneinstrah‐ lung sind drei der wichtigsten Inputfaktoren für die Produktion. Diese 2. 4 Bernadette Andreosso-O’Callighan, The Economics of European Agriculture (2003), 59. 5 Andreosso-O’Callighan (Fn. 4), 59. 6 Siehe John B. Penson jr./Oral Capps jr./C. Parr Rosson III/Richard D. Woodward, Introduction to Agricultural Economics, 6. Aufl. (2015), 148 f.; vgl. auch Christian Busse, in: Jan Busche/Andreas Röhling (Hrsg.), Kölner Kommentar zum Kartell‐ recht, Band 1 (2017), § 28 GWB, Rz. 4, unter besonderem Hinweis auf den laufend sinkenden Anteil der Landwirtschaft an der Bruttowertschöpfung am Beispiel Deutschlands; weiter Patrik Ducrey, Marktmacht und schweizerische Landwirt‐ schaft – Kartellrecht als Korrektiv?, Blätter für Agrarrecht 2008, 123–136, 134.; Paul Richli, Umsetzung der «idealen» Lösung – Handlungsbedarf aus rechtlicher Sicht, Blätter für Agrarrecht 2006, 163–177, 165 f. Generalbericht der Kommission I 195 können auch mit der modernen Technologie nur unvollkommen be‐ herrscht werden7. (4) Im Weiteren machen der Landwirtschaft klimatische Bedingungen und Wetterprobleme zu schaffen, ebenso Schäden durch Naturereig‐ nisse und Krankheiten von Pflanzen und Tieren8. (5) Anders als in vielen anderen Wirtschaftszweigen kann die Produktion nur mit einem erheblichen zeitlichen Vorlauf umgestellt oder einge‐ stellt werden. Dies gilt insbesondere für den Gemüse- und Getreide‐ anbau sowie für den Obst- und Weinbau (nur eine Ernte jährlich), für die Fleischproduktion (Tiere haben einen erheblichen Lebenszyklus) sowie für die Milchproduktion (Milchkühe können nicht kurzfristig vermehrt bzw. reduziert werden)9. (6) Nicht zuletzt fällt die grundsätzlich geringe Preiselastizität der Nach‐ frage nach landwirtschaftlichen Produkten auf ein sich ausweitendes Angebot negativ ins Gewicht. Im Fall einer geringen Preiselastizität des Angebots sinkt der Gesamtertrag bei einer Mengenausweitung10. So kann eine Mengenausweitung bei bestimmten homogenen Produk‐ ten (raw food and fiber products) um ein Prozent eine Preisreduktion von fünf Prozent auslösen11, wobei dies allerdings maßgeblich von dem jeweiligen Produktionszweig sowie der aktuellen Markt- und Wertschöpfungsstruktur abhängt. (7) Es kommt hinzu, dass die Landwirtschaft ein Wirtschaftssektor mit einem sehr hohen Investitionsbedarf je Arbeitskraft ist, insbesondere im Verhältnis zu den Ertragsmöglichkeiten. In den USA soll die Landwirtschaft sogar den höchsten Investitionsbedarf je Arbeitskraft erreichen12. (8) Weiter sei erwähnt, dass ein landwirtschaftlicher Produktionsbetrieb vergleichsweise hohe Marktaustrittschranken zu überwinden hat, wenn er sich neu orientieren muss. Der Boden kann meistens nur landwirtschaftlich genutzt werden. Sodann können die Gebäude aus 7 Penson jr./Capps jr./Rosson III/Woodward (Fn. 6), 174 ff. 8 Andreosso-O’Callighan (Fn. 4), 49 ff. und 66 f. 9 Ulrich Koester, Grundzüge der landwirtschaftlichen Marktlehre, 4. Aufl. (2010), 94 f.; Andreosso-O’Callighan (Fn. 4), 56 f. 10 Penson jr./Capps jr./Rosson III/Woodward (Fn. 6), 201 ff.; Andreosso-O’Callighan (Fn. 4), 44 ff. 11 Penson jr./Capps jr./Rosson III/Woodward (Fn. 6), 71 ff., 219 ; Koester (Fn. 9), 35 ff., 52 ff. und 216. 12 Penson jr./Capps jr./Rosson III/Woodward (Fn. 6), 219. Generalbericht der Kommission I 196 bautechnischen und – je nach Landesrecht – wegen Raumnutzungsbe‐ stimmungen nicht ohne weiteres einer anderen Nutzung zugeführt werden13. (9) Während die Inputkosten für die Landwirtschaft langfristig nach oben tendieren, ist das Gegenteil für die Agrarproduktepreise der Fall. Die‐ se sinken im Vergleich zu Industrieprodukten, was zu einer schlei‐ chenden Erosion der landwirtschaftlichen Einkommen im Vergleich zu anderen Einkommen führt. Dies scheint das eigentliche "Farmpro‐ blem" auszumachen14. (10) Neben diesen ökonomischen Aspekten werden als Rechtfertigung für staatliche Interventionen in die Agrarmärkte aber auch politisch-stra‐ tegische Gründe angeführt. Die Sorge um Nahrungs(mittel)sicherheit ist ein konstanter, bis auf die Pharaonen zurückreichender15 Grund für staatliche Intervention16. Ein Blick in den Ursprung agrarkartellrechtlicher Regelungen: der Capper-Volstead Act und die nachfolgenden Gesetze in den USA Unter dem Eindruck der grossen Marktungleichgewichte wurde in den USA schon 1922 mit dem Capper-Volstead Act17für Genossenschaften18 eine Ausnahme von Bestimmungen der Antikartellgesetzgebung, d.h. vom 3. 13 Siehe etwa Roger Zäch, Schweizerisches Kartellrecht, 2. Aufl., (2005), Rz. 111 ff.; Richli (Fn. 6), 166. 14 Andreosso-O’Callighan (Fn. 4), 58 f. 15 Genesis 41:1. 16 Andreosso-O’Callighan (Fn. 4), S. 62 und 66; Koester (Fn. 9), S. 216; Peter C. Carstensen, Agricultural Cooperatives and the Law: Obsolete Statutes in a Dy‐ namic Economy, Legal Studies Research Paper Series, Paper No. 1245, 58 South Dakota Law Review 463 (2013), 462–498, 462. 17 Eine gute Übersicht über diesen Erlass und die Praxis dazu bietet Carstensen (Fn. 16), 482 ff.; ausführlich zur Geschichte des Capper-Volstead Act: Donald A. Frederick, Antitrust Status of Farmer Cooperatives: the story of Capper Volstead Act, USDA Cooperative information report, n° 59, September 2002, U.S. Depart‐ ment of Agriculture; vgl. auch Margerite Zoeteweij-Turhan, The Role of Producer Organizations on the Dairy Market (2012), 131 ff. 18 Eine gute Typologie der relevanten Genossenschaften präsentiert Carstensen (Fn. 16), 472 ff. Beispiele für Genossenschaften finden sich bei: Sarah Servin, Agricultural Cooperatives in the 21st Century: The progression towards local and regional food systems in the United States (2015). Generalbericht der Kommission I 197 Sherman Antitrust Act von 1890 und vom Clayton Act von 1914, ge‐ macht. Es handelt sich dabei um die wohl älteste, seit bald 100 Jahren un‐ unterbrochen gehandhabte Ausnahmeregelung vom Kartellverbot im Be‐ reich des Agrarrechts. Zu betonen ist, dass allein das genossenschaftsinter‐ ne Verhalten privilegiert ist, hingegen nicht wettbewerbsbeschränkendes Verhalten durch Absprache mit aussenstehenden Partnern19. Weitere Erleichterungen von der Antikartellgesetzgebung wurden ins‐ besondere durch die folgenden Gesetze bezweckt20: (1) Packers and Stockyards Act von 1921, welcher die Antitrustregelung mit Bezug auf Marketingmassnahmen für Vieh verstärkte; (2) Cooperative Marketing Act von 1926, welcher den Farmern oder ihren Organisationen erlaubte, Informationen über Preise und Markt‐ informationen zu erwerben, auszutauschen und zu verbreiten; (3) Robinson Patman Act von 1936, der vor allem die Preisdiskriminie‐ rung betrifft; (4) Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act von 1937. Alle diese gesetzlichen Massnahmen sind darauf ausgerichtet, gegen die grossen Abnehmer den Aufbau einer Gegenmacht (countervailing power) zu ermöglichen21. Dieser Aufbau ist sogar bis zu einem hundertprozenti‐ gen Marktanteil zulässig, sofern diese Position allein durch eigene Leis‐ tung oder durch allgemein erlaubte Praktiken erlangt wird. Unzulässig wä‐ re dann erst das missbräuchliche Ausnützen des Monopols22. In der Praxis scheint es denn auch Genossenschaften zu geben, welche der Marktgegen‐ seite hinsichtlich Marktmacht überlegen sind, was auch kritische Stimmen mit der Forderung nach Revision des Capper-Volstead Act auf den Plan gerufen hat23. Eine besondere Stärkung des Gedankens des Aufbaus von Gegenmacht ist gegeben, wenn Aussenseiter, gestützt auf den Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act von 1937, mittels staatlicher "Order" zur Mitwirkung an 19 Penson jr./Capps jr./Rosson III/Woodward (Fn. 6), 165; Busse (Fn. 6), Rz. 44 ff. 20 Penson jr./Capps jr./Rosson III/Woodward (Fn. 6), 166. 21 Carstensen (Fn. 16), 465 f., mit Nachweisen. 22 Siehe Werner Klohn, Die Farmer-Genossenschaften in den USA – Eine agrargeo‐ graphische Untersuchung (1990), 51. 23 Carstensen (Fn. 16), 462 und 479 ff.; Anne McGinnis, Ridding the Law of Outdat‐ ed Statutory Exemptions to Antitrust Law: A Proposal for Reform, University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform 47 (2014), 529–554. Generalbericht der Kommission I 198 genossenschaftlichen Massnahmen verpflichtet werden24. Die Order be‐ deutet, dass die Bundesregierung eine Art Allgemeinverbindlichkeit fest‐ setzt, um "Trittbrettfahrer" daran zu hindern, von höheren Preisen zu pro‐ fitieren und mit ihren Mengenausweitungen die Preise wieder zu drü‐ cken25. Es geht um nichts weniger als um die Schaffung staatlich "gespon‐ serter" Kartelle über Mengen und Preise für bestimmt umschriebene Ge‐ biete, nicht für die ganze USA26. Am meisten verbreitet sind "Orders" im Bereich der Milchwirtschaft bei Milchgenossenschaften; in anderen Pro‐ duktionsbereichen gibt es wenige Beispiele27. Da die Regelung des Ge‐ nossenschaftsrechts in der Zuständigkeit der Bundesstaaten liegt, sind die Möglichkeiten von "Orders" nicht in den ganzen USA identisch28. Ein staatlicher Bericht kommt – anders als die kritischen Stimmen – zum Schluss, dass insbesondere in der Milchwirtschaft die Konzentration der Milchgenossenschaften gerechtfertigt ist, um eine gewisse Marktposi‐ tion zu wahren29. Es wird nicht als problematisch betrachtet, dass zwi‐ schen 1950 und 2000 die Zahl der Kooperativen von 10.035 auf 3.346 ab‐ genommen hat, während der Gesamtumsatz dieser Kooperativen von 8,7 Milliarden Dollar auf nahezu 100 Milliarden Dollar zunahm30. Die Emp‐ fehlungen am Ende dieses Berichts lauten nicht auf Aufspaltung von Ge‐ nossenschaften, sondern vor allem auf die Notwendigkeit kompetenter Führung31. Im Übrigen ist der Capper-Volstead Act kein Persilschein für irgend‐ welches Verhalten, das anderen Unternehmen wettbewerbsrechtlich unter‐ 24 Carstensen (Fn. 16), 469 f. 25 American Bar Association, Section of Antitrust Law, Federal Statutory Exemption of Antitrust Law, Monograph 24 (2007), 36 ff.; Penson jr./Capps jr./Rosson III/ Woodward (Fn. 6), 166. 26 American Bar Association (Fn. 25), 94 und 114 ff. 27 American Bar Association (Fn. 25), 95 und 116 f.; Carstensen (Fn. 16), 476. 28 Carstensen (Fn. 16), 478 f. 29 Zur Frage, ob der Capper-Volstead Act auch genossenschaftliche Beschränkungen der Produktion abdeckt, siehe Yulyia Bolotova, Agricultural Production Restric‐ tions and Market Power: An Antitrust Analysis, Selected Paper prepared for pre‐ sentation at the Southern Agricultural Economics Association’s 2015 Annual Meeting (2015). 30 United States Departement of Agriculture, Agricultural Cooperatives in the 21st Century, November 2002, 20. 31 Agricultural Cooperatives (Fn. 30), 30 ff. Generalbericht der Kommission I 199 sagt ist. Insbesondere ist auch hier der Verkauf unter Einstandspreis als unlauterer Wettbewerb verboten32. Per Saldo könnte es sich lohnen, sich im Hinblick auf die weitere Bear‐ beitung des Verhältnisses zwischen Wettbewerbsrecht und Agrarrecht et‐ was näher mit der Entwicklung der landwirtschaftlichen Genossenschaften in den USA sowie mit dem Einfluss des Capper-Volstead Act zu beschäfti‐ gen. Es scheint, dass eine Privilegierung auch zu weit gehen kann, wenn Wachstumsprozesse auf der Anbieterseite zu Anbietermonopolen führen können. Mit einer solchen Interessenszuwendung würde man im Übrigen eine Hinwendung wiederholen, welche in Deutschland im Hinblick auf den Erlass des GWB erfolgte. In den fünfziger Jahren wurde eine Studien‐ gruppe unter der Leitung von Franz Böhm eingesetzt, welche einen Studi‐ enaufenthalt in den USA durchführte33. Zum besonderen Hintergrund der Beratungen der Kommission I Wie schon in der Einleitung zum Fragebogen der Kommission I angedeu‐ tet wurde, fanden die Vorbereitung und die Beratungen der Kommission I vor einem besonderen Hintergrund statt, dessen Kenntnis nützlich ist, um die Beratungen vollumfänglich zu würdigen. Hierbei handelt es sich ers‐ tens um das Vorabentscheidungsverfahren vor dem EuGH in der Rechtssa‐ che C-671/15 (APVE), in dem es um eine Kartellabsprache zwischen Marktbeteiligten auf dem französischen Markt für Chicorée geht. Die französische Kartellbehörde hatte 2012 das Kartell als nicht von einer Agrarkartellausnahme abgedeckt eingestuft und daher eine Bußgeldverfü‐ gung erlassen. Die dagegen angerufene erstinstanzliche Cour d`appel de Paris widersprach dieser Sichtweise. Daraufhin legte die zweitinstanzliche Cour de cassation 2015 dem EuGH zwei Fragen zur Vorabentscheidung vor, mit denen die Reichweite der Kartellausnahmen im EU-Agrarmarkt‐ recht geklärt werden sollte. Dadurch wurden zum ersten Mal vor dem EuGH konkrete Fragen zu den agrarkartellrechtlichen Regelungen der liberalisierten EU-Agrarmarkt‐ organisation gestellt, wobei allerdings nicht die aktuelle Fassung, sondern die bis 2013 gültige Fassung und die Vorgängerregelung im Bereich Obst D. 32 Klohn (Fn. 22), 50. 33 Busse (Fn. 6), Rz. 44. Generalbericht der Kommission I 200 und Gemüse Anwendung fanden. Generalanwalt Wahl legte im April 2017 seine Schlussanträge vor, die sich eingehend mit der Materie befassen und zu grundlegenden Äußerungen kamen34. Der EuGH verkündete sein Urteil erst nach dem XXIX. Europäischen Agrarrechtskongress, so dass im Rah‐ men der nationalen Berichte und der Beratungen der Kommission I nur die Schlussanträge diskutiert werden konnten. Mit Spannung wurde insofern auf das zu fällende Urteil geblickt. Zweitens hatte das Europäische Parlament im Mai 2017 ausgehend von dem Abschlussbericht der Task Force "Landwirtschaftliche Märkte" gefor‐ dert, umfangreiche Änderungen hinsichtlich der Regelungen zu anerkann‐ ten Agrarorganisationen vorzunehmen. Diese Änderungen sollten im Zu‐ sammenhang mit der so genannten Omnibus-Verordnung erfolgen, die die Europäische Kommission im September 2016 als Legislativvorschlag vor‐ gelegt hatte. Die Kommission I hat diese Vorschläge des Europäischen Parlaments in ihre Beratungen miteinbezogen. Während der Tagung der Kommission I fand die Schlussphase der so genannten informellen Trilo‐ ges zur Omnibus-Verordnung zwischen Europäischem Parlament, EU-Rat und der Europäischen Kommission statt. Das Thema der Kommission I besaß damit eine unmittelbare gesetzgeberische Relevanz. So war die Europäische Kommission auch in der Auftaktveranstaltung des XXIX. Europäischen Agrarkongresses vertreten und kam auf die Omni‐ bus-Verordnung zu sprechen. Insofern erwarteten die Teilnehmer der Kommission I ebenfalls mit Neugier das Ergebnis der Verhandlungen auf EU-Ebene. Fragen für die Landesberichte und deren Beantwortung samt Synthese der Generalberichterstatter Nationales Agrarwettbewerbsrecht Allgemeines Kartellrecht Gibt es in Ihrem Land zum Kartellverbot, zur Missbrauchsaufsicht über marktbeherrschende Unternehmen und zur Fusionskontrolle allgemeines nationales Kartellrecht? II. A. 1. 34 Generalanwalt Wahl, Schlussanträge vom 6.4.2017, Rs. C-671/15 (APVE), ECLI:EU:C:2017:281, Rz. 28 ; siehe auch hinten Ziff. II.1.5.3. Generalbericht der Kommission I 201 Bulgarien Das Gesetz zum Schutz des Wettbewerbs von 2008 hat Kartelle, Fusionen zwischen Gesellschaften und marktbeherrschenden Positionen zum Ge‐ genstand. Deutschland Das 1957 entstandene und 2013 neugefasste Gesetz gegen Wettbewerbs‐ beschränkungen von (GWB) enthält zu allen drei Bereichen Vorschriften. Frankreich Das nationale Kartellrecht ist im Buch IV des Handelskodex (code de commerce) verankert. Es handelt sich nicht um eine Gesetzgebung mit per se-Verboten, sondern um eine mittlere Lösung, welche wettbewerbswidri‐ ge Absprachen und wettbewerbswidriges Verhalten (Missbrauch von Marktmacht) rechtlich fasst (Art. L420-1 und Art. L420-2), sofern dieses den Markt beeinträchtigen können (effets réels et potentiels). Die Miss‐ brauchsaufsicht ist laut Landesbericht im Ergebnis wirkungslos. Weiter enthält der Handelskodex eine Fusionskontrolle, vergleichbar der EU-Re‐ gelung (Art. L430-1 ff.). Wichtig sind die Rechtfertigungsgründe für Wett‐ bewerbsbeschränkungen und die individuellen Ausnahmen von den Wett‐ bewerbsbestimmungen (Art. L420-4). Großbritannien Der Competition Act 1998 (CA 1998) behandelt wettbewerbsbeschrän‐ kende Vereinbarungen, Kartelle und den Missbrauch einer marktbeherr‐ schenden Stellung. Es ist Art. 101 und 102 AEUV nachgebildet. Der En‐ terprise Act 2002 (EA 2002) enthält Regelungen zu Fusionen. Italien Es gilt das Kartellgesetz Nr. 287/1990 (Legge 10 ottobre 1990, no. 287 – Norme per la tutela della concorrenza e del mercato). Niederlande Es gilt der Dutch Competition Act (Mededingingswet) von 1998. Österreich Maßgebend ist das Bundesgesetz gegen Kartelle und andere Wettbewerbs‐ beschränkungen (Kartellgesetz 2005 – KartG 2005). Generalbericht der Kommission I 202 Polen Es gilt der Competition and Consumer Protection Act von 2007. Schweiz Das Kartellgesetz von 1995 beruht im Unterschied zum EU-Recht nicht auf dem Verbots-, sondern auf dem Missbrauchsprinzip, wobei aber eine Vermutung für die Unzulässigkeit der "harten Kartelle" gilt (Preis-, Ge‐ biets- und Mengenabsprachen). Die Praxis zum Missbrauchsprinzip nähert sich im Ergebnis dem Verbotsprinzip an. Spanien Es gilt das Gesetz 15/2007 zur Verteidigung des Wettbewerbs (Defensa de la competencia), das vorangehende Regelungen abgelöst hat. Synthese der Generalberichterstatter Alle vertretenen Länder verfügen über eigene Kartellgesetze. Überwie‐ gend beruhen diese wie das EU-Wettbewerbsrecht auf dem Verbotsprinzip hinsichtlich wettbewerbsbeschränkender Absprachen und enthalten eine Missbrauchsaufsicht sowie eine Fusionskontrolle. Die Wettbewerbsrechte in Frankreich und der Schweiz kennen formal kein Kartellverbot, sondern beruhen auf dem Missbrauchsprinzip. Die Ergebnisse sind aber nicht fun‐ damental anders als im Fall der Regelung auf der Grundlage des Verbots‐ prinzips. Kartellrechtliche Privilegien für die Landwirtschaft in der Staatsverfassung Ist in Ihrem Land die Möglichkeit einer kartellrechtlichen Privilegierung der Landwirtschaft in der Verfassung angesprochen? Wenn ja, welchen Inhalt hat diese Regelung? Die landesrechtliche Lage Die Verfassungen von Bulgarien, Deutschland, Frankreich, Italien, der Niederlande, Österreich und Polen enthalten keine Bestimmungen, wel‐ che die Agrarwirtschaft im Hinblick auf das Kartellrecht privilegieren. Die Bundesverfassung der Schweiz sieht in Art. 104 Abs. 2 vor, dass der Bund ergänzend zur zumutbaren Selbsthilfe der Landwirtschaft und 2. Generalbericht der Kommission I 203 nötigenfalls abweichend vom Grundsatz der Wirtschaftsfreiheit die boden‐ bewirtschaftenden bäuerlichen Betriebe fördert. Gestützt darauf kann die Landwirtschaft wettbewerbspolitisch privilegiert werden. In Art. 130 der Verfassung Spaniens wird die Landwirtschaft zur Mo‐ dernisierung und Entwicklung verpflichtet. Diese Bestimmung hat zwar keine direkte Wirkung, kann aber als Grundlage für Bestimmungen über die landwirtschaftlichen Branchenverbände sowie für Kodexe guten Ver‐ haltens dienen. Synthese der Generalberichterstatter Da es sich um eine sehr spezielle Materie handelt, kann es kaum überra‐ schen, dass die Staatsverfassungen die Stellung der Landwirtschaft im Kartellrecht nicht unmittelbar regeln. Sie enthalten dazu höchstens mittel‐ bare Festlegungen oder Regelungen bzw. Handlungsaufträge, welche bei entsprechender Interpretation auf das Kartellrecht ausstrahlen können. Sehr weitgehend ist in diesem Punkt die Schweiz. Spezielles Kartellrecht für den Agrarbereich Existiert in Ihrem Land spezielles nationales Kartellrecht für den Agrarbe‐ reich? Wenn ja, welchen Inhalt hat dieses Recht und wo ist es geregelt? Deutschland Ein eigenes Gesetz für das Kartellrecht im Agrarbereich existiert nicht. Das GWB enthält aber eine Ausnahme für die Landwirtschaft vom Kar‐ tellverbot. In § 28 GWB ist insbesondere geregelt, dass Vereinbarungen von landwirtschaftlichen Erzeugerbetrieben, Vereinbarungen und Be‐ schlüsse von Vereinigungen solcher Betriebe und Vereinigungen solcher Vereinigungen über Erzeugung oder Absatz landwirtschaftlicher Erzeug‐ nisse und die Benutzung gemeinsamer Einrichtungen für die Lagerung, Be- oder Verarbeitung landwirtschaftlicher Erzeugnisse vom Kartellverbot ausgenommen sind, sofern sie keine Preisbindungen enthalten oder den Wettbewerb nicht ausschließen Für anerkannte Erzeugerorganisationen, anerkannte Vereinigungen von anerkannten Erzeugerorganisationen und für anerkannte Branchenverbän‐ de regelt zudem § 5 Agrarmarktstrukturgesetz (AgrarMSG) eine Ausnah‐ 3. Generalbericht der Kommission I 204 me vom Kartellverbot und zwar für den von der Anerkennung umfassten Bereich. Frankreich Sonderbestimmungen für die Landwirtschaft mit besonderen Rechtferti‐ gungsgründen finden sich in Art. L-420-4 Abs. I, 2 des Handelskodex’ i.V.m. Titel III des Buchs VI des Code rural. Angesprochen sind diesbe‐ züglich vor allem Branchenverträge. Erwähnenswert ist weiter Art. L420-1 Abs. 2, wonach die Wettbewerbsregeln nicht anwendbar sind, wenn Wettbewerbsbeschränkungen durch einen ökonomischen Fortschritt gerechtfertigt werden können, sofern die Konsumenten angemessen am Vorteil partizipieren und der Wettbewerb nicht für einen wesentlichen Teil der Produkte ausgeschlossen wird. Die Praxis zur Einschränkung der Wettbewerbsregeln ist sehr restriktiv, sodass sich für die Landwirtschaft keine nennenswerten Entlastungen von den Wettbewerbsregeln ergeben. Erwähnenswert sind weiter insbesondere die folgenden Gesetze: Das Gesetz vom 27. Juli 2010 über die Modernisation der Landwirt‐ schaft und der Fischerei (Loi du 27 juillet 2010 de modernisation de l'agri‐ culture et de la pêche, LMAP), geändert durch das Zukunftsgesetz von 13. Oktober 2014 (Loi d’avenir du 13 octobre 2014), kodifiziert im Code rural. Diese Art. L632-24 ff. über die Vertragsregulierung (contractualisati‐ on) stehen im Zusammenhang mit dem EU-Milchpaket von 2012, wozu der Landesbericht ausführt, man laufe das Risiko, dass die Minimalpreis‐ garantie seitens der Branchenverbände wettbewerbsrechtlich unzulässig sein könnte. Heikel seien auch Referenzindikatoren mit einer Tendenz zu Preisempfehlungen. Die Produzenten müssten in der Preisfestsetzung frei bleiben. Diese Haltung schaffe Rechtsunsicherheit und ist dafür verant‐ wortlich, dass die Vertragsregulierung in nur wenigen Produktionsberei‐ chen Fuss gefasst hat. Die Vertragsregulierung erhöhe zwar die Transpa‐ renz, führe aber zu keiner Einkommensverbesserung in der Landwirt‐ schaft. Das Gesetz Nr. 2016-1691 (so genanntes Loi Sapin 2) möchte die Stel‐ lung der Landwirte in der Nahrungsmittelkette durch Ausbalancierung der Machtasymmetrie zwischen Produzenten und nachgelagerten Stufen stär‐ ken. Instrumentell geht es insbesondere um die Vertragsregulierung. Da‐ nach müssen den Verträgen verschiedene Referenzkriterien zugrunde ge‐ legt werden. Generalbericht der Kommission I 205 Großbritannien Der CA 1998 enthält bezüglich Vereinbarungen über die Zusammenarbeit zwischen Landwirten und deren Vereinigungen Ausnahmen zum allgemei‐ nen Kartellrecht. Diese Ausnahmen betreffen die Produktion und den Ver‐ kauf von landwirtschaftlichen Erzeugnissen sowie die Nutzung von ge‐ meinsamen Einrichtungen. Dabei sind gewisse einschränkende Bedingun‐ gen zu beachten, so etwa, dass die Vereinbarungen nur zwischen Landwir‐ ten (und damit zum Beispiel nicht zwischen Verarbeitern) abgeschlossen werden und keine Verpflichtung der Landwirte enthalten dürfen, einen einheitlichen Preis für ihre Erzeugnisse zu verlangen. Im Übrigen besteht sehr wenig spezielles Kartellrecht im Bereich der Landwirtschaft. Niederlande Es gibt lediglich ein Handbuch des Wirtschaftsministeriums von 2015, das erläutert, welche Möglichkeiten der Zusammenarbeit von anerkannten Er‐ zeugerorganisationen, anerkannten Vereinigungen von Erzeugerorgansia‐ tionen sowie anerkannten Branchenverbänden im Agrarbereich bestehen, ohne gegen allgemeines Kartellrecht zu verstoßen. Das Handbuch ist nach Auffassung des Landesberichts überflüssig und enthält keine Neuigkeiten. Österreich Das KartG enthält in § 2 Abs. 2 Nr. 5 Sonderrecht für die Landwirtschaft. Danach sind Vereinbarungen, Beschlüsse und Verhaltensweisen von land‐ wirtschaftlichen Erzeugerbetrieben, Vereinigungen von landwirtschaftli‐ chen Erzeugerbetrieben oder Vereinigungen von solchen Erzeugervereini‐ gungen insbesondere über die Erzeugung oder den Absatz landwirtschaft‐ licher Erzeugnisse vom Kartellverbot ausgenommen, sofern sie keine Preisbindung enthalten und den Wettbewerb nicht ausschließen. Schweiz Es besteht – mit Ausnahme von Art. 171a des Landwirtschaftsgesetzes vom 29. April 1998 (LwG) über so genannte Gegengeschäfte marktbe‐ herrschender Unternehmen – kein nominales Agrarkartellrecht. Das Kar‐ tellgesetz enthält aber eine Rechtsgrundlage für den Koordinationsmecha‐ nismus zwischen Agrarrecht und Kartellrecht. So sind nach dessen Art. 3 Abs. 1 andere Vorschriften vorbehalten, soweit diese auf einem Markt Wettbewerb nicht zulassen. Hierzu gehören insbesondere Vorschriften, die eine staatliche Markt- oder Preisordnung begründen (Bst. a), oder die ein‐ zelnen Unternehmen zur Erfüllung öffentlicher Aufgaben mit besonderen Generalbericht der Kommission I 206 Rechten ausstatten (Bst. b). Solche vorbehaltenen Vorschriften finden sich gerade auch im Agrarrecht. Diesbezüglich ist insbesondere auf die folgen‐ den Bestimmungen hinzuweisen: Das LwG enthält Bestimmungen über die Selbsthilfe von Agrarorgani‐ sationen, über die Herausgabe von Richtpreisen durch Agrarorganisatio‐ nen und über die Unterstützung von Selbsthilfemassnahmen solcher Orga‐ nisationen durch den Bund (Art. 8 ff.). Als Agrarorganisationen kennt die Schweiz die beiden Formen der Branchenorganisation und der Produzen‐ tenorganisation. Als Branchenorganisation gilt der Zusammenschluss von Produzenten und Produzentinnen einzelner Produkte oder Produktegrup‐ pen mit den Verarbeitern und gegebenenfalls mit dem Handel (Art. 8 Abs. 2). Nach den Selbsthilfemaßnahmen in Art. 8 Abs. 1 LwG sind die Förde‐ rung der Qualität und des Absatzes sowie die Anpassung der Produktion und des Angebotes an die Erfordernisse des Marktes Sache der Branchenoder Produzentenorganisationen. Nach Art. 8 Abs. 1bis LwG können die Branchenorganisationen Standardverträge herausgeben. Ein Sonderregime gilt für Milchkaufverträge (vgl. Art. 37 LwG). Die Branchen- und Produzentenorganisationen können zudem Richt‐ preise herausgeben, auf welche sich die Lieferanten und die Abnehmer ge‐ einigt haben (Art. 8a LwG). Damit räumt der schweizerische Gesetzgeber den Agrarorganisationen die Möglichkeit einer Koordination in einem wettbewerbspolitisch äusserst sensiblen Bereich ein. Die Unternehmen dürfen, was für Richtpreise typisch ist, nicht zur deren Einhaltung ge‐ zwungen werden. Für Konsumentenpreise sind schliesslich gar keine Richtpreise festlegbar. Der Bundesrat ist ferner ermächtigt, auf einen entsprechenden Antrag der Branchen- und Produzentenorganisationen in den Bereichen der Quali‐ täts- und Absatzförderung sowie der Anpassung der Produktion und des Angebotes an die Erfordernisse des Marktes Selbsthilfemassnahmen auf Nichtmitglieder (so genannte Trittbrettfahrer) auszudehnen. Ausgeschlos‐ sen ist die Ausdehnung von Richtpreisen auf Nichtmitglieder. Diese Rege‐ lung findet sich in Art. 1 der Verordnung über die Ausdehnung der Selbst‐ hilfemassnahmen von Branchen- und Produzentenorganisationen vom 30. Oktober 2002 (VBPO). Synthese der Generalberichterstatter Soweit die Landesberichte Angaben enthalten, gibt es in Kartellgesetzen bzw. kartellrechtlichen Regelungen der Länder unmittelbare oder mittelba‐ Generalbericht der Kommission I 207 re Sonderbestimmungen für die Landwirtschaft. Deren Zielsetzung ist die Privilegierung gewisser wettbewerbsbeschränkender Absprachen oder Verhaltensweisen. Im Fokus steht vor allem kollektives Handeln in Erzeu‐ gerorganisationen und deren Vereinigungen im Hinblick auf Produktion und Absatz landwirtschaftlicher Güter, ausgenommen allerdings die Fest‐ setzung von Preisen und Mengen. Es gibt auch eine Tendenz zu Vertrags‐ regulierungen (Kontraktualisierung). Die Voraussetzungen für Ausnahmen vom Kartellverbot bzw. Missbrauchsverbot sind nicht durchwegs überein‐ stimmend. Vielfach lehnen sie sich allerdings an die entsprechende Agrarkartellausnahme der EU an. Die Landesberichte hegen auch nicht durchwegs die gleichen Erwartungen an Ausnahmeregelungen. Vor allem der französische Landesbericht bedauert das Risiko, dass Minimalpreisga‐ rantien seitens der Branchenverbände unzulässig sein könnten. Ausdrück‐ lich zugelassen ist die Herausgabe von Richtpreisen in der Schweiz. Spezielle Behörden für das Agrarkartellrecht Gibt es in Ihrem Land spezielle Behörden, die das Agrarkartellrecht durchführen? In keinem der zehn Länder, die mit Berichten in der Kommission I ver‐ treten waren, gibt es eine besondere Behörde für die Anwendung des Agrarkartellrechts. Zuständig sind die allgemeinen Kartellbehörden. Agrarkartellrechtliche Verfahren im letzten Jahrzehnt Gab es im letzten Jahrzehnt besonders wichtige nationale behördliche oder gerichtliche Verfahren im Agrarkartellrecht in Ihrem Land (Kartell‐ verbot; Missbrauchsaufsicht; Fusionskontrolle)? Wenn ja, welchen Inhalt hatten diese Verfahren und wurden sie nach na‐ tionalem Recht oder Unionsrecht entschieden? Bulgarien Es werden beispielhaft vier Verfahren im Agrarkartellrecht hervorgeho‐ ben: (1) 2011 deckte die Kommission zum Schutz des Wettbewerbs Kartelle für Zucker, Backöl, Mehl und Eier auf. 4. 5. Generalbericht der Kommission I 208 (2) 2013 kam es zu einem Kartellverfahren bezüglich Lieferanten von Backöl. Die kartellrechtliche Verfügung wurde 2014 durch den höchsten Verwaltungsgerichtshof bestätigt. (3) Die Kommission zum Schutz des Wettbewerbs initiierte eine Selbst‐ verpflichtung gegen den unfairen Wettbewerb in akkreditierten Labo‐ ratorien zur Kontrolle der Zusammensetzung und Qualität von Milch. Der Grund dafür ist die Pflicht zur Beachtung des Verhältnismässig‐ keitsprinzips (Entscheid Nr. ACT 962-10.08.2017). (4) Mit Entscheid Nr. ACT 940-10.08.2017 wurde ein unzulässiger un‐ fairer Wettbewerb hinsichtlich der Erzeugung und des Verkaufs von Käse festgestellt. Deutschland Der Landesbericht beschreibt besonders relevante Aktivitäten des Bundes‐ kartellamtes: (1) Sektoruntersuchung Milch Im letzten Jahrzehnt gab es im Sektor Milch eine breit angelegte Marktuntersuchung, die im Januar 2012 mit einem Endbericht abge‐ schlossen wurde35. Im Rahmen dieser Untersuchung durchleuchtete das Bundeskartellamt den gesamten nationalen Milchmarkt und dabei insbesondere die Konzentration der Molkereien, die Vertragsbezie‐ hungen auf dem Rohmilchmarkt sowie Marktinformationssysteme einschließlich Referenzpreissysteme. (2) Pilotverfahren bei einer Molkerei betreffend die Lieferbeziehungen 2016 wandte sich das Bundeskartellamt erneut dem Milchmarkt zu, und zwar im Rahmen eines Pilotverfahrens bei einer Privatmolkerei. Es ging um die Untersuchung der Milchlieferbeziehungen. Im März 2017 veröffentlichte das Bundeskartellamt dazu einen Sachstandsbe‐ richt, der von der Molkereiwirtschaft äußerst kritisch gesehen wird. Viele der andiskutierten Punkte greifen stark in die gesellschaftsrecht‐ lichen und vertraglichen Beziehungen ein, ohne dass ein Verstoß ge‐ gen kartellrechtliche Bestimmungen evident wird. Vielmehr entsteht der Eindruck, dass das Bundeskartellamt insbesondere hinsichtlich der Beziehung zwischen Milcherzeuger und Molkerei agrar- und 35 Abrufbar unter folgendem Link: http://www.bundeskartellamt.de/SharedDocs/Pub likation/DE/Sektoruntersuchungen/Sektoruntersuchung%20Milch%20 %20Ab‐ schlussbericht.pdf?blob=publicationFile&v=4. Generalbericht der Kommission I 209 marktpolitische Belange verfolgt. Das Verfahren ist noch nicht abge‐ schlossen36. Das Bundeskartellamt kritisiert insbesondere die Vollablieferungs‐ pflicht durch die Milcherzeuger einschließlich der hiermit verbunde‐ nen Vollannahmepflicht der Molkereien, weil diese nach Ansicht der Behörde einer Überproduktion Vorschub leisten. Zudem werden die Kündigungsfristen, die mit ihren in der Regel zwei Jahren Laufzeit nach Auffassung des Bundeskartellamtes zu lang sind, und die nach‐ trägliche Festsetzung der Milchpreise thematisiert. Das Bundeskar‐ tellamt prüft zudem die Entkoppelung von Lieferpflichten und Mit‐ gliedschaft. Gegen die Argumentation des Bundeskartellamtes machen die genos‐ senschaftlichen Molkereien gemäß dem Landesbericht unter anderem die folgenden Einwände geltend: Die eingetragene Genossenschaft ist eine personalistisch ausgestaltete Gesellschaft mit nicht geschlossener Mitgliederzahl. Im Mittelpunkt der Genossenschaft steht der Förderzweck, den § 1 Absatz 1 des Ge‐ nossenschaftsgesetzes vorgibt. Zweck der Genossenschaft ist gerade die Förderung des einzelwirtschaftlichen Betriebes des landwirt‐ schaftlichen Mitgliedes. Im vorliegenden Zusammenhang ist bedeu‐ tungsvoll, dass sich das Milch erzeugende Mitglied freiwillig als Ge‐ sellschafter die Struktur einer Genossenschaft ausgesucht hat, um in ihr und mit ihr nach demokratischen Grundsätzen zu arbeiten. Die Ausnützung der gesellschaftsrechtlichen Möglichkeiten löst keine Verletzung von Wettbewerbsregeln aus. Was die Exklusivität sowie die Vollablieferungspflicht und Vollan‐ nahmepflicht betrifft, so lassen sich diese gesellschaftsrechtlich be‐ gründen. Für die Mitglieder in der Genossenschaft besteht jederzeit die Möglichkeit, mit demokratischen Mehrheitsentscheidungen die Lieferpflichten anzupassen. Weiter ist die Kündigungsfrist von zwei Jahren gut zu rechtfertigen. Denn da verlässliche Lieferbeziehungen und eine stetige Rohstoffversorgung zwischen landwirtschaftlichem 36 Der Sachstandbericht kann unter folgendem Link abgerufen werden: http://www.b undeskartellamt.de/SharedDocs/Publikation/DE/Berichte/Sachstand_Milch.pdf?__ blob=publicationFile&v=3; siehe für eine Würdigung des Sachstandsberichts Christian Busse, Der Sachstandsbericht des Bundeskartellamtes vom 13.3.2017 zu dem Verfahren "Lieferbedingungen für Rohmilch", Agrarrecht – Jahrbuch 2018, 167–180. Generalbericht der Kommission I 210 Erzeuger und Molkereigenossenschaft wichtige Kernpunkte sind, die sich auch aus dem Förderzweck ergeben, bedarf es gewisser Fristig‐ keiten. Die seitens des Bundeskartellamts angeregte Entkoppelung von Lieferverhältnissen und Genossenschaftsmitgliedschaften wider‐ spricht gerade dem Sinn und Zweck der Molkereigenossenschaft. Sie ist geschaffen worden – und hierauf haben die im Ehrenamt tätigen landwirtschaftlichen Erzeuger explizit hingewiesen –, um Erwerb und Wirtschaft ihrer Mitglieder zu fördern. Werden Lieferverhältnis und Mitgliedschaftsverhältnis entkoppelt, so ist auch die Erfüllung des Zwecks des Unternehmens in Frage gestellt. Das Bundeskartellamt kritisiert auch die nachträgliche Festlegung der Preise anstelle von Festpreisvereinbarungen im Vornhinein. Im ge‐ sellschaftsrechtlichen Verhältnis ist es üblich, zuerst den Gewinn zu erwirtschaften und ihn dann zu verteilen. Um aber den landwirt‐ schaftlichen Milcherzeuger kontinuierlich mit den entsprechenden Produktionsmitteln auszustatten, werden in der Regel im genossen‐ schaftlichen Bereich Abschlagszahlungen geleistet und eine Ab‐ schlusszahlung zum Ende des Jahres gewährt, wenn feststeht, wie hoch der Gewinn tatsächlich war. Der Hinweis auf Mengensteuerungsmöglichkeiten durch die Molkerei basiert nicht auf einem möglichen kartellrechtlichen Verstoß. Die Fra‐ ge von molkereiinternen Mengensteuerungsmaßnahmen ist kein kar‐ tellrechtliches Thema, das seitens des Bundeskartellamtes aufgegrif‐ fen werden kann. Dieses sollte daher in der Entscheidungshoheit einer jeden Molkerei bleiben. Der letzte Hinweis des Bundeskartellamts, der die Absicherung durch Erzeugerorganisationen betrifft, missachtet, dass die Genossenschaft aus historischer Sicht mit oder ohne behördliche Anerkennung ein klassischer Erzeugerzusammenschluss ist. In der Vergangenheit hat es daher einige Molkereigenossenschaften gegeben, die eine Anerken‐ nung gemäß dem alten Marktstrukturgesetz besaßen. Diese Anerken‐ nung wurde jedoch auf der Basis des überarbeiteten AgrarMSG viel‐ fach wegen fehlender Notwendigkeit nicht aufrechterhalten. Grund hierfür war insbesondere der Wegfall öffentlicher Förderungen für die anerkannten Erzeugerorganisationen. Es steht landwirtschaftlichen Erzeugern immer offen, neue Erzeugerorganisationen zu gründen. Ebenso ist für bestehende Molkereigenossenschaften die Möglichkeit gegeben, den Status einer anerkannten Erzeugerorganisation anzustre‐ ben. Auch dies ist keine Frage des kartellrechtlichen Verstoßes oder Generalbericht der Kommission I 211 der kartellrechtlichen Notwendigkeiten. Kartellrechtliche Ausnahmen existieren in beiden Fällen, und zwar ohne staatliche Anerkennung der Erzeugerorganisation in § 28 GWB sowie mit einer solchen Aner‐ kennung in § 5 AgrarMSG. (3) Bußgeldverfahren Darüber hinaus gab es im landwirtschaftlichen Sektor einige Buß‐ geldverfahren im Hinblick auf Verstöße gegen das Kartellverbot und hier insbesondere wegen unzulässiger Preisabsprachen. Diese betref‐ fen in der Regel der Urproduktion nachgelagerte Bereiche, u.a. Ge‐ treide/Mühlen, Zuckerfabriken etc. Beispielhaft sei hier auch auf das Bußgeldverfahren im Zuckerbereich hingewiesen, das 2014 zu hohen Geldbußen wegen des Vorwurfs eines Gebietskartells geführt hat37. In den genannten Verfahren kam grundsätzlich nur das nationale Wettbe‐ werbsrecht zur Anwendung. Frankreich Die Wettbewerbsbehörde (autorité de la concurrence; ADLC) entfaltete eine intensive konsultative Tätigkeit, teils aus eigener Initiative, teils auf Antrag von Behörden und Berufsorganisationen. Darin sprach sie sich für eine vermehrte Inanspruchnahme juristischer Instrumente zur Stärkung der Position der Produzenten in der Nahrungskette aus, insbesondere für mehr Vertragslösungen, Zusammenschlüsse und gemeinschaftliche Strukturen zur Entwicklung von Qualitätszeichen. Auch in diesem Zusammenhang sind aber Preisabsprachen tabu. Die Produzenten werden als wirtschaftlich und juristisch selbstständige Akteure bezeichnet, weshalb sie die Preise in‐ dividuell festsetzen müssen. Im Bereich der Fusionskontrolle hat die ADLC Zusammenschlüsse im Landwirtschaftssektor durchgehend gutgeheissen, insbesondere auch im Bereich der Genossenschaften, damit die Verhandlungsmacht der Produ‐ zenten gegenüber den Abnehmern gestärkt werden kann. Gebilligt wurden auch vertikale Integrationen, vor allem im Milchbereich. Was die Beurteilung von Wettbewerbsbeschränkungen durch Abspra‐ chen betrifft, ist die Praxis – wie bereits erwähnt – sehr restriktiv. So un‐ tersagte die ADLC insbesondere Absprachen in den Streitfällen Farines 37 Die entsprechende Mitteilung kann über folgenden Link abgerufen werden: http:// www.bundeskar te l lamt .de /Shared Docs/Meldung/DE/Pressemitteilungen/ 2014/18_02_2014_Zucker.html. Generalbericht der Kommission I 212 (Mehl) und Chicorée (Endivien). Besondere Aufmerksamkeit verdient da‐ bei der Chicorée-Fall38, weil er mit Erfolg an das Appellationsgericht Pa‐ ris gezogen wurde39. Gegen diesen Entscheid rekurrierte die ADLC an das Kassationsgericht. Dieses unterbreitete den Fall dem EuGH zur Vorabent‐ scheidung. Generalanwalt Wahl legte seine Schlussfolgerungen am 6. April 2017 vor40. Dem Urteil des EuGH wird voraussichtlich grosse Bedeutung zukommen, weil es die Reichweite der Ausnahmen des Agrar‐ rechts vom Wettbewerbsrecht grundsätzlich festlegen könnte. Damit ein‐ her gehen die Möglichkeiten und Unmöglichkeiten der Produzentenorga‐ nisationen, ihre Marktposition zu verbessern. Interessant sind im Chicorée-Fall nicht zuletzt die Reaktionen betroffe‐ ner Kreise auf den Entscheid der ADLC. Aus der Landwirtschaft wurden dagegen insbesondere die folgenden Argumente vorgetragen: Die Gemü‐ se- und Früchteproduktion befinde sich in einer erheblichen Krise, nicht zuletzt wegen des Preisdrucks, der von der Abnehmerseite ausgehe. Der Entscheid falle zur Unzeit, weil im Rahmen der GAP-Reform die Stellung der Produzentenorganisationen gestärkt werden solle. Der Entscheid stehe auch gegen die Bestrebungen zur Stärkung der Stellung der Produzenten‐ organisationen (organisations communes des marchés; OCM) der Verord‐ nung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013. Das Appellationsgericht Paris nahm eine gegenteilige Wertung zur ADLC vor. Es stellte die Verfolgung der Ziele gemäss Art. 39 AEUV über die Verfolgung der Ziele der Konsumentenpolitik und der Wettbewerbspo‐ litik. Es hob den Entscheid der ADLC und damit auch die Busse von 3,6 Mio. Euro mit Urteil vom 6. März 2012 auf. Nach den Ausführungen des französischen Berichts stellt sich das Appellationsgericht Paris mit sei‐ ner Haltung gegen die Auffassung der EU-Organe, die davon ausgehen, dass das Wettbewerbsrecht angesichts von Art. 42 AEUV und der Verord‐ nung (EG) Nr. 1184/2006 Vorrang vor dem Agrarrecht hat. Es handelt sich dabei um einen Paradigmawechsel vom Grundsatz der Anwendbarkeit des 38 Décision de l’ADLC 12-D-08 du 6 mars 2012, Secteur de la production et de la commercialisation des endives. 39 Arrêt du 15 mai 2014 de la Cour d’appel de paris, Pôle 5 – Chambre 5-7, http://w ww. autoritedelaconcurrence.fr/doc/ca_12d08.pdf – Siehe dazu Catherine Del Cont, L’arrêt de la Cour d’appel de Paris du 14 mai 2014, «l’affaire endives»: quels enseignements pour l’avenir de la «relation spéciale» entre agriculture et concurrence ?, Rivista di diritto agrario 2015, Fascicolo II, S. 84-109. 40 Siehe dazu auch Ziff. I.4 und IV des vorliegenden Berichts. Generalbericht der Kommission I 213 Wettbewerbsrechts, eingeschränkt durch agrarpolitische Ausnahmen. Für die Rechtfertigung der Mindestpreisfestsetzung berief sich das Appellati‐ onsgericht Paris angesichts des zeitlich anwendbaren Rechts auf den Streitfall auf ein französisches Gesetz aus dem Jahr 1962 sowie auf frühe‐ re EU-Verordnungen. Das interessanteste und ungewöhnlichste Argument lautet nach dem Landesbericht dahin, dass das Ziel der angemessenen Ein‐ kommenssicherung gemäss Art. 39 Abs. 1 Bst. b AEUV für sich allein die Festsetzung von Mindestpreisen zu rechtfertigen vermöge. Denn diese Auffassung widerspricht der bisherigen Rechtsanwendung und Rechtspre‐ chung auf EU-Ebene. Auf Rekurs der ADLC hatte sich das Kassationsgericht mit dem Urteil des Appellationsgerichts Paris zu befassen. Ein Urteil erging am 8. De‐ zember 2015, mit dem sich das Gericht an den EuGH mit dem Ersuchen um Vorabentscheidung wandte41. Die wesentliche, zweite Frage lautet da‐ hin, ob die in verschiedenen EU-Verordnungen über Erzeugerorganisatio‐ nen, Branchenverbände und Marktteilnehmerorganisationen (besonders Verordnung [EG] Nr. 1182/2007 und Verordnung [EG] Nr. 1234/2007) enthaltenen Ziele für diese Agrarorganisationen, worunter die Regulierung der Produktionspreise und die Anpassung des Angebots an die mengen‐ mässige Nachfrage fallen, so zu interpretieren sind, dass Praktiken zur Festsetzung von kollektiven Mindestpreisen sowie Absprachen betreffend die auf den Markt zu bringenden Erzeugnismengen und den Austausch strategischer Informationen dem Verbot von Wettbewerbsabsprachen ent‐ gehen, soweit sie der Verfolgung dieser Ziele dienen. Die Schlussanträge von Generalanwalt Wahl vom 6. April 201742 zur entscheidenden zweiten Frage lassen sich wie folgt zusammenfassen: Kol‐ lektive Preisabsprachen sind in der Sache wettbewerbsfeindlich, für das gute Funktionieren des Wettbewerbs schädlich und daher prinzipiell unzu‐ lässig. Was die Bündelung von Mengen zur Preisstabilisierung betrifft, so sind solche erlaubt, soweit sie in einer internen Absprache erfolgen, nicht aber in einer Absprache mit Dritten. Der Austausch von strategischen In‐ formationen ist unter bestimmten Bedingungen zulässig, und zwar, wenn es sich um einen wenig konzentrierten Markt handelt, die Informationen öffentlich und aggregiert sind, sich nicht auf die Preisbildung beziehen und keine indirekte Ermittlung von Anbieterkosten ermöglichen. 41 Beschluss Nr. 1056 vom 8.12.2015 (abrufbar: www.autoritedelaconcurrence.fr/doc / cass_endives_12d08.pdf). 42 Generalanwalt Wahl (Fn. 34). Generalbericht der Kommission I 214 Der Landesbericht beurteilt die Haltung von Generalanwalt Wahl kri‐ tisch, da sie keine definitive Klärung bringen würde. Er kritisiert nament‐ lich, dass der Generalanwalt die Lehrmeinung zu Preisabsprachen unbese‐ hen der Sondersituation des Agrarrechts übernehme. Seines Erachtens ver‐ bietet Art. 209 der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 nur Fixpreise, aber keine Minimalpreise, welche höhere Preise zulassen und daher nicht zu einheitlichen Preisen führen. Unter diesen Umständen blieben preisrele‐ vante Massnahmen zu Unrecht auf die Sektoren Milch, Olivenöl und Rindfleisch beschränkt. Der Landesbericht sieht auch die Unterscheidung zwischen interner und externer Bündelung von Mengen kritisch. Großbritannien Landwirtschaftliche Betriebe erreichen nur sehr selten bedeutende Markt‐ anteile (ausgenommen Pflanzer spezialisierter Getreide). Es gibt daher auf der Stufe der Produzenten kaum kartellrechtliche Fragen im Zusammen‐ hang mit der Zusammenarbeit. In einem 2011 erstellten Dokument der OFT gibt es denn auch keine Hinweise auf Wettbewerbsfälle im Zusam‐ menhang mit der landwirtschaftlichen Geschäftstätigkeit seit der Einfüh‐ rung des CA 1998. Dies rechtfertigt für sich allein schon die Auffassung, dass landwirtschaftliche Betriebe insgesamt klein sind und keinen signifi‐ kanten Einfluss auf den Markt haben. In den letzten Jahren gab die geplante Fusion zwischen Dairy Crest und Muller Anlass zu Untersuchungen durch die Wettbewerbs- und Marktbe‐ hörde (Competition and Markets Authority; CMA). Eine zweite Stufe der Untersuchung wurde in Aussicht genommen, falls Muller keine geeigne‐ ten Massnahmen getroffen hätte. Es gab Befürchtungen, dass Muller und Arla im Gefolge der Fusion die einzigen Milchkäufer wären, die eine aus‐ reichende Größe besessen hätten, um die Supermärkte zu beliefern. Da‐ raus könnten höhere Konsumentenpreise entstehen. Die Kehrseite dieses Arguments ist allerdings, dass diese Veränderung Stabilität und einen nachhaltigeren Milchmarkt in Großbritannien zur Folge haben könnte. Nach dem Einverständnis, Milch für einen kleineren Wettbewerber zu ver‐ arbeiten, wurde das lange Verfahren abgeschlossen. Muller erwarb das Milchgeschäft von Dairy Crest. Dieses Geschäft folgt dem 2012 getätigten Kauf von Robert Wiseman Dairies durch Muller. Zu erwähnen ist weiter die sich auf mehrere Mitgliedstaaten erstrecken‐ de Genossenschaftsmolkerei Arla. Diese erwarb Milch Link, bei der es sich um eine Genossenschaft handelte, die für den Aufbau eines haupt‐ sächlich genossenschaftlichen Geschäfts in Großbritannien geschaffen Generalbericht der Kommission I 215 wurde. Die Europäische Kommission besaß anfänglich Bedenken im Hin‐ blick auf die Wettbewerbsverminderung, die in einer langfristigen Per‐ spektive eintreten würde. Als diese Thematik geklärt war, konnte der Zu‐ sammenschluss verwirklicht werden. Ohne Zweifel ist durch Arla und Muller als den zwei wichtigsten Ak‐ teuren eine Konsolidierung auf dem Milchmarkt in Großbritannien einge‐ treten, weshalb die CMA und die Europäische Kommission Probleme hin‐ sichtlich des Wettbewerbs sahen. Obschon es bei Arla einen erheblichen Eigentumsanteil in den Händen von Produzenten gibt, bleibt die Heraus‐ forderung, dass die Milcherzeuger eine schwache Marktposition besitzen und Arla die Preisbildung für ihre Produkte beeinflusst. Niederlande Der Landesbericht hebt die vergleichsweise vielen Verfahren hervor und nennt konkret folgende Fälle: • kartellrechtliche Verwaltungs- und Zivilrechtsverfahren in den Berei‐ chen Paprika, Silberzwiebeln, Baumschulen und der Fall The Greene‐ ry/Oussoren; • Fusionskontrollverfahren: Bloemenveiling Aalsmeer/FloraHolland; Tradition – WestVeg – Unistar – Brassica-Group; Van Drie/Alpuro; • informelle Auskunftsverfahren: Kompany; FresQ; Van Nature & Best of Four; • Fälle im Bereich Nachhaltigkeit: Vereinbarung zu antibiotischen Resis‐ tenzen im Bereich der Tierhaltung; Kastration von Schweinen im Rah‐ men einer Betäubung; Chicken of Tomorrow. (1) Von besonderem Interesse ist gemäß dem Landesbericht der langjäh‐ rige Paprika-Fall, zu dem er hervorhebt: Der Fall begann 2009 mit einem Antrag im Rahmen der Kronzeugen‐ regelung und endete 2016 mit einem Vergleich. Er betraf ein Zusam‐ menwirken bei Tages- und Wochenpreisen, die Marktaufteilung und den Austausch sensibler Daten zwischen drei anerkannten Erzeuger‐ organisationen im Bereich Obst und Gemüse. Die niederländische Wettbewerbsbehörde (Autoriteit Consument en Markt; ACM) kam zum Schluss, dass die Erzeugerorganisationen sowohl das niederlän‐ dische Kartellverbot als auch das EU-Kartellverbot verletzten. Diese Ansicht wurde durch das Bezirksgericht von Rotterdam bestätigt. Vier Aspekte machen den Fall besonders bemerkenswert. Erstens nutzten alle drei Erzeugerorganisationen die Dienstleistung einer Generalbericht der Kommission I 216 Agrarkonsultingfirma, um ihr Verhalten aufeinander abzustimmen. Diese Firma wurde in Übereinstimmung mit dem Treuhand-Urteil des EuG als Bestandteil des Kartells eingestuft. Zweitens beriefen sich zwei der Erzeugerorganisationen darauf, dass sie faktisch wie eine Vereinigung von Erzeugerorganisationen gehandelt hätten und daher vom Kartellverbot befreit gewesen wären. Die ACM folgte dem nicht, da es sich nicht um eine nach EU-Recht anerkannte Vereini‐ gung gehandelt hatte. Drittens begrenzte die ACM den relevanten Markt als den niederländischen Markt für Paprika in der "Holland Saison". Wegen dieser eher engen Marktabgrenzung griff die streitge‐ genständliche Verhaltensweise erheblich in den Wettbewerb ein. Vier‐ tens ging die ACM bei der Festlegung des Umsatzes für die Berech‐ nung der Kartellbußgelder von einer Zusammenrechnung der Umsät‐ ze der einzelnen Mitglieder und der betroffenen Erzeugerorganisatio‐ nen aus. Während des Verfahrens musste allerdings die ACM die Bußgelder reduzieren, weil sie ansonsten nicht hätten gezahlt werden können. Denn die Erzeuger hatten alle die bestraften Erzeugerorgani‐ sationen verlassen, so dass die Erzeugerorganisationen über keine fi‐ nanziellen Mittel mehr verfügten. Die ACM forderte allerdings, dass sich die ehemaligen Erzeuger an der Bußgeldzahlung der Erzeugeror‐ ganisationen beteiligten. (2) Weiterhin geht der Berichterstatter noch näher auf den Silberzwiebel‐ fall ein: Ausgehend von einem behördlichen Anfangsverdacht kam die ACM zu dem Ergebnis, dass fünf niederländische Unternehmen, die Silber‐ zwiebeln erzeugten, vermarkteten und verkauften, das niederländi‐ sche Kartellverbot und das EU-Kartellverbot verletzten, indem sie eine Absprache über die Höchstanbaufläche für Silberzwiebeln ge‐ troffen hatten. Ursprünglich war diese Absprache innerhalb der Ge‐ nossenschaft der Silberzwiebelanbauer vorgenommen worden. Nach‐ dem diese Genossenschaft 2003 aufgelöst worden war, wurde die Ab‐ sprache durch ihre vormaligen Mitglieder fortgeführt. Außerdem übernahmen die Kartellmitglieder die Anlagen von Silberzwiebeler‐ zeugern, die ihre Produktion eingestellt hatten. Auf diese Weise wur‐ de der Markteintritt neuer Erzeuger verhindert und dadurch die Ab‐ sprache über die Anbaufläche unterstützt. Zudem unterrichteten sich die betroffenen Unternehmen mehrere Jahre lang über die Preise, die sie von ihren Abnehmern für die Silberzwiebeln verlangten. Generalbericht der Kommission I 217 Eines der betroffenen Unternehmen berief sich auf die landwirtschaft‐ liche Kartellausnahme. Diese Argumentation wurde zurückgewiesen, weil die Voraussetzungen der Ausnahme nicht vorlägen. So sei die Absprache nicht notwendig, um die Ziele der GAP zu verwirklichen. Insbesondere wurde das Ziel, angemessene Verbraucherpreise zu er‐ reichen, gefährdet. Außerdem verwiesen die Unternehmen darauf, dass die Genossenschaft als Erzeugerorganisation im Sinne der Ge‐ meinsamen Agrarmarktordnung gehandelt hätte. Da jedoch keine staatliche Anerkennung der Genossenschaft als Erzeugerorganisation vorhanden war, griff auch dieses Argument nicht. Schweiz Die Schweiz kennt insgesamt eine ausgiebige Praxis zum Agrarkartell‐ recht, welche allerdings zum größten Teil länger als zehn Jahre zurück‐ reicht43. Seit 2007 stehen Fusionskontrollfälle im Vordergrund. Nachste‐ hend wird ein Fall skizziert, der eine gewisse Intervention der Wettbe‐ werbsbehörde auslöste (Migros/Denner AG). Vorweg wird ein Fall zur Marktmachtkontrolle dargestellt (Eierhandel). (1) Eierhandel Aufgrund einer Anzeige der Futtermittelproduzentin Egli AG im Jahr 2008 befasste sich das Sekretariat der Wettbewerbskommission im Rahmen einer Vorabklärung mit dem Eierhandel44. Die Vorabklärung ergab, dass die Lüchinger + Schmid AG weder alleine noch kollektiv mit weiteren Eierhändlern, nämlich mit der Frigemo AG und der Ei AG, eine marktbeherrschende Stellung im Sinne von Art. 7 KG ein‐ nahm. Die Behörde begründete den Entscheid mit ungenügenden Symmetrien, fehlender Markttransparenz und unterschiedlichen Stra‐ tegien der drei Unternehmen. Dieser Befund gelte selbst dann, wenn 43 Siehe den Überblick über die agrarkartellrechtliche Praxis der Schweiz von Jürg Niklaus/Benjamin Zünd, Flurbegehung durch das schweizerische Agrarkartell‐ recht, Schweizerische Juristen-Zeitung (SJZ) 2015, 1–10, 5 ff. Die kartellrechtli‐ che Überwachung der Agrarmärkte setzt sich typischerweise mit dem Problem der Aufsicht über marktbeherrschende Zulieferer und Abnehmer der Landwirtschaft oder mit der Aufsicht über bäuerliche Bündelungsbestrebungen auseinander. Die Übersicht gliedert sich daher in die kartellrechtliche Überwachung der vor- und nachgelagerten Stufen der Landwirtschaft einerseits und in die kartellrechtliche Überwachung der Landwirtschaft andererseits. 44 Recht und Politik des Wettbewerbs (RPW) 2011/2, 230. Generalbericht der Kommission I 218 die Existenz von Wettbewerb auf dem nachgelagerten Detailhandels‐ markt verneint werde. Zudem wurde die Vereinbarung zwischen der Lüchinger + Schmid AG und den Eierproduzenten betreffend die Fut‐ termittel nicht als unzulässige Wettbewerbsabrede im Sinne von Art. 5 KG qualifiziert. (2) Migros/Denner AG Im Jahr 2007 meldete die Migros der Wettbewerbskommission das Zusammenschlussvorhaben mit der Denner AG45. Die Behörde pro‐ gnostizierte in der vorläufigen Prüfung als Folge des Zusammen‐ schlusses eine substanzielle Schwächung des Wettbewerbs. Aus einer Gesamtbetrachtung ergaben sich aber nicht genügend Anhaltspunkte für eine marktbeherrschende Stellung der Parteien. Obwohl die Marktanalyse Migros/Denner AG und Coop in einer kollektiv markt‐ beherrschenden Stellung mündete, bewilligte die Wettbewerbsbehör‐ de den Zusammenschluss aufgrund des Grundsatzes der Verhältnis‐ mässigkeit mit Auflagen. Diese sollten insbesondere die operative Selbstständigkeit und die Marke Denner für eine gewisse Zeit ge‐ währleisten. Spanien Es gab in den letzten zehn Jahren vor allem Administrativverfahren. Nach nationalem Wettbewerbsrecht entschied der Markt- und Wettbewerbsrat (Consejo de los Mercados y de la Competencia; CNMC) insbesondere be‐ treffend die Milchproduktion (Urteil vom 3. März 2015) und des Kanin‐ chenfleischs (Urteil vom 14. Juni 2011). Aufgrund des EU-Wettbewerbs‐ rechts wurde vor allem eine Fusion in der Zuckerwirtschaft entschieden46. Synthese der Generalberichterstatter Den Landesberichten ist zu entnehmen, dass die Zahl der in den letzten zehn Jahren besonders wichtigen behördlichen und gerichtlichen Verfah‐ ren im Agrarkartellrecht sehr unterschiedlich ist. Die größte Zahl von Fäl‐ len führt der niederländische Bericht auf, während der britische Bericht le‐ diglich Fusionsverfahren nennt. Zum Teil wurden diese Verfahren nach 45 RPW 2008/1, 129; vgl. auch Bischofszell Nahrungsmittel AG/Weisenhorn Food Specialities GmbH, RPW 2010/1, 184. 46 TJUE Aa. c.415/2001, Urteil vom 20.11.2003. Generalbericht der Kommission I 219 nationalem Kartellrecht und zum Teil nach EU-Kartellrecht entschieden, wobei das Agrarkartellrecht mehrfach eine Rolle spielte. Im Zentrum stehen wettbewerbsbeschränkende Absprachen, die zum großen Teil für unzulässig erklärt wurden, insbesondere, wenn sie für die Preisbildung relevant sind. Demgegenüber führten Fusionskontrollverfah‐ ren kaum zu Untersagungen. Die Wettbewerbsbehörden entschieden über‐ wiegend, dass die Fusionen im Hinblick auf die Stärkung der Wettbe‐ werbsposition der fusionierenden Partner gerechtfertigt sind. Dies gilt in Großbritannien insbesondere für die Fusionen zwischen Crest und Muller sowie zwischen Arla und Milch Link, in denen es um die Übernahme des Milchgeschäfts ging, die zu einer gewissen Konsolidierung des Milch‐ markts führte. In der Schweiz standen Fusionsvorhaben im Eierhandel und zwischen den Migros als dem größten Detailhändler und dem Discounter Denner AG im Fokus. Im einen oder anderen Fusionsfall gab es immerhin gewisse Auflagen. Besonders herausragend ist der Chicorée-Fall aus Frankreich, weil das erstinstanzliche französische Gericht entgegen der Wettbewerbsbehörde die Meinung vertrat, dass die Verwirklichung des Ziels der angemessenen Einkommenssicherung der EU-Agrarpolitik (Art. 34 Abs. 1 Bst. b AEUV) auch Preis- und Mengenabsprachen zu rechtfertigen vermöge. Das Kassa‐ tionsgericht, an das der Entscheid des Appellationsgerichts Paris weiterge‐ zogen wurde, rief den EuGH in einem Vorabentscheidungsverfahren zur Klärung von Fragen an. Der Generalanwalt vermochte der Auffassung des Appellationsgerichts nicht undifferenziert zu folgen, sondern beurteilte im Wesentlichen nur die Bündelung des Angebots innerhalb von Genossen‐ schaften für rechtmäßig (vgl. zu dem Verfahren auch bereits Ziff. I.4 und zu dem nachfolgenden Urteil des EuGH Ziff. IV). Der Landesbericht Deutschlands referiert insbesondere das Pilotverfah‐ ren bei einer Molkerei betreffend die Lieferbeziehungen. Umstritten ist darin vor allem die Haltung des Bundeskartellamtes, dass Exklusivverhält‐ nisse, d.h. die Vollablieferungspflicht der Milcherzeuger und die Vollan‐ nahmepflicht der Molkereien, kartellrechtlich problematisch sowie Kündi‐ gungsfristen von zwei Jahren für den Austritt aus den Erzeugergenossen‐ schaften zu restriktiv seien. Die Branche macht gegen diese kartellrechtli‐ che Betrachtungsweise die genossenschaftsrechtliche Sicht geltend, wel‐ che für die Rechtmäßigkeit dieser Regelungen stehe und die Vorrang ha‐ ben müsse. Aus den Niederlanden ist vor allem der Paprika-Fall aufsehenerregend. Diesbezüglich gelangte die nationale Wettbewerbsbehörde zum Schluss, Generalbericht der Kommission I 220 dass die Erzeugerorganisationen insbesondere unzulässige Preisabspra‐ chen getroffen hätten. Die Behörde wies insbesondere das Argument der Erzeugerorganisationen zurück, wonach man faktisch wie eine Vereini‐ gung von Erzeugerorganisationen gehandelt habe, sodass das Kartellver‐ bot nicht zum Zug komme. Ebenso anerkannte sie das Argument nicht, der relevante Markt sei mit der Beschränkung auf das Gebiet der Niederlande zu eng umschrieben worden. Bemerkenswert ist weiter die Auffassung der Wettbewerbsbehörde im Silberzwiebelfall, dass die Weiterführung von ge‐ nossenschaftlichen Absprachen über Höchstanbauflächen unter ehemali‐ gen Genossenschaftsmitgliedern nach Auflösung der Genossenschaft kar‐ tellrechtswidrig sei. Regelungen und Projekte zu unfairen Praktiken in der Lebensmittelkette Gibt es in Ihrem Land eine rechtliche Regelung oder einen unverbindli‐ chen code of conduct über unfaire Praktiken in der Lebensmittelkette (z.B. hinsichtlich der Preisgestaltung bei landwirtschaftlichen Erzeugnissen)? Sehen Sie eine Regulierung solcher unfairer Praktiken als sinnvoll an und wenn ja, was sollten Inhalte einer Regulierung sein? Bulgarien Die Gesetzgebung erfasst unfaire Geschäftspraktiken im Konsumenten‐ schutzgesetz. Dabei wurde mit Bezug auf den Schutz der Konsumenten‐ rechte ein langer Weg zurückgelegt. Ab 2003 ist sukzessive das gesamte EU-Recht übernommen worden. Antidumping-Verhalten fällt unter das Gesetz über den Wettbewerbsschutz. Aus den letzten zehn Jahren sind kei‐ ne Fälle von Zuwiderhandlungen im Bereich der Landwirtschaft bekannt geworden. Deutschland Sowohl das GWB als auch das Gesetz gegen unlauteren Wettbewerb (UWG) enthalten Regelungen betreffend unfaire Praktiken. Das GWB re‐ gelt in § 20 im Rahmen der Missbrauchsaufsicht insbesondere verbotenes Verhalten für Unternehmen mit relativer oder überlegener Marktmacht. Hierzu gehört auch das Verbot des Verkaufs von Lebensmitteln unter dem Einstandspreis (§ 20 Abs. 3 GWB). Ein solcher Verkauf ist nur zulässig, wenn eine sachliche Rechtfertigung – zum Beispiel die Verderblichkeit 6. Generalbericht der Kommission I 221 des Lebensmittels – nachgewiesen werden kann. Im UWG finden sich um‐ fassende Verbotsregelungen für unlautere, aggressive oder irreführende geschäftliche Handlungen, die auch Regelungen zur Anspruchsdurchset‐ zung sowie Bußgeldbestimmungen und sogar Strafvorschriften beinhalten. Diese Regelungen gelten für alle Unternehmen, unabhängig von ihrer Tä‐ tigkeit, so dass es keine landwirtschaftsspezifischen Bestimmungen gibt. Solche sind aufgrund der umfassenden gesetzlichen Vorschriften aber auch nicht notwendig. Demnach ist gemäss dem Landesbericht kein Be‐ darf für zusätzliche Regelungen vorhanden. Allerdings müsse darauf ge‐ achtet werden, dass im internationalen Handel keine Wettbewerbsverzer‐ rungen durch fehlende freiwillige oder rechtliche Regelungen entstehen. Großbritannien Eine wichtige Entwicklung, insbesondere für Produzenten, ist der Lebens‐ mittelkodex und das Büro des Schiedsrichters für den Lebensmittelkodex. Schon lange vor der Schaffung dieser Institution 2013 gab es hinsichtlich der Behandlung der Lieferanten – oft sehr viele kleinere Unternehmen – bedeutende Kritik an den großen Supermärkten. Es kamen Vorkommnisse wie verspätete Zahlungen und Lieferrabatte ans Tageslicht. Der Schiedsrichter wurde eingerichtet, um die Beziehungen zwischen Supermärkten und ihren Lieferanten entsprechend dem Lebensmittelkodex zu beaufsichtigen. Diese Regelungen betreffen grundsätzlich nicht die Produzenten direkt, weil diese die Wiederverkäufer selten direkt beliefern. Dennoch wurde im Januar 2017 eine Konsultation im Interesse der Erwei‐ terung des Aufgabenbereichs des Schiedsrichters auf kleinere Produzenten durchgeführt. Die Antworten befinden sich im Stadium der Auswertung. Die Schiedsrichterin, Frau Christine Tacon CBE, warnte vor zu weitge‐ henden Erwartungen angesichts der prinzipiell gleichgerichteten Anliegen der Lieferanten. Denn die Behandlung von Beschwerden betreffend die Preisgestaltung liegt außerhalb ihres Kompetenzbereichs. Sie kann einzig die Vertragsbedingungen überprüfen. Die Preisbildung wird dem Markt überlassen. Man darf auf die nächsten Schritte gespannt sein und wird se‐ hen, wie sich die Regelungen nicht nur auf Produzenten, Verarbeiter und den Handel, sondern auch auf die zahlreichen Unternehmen, die zwischen Produzenten und Endverbrauchern tätig sind, auswirken. Im Anschluss an die jüngste Krise der Milchwirtschaft wurde im Milch‐ sektor ein Kodex eingeführt, der versucht, grundsätzliche Regeln in Über‐ einstimmung mit Produzenten und Verarbeitern zu erreichen. Der Um‐ stand, dass der Kodex freiwillig ist, zeigt allerdings, dass trotz der beste‐ Generalbericht der Kommission I 222 henden Mängel wenig Bereitschaft von Seiten der Regierung besteht, in den freien Markt einzugreifen. Italien Hingewiesen wird auf Art. 62 Law Decree 1/2012. Diese Regelung hin‐ sichtlich der Lebensmittelkette geht über die Vertragsregulierung der Ge‐ meinsamen Marktorganisation hinaus und ist daher mit ihr nicht vollstän‐ dig kompatibel. Niederlande Zu verzeichnen ist einzig ein Pilotverfahren, das auf einen so genannten Kodex für faire Handelspraktiken im Bereich von Agrarprodukten (Ge‐ dragscode eerlijke handelspraktijken agrofood) abzielte. Gemäß den An‐ gaben des Ministers für wirtschaftliche Angelegenheiten wurden aufgrund des Pilotprojekts keine ernsthaften Probleme sichtbar. Österreich In Österreich gibt es keine speziellen Regelungen über die Lebensmittel‐ kette. Es gelten die allgemeinen Regeln des Kartell-, Wettbewerbs- und Lauterkeitsrechts. Eine Rahmenregelung auf EU-Ebene über unfaire Han‐ delspraktiken wird im Landesbericht begrüßt. Ein "code of conduct" sollte insbesondere folgende Bestandteile aufweisen: Risikoübertragung, Han‐ delsbräuche, unsachliche Beeinträchtigung der Entscheidungsfreiheit, Ausbeutungsmißbrauch. Polen In Polen besteht ein Gesetz über Massnahmen gegen das unfaire Ausnüt‐ zen von Vertragsvorteilen hinsichtlich des Handels mit Agrarprodukten und Nahrungsmitteln von 2006. Das Gesetz verbietet Käufern und Liefe‐ ranten, vertragliche Vorteile in unfairer Weise zu gebrauchen. Der polni‐ sche Gesetzgeber sieht das Ausnutzen von Vertragsvorteilen als unfair an, falls es gegen die guten Sitten verstößt und wesentliche Interessen der Ge‐ genpartei gefährdet oder verletzt. Art. 7 Abs. 3 des Gesetzes umfasst das unfaire Ausnutzen von Vertragspraktiken. Unfaires Wettbewerbsverhalten wird vom Präsidenten des Büros für Wettbewerb und Konsumentenschutz registriert. Generalbericht der Kommission I 223 Schweiz Die Schweiz kennt keine gesetzliche Regelung gegen unfaire Praktiken in der Lebensmittelkette. Es ist das allgemeine Lauterkeitsrecht im Bundes‐ gesetz gegen den unlauteren Wettbewerb von 1986 (UWG) anwendbar. Allerdings bestehen Ansätze zu einem unverbindlichen Verhaltenskodex. So wurde am 24. November 2016 der Verein zur Förderung der Qualitäts‐ strategie für die Schweizer Land- und Ernährungswirtschaft gegründet47. Die unterzeichnenden Akteure sind der Überzeugung, dass sich schweize‐ rische Nahrungsmittel durch umfassende Qualität auszeichnen müssen. Nur so könne den Bedürfnissen der Konsumenten und Konsumentinnen entsprochen und eine erfolgreiche Positionierung der Produkte auf den Märkten erreicht werden. Dies gelingt nach Angabe des Vereins besser, wenn Partnerschaften innerhalb der Wertschöpfungskette eingegangen und gepflegt werden. Die unterzeichnenden Mitglieder haben dazu eine Charta unterzeichnet, welche gewisse Grundaussagen zur starken Qualitätsführer‐ schaft, zur gelebten Qualitätspartnerschaft sowie zur gemeinsamen Markt‐ offensive macht. Eine gewisse Regulierung unfairer Praktiken erscheint sinnvoll. Vorsichtige Ansätze dazu finden sich im Instrument der Vertrags‐ regulierung (vgl. Art. 8 Abs. 1bis sowie Art. 37 LwG). Spanien Es besteht das Gesetz (12/2013) über Massnahmen für das bessere Funk‐ tionieren der Lebensmittelkette (ley para medidas para la mejora del fun‐ cionamiento de la cadena alimentaria; LMFCA), das die unlauteren Han‐ delspraktiken benennt und neben den im Zivilrecht verankerten privat‐ rechtlichen Sanktionen auch verwaltungsrechtliche Maßnahmen vorsieht. Dieses Gesetz wird durch ein Dekret und durch einen Kodex guten Verhal‐ tens konkretisiert. Darin ist unter anderem ein Rahmenvertrag enthalten. Für die Anwendung ist die AICA, ein Büro des Ministeriums für Land‐ wirtschaft, Ernährung und Umwelt (Ministerio de Agricultura, Alimenta‐ ción y Medio Ambiente; MAPAMA), zuständig. Die Praxis erwartet da‐ von sehr positive Wirkungen auf das Funktionieren der Lebensmittelkette. Für eine Evaluation ist es noch zu früh. So liegt bislang lediglich ein Be‐ richt über Inspektionen und Kontrollen bis zum 30. Juni 2017 vor. 47 Mehr dazu unter: www.qualitaetsstrategie.ch. Generalbericht der Kommission I 224 Synthese der Generalberichterstatter Regelungen spezifisch für die Lebensmittelkette sind aufgrund der Berich‐ te in den einzelnen Staaten nicht sehr verbreitet. Insbesondere Polen und Spanien verfügen über ein entsprechendes Gesetz, das noch durch einen Kodex guten Verhaltens konkretisiert wird. In den Berichten für die ande‐ ren Staaten wird vorwiegend auf das Kartellrecht und das Recht gegen den unlauteren Wettbewerb verwiesen, welche unfaire Geschäftspraktiken ganz allgemein, nicht nur solche in der Landwirtschaft, ins Recht fassen. Als besondere Rechtsinstitute gegen unfaire Handelspraktiken sind zu‐ dem das Verbot des Verkaufs unter Einstandspreis (besonders betont im deutschen Landesbericht) und der Lebensmittelkodex in Verbindung mit dem Lebensmittel-Schiedsrichter, der die Beziehungen zwischen den Lie‐ feranten und den großen Supermärkten zu überwachen hat (Großbritanni‐ en), zu nennen. Der Sinn bzw. die Notwendigkeit einer EU-Regelung der fraglichen Materie wird nur vereinzelt begrüßt (Österreich). In der Schweiz gibt es Bestrebungen für einen unverbindlichen privatrechtlichen Verhaltensko‐ dex. Agrarkartellrecht der Europäischen Union Zahl anerkannter Erzeugerorganisationen, deren Vereinigungen sowie Branchenverbände Wie viele nach der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 anerkannte Erzeuger‐ organisationen, Vereinigungen von Erzeugerorganisationen und Bran‐ chenverbände sind in Ihrem Land vorhanden (gegebenenfalls aufgeglie‐ dert nach Sektoren)? Gibt es eine amtliche Statistik oder ein öffentlich zugängliches Register über solche anerkannten Agrarorganisationen? Deutschland Die gemäß der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 anerkannten Erzeugeror‐ ganisationen, Vereinigungen von Erzeugerorganisationen und Branchen‐ verbände können dem Agrarorganisationsregister unter dem Link https://a oreg.ble.de/agrarorganisationen/ entnommen werden. Dort lassen sich die anerkannten Agrarorganisationen insgesamt oder sektorspezifisch abfra‐ gen. B. 1. Generalbericht der Kommission I 225 Danach sind zurzeit 642 Agrarorganisationen in Deutschland anerkannt. Für ausgewählte Erzeugnisbereiche ergeben sind folgende Zahlen: Milch 163; Getreide 138; Wein 99; Kartoffeln 52; Rindfleisch 43; Obst und Ge‐ müse 31. Enthalten sind im Register auch die anerkannten Vereinigungen von Er‐ zeugerorganisationen. Anerkannte Branchenverbände gibt es in Deutsch‐ land bislang nur einen einzigen, und zwar im Zuckerbereich. In den Sekto‐ ren Milch und Wein wird die Gründung von Branchenverbänden bislang ohne Ergebnis diskutiert. Großbritannien Im Bereich der tierischen Produktion hat es bislang nur wenige Bemühun‐ gen gegeben, Erzeugerorganisationen zu bilden. In den amtlichen Statisti‐ ken und Registern zu Agrarorganisationen sind keine solchen Erzeugeror‐ ganisationen verzeichnet. Der Landesbericht teilt einen Fall mit, in dem der Berichterstatter von einer Gruppe von Milcherzeugern damit beauf‐ tragt wurde, Vorbereitungen für die Gründung einer Erzeugerorganisation zu treffen. Letztlich entschieden die Milcherzeuger jedoch, dass dem kom‐ plexen Unterfangen, eine Erzeugerorganisation zu gründen, kein ausrei‐ chender Nutzen gegenüberstehen würde. Eine der ersten, die damit begonnen haben, Erzeugerorganisationen zu gründen, war Dairy Crest Direct. Sie wurde 2015 amtlich anerkannt und repräsentierte 1.050 Milcherzeuger. Nach der Fusion der Milchabteilung von Dairy Crest mit Muller ist eine Aufspaltung in zwei Erzeugerorgani‐ sationen erfolgt. Die eine beliefert Muller mit Rohmilch, während die an‐ dere Rohmilch zur Verarbeitung innerhalb von Dairy Crest liefert. Erfolgreicher sind Erzeugerorganisationen im Fischbereich und insbe‐ sondere im Getreide- und Blumenbereich. Die Internetseite gov.uk ver‐ zeichnet für 2015 33 aktive Erzeugerorganisationen in den letztgenannten Bereichen. Möglicherweise ist es einfacher, auf der Grundlage der ge‐ meinsamen Nutzung von speziellen Maschinen, der Vereinheitlichung von Verfahrensweisen oder der gemeinsamen Vermarktung von Getreide eine Erzeugerorganisation zu gründen, als eine Gründung im Bereich der unter‐ schiedlichen Systeme landwirtschaftlicher Tierhaltung zu versuchen. Italien Die entsprechenden Organisationen sind auf einer Internetseite des italie‐ nischen Landwirtschaftsministeriums verzeichnet. Generalbericht der Kommission I 226 Niederlande Vorhanden sind 14 Erzeugerorganisationen und 9 Branchenverbände. Ver‐ einigungen bestehen hingegen nicht. Es gibt keine offizielle Statistik und kein öffentlich zugängliches Register. Österreich Es bestehen folgende anerkannte Erzeugerorganisationen: Obst/Gemüse 10, Getreide 4, Getreide und Kartoffel 2, Kartoffel 1, Schweine 5, Rinder 8, Schafe/Ziegen 1, Geflügel 1, Blumen 1, Eier 1, Wein 1. Ein anerkannter Branchenverband ist bislang nicht gegründet worden. Allerdings befindet sich gegenwärtig ein Verband im Bereich Obst und Gemüse in Gründung. Polen Es gibt verschiedene öffentliche Register zu anerkannten Agrarorganisa‐ tionen. Zuständig für die Registerführung war bis Ende August 2017 die Agentur für Restrukturierung und Modernisierung der Landwirtschaft (Agency for Restructuring and Modernization of Agriculture). Seit dem 1. September 2017 obliegt die Führung der Register dem Präsidenten die‐ ser Agentur. Vorhanden ist zudem eine Liste von 341 vorgeprüften Organi‐ sationen und Produzentengruppen. Schweiz Da die Schweiz nicht Mitglied der EU ist und kein vergleichbares System für anerkannte Agrarorganisationen kennt, existiert kein Anerkennungs‐ system im Sinne einer ex ante-Prüfung. Es sind folglich keine amtliche Statistik und kein offizielles Register zu der Anzahl bestehender Produ‐ zenten- und Branchenorganisationen vorhanden. Spanien Die Zahl von anerkannten Erzeugerorganisationen, ihrer Vereinigungen sowie Branchenverbände variiert je nach Erzeugnissektor. Es bestehen Re‐ gelungen und öffentliche Register im MAPAMA für die Agrarorganisatio‐ nen der Sektoren Obst und Gemüse, Milch und Tabak. Synthese der Generalberichterstatter In einigen Ländern sind amtliche Register oder Statistiken zu anerkannten Agrarorganisationen vorhanden, die öffentlich zugänglich sind. In diesen Ländern lässt sich daher die Anzahl der Agrarorganisationen und deren Aufgliederung relativ leicht feststellen, wobei allerdings teilweise nur ein‐ Generalbericht der Kommission I 227 zelne Sektoren oder Agrarorganisationstypen erfasst werden. In mehreren anderen Ländern fehlen derartige Instrumente, so dass kein genauer Über‐ blick über die Anzahl gegeben werden kann. Letzteres gilt auch für die in der Schweiz vorhandenen Produzenten- und Branchenverbände. Befreiung vom Kartellverbot für anerkannte Agrarorganisationen Sind nach der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 anerkannte Agrarorganisa‐ tionen gemäß Ihrer Ansicht nur von dem Kartellverbot des Artikel 101 AEUV oder auch von einem nationalen Kartellverbot befreit? Wenn sie nicht vom nationalen Kartellverbot befreit sind, stellt dies ein Problem dar und wenn ja, wie wird dies im nationalen Recht gelöst? Deutschland Die Befreiung nach Art 152 ff. der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 aner‐ kannter Agrarorganisationen vom EU-Kartellverbot wirkt auch als Befrei‐ ung im nationalen Recht, weil die Voraussetzungen der gesetzlichen Rege‐ lungen weitgehend identisch sind und die Befreiung nach EU-Recht zu‐ dem als lex specialis gilt. Um die Parallelität der Befreiung sicherzustel‐ len, ist eine Klarstellung im Rahmen der nationalen Regelung des § 5 AgrarMSG verankert. Für den Sektor Obst und Gemüse erfolgt eine ent‐ sprechende Verknüpfung über die Verordnung zur Durchführung der uni‐ onsrechtlichen Regelungen über Erzeugerorganisationen im Sektor Obst und Gemüse (Obst-Gemüse-Erzeugerorganisationendurchführungsver‐ ordnung – OGErzeugerOrgDV). Großbritannien In Bezug auf die Befreiung vom nationalen Kartellverbot (Chapter 1 CA 1998) bietet Schedule 3 denjenigen Schutz, der schon immer für Landwir‐ te und deren Zusammenschlüsse vorhanden war. Allerdings ist der CA 1998 bislang nicht explizit an die Regelung zu Erzeugerorganisationen im EU-Recht angepasst worden. Die in Schedule 3 geregelte Ausnahme dürf‐ te allerdings auch auf diese Konstellation Anwendung finden. Denn die Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 ist unmittelbar in Großbritannien an‐ wendbar, und Section 60 CA 1998 möchte die Unterschiede zwischen EU- Kartellrecht und nationalem Kartellrecht auf ein Minimum beschränken. Vor dem Hintergrund der Unterstützung von Erzeugerorganisationen in 2. Generalbericht der Kommission I 228 der EU erscheint es für die Gerichte in Großbritannien schwierig, die kar‐ tellrechtliche Position von Erzeugerorganisationen unterlaufen zu können. Italien Die Befreiung vom Kartellverbot dürfte sich vermutlich über das EU- Recht ergeben. Im nationalen Recht fehlt eine ausdrückliche Regelung. Niederlande Die Befreiung besteht auf der Grundlage des EU-Rechts. Dies ist aber nicht explizit geregelt. Zudem gibt es zwei alternative De-minimis-Aus‐ nahmen. Österreich Die kartellrechtliche Sonderstellung wird aus der allgemeinen landwirt‐ schaftlichen Kartellausnahme des § 2 Abs. 2 Nr. 5 KG abgeleitet. Polen Die Befreiung wird über das EU-Recht erreicht. Ein spezieller nationaler Befreiungstatbestand existiert nicht. Spanien Die Befreiung anerkannter Agrarorganisationen auf der Grundlage der Verordnung (EU) 1308/2013 gilt auch auf nationaler Ebene. Dabei wird die Interpretation dieses Rechts durch die EU-Organe herangezogen. Da‐ bei stünden leider die quantitativen Wirkungen auf die Interessenten der Konsumenten statt der qualitativen Wirkungen im Vordergrund. Synthese der Generalberichterstatter Nur in Deutschland besteht ein ausdrücklicher nationaler Befreiungstatbe‐ stand. In Österreich und Großbritannien wird die Kartellbefreiung aus einem allgemeinen kartellrechtlichen Privileg im Landwirtschaftsbereich abgeleitet. In den übrigen Ländern erfolgt eine analoge Anwendung des EU-Rechts, die allerdings zum Teil als nicht besonders rechtssicher einge‐ stuft wird. Generalbericht der Kommission I 229 Bündelungsobergrenzen Sehen Sie die in Artikel 149, 169, 170 und 171 der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 enthaltenen Bündelungsobergrenzen als sinnvoll an? Werden diese Bestimmungen in der Praxis genutzt, indem die in diesen Be‐ stimmungen vorgesehenen Meldungen über die gebündelten Mengen ab‐ gegeben werden? Bulgarien Die Obergrenze mit Bezug auf Art. 149 (Milch) wird als ungenügend ein‐ gestuft. Die Obergrenze in Bezug auf Art. 169 (Olivenprodukte) ist man‐ gels entsprechender Erzeugnisse nicht relevant. Ähnliches gilt für die Obergrenze in Bezug auf Art. 170 (Rind- und Kalbfleisch), weil die Pro‐ duktion sehr klein ist. Mit Bezug auf Art. 171 (Feldfrüchte) wird ausge‐ führt, dass doppelt so viel produziert wird, wie Bulgarien benötigt. Die Vereinbarungen hätten daher einen sehr großen Einfluss auf den Wettbe‐ werb. Verwiesen wird ferner auf Instrumente der Vermeidung von Kon‐ zentration und Marktbeherrschung, die durch besondere Verfahrensmecha‐ nismen für einzelne der primären Produktionsfaktoren (vor allem Kultur‐ land) genutzt werden. Genannt wird insbesondere Art. 37 des Gesetzes über das bäuerliche Grundeigentum und die Landnutzung (ALOUA). Deutschland Die in Art. 149, 169, 170 und 171 enthaltenen Bündelungsobergrenzen sind angemessen und auch zielführend, um eine produktspezifische kom‐ plette Bündelung in einer Hand zu vermeiden. Die Einhaltung der Ober‐ grenzen im Bereich Milch (Art. 149) wird besonders überprüft. Denn hier erfolgt eine Meldung der anerkannten Erzeugerorganisationen mit Blick auf die gebündelten Rohmilchmengen. In den anderen Sektoren ist eine geringere praktische Bedeutung festzustellen. Allerdings ist eine produkt‐ spezifisch definierte Obergrenze nach Auffassung des Landesberichts grundsätzlich sinnvoll. Großbritannien Die Obergrenze des Art. 149 (Milch) bereitet keine Schwierigkeiten, weil die Erzeugerorganisationen im Milchbereich sehr klein sind. Grundsätz‐ lich lasse die spezielle Obergrenze von 33 Prozent einen bedeutenden Marktanteil zu. Jede Erzeugerorganisation mit solch einem Marktanteil wird in der Lage sein, einen besonderen Preisaufschlag zu erreichen oder 3. Generalbericht der Kommission I 230 zumindest einen höheren Preis zu erzielen. Tatsächlich ist es auf Grund der besonderen Beschaffenheit des Produktes – vor allem in Großbritanni‐ en, wo ungefähr die Hälfte der Rohmilch zu Konsummilch verarbeitet wird – schwierig, selbst als große Erzeugerorganisation einen Preis für solch ein leicht verderbliches Produkt zu diktieren. Art. 169 (Olivenöl) ist in Großbritannien nicht relevant. Bezüglich Art. 170 (Rind- und Kalbfleisch) ist wiederum nicht ersichtlich, dass die Grenzen von 15 Prozent demnächst erreicht werden könnte. Eine bedeu‐ tende Erzeugerorganisation in diesem Bereich besteht bislang nicht. Daher ist die Beurteilung schwierig, ob die Grenze Probleme schaffen könnte. Gleiches gilt für die Obergrenze des Art. 171 (Feldfrüchte). Gerade jetzt ist die Zukunft dieses Bereichs angesichts des Brexit und damit des Verlassens der GAP noch unsicherer. Es ist vollkommen unklar, wie die Ziele und das Konzept von Erzeugerorganisationen in den zukünf‐ tigen britischen Agrarmarkt passen werden. Großbritannien muss gemäß dem Landesbericht seinen eigenen Weg finden, um die Position kleinerer Erzeuger und Landwirte zu verbessern. Vor dem Hintergrund solcher Un‐ sicherheiten wird wohl derzeit keine Erzeugergruppe bereit sein, die Grün‐ dung einer Erzeugerorganisation mit all den dadurch entstehenden Kosten und den dabei zu erfüllenden Voraussetzungen in Angriff zu nehmen. Es erscheint attraktiver, in einer anderweitigen, einfacher zu verwirklichen‐ den Weise zu kooperieren, die sich auf die allgemeine Agrarkartellausnah‐ me in Chapter 1 stützen kann. Italien Diese Bestimmungen werfen in Italien zahlreiche Fragen auf. Die Leitlini‐ en der Europäischen Kommission zur Durchführung der Art. 169 bis 171 sind nach Ansicht des Landesberichts kein nützliches Instrument. Niederlande Die Art. 149, 169, 170 und 171 werden als Beschränkung und nicht als Er‐ weiterung der Ausnahmen vom Kartellverbot verstanden. Sie werden da‐ her nicht genutzt. Österreich Die Bestimmungen kommen nicht zur Anwendung, weil die Obergrenzen zu niedrig sind. Es wird durch sie vor allem kein Gegengewicht zur Kon‐ zentration im Lebensmitteleinzelhandel geschaffen. Generalbericht der Kommission I 231 Polen Art. 149 (Milch) verliert wegen der Aufhebung der EU-Milchquotenrege‐ lung allmählich an Bedeutung. Die Verhandlungsobergrenze ist ausrei‐ chend. Allerdings erscheint die Anwendung der Regelung nicht ganz ein‐ deutig. Art. 169 (Olivenöl) hat keine große Bedeutung. Art. 170 (Rindund Kalbfleisch) ist hingegen eine sehr wichtige Bestimmung für die Funktionsfähigkeit dieses Sektors. Gegenwärtig erscheinen die Obergren‐ zen ausreichend. Die Obergrenze des Art. 171 (Feldfrüchte) bedürfte dem‐ gegenüber eine Erhöhung. Denn dadurch könnte ein Anreiz geschaffen werden, größere Erzeugerorganisationen zu bilden, die ihren Mitgliedern ein höheres Einkommen verschaffen. Schweiz In wettbewerbspolitischer Hinsicht erscheint es wünschenswert, dass die Bündelungsbestrebungen von Agrarorganisationen, die mittels der bilate‐ ralen Verträge zwischen der Schweiz und der EU auch für die Schweiz Bedeutung erlangen können, den Wettbewerb im relevanten Markt nicht gänzlich beseitigen können. Dies setzt voraus, dass neben dem gebündel‐ ten Angebot ausreichend Restwettbewerb verbleibt. Ein solcher Restwett‐ bewerb kann sich entweder als Außenwettbewerb (etwa durch das Ange‐ bot von nicht eingebundenen Konkurrenten) oder als Innenwettbewerb (et‐ wa Beratungs-, Service- oder Qualitätswettbewerb unter den Bündelungs‐ partnern selber) manifestieren. Neben tatsächlichen Wettbewerbern kann auch von potenziellen Wettbewerbern ein gewisser Wettbewerbsdruck aus‐ gehen48. Bündelungsobergrenzen bezwecken, mittels eines quantitativen Ansatzes (Abstellen auf den Marktanteil) ausreichend Außenwettbewerb sicherzustellen. Der Landesbericht fragt sich, wie man daneben auch den Innenwettbewerb stärken könnte. Im Vordergrund steht dabei der bereits erwähnte Beratungs-, Service- und Qualitätswettbewerb unter den Bünde‐ lungspartnern selber. Spanien Die Obergrenzen werden als sinnvoll eingestuft und sind nicht kontrovers. Die Anwendung erfolgt vor allem über die Mitteilung der gebündelten Mengen. 48 Zu potenziellen Wettbewerbern siehe statt vieler: Zäch (Fn. 13), Rz. 13. Generalbericht der Kommission I 232 Synthese der Generalberichterstatter Die Obergrenzen besitzen entsprechend der jeweiligen nationalen Produk‐ tion höchst unterschiedliche Bedeutung in den Ländern. Zum Teil werden sie als angemessen eingestuft. Soweit sie als nicht angemessen angesehen werden, erfolgt kein Rückgriff auf die Obergrenzen. Offenbar agieren die betreffenden Erzeugerorganisationen und ihre Vereinigungen dann auf der Grundlage der allgemeinen Agrarkartellausnahme. Die genaue Nutzung des Meldesystems bleibt zumeist unklar. Teilweise wird über Unsicherhei‐ ten bei der Anwendung der Bestimmungen berichtet. Für Italien werden die Leitlinien der Europäischen Kommission zu den betreffenden Artikeln als nicht sinnvoll eingestuft. Angesichts des Brexit besteht in Großbritan‐ nien derzeit eine große Zurückhaltung gegenüber dem Instrument. Die Schweiz fragt sich, ob sich über die bilateralen Abkommen zwischen der Schweiz und der EU im Landwirtschaftsbereich die Bündelungsmöglich‐ keiten auf den schweizerischen Agrarmarkt auswirken. Befristete Kartellfreistellungen Wie bewerten Sie die besonderen befristeten Kartellfreistellungen, die die Verordnung (EU) 2016/558 und die Verordnung (EU) 2016/559 für den Milchbereich enthalten? Halten Sie solche Kartellfreistellungen für ein geeignetes Instrument, um kurzfristig Marktkrisen zu begegnen? Bulgarien Im Unterschied zum Trend auf dem Weltmarkt wird sehr wenig Milch er‐ zeugt. Die inländische Produktion deckt nur 15 Prozent des eigenen Be‐ darfs. Der Konsum steigt kaum noch. Die Kartellfreistellungen sind daher für die Planung der Milchproduktion nicht von Bedeutung. Deutschland Grundsätzlich sind Kriseninstrumente, die den Unternehmen mehr Spiel‐ raum im Wettbewerb geben, begrüßenswert. Allerdings scheitert eine wir‐ kungsvolle Anwendung der Kriseninstrumente häufig an der Schnelllebig‐ keit der Märkte. Aufgrund der zunächst zu treffenden behördlichen Ent‐ scheidungen bis zur Veröffentlichung im Amtsblatt wird das Instrument nicht so kurzfristig eingesetzt wie notwendig. Es ist daher nur bedingt tauglich, um Krisen erfolgreich zu bewältigen. 4. Generalbericht der Kommission I 233 Niederlande Diese Möglichkeiten wurden in den Niederlanden nicht genutzt. Es ist auch fraglich, ob das Instrument zweckdienlich ist. In der Regel wird die Produktion ziemlich weit im Voraus geplant. Nach der Planungsphase kann die Produktion nicht kurzfristig eingestellt werden. Pflanzen wach‐ sen weiter. Man hat es nicht mit einer industriellen Produktion zu tun, bei der man Maschinen zeitweise problemlos stilllegen kann. Österreich Grundsätzlich ist eine Eignung des Instruments gegeben. Der vorgesehene Zeitraum wird für eine abschließende Beurteilung aber als zu kurz be‐ trachtet. Polen Solche Instrumente helfen nur zeitweilig und können keine langfristige Entwicklung der EU-Milchpolitik sicherstellen. Der Milchsektor muss auf die lange Sicht beurteilt werden. Es bedürfe schlagkräftiger Instrumente in diesem Markt. Die befristeten Kartellfreistellungen sind nicht hinreichend klar ausgestaltet. Schweiz Wettbewerbspolitische Privilegien unter klar definierten Voraussetzungen sind ganz allgemein ein geeignetes Instrument, um kurzfristigen Marktrisi‐ ken zu begegnen. Der schweizerische Bundesrat kann denn auch gemäß Art. 9 Abs. 3 LwG zwecks Anpassung der Produktion und des Angebotes an die Erfordernisse des Marktes Selbsthilfemaßnahmen für den Fall au‐ ßerordentlicher Entwicklungen, die nicht durch strukturelle Probleme be‐ dingt sind, unterstützen. Die Beschränkung auf Ausnahmesituationen soll strukturelle Fehlentwicklungen durch staatliche Interventionen verhindern. Spanien Die entsprechenden Maßnahmen sind effizient, um auf Krisen zu reagie‐ ren. Es muss jedoch noch die Antwort des Marktes abgewartet werden. Synthese der Generalberichterstatter Die Mehrheit der Landesberichte steht dem Instrument kritisch gegenüber, da es nicht geeignet sei, ausreichend kurzfristig Marktveränderungen her‐ beizuführen. Soweit das Instrument als prinzipiell sinnvoll eingestuft wird, Generalbericht der Kommission I 234 erfolgt der Hinweis darauf, dass eine Evaluation erforderlich ist. Für die Schweiz wird erläutert, dass es dort ein ähnliches Instrument für außerge‐ wöhnliche Marktsituationen gibt. Allgemeinverbindlichkeitserklärung Wird in Ihrem Land das Instrument der Allgemeinverbindlichkeitserklä‐ rung von Beschlüssen anerkannter Agrarorganisationen und der zugehöri‐ gen zwangsweisen Beteiligung an der Finanzierung von Agrarorganisatio‐ nen (Artikel 164 und 165 der Verordnung [EU] Nr. 1308/2013) genutzt? Sehen Sie dieses Instrument als sinnvoll und praxistauglich an? Bulgarien Das Instrument der Allgemeinverbindlichkeitserklärung könnte dafür ein‐ gesetzt werden, um Transaktionskosten von grossen kooperativen Einhei‐ ten auf kleinere Einheiten zu übertragen, wenn dies der Marktbedingung und der institutionellen Umwelt entspricht. Deutschland Das Instrument der Allgemeinverbindlichkeitserklärung und der zugehöri‐ gen zwangsweisen Beteiligung an der Finanzierung von Agrarorganisatio‐ nen wird derzeit nicht genutzt. Im Übrigen ist einem freien Wettbewerb der Vorzug vor einem wettbewerbsregelnden Element zu geben. Daher ist die Allgemeinverbindlichkeit nur bedingt praxistauglich. Großbritannien Das Instrument der Allgemeinverbindlichkeitserklärung wird nicht ge‐ nutzt. Italien Das Instrument der Allgemeinverbindlichkeitserklärung wird genutzt, wo‐ bei Art. 3 des Gesetzesdekrets 51/2015 maßgeblich ist. Der Einsatzbereich beschränkt sich auf Branchenverbände und setzt die Zustimmung von 85 Prozent der Mitglieder voraus. Die Finanzbeiträge sind keine Steuern, son‐ dern ein "privater Kredit". Es gibt eine Sanktion von 1.000 bis 5.000 EUR. Der Landesbericht erwähnt Fälle aus dem Kiwisektor 2014/15 und Tabaksektor von 2015 bis 2017. 5. Generalbericht der Kommission I 235 Niederlande Das Instrument der Allgemeinverbindlichkeitserklärung wird genutzt. Grundlage dafür ist die Verordnung über Erzeuger und Branchenverbände (Regeling producenten en brancheorganisaties). Erzeugerorganisationen und Vereinigungen von Erzeugerorganisationen im Obst- und Gemüsesek‐ tor sind ausgeschlossen. Die Regelung ersetzt die Produktverbände (pro‐ ductschappen), die bis 2014 tätig waren. 2016 wurden Branchenverbände in den Bereichen Getreide, Zucker und Kartoffeln akzeptiert, allerdings nur bezogen auf die Forschung. Einige weitere Anträge wurden bereits ge‐ stellt. Der Landesbericht beurteilt das Instrument als gut. Es habe aller‐ dings einen beschränkten Wirkungskreis. Polen Das Instrument wird nicht genutzt. Es könnte sich allerdings in der Zu‐ kunft als nützlich erweisen. Beispiele dafür sind die Ausarbeitung von Standardverträgen und deren Überwachung, die Entwicklung und Verbrei‐ tung von statistischen Informationen und Markttrends, Beschlüsse über Regeln im Bereich der Ursprungskennzeichnung sowie die Erarbeitung von Vermarktungskampagnen. Schweiz Das LwG eröffnet in Art. 9 Abs. 1 mit Hinweis auf Art. 8 Abs. 1 umfang‐ reiche Möglichkeiten für Selbsthilfemaßnahmen von Agrarorganisationen gegenüber Nichtmitgliedern (so genannte Trittbrettfahrer) für die Bereiche der Qualitäts- und Absatzförderung sowie der Anpassung der Produktion und des Angebotes an die Erfordernisse des Marktes. Der Bundesrat kann Nichtmitglieder einer Organisation sodann auch verpflichten, Beiträge zur Finanzierung von Selbsthilfemaßnahmen nach Art. 8 Abs. 1 LwG zu leis‐ ten. Die Organisation muss jedoch ziemlich strenge Anforderungen insbe‐ sondere an die Repräsentativität erfüllen. Die Möglichkeit der Ausdehnung von Selbsthilfemaßnahmen auf "Tritt‐ brettfahrer" wird in der Praxis rege genutzt, so etwa für die Branchenorga‐ nisation Milch (Standardvertrag und Reglement Segmentierung Milch‐ markt), für Emmentaler Switzerland (Marketingbeiträge), für die Interpro‐ fession du Vacherin Fribourgeois (Marketingbeiträge), für den Schweizer Bauernverband (Marketingbeiträge), für die Schweizer Milchproduzenten Generalbericht der Kommission I 236 (Marketingbeiträge) und für GalloSuisse (ebenfalls Marketingbeiträge)49. Weitere Anträge sind beim Bundesrat anhängig. Spanien Seit mehreren Jahren wird von der Möglichkeit der Allgemeinverbindlich‐ keitserklärung Gebrauch gemacht. Gleiches gilt für die zwingende Kosten‐ beteiligung der Akteure an der Finanzierung der Organisationen. Besonde‐ re Bedeutung für die Anwendung hat eine Verordnung des MAPAMA. Synthese der Generalberichterstatter Während einige Länder das Instrument der Allgemeinverbindlichkeitser‐ klärung und Beteiligung an der Finanzierung aus unterschiedlichen Grün‐ den nicht nutzen, wird es in anderen Ländern in größerem Umfang einge‐ setzt. Zur Praxistauglichkeit gibt es dabei allerdings kaum Aussagen. Her‐ vorzuheben ist die Schweiz, die umfangreiche Erfahrungen mit dem Ins‐ trument besitzt. Kartellrechtliche Privilegien für nichtanerkannte Zusammenschlüsse Sollten neben den anerkannten Agrarorganisationen auch generell land‐ wirtschaftliche Genossenschaften und sonstige landwirtschaftliche Zusam‐ menschlüsse kartellrechtliche Privilegien besitzen? Wenn ja, ist Ihrer Ansicht nach die Regelung des Artikels 209 Absatz 1 Unterabsatz 2 der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 ausreichend? Bulgarien Die Privilegien sollten nicht ausgeweitet werden. Deutschland Neben den anerkannten Agrarorganisationen müssen landwirtschaftliche Genossenschaften und sonstige landwirtschaftliche Zusammenschlüsse ge‐ nerell kartellrechtliche Privilegien besitzen, wie es bisher bereits durch die Ausnahmeregelungen der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013, ergänzt durch die Verordnung (EU) 1184/2006, geregelt ist. Da sich die nationalen Be‐ 6. 49 Schweizerisches Handelsamtsblatt vom 8.9.2015; vgl. auch Medienmitteilung des Bundesamtes für Landwirtschaft vom 8.9.2015: Selbsthilfemassnahmen Landwirt‐ schaft: Begehren von sechs Organisationen publiziert. Generalbericht der Kommission I 237 stimmungen des § 28 GWB, des § 5 AgrarMSG sowie die EU-Regelungen weitgehend entsprechen, ist Art. 209 Abs. 1 Unterabs. 2 der Verordnung (EU) 1308/2013 ausreichend. Gleiches gilt für die Verordnung (EU) 1184/2006, soweit anerkannte bzw. nicht anerkannte Erzeugerorganisatio‐ nen nicht bereits unter Art. 209 der Verordnung (EU) 1308/2013 fallen. Großbritannien Angesichts des geringen Marktanteils der großen Mehrheit der Erzeuger und Anbauer im Agrarbereich ist es wünschenswert, dass die Verbesse‐ rung der Zusammenarbeit so einfach wie möglich gestaltet wird. Bis die Marktmacht solcher gemeinsamen Unternehmungen bedeutsam gestiegen ist, sollte die Zusammenarbeit ermutigt und vereinfacht werden. Eine der‐ artige Zusammenarbeit kann sogar dem eigentlichen Wettbewerb vorgela‐ gert sein, wenn sie sich auf Effizienzen in der Versorgungskette bezieht. Eine unerfreuliche Folge des allgemeinen Wettbewerbsrechts und des star‐ ken Schutzes der Verbraucher ist, dass große Weiterverkäufer die kleinen Lieferanten dominieren können. Da dies nur ein geringes Risiko für den Verbraucher darstellt, sollte dieses Problem angegangen werden, um Nachhaltigkeit und Effizienzen zu verbessern. Art. 209 Abs. 1 Unterabs. 2 der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 unter‐ stützt dieses Ziel. Allerdings beschränkt es die Zusammenarbeit zwischen verschiedenen Arten von Unternehmen, was der Erreichung von Effizien‐ zen abträglich ist. Es ist zum Beispiel nicht möglich, die Ausnahme für die Zusammenarbeit zwischen Erzeugern, Verarbeitern und Schlachthöfen zu nutzen. Die Kartellausnahme bietet folglich nicht die erforderliche Rechts‐ sicherheit in Konstellationen, in denen die Erzeuger versuchen, durch die Kontrolle der weiteren Verarbeitungskette höhere Erlöse zu erzielen. Es werde zwar oft über die Erzielung eines höheren Wertes für ein Erzeugnis gesprochen. Dann dürfte jedoch die Ausnahme nicht an dem Punkt enden, an dem das Urerzeugnis den landwirtschaftlichen Betrieb verlässt. Sie müsste vielmehr die nächste Verarbeitungsstufe miteinschließen und erlau‐ ben, dass die Urerzeugungsseite mit Unternehmen, die Erfahrungen auf der nächsten Stufe besitzen, kooperieren kann. Niederlande Da Art. 209 der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 einen sehr breiten An‐ wendungsbereich besitzt, erscheint die Regelung auf den ersten Blick aus‐ reichend. Allerdings ist es ziemlich schwierig, die Voraussetzungen für die Ausnahme zu erfüllen. Generalbericht der Kommission I 238 Österreich Um den Anteil der Landwirtschaft an der Wertschöpfungskette zu stei‐ gern, sind über die Artikel 206 und 209 der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 hinaus noch weitergehende Ausnahmen vom Wettbewerbs‐ recht erforderlich. Zu überlegen wäre zudem, eine Vorabentscheidung durch die Wettbewerbsbehörden nach Art. 209 Abs. 2 der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 einzuführen. Polen Zusammenschlüsse für die Zwecke gemeinsamer und organisierter Aktivi‐ täten von landwirtschaftlichen Erzeugern, die im Interesse ihrer Mitglieder handeln, sind unabhängig von ihrer Rechtsform gleich zu behandeln. Die Bestimmungen des Art. 209 Abs. 1 der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 sind diesbezüglich ausreichend und sollten nicht verändert werden. Schweiz Vor dem bereits beschriebenen Hintergrund der vom EU-Recht abwei‐ chenden Rechtslage zur Erzeuger- und Branchenzusammenarbeit stellt sich die Frage nicht mit derselben Dringlichkeit. Durch die allgemeine Pri‐ vilegierung der Selbsthilfemaßnahmen im Landwirtschaftsbereich, die ge‐ stützt auf die Bundesverfassung im LwG enthalten ist, wird nicht zwi‐ schen anerkannten und nichtanerkannten Agrarorganisationen differen‐ ziert50. Spanien Es sollte eine Gleichstellung erfolgen. Allerdings ist fraglich, ob Art. 209 Abs. 1 Unterabs. 1 der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 für diesen Zweck ausreichend ist. Synthese der Generalberichterstatter Überwiegend wird das Erfordernis einer Gleichstellung von generell land‐ wirtschaftlichen Genossenschaften einerseits sowie sonstigen landwirt‐ schaftlichen Zusammenschlüssen anerkannter Agrarorganisationen ande‐ rerseits bejaht. Daher findet sich auch eine entsprechende Befürwortung 50 Vgl. näher zu den Voraussetzungen, die an die jeweilige Agrarorganisation im Fal‐ le eines Antrages auf Ausdehnung von Regelungen gestellt werden, die Verord‐ nung über die Branchen- und Produzentenorganisationen (VBPO). Generalbericht der Kommission I 239 des Art. 209 Abs. 1 Unterabs. 2 der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013. Zu‐ gleich betonen jedoch mehrere Landesberichte, dass die Reichweite und Auslegung der Bestimmung verbesserungswürdig ist. Verbot der Preisbindung Wie wird in Ihrem Land das in Artikel 209 Absatz 1 Unterabsatz 3 der Ver‐ ordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 enthaltene Verbot der Preisbindung verstan‐ den und sehen Sie Klärungsbedarf? Bulgarien Der Preis einer Ware ist eine hauptsächliche Informationsquelle. Aber auch wenn Warenpreise nicht Gegenstand einer Vereinbarung sind, gibt es auf Grund asymmetrischer Informationen Möglichkeiten für den Zugang zu gewissen Märkten. Dies mag den Anschein von Wettbewerb erwecken und zu "unfairen Vorteilen" im Rahmen von Verträgen führen, die auf die‐ ser Informationsbasis abgeschlossen werden. Solche Zustände sind nicht ausgeschlossen, insbesondere nicht auf lokalen Märkten. Deutschland Das Verbot der Preisbindung entspricht grundsätzlich der Rückausnahme der nationalen Regelung. Klarstellend müsste jedoch normiert werden, dass die Preisbindung innerhalb von Erzeugerzusammenschlüssen (z.B. innerhalb einer Genossenschaft oder einer Erzeugerorganisation) ohnehin rechtlich erlaubt ist und auch Preisabsprachen zwischen anerkannten Er‐ zeugerorganisationen begünstigt sind. Preisverhandlungen anerkannter Er‐ zeugerorganisation oder anerkannter Vereinigungen mit Dritten sind eben‐ falls kein Fall der verbotenen Preisbindung. Vom Verbot sind deshalb nur Preisbindungen mit Dritten außerhalb des Erzeugerzusammenschlusses und außerhalb der erwähnten Preisverhandlungen erfasst. Großbritannien Angesichts fehlenden Fallrechts in diesem Bereich und dem Mangel an Erzeugerorganisationen bestehen keine Anhaltspunkte, um den Wortlaut der Bestimmung näher interpretieren zu können. 7. Generalbericht der Kommission I 240 Italien Die Bestimmung ist nicht konsistent, weil es im Falle der Erzeugerzusam‐ menarbeit gerade um die Preisbindung geht. Für anerkannte Erzeugerorga‐ nisationen ist die Frage durch Art. 206 der Verordnung (EU) 1308/2013 geklärt. Niederlande In der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 scheint die holländische Sprachfas‐ sung an die englische Sprachfassung angepasst worden zu sein. Gerichts‐ fälle zu der Bestimmung existieren in den Niederlanden nicht. Wird davon ausgegangen, dass auf das Fallrecht zu Art. 176 Abs. 1 Un‐ terabs. 2 der Verordnung (EG) Nr. 1234/2007 zurückgegriffen werden kann, dürfte die Bedingung des Preisbindungsverbots schnell vermutet werden. Eine derart weite Auslegung ist beispielsweise in der Entschei‐ dung der ACM im beschriebenen Silberzwiebelfall zu finden. Es wäre sinnvoll, wenn geklärt würde, wie viel Spielraum die Bestimmung bietet. Österreich Die Bestimmung sollte gestrichen werden. Polen Vereinbarungen, mit denen Landwirte ihre Erzeugnisse durch eine ge‐ meinsame Genossenschaft verkaufen und dafür den erreichbaren Markt‐ preis erzielen, sollten gestattet sein. Im Bereich anerkannter Erzeugerorga‐ nisationen erscheint eine weitere Klarstellung erforderlich. Schweiz Das schweizerische Kartellrecht enthält im Rahmen des Missbrauchsprin‐ zips bei horizontalen Abreden über die direkte oder indirekte Festsetzung von Preisen eine Vermutung der Beseitigung des wirksamen Wettbewerbs. Kann diese Vermutung nicht widerlegt werden (durch Nachweis von Au‐ ßen- oder Innenwettbewerb), ist die Effizienzeinrede abgeschnitten und die Abrede unzulässig. Eine gewisse Relativierung ergibt sich aus dem Agrarrecht. Denn die schweizerischen Produzenten- und Branchenorgani‐ sationen dürfen gemäss Art. 8a LwG Richtpreise herausgeben. Dabei sind allerdings Konsumentenpreise ausgenommen. Spanien Eine Klarstellung der Bestimmung ist erforderlich. Generalbericht der Kommission I 241 Synthese der Generalberichterstatter Weithin wird die Bestimmung als unklar angesehen. Fallrecht existiert nur in geringem Umfang. Übereinstimmend findet sich die Forderung, zumin‐ dest die Binnenaktivitäten der Erzeugerzusammenarbeit auszunehmen. Verbot des Wettbewerbsausschlusses Wie wird in Ihrem Land das in Artikel 209 Absatz 1 Unterabsatz 3 der Ver‐ ordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 enthaltene Verbot des Wettbewerbsausschlus‐ ses verstanden und sehen Sie Klärungsbedarf? Bulgarien Vom Verbot des Wettbewerbsausschlusses sollte es keine Ausnahmen ge‐ ben. Deutschland Es besteht Klärungsbedarf hinsichtlich der Definition des Wettbewerbs‐ ausschlusses. Eine feste Prozentgrenze ist abzulehnen, weil diese zu starr ist. Wettbewerb kann auch schon bestehen, wenn nur zwei Unternehmen am Markt tätig sind. Daher sollten die individuellen Marktbetrachtungen flexibler in die Auslegung eines Marktausschlusses einbezogen werden. Großbritannien Wie schon bei der Frage des Preisbindungsverbotes fehlt es an Praxis, um die Bestimmung näher zu diskutieren. Niederlande Fallrecht existiert hinsichtlich der Bestimmung nicht. Die Fallpraxis zur Vorgängerbestimmung des Art. 176 Abs. 1 Unterabs. 2 der Verordnung (EG) Nr. 1234/2007 ist undurchsichtig. Im Silberzwiebelfall wird die Be‐ stimmung allerdings sehr weit ausgelegt. Für die tägliche Praxis wäre es hilfreich, wenn das verfolgte Konzept klarer beschrieben würde. Österreich Die Bestimmung sollte gestrichen werden. Denn angesichts der enormen Konzentration im Lebensmitteleinzelhandel bedarf die Produzentenseite 8. Generalbericht der Kommission I 242 einer Stärkung. So verfügen in Österreich die drei größten Unternehmen im Lebensmitteleinzelhandel über einen Marktanteil von 86 Prozent. Polen Die Bestimmung wird sehr grosszügig interpretiert. Dennoch ist eine wei‐ tere Klarstellung im Kontext von Erzeugerorganisationen erforderlich. Schweiz Gemäss Art. 5 Abs. 1 KG sind Abreden unzulässig, die den Wettbewerb auf einem Markt für bestimmte Waren oder Leistungen erheblich beein‐ trächtigen und sich nicht durch Gründe der wirtschaftlichen Effizienz rechtfertigen lassen oder die zur Beseitigung wirksamen Wettbewerbs füh‐ ren. Während damit erheblich beeinträchtigende Abreden der Effizienz‐ einrede zugänglich sind, können den wirksamen Wettbewerb beseitigende Abreden keinesfalls gerechtfertigt werden. Die agrarrechtlichen Sonder‐ vorschriften verdrängen diese Rechtslage insoweit, als der Bundesrat nach Art. 8 Abs. 1 LwG über die Kompetenz verfügt, Selbsthilfemaßnahmen von Agrarorganisationen auf Nichtmitglieder auszudehnen. Denn eine sol‐ che Ausdehnung kann im Ergebnis zu einer Beseitigung des Wettbewerbs führen. Spanien Es wird Klärungsbedarf bezüglich der Bestimmung gesehen. Dabei sollten nicht nur quantitative, sondern auch andere Aspekte einbezogen werden. Synthese der Generalberichterstatter Die Mehrheit der Landesberichte möchte an der Bestimmung festhalten, sieht jedoch Klärungsbedarf bei ihrer konkreten Anwendung. Vereinzelt wird mit Blick auf die hohe Konzentration im Lebensmitteleinzelhandel für eine Abschaffung der Bestimmung plädiert. Das schweizerische Kon‐ zept ist andersartig ausgerichtet. Vertragsregulierung Wird in Ihrem Land das Instrument der Vertragsregulierung (Art. 148 und 168 der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 genutzt? Wenn ja, für welche landwirtschaftlichen Erzeugnisse besteht es? Welchen Nutzen sehen Sie in diesem Instrument? 9. Generalbericht der Kommission I 243 Bulgarien Die Vertragsregulierung könnte nützlich sein, um die Risikoverteilung zwischen Produzenten und der Lebensmittelindustrie zu verbessern. Es ist hingegen nicht angezeigt, die Verträge zwischen den Produzenten selber zum Zwecke der Verbesserung der Integration und der Kostensenkung zu regulieren. Deutschland Lieferbeziehungen werden in Deutschland grundsätzlich auf der Basis von schriftlichen Regelungen getroffen. Diese befinden sich bei Genossen‐ schaften in der Regel in einem gesellschaftsrechtlichen Regelwerk, das einer Mustersatzung entspricht und durch eine Lieferungsordnung ergänzt wird, so dass ein zusätzlicher schuldrechtlicher Vertrag überflüssig ist. Im Übrigen sollte die Vertragsfreiheit gewahrt werden. Staatliche Ein‐ griffe in die Vertragshoheit zwischen den Vertragsparteien haben daher nach Möglichkeit zu unterbleiben. Zumindest sind sie äußerst kritisch zu hinterfragen, weil sie geeignet sind, eine freie Marktwirtschaft zu beein‐ trächtigen. Insoweit wird kein großer Nutzen in den genannten Regelun‐ gen gesehen. Folgerichtig werden diese derzeit national nicht angewandt. Frankreich Die Vertragsregulierung wird seit 2010 gesetzlich stark unterstützt, und zwar namentlich durch das Gesetz über die Modernisierung der Landwirt‐ schaft und den Code rural. Es geht um die Verstärkung des Markteinflus‐ ses der Produzentinnen und Produzenten im Anschluss an die Krisen im Milchbereich, im Bereich Obst und Gemüse sowie im Fleischbereich. Italien Das Instrument der Vertragsregulierung wird im Zusammenhang mit den unfairen Handelspraktiken für alle Sektoren eingesetzt. Allerdings beste‐ hen dabei viele Unklarheiten. Polen Das Instrument wird verwendet. Die rechtliche Basis dafür ist das Gesetz vom 10. Juli 2015 zur Änderung des Gesetzes über die Agrarmarktbehör‐ de und die Organisation bestimmter Agrarmärkte und bestimmter anderer Gesetze zur Einführung schriftlicher Verträge für alle Lieferungen von Agrarprodukten an den Erstkäufer. Zudem existiert das Gesetz vom Generalbericht der Kommission I 244 15. Dezember 2016 zur Verhinderung eines unfairen Vertragsvorteils beim Verkauf von Agrarprodukten und Lebensmitteln, durch das ebenfalls das Gesetz vom 11. März 2014 über die Agrarmarktbehörde und die Organisa‐ tion bestimmter Agrarmärkte geändert wird. Es ist dadurch möglich, be‐ stimmte Käufer von Agrarprodukten zu bestrafen, wenn sie über keinen schriftlichen Vertrag mit dem Erzeuger verfügen. Allerdings ist die Nut‐ zung des Instruments bislang wenig ausgeprägt, weil die Erzeuger gegen‐ über dem Abnehmer in einer schwachen Position sind. Schweiz Das Instrument der Vertragsregulierung existiert in allgemeiner Form durch Art. 8 Abs. 1bis LwG und in besonderer Form für den Milchsektor in Art. 37 LwG. Dabei weist das LwG die Aufgabe der Vertragsregulierung im Milchsektor grundsätzlich den Branchenorganisationen zu. Der Bun‐ desrat kann den Standardvertrag auf Begehren einer Branchenorganisation auf allen Stufen des Kaufes und des Verkaufes von Rohmilch für allge‐ meinverbindlich erklären. Subsidiär hat der Bundesrat die Kompetenz, auch selber eine derartige Regelung zu erlassen. Ein Standardvertrag der Branchenorganisation des Milchsektors muss eine Reihe inhaltlicher An‐ forderungen erfüllen. In wettbewerbspolitischer Hinsicht hält das LwG fest, dass die Regelungen im Standardvertrag den Wettbewerb nicht erheb‐ lich beeinträchtigen dürfen. Zudem bleibt die Preis- und Mengenfestle‐ gung in jedem Fall in der Zuständigkeit der Vertragspartner. Spanien Das Instrument wird nicht nur für den Milchbereich, sondern auch für alle anderen Verträge im Bereich der Lebensmittel im Sinne des Art. 5 des Ge‐ setzes 12/2013 genutzt. Es hat sich als sehr sinnvoll herausgestellt, um das Gleichgewicht zwischen den Interessen der Vertragspartner zu überwa‐ chen. Großbritannien, Niederlande und Österreich In diesen Ländern wird das Instrument der Vertragsregulierung nicht ge‐ nutzt. Synthese der Generalberichterstatter Während in einem Drittel der Länder das Instrument unter anderem wegen mangelnder Praxisrelevanz oder aus ordnungspolitischen Gründen nicht genutzt wird, kommt es in den anderen Ländern zumeist in allen Sektoren Generalbericht der Kommission I 245 zur Anwendung. Allerdings wird hinsichtlich der Anwendung kritisiert, dass die Regelungen nicht vollkommen klar sind und Schwierigkeiten bei der Durchsetzung bestehen. Allgemeine Fragen Öffentliche Diskussion über die rechtliche Stellung der Landwirtschaft in der Vermarktungskette Gab es in Ihrem Land im letzten Jahrzehnt eine öffentliche Diskussion über die Frage, ob die rechtliche Stellung der Landwirtschaft in der Ver‐ marktungskette verstärkt werden soll? Wenn ja, welchen Inhalt hatte oder hat diese Diskussion? Hat sie zu Re‐ formen oder Reformvorschlägen geführt? Bulgarien Die Diskussion über die Stärkung der Landwirtschaft in der Vermark‐ tungskette ist noch im Gang. In einem der Rechtstexte (Trauben und Wein) sind in den letzten zwei Jahren 122 Änderungen vorgenommen worden. Trotz dieser Änderungen ist die Konzentration in einigen Pro‐ duktbereichen sehr hoch, was zeigt, dass sie stark unter Druck stehen. Es ist möglich, dass wegen des bestehenden Ungleichgewichts hinsichtlich Grösse und Typus zwischen den Organisationen eine Polarisierung ent‐ steht. Deutschland Grundsätzlich wurde über die Stärkung der Position der Landwirtschaft im letzten Jahr diskutiert. Wichtig ist in diesem Zusammenhang die markt‐ mächtige und auf wenige Unternehmen fokussierte Lebensmittelhandels‐ seite. Hierzu hat das Bundeskartellamt eine Sektoruntersuchung durchge‐ führt und im September 2014 einen umfassenden Bericht veröffentlicht51. Ein Ergebnis der Diskussion ist die Aufhebung der Befristung des Verbots des Verkaufs unter dem Einstandspreis. C. 1. 51 Abrufbar unter www.bundeskartellamt.de/Sektoruntersuchung_LEH.pdf %3F__blob%3DpublicationFile%26v%3D7. Generalbericht der Kommission I 246 Großbritannien Die Turbulenzen der letzten Jahre auf dem Milchmarkt haben als Kataly‐ sator für eine gewisse öffentliche Diskussion über insbesondere dasjenige, was die Landwirte im Gegenzug für ihre Produkte erhalten, fungiert. Al‐ lerdings darf vor allem von der Landwirtschaftsseite aus der Umfang die‐ ser Debatte nicht überschätzt werden. Zumindest aber hat sie ein Bewusst‐ sein dafür geweckt, dass der Preis, den die Landwirte für ihre Produkte er‐ halten, oftmals nur wenig über ihren Produktionskosten liegt oder sogar niedriger ist. Umfragen haben dann gezeigt, dass die Mehrheit der Konsu‐ mentinnen und Konsumenten bereit wäre, mehr zum Beispiel für die Milch zu bezahlen, wenn die Landwirte einen fairen Preis für die Roh‐ milch erhalten würden. Die Supermarktseite sagt allerdings, dass sie von den Konsumenten getrieben sei. Zudem dürfte die Regierung angesichts niedriger Lebensmittelpreise wenig Interesse daran haben, die Frage der Nachhaltigkeit der Produktion aufzuwerfen. Insbesondere angesichts des Brexit und der damit verbundenen Gefahr von Zöllen besteht sicherlich das Risiko, dass das jahrelange Desinteresse der Regierung an Aspekten der Lebensmittelversorgung und der Nachhaltigkeit der Produktion zu einem realen und dringenden Problem wird. Zwar ist der Lebensmittelkodex-Schiedsrichter eine erfreuliche Ent‐ wicklung und die mögliche Erweiterung seiner Zuständigkeiten ein positi‐ ves Zeichen. Was rechtliche Reformen bezüglich der Situation auf dem Markt betrifft, so geschieht aber wenig. Es wird allein auf den Druck ge‐ setzt, dass die Supermarktketten und andere Handlungsträger "richtig han‐ deln". Der Milch-Kodex wurde unter anderem ins Leben gerufen, um zu versuchen, einen angemesseneren Zeitraum zu schaffen, in dem die Erzeu‐ ger auf niedrigere Milchpreise reagieren können. Allerdings besteht die Einrichtung des Schiedsrichters auf einer rein freiwilligen Basis. Das Image ist natürlich für große Marken wichtiger denn je zuvor. Da‐ her existieren einige positive Beispiele für eine Zusammenarbeit innerhalb der Lebensmittelkette. Aber es hat den Anschein, als würde jede Aktivität hin zu einer Thematisierung des Nachhaltigkeitsaspekts und einer Stär‐ kung des Vertrauens innerhalb der Lebensmittelkette durch eine bewusst gegenteilige Bewegung konterkariert. Es bleibt mithin Misstrauen zurück. Die jüngste Praxis mehrerer Supermärkte, Produkte mit vorgetäuschten landwirtschaftlichen Betrieben zu kennzeichnen, ist ein weiteres Beispiel eines solchen unglücklichen Schrittes zurück. Generalbericht der Kommission I 247 Niederlande Am 24. Mai 2016 hat das Parlament eine Entschließung verabschiedet, mit der die Regierung aufgefordert wurde, zusammen mit der ACM den Missbrauch der Nachfragemacht der Supermärkte zu untersuchen und zu bekämpfen. Dies hat allerdings weder zu Reformen noch wenigstens zu Reformvorschlägen geführt. Österreich Es fand eine solche Diskussion statt, bei der besonders ins Gewicht fiel, dass die Landwirtschaft das schwächste Glied in der Lebensmittelkette ist. Sie findet sich gewissermaßen zwischen einem hoch konzentrierten vorge‐ lagerten Bereich (Pflanzenschutzmittel, Düngemittel, Saatgut, Landma‐ schinenindustrie) und einem hoch konzentrierten nachgelagerten Bereich (Lebensmitteleinzelhandel) eingeschlossen. Als eine Antwort auf diese Herausforderung wird eine stärkere Konzentration im Bereich der Verar‐ beitung in Form von Genossenschaften und Erzeugerorganisationen gese‐ hen. Im Bereich von Obst und Gemüse ist ein Branchenverband in Grün‐ dung begriffen. Diskutiert werden sodann die Schaffung einer Ombuds‐ stelle und verbindliche Regeln über unfaire Geschäftspraktiken. Polen Direkter Auslöser der Diskussion waren die Signale, die von dem erschre‐ ckenden Stand der Erzeuger im Vergleich mit anderen Marktbeteiligten ausgingen. Die diskutierten Reformentwürfe umfassten eine maximale Zahlungsfrist und die Möglichkeit für Landwirte, anonyme Beschwerden gegenüber den Lebensmittelketten zu erheben. Als Ergebnis dieser Debat‐ te wurden die unter Ziff. 2.9 dargestellten Gesetze beschlossen. Schweiz Die Diskussion rund um die Frage nach der Stellung der Landwirtschaft innerhalb der Wertschöpfungskette hat sich nach dem agrarpolitischen Pa‐ radigmenwechsel anfangs der Neunzigerjahre des letzten Jahrhunderts (Entkoppelung von landwirtschaftlicher Preis- und Einkommenspolitik, Liberalisierung der Agrarmärkte, Einführung von Direktzahlungen usw.) deutlich verschärft. Der staatliche Interventionsgrad in der Agrarwirtschaft wurde seither in mehreren agrarpolitischen Schritten abgebaut. Die Folge ist, dass die Frage der Marktpolitik nun vorwiegend innerhalb von Bran‐ chen-, Produzenten- und Sortenorganisationen geführt wird. Das gilt gera‐ Generalbericht der Kommission I 248 de auch im Milchmarkt nach der Aufhebung der Milchkontingentierung. Nach wie vor umstritten ist die Ausgestaltung der Vertragsregulierung. Spanien Die Diskussion hat sich vor allem auch nach der Präsentation des Geset‐ zesentwurfs über die Lebensmittelkette entwickelt. Kritisch zu diesem Entwurf äußerten sich insbesondere der – inzwischen aufgelöste – nationa‐ le Wettbewerbsrat (Consejo Nacional de la Competencia; CNC) und der Ökonomie- und Sozialrat (Consejo económico y social; CES). Die Vorlage sei zu bürokratisch und behindere den Wettbewerb. Synthese der Generalberichterstatter Die Landesberichte lassen erkennen, dass die Produzentinnen und Produ‐ zenten landwirtschaftlicher Güter in beinahe allen Ländern unter starkem Druck stehen und zum Teil Schwierigkeiten haben, ihre Kosten zu decken. Sie befinden sich gewissermaßen im Sandwich zwischen hoch konzen‐ trierten Anbietern auf der vorgelagerten Marktstufe (Landmaschinen, Saatgut, Düngemittel, Pflanzenschutzmittel) und dem nachgelagerten hoch konzentrierten Lebensmitteleinzelhandel bzw. der Verarbeiterstufe. Es werden mit anderen Worten ziemlich durchgehend erhebliche Mark‐ tungleichgewichte zulasten der Landwirtschaft diagnostiziert. Die prekäre Lage hat dazu geführt, dass öffentliche Diskussionen ziemlich verbreitet sind und dass auch gewisse Maßnahmen ergriffen wurden oder mindestens eine Diskussion und Prüfung gewisser Maßnahmen begonnen hat, z.B. Sektoruntersuchung des Bundeskartellamtes und Aufhebung der Befris‐ tung des Verbots des Verkaufs unter Einstandspreis in Deutschland; Ein‐ führung des Lebensmittelkodex-Schiedsrichter in Großbritannien; Schaf‐ fung einer Ombudsstelle und verbindlicher Regeln über unfaire Geschäfts‐ praktiken in Österreich; Einführung einer Agrarmarktbehörde sowie eines Vertragsmodell für die Lieferung von Agrarprodukten in Polen. Ein ande‐ res Lösungsmuster sind Maßnahmen der Landwirtschaft selber im Rah‐ men von Branchenorganisationen, wofür insbesondere Frankreich und die Schweiz charakteristisch sind. Generalbericht der Kommission I 249 Reformbedürftigkeit des Agrarwettbewerbsrechts? Wenn Sie das nationale Agrarwettbewerbsrecht bzw. das EU-Agrarwettbe‐ werbsrecht insgesamt betrachten, ist dieses Ihrer Ansicht nach reformbe‐ dürftig? Wenn ja, was sollten die Schwerpunkte der Reform sein? Bulgarien Besondere Reformanliegen sind die Verhinderung der Möglichkeiten des unbegrenzten Aufkaufs von Kulturland sowie die Beschränkung der asym‐ metrischen Verteilung der Subventionen für die Landwirtschaft. Deutschland Grundsätzlich ist in Gesamtbetrachtung des Agrarkartellrechtes eine Re‐ formbedürftigkeit zwar nicht gegeben, weil die vorhandenen Regelungen hinreichende Spielräume eröffnen. Eine weniger restriktive Auslegungs‐ praxis der Kartellbehörden wäre aber erwünscht. Im Hinblick darauf wä‐ ren einige klarstellende Regelungen sowohl im EU-Recht als auch im GWB erwünscht. Das gilt beispielsweise für den genauen Handlungsspiel‐ raum – einschließlich der Frage der Preisbindung – von anerkannten und nicht anerkannten Erzeugerorganisationen, die Definition von Erfassungs‐ märkten, die Auslegung des Wettbewerbsausschlusskriteriums und die Be‐ rücksichtigung der Marktgegenseite. Frankreich Der Landesbericht trägt eine Kritik vor, die sich einerseits auf die nationa‐ le Praxis und andererseits auf die Praxis der EU bezieht. Daraus leitet er Forderungen an beide Regelungskreise ab. Es geht ihm insbesondere um Folgendes: Die restriktive Interpretation der Ausnahmebestimmungen zugunsten der Landwirtschaft sowohl durch die ADLC als auch durch die EU-Orga‐ ne führt zu einem Übergewicht der Wettbewerbsbestimmungen des AEUV. Die Spezifizität des Agrarrechts kommt zu wenig zum Tragen. Die Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 hat an diesem Trend nichts geändert und verkehrt daher Art. 42 AEUV immer noch in sein Gegenteil. Es gilt nicht mehr der funktionelle Vorrang des Agrarrechts vor dem Wettbewerbsrecht, sondern die umgekehrte Sichtweise, die verfolgt wird. Die Erzeugerorga‐ nisationen, die Vereinigungen der Erzeugerorganisationen und die Ver‐ tragsregulierung können sich zu wenig entfalten, um gegenüber den nach‐ gelagerten Stufen eine hinreichende Gegenmacht aufzubauen. Es braucht 2. Generalbericht der Kommission I 250 insgesamt eine bessere Umschreibung der Reichweite der Ausnahmen vom allgemeinen Kartellverbot. Die französische Praxis lehnt sich zu stark an die restriktive Interpreta‐ tion durch die EU-Organe an, wie der Chicorée-Fall zeigt. Die im franzö‐ sischen Recht verankerte Vertragsregulierung (Gesetz Nr. 2010-874 vom 27. Juli 2010 über die Modernisierung der Landwirtschaft und der Fische‐ rei) reicht nicht aus, um die schwierige Situation der französischen Land‐ wirtschaft zu verbessern und der Zielsetzung von Art. 39 AEUV, insbeson‐ dere die Ermöglichung eines angemessenen Einkommens, zu genügen. Es fehlt die Möglichkeit der Absprache von Preisen bzw. der Festlegung von Mindestpreisen. Zu kritisieren ist außerdem, dass gemeinsame Absatzprei‐ se nur gebilligt werden, wenn die Produzenten zuvor das Eigentum an den Produkten übertragen haben. Sachdienlich wären nur eine Konzentration des Angebots im Sinne von Art. 152 sowie eine Redimensionierung von Art. 209 der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 im Sinne der Streichung des Verbots von Vertragsklauseln mit Preisbindungen. Zentral sei auch eine Klarstellung der Aufgaben von Erzeugerorganisationen (organisations de producteurs; OP), weil diesbe‐ züglich Rechtsunsicherheit herrsche. Die Lösung sollte mindestens in der Erweiterung von Art. 149 der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 über den Milchsektor hinaus bestehen und Preisverhandlungen zwischen den Mit‐ gliedern von Erzeugerorganisationen ermöglichen, gleichgültig, ob die Ware vor dem Verkauf auf die Organisation übergehe oder nicht. Verboten sollten nur Preisfixierungen sein, wenn Produzenten individuell zu gebun‐ denen Preisen direkt an Abnehmer verkauften. Als Vorbild für diese Rege‐ lung sieht der Landesbericht die Regelung im schwedischen Kartellgesetz von 2008 (Swedish Competition Act – 2008:579; Kapitel 1 Art. 4). Zur Unterstützung seiner Anliegen weist der Landesbericht auf die amerikanische Gesetzgebung (Capper-Volstead Act; siehe dazu schon Ziff. I.3.3) sowie auf amerikanische ökonomische Studien hin52. Her‐ vorzuheben ist folgende Aussage53: "In the case of a classic cartel, the ad‐ verse market effects are a lower output quantity, which further increases a dead-weight loss due to the seller market power, and additional price in‐ 52 Carstensen (Fn. 16), 465; E. V. Jesse/B. W. Marion/A. C. Manchester/A. C. John‐ son, Interpreting and Enforcing Section of the Capper-Volstead Act, American Journal of Agricultural Economy, Volume 64, Issue 3, 1 August 1982, S. 431–443; Frederick (Fn. 17). 53 Bolotova (Fn. 29), S. 9 f. Generalbericht der Kommission I 251 crease imposed on consumers. In contrast, agricultural output control al‐ lows agricultural producers to eliminate unnecessary commodity losses due to agricultural over -supply and also to decrease (and ideally elimi‐ nate) the costs of producing the volume that cannot be absorbed by the market at the acceptable price level. Consequently, this helps agricultural producers attain a fair level of price, which is the level of price that covers their production costs. The overall societal benefit is maintaining a viable agricultural production." Großbritannien Der Marktanteil der breiten Mehrheit der einzelnen Landwirte ist so ge‐ ring, dass selbst in kleinen Gruppen kein spürbarer Einfluss auf den Markt ausgeübt werden kann. Der Großteil des derzeit geltenden allgemeinen Wettbewerbsrechts besitzt daher keine Bedeutung für die Entscheidungen der Landwirte. Dies bedeutet allerdings nicht, dass die Haltung der für den Wettbewerb zuständigen Behörden einem wirklichen Fortschritt in frag‐ mentierten Märkten wie dem Agrarmarkt förderlich ist. Denn in solchen Märkten ist es notwendig, zu einer Zusammenarbeit zwischen kleinen Un‐ ternehmen zu ermutigen und die relevanten wettbewerbsrechtlichen Aus‐ nahmen klar zu formulieren. Das Wettbewerbsrecht sollte sich eigentlich nicht mit Markttätigkeiten von derart geringer Größe beschäftigen. Solche Ermutigungen bringen keine Bedenken in Bezug auf den Wettbewerb mit sich, sondern würden die Zusammenarbeit stärken und die Nachhaltigkeit bedeutend verbessern. Begleitend zur Unterstützung durch die Behörden sollten sich die Er‐ zeuger selbst der Vorteile einer Zusammenarbeit bewusst werden, um da‐ durch ihre Verhandlungsmacht zu stärken. Solange dies nicht geschieht, indem sich die Haltung ändert und ein Wille zur Kooperation entsteht, dürfte es in Großbritannien wenig Sinn machen, zusätzliche Ausnahmen oder anderweitige signifikante Rechtsänderungen zu fordern. In diesem Zusammenhang ist die bedeutsame Rolle einer Unterrichtung über Marktfragen und die Funktionalität der einzelnen Märkte vor allem nach dem Verkauf auf der Urerzeugungsseite hervorzuheben. Dies gilt ins‐ besondere angesichts der Gefahren und Chancen, die der Brexit mit sich bringt. Allerdings ist der Landesbericht ein wenig besorgt darüber, dass die Landwirte in Großbritannien allein weniger Einfluss auf ihre Regie‐ rung haben werden als die Landwirte der EU gebündelt auf die EU-Orga‐ ne. Aus seiner Sicht wäre eine Reform der EU von innen heraus besser ge‐ wesen. Um auch nach einem Brexit Erfolgsaussichten zu haben, sei eine Generalbericht der Kommission I 252 Änderung der Haltung sowohl bei den Regulierern als auch bei den Regu‐ lierten erforderlich. Dies gelte nicht nur für den Bereich des Wettbewerbs‐ rechts im engeren Sinne, sondern allgemein im Hinblick auf die Wettbe‐ werbsfähigkeit im Agrarbereich. Generell sollten drei Punkte berücksichtigt werden, um die Verhand‐ lungsmacht der Landwirte in Großbritannien zu verbessern: (1) Ausbildung Ein Urerzeuger zu sein ist inzwischen weitaus komplexer geworden. Die Marktkräfte, die den Urerzeugungspreis bestimmen, werden sich weiter ändern und unterliegen mehr und mehr globalen Einflüssen. Vielen Landwirten ist dies bereits bewusst. Eine verbesserte Informa‐ tion und Ausbildung würde sie allerdings in die Lage versetzen, ihre Entscheidungen noch informierter zu treffen, wenn sich ihnen die Ge‐ legenheit zu derartigen Entscheidungen bietet. (2) Verkaufsoptionen In anderen Ländern gibt es über Auktionen hinaus weitere Möglich‐ keiten, die Erzeugnisse zu veräußern. In Großbritannien sollte die Le‐ bensmittelkette besser integriert sein, um die Nahrungsmittelversor‐ gung sicherzustellen und eine nachhaltige Zukunft zu gewährleisten. Der Direktverkauf durch Genossenschaften und die Vereinbarung von Vorhand-Preisen wären zu erwägen und zu unterstützen. (3) Zusammenarbeit Wie auch immer die Zusammenarbeit durch gleichgesinnte Erzeuger organisiert ist – als Genossenschaft, als Erzeugerorganisation oder als etwas Drittes –, dient sie immer dem Wohl aller Beteiligten. Italien Abgesehen davon, dass Vieles an den bestehenden Regelungen unklar ist und daher eindeutiger geregelt werden sollte, ist ein stärkerer Fokus auf die Wettbewerbsverhältnisse in der Lebensmittelkette und vor allem auf die starke Nachfragemachtseite zu legen. Niederlande Es besteht das Bedürfnis für mehr Klarheit und Rechtssicherheit in der Praxis. Denn das EU-Agrarkartellrecht ist weder klar und transparent for‐ muliert, noch für Landwirte und ihre Organisationen verständlich. Ein Verfahren wie das in Art. 210 Abs. 2 der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 Generalbericht der Kommission I 253 enthaltene Verfahren oder die Möglichkeit einer informellen Auskunft bzw. eines "comfort letter" sollte eingeführt werden. Österreich Die Abgrenzung des allgemeinen EU-Wettbewerbsrecht zur GAP ist drin‐ gend reformbedürftig. Es geht darum, die Position der Landwirte in der Lebensmittelkette zu stärken. Dazu sind insbesondere die Art. 152, 206, 209 und 210 der Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 grundlegend zu überar‐ beiten. Ziele der Reform sollten insbesondere sein: • Sicherstellung der Sonderstellung der Landwirtschaft, insbesondere durch Ausnahmen im Kartellrecht für die Landwirtschaft und ihre Ge‐ nossenschaften (Art. 206); • Zusammenschlüsse von Landwirten (in Form von Genossenschaften und Erzeugerorganisationen) vom Wettbewerbsrecht auszunehmen (Art. 209) und Vorabentscheidungen der Wettbewerbsbehörden zu er‐ möglichen; • Stärkung der rechtlichen Möglichkeiten von Branchenverbänden (Art. 210); • die Anordnung einer verbindlichen Preisberichterstattung über die ge‐ samte Lieferkette; • der Erlass einer EU-Rahmenregelung betreffend unfaire Geschäfts‐ praktiken; • ein EU-weites Verbot des Verkaufs unter dem Einstandspreis; • die Fortführung der Möglichkeit von jederzeit möglichen Krisenmaß‐ nahmen; • Ausbau von Regionalität und Herkunftsschutz; • eine hinreichende Definition des "relevanten Marktes" auf Produzen‐ tenseite als Gegengewicht zur Konzentration auf Seiten des Lebensmit‐ teleinzelhandels. Polen Der gegenwärtige Stand der nationalen Gesetzgebung erscheint ausrei‐ chend und jede weitere Fortentwicklung sollte eng mit derjenigen auf EU- Ebene korrespondieren. Zwei Faktoren sind vor allem zu berücksichtigen: (1) Die Notwendigkeit, einerseits für stabile Verhältnisse hinsichtlich der landwirtschaftlichen Tätigkeiten zu sorgen, und andererseits zugleich Generalbericht der Kommission I 254 das generelle Wettbewerbsprinzip aufrecht zu erhalten, da dieses Prinzip der Schlüssel nicht nur für die Produktivität, sondern auch für die Erreichung einer angemessenen Qualität der Produkte ist. (2) Die Auswirkungen der auswärtigen Einflüsse auf das Funktionieren der GAP sollten nicht übersehen werden. Schon jetzt steht die EU- Landwirtschaft unter einem enormen Wettbewerbsdruck, der von dem Agrarhandel mit Nicht-EU-Staaten ausgeht. Schweiz Im Gesamten hat sich der Koordinationsmechanismus zwischen Agrar‐ recht und Kartellrecht als praktikabel erwiesen. Negativ sind sicherlich der relativ hohe Komplexitätsgrad der Regelung und die daraus hervorgehen‐ de Rechtsunsicherheit. In der Sache selbst lassen sich aber je nach den em‐ pirischen und normativen Besonderheiten der verschiedenen Agrarmärkte recht pragmatische Lösungen finden. Ob und wie das Agrarkartellrecht gesetzlich weiter zu entwickeln ist, wird auch von den agrarpolitischen Entwicklungen in der EU abhängen. Der Bericht der Task Force Agrar‐ märkte bietet jedenfalls interessante Ansätze. Bevor weitere wettbewerbspolitische Privilegien für die Landwirtschaft eingeführt werden, sollte sichergestellt sein, dass das Potenzial effizienter Möglichkeiten zur Stärkung des landwirtschaftlichen Markteinflusses voll ausgeschöpft ist. Solche Möglichkeiten liegen etwa in der Schärfung des Marktprofils der einzelnen Landwirte als Marktakteure, in der Schaffung von Ausweichmöglichkeiten bei den Marktpartnern und im Fokus auf ge‐ sunde, marktgerechte Betriebsstrukturen54. Spanien Das nationale Wettbewerbsrecht ist reformbedürftig. Es müsse sensibler für die qualitativen Aspekte des Konsumentenschutzes werden. Zu Un‐ recht steht bis jetzt eine quantitative Beurteilung im Vordergrund. Synthese der Generalberichterstatter Den Landesberichten ist zum großen Teil zu entnehmen, dass ein sehr er‐ heblicher Reformbedarf diagnostiziert wird, was bedeutet, dass das gelten‐ de nationale Agrarwettbewerbsrecht und das EU-Agrarwettbewerbsrecht als derzeit ungenügend ausgestaltet beurteilt werden. 54 Ausführlich dazu Niklaus/Zünd (Fn. 43), S. 9 f. Generalbericht der Kommission I 255 Eine gewisse Gegenposition nimmt vor allem der deutsche Bericht ein. Danach braucht es nicht so sehr neue Rechtsnormen und Rechtsinstitute, sondern eine großzügigere Handhabung bzw. eine bessere Ausnützung der Spielräume des geltenden Rechts. Ähnlich argumentiert der schweize‐ rische Bericht. Weiter setzt sich auch der französische Bericht – außer für zusätzliche Maßnahmen – für die bessere Ausnützung von Spielräumen ein, insbesondere durch echte Umsetzung des Vorrangs des Agrarrechts vor dem Wettbewerbsrecht in der EU. Heute hätten umgekehrt die Wettbe‐ werbsregeln des AEUV Vorrang gegenüber den Ausnahmebestimmungen zugunsten der Landwirtschaft55. Man sollte auch Preisverhandlungen und Preisbindungen zulassen. Der britische Bericht plädiert dafür, das Wettbewerbsrecht auf die klein‐ strukturierten Produzentinnen und Produzenten überhaupt nicht anzuwen‐ den, weil diese einen zu vernachlässigenden Markteinfluss hätten. Man sollte die Branche vielmehr zur verstärkten Zusammenarbeit aufrufen, um ihre Verhandlungsmacht zu stärken. Anzutreffen ist sodann die Meinung, die bestehenden Bestimmungen seien teilweise unklar und bedürften der legislativen Konkretisierung im Hinblick auf die notwendige Stärkung der Landwirtschaft (Italien; Nieder‐ lande mit der Forderung nach der Einführung eines "comfort letter"). Den längsten Forderungskatalog für neue Regeln und die Konkretisie‐ rung bestehender Rechtsnormen enthält der österreichische Bericht. Neben bereits erwähnten Maßnahmen geht es insbesondere um die Anordnung einer verbindlichen Preisberichterstattung über die gesamte Lieferkette, die Fortführung der Möglichkeit von jederzeitigen Krisenmaßnahmen so‐ wie um den Ausbau von Regionalität und Herkunftsschutz. Der polnische Bericht macht darauf aufmerksam, dass die EU-Land‐ wirtschaft unter einem enormen Wettbewerbsdruck stehe, der vom Agrar‐ handel mit Nicht-EU-Mitgliedstaaten ausgehe. Laut dem spanischen Bericht muss vermehrt auf die qualitativen As‐ pekte der Landwirtschaft Wert gelegt werden. 55 Die Meinung, dass es in Wirklichkeit keinen Primat der Landwirtschaftspolitik ge‐ genüber der Wettbewerbspolitik gibt, wird auch in der Kommentarliteratur, min‐ destens vereinzelt, vertreten; siehe Georg-Klaus de Bronett, in: Josef L. Schulte/ Christoph Just (Hrsg.), Kartellrecht – GWB, Kartellvergaberecht, EU-Kartellrecht (2016), Art. 101 AEUV, Rz. 134. Generalbericht der Kommission I 256 Schlussfolgerungen und Empfehlungen der Kommission I Die Schlussfolgerungen und Empfehlungen der Kommission I sind bereits vor dem Kongress in gemeinsamer Arbeit des Präsidenten der Kommissi‐ on (Prof. Dr. Rudolf Mögele) und der beiden Generalberichterstatter (Dr. Christian Busse und Prof. em. Dr. Paul Richli) entworfen worden. Dieser Entwurf wurde in der Schlusssitzung der Kommission diskutiert und – unter dem Eindruck der Präsentation und Diskussion der Landesbe‐ richte – in einzelnen Punkten modifiziert und ergänzt. Wie üblich findet sich die Endfassung der Schlussfolgerungen und Empfehlungen nicht in den Bericht der Generalberichterstatter integriert, sondern im Kongress‐ band separat wiedergegeben (hinten S. 263). Die Ergebnisse der Kommission I im Lichte des Chicorée-Urteils des EuGH und der Änderungsverordnung (EU) 2017/2393 Nach dem Abschluss des XXIX. Europäischen Agrarrechtskongresses ver‐ kündete der EuGH im November 2017 sein Urteil in der Rechtssache C-671/1556. Entsprechend der Zielrichtung der Empfehlungen der Kom‐ mission I bestätigte der EuGH nicht nur allgemein den Grundsatz, dass das EU-Agrarmarktrecht Vorrang vor dem allgemeinen EU-Kartellverbot besitzt, sondern insbesondere auch die kartellrechtliche Freistellung von anerkannten Erzeugerorganisationen und deren Vereinigungen. Zugleich urteilte der EuGH, dass wettbewerbsrelevante Absprachen im Agrarbe‐ reich, die über die expliziten und impliziten Ausnahmen hinausgehen, dem allgemeinen Kartellrecht unterfallen. Insbesondere sind dem EuGH zufol‐ ge Preisabsprachen zwischen anerkannten und nicht anerkannten Formen der Erzeuger- und Branchenzusammenarbeit nicht privilegiert. Folglich sorgte der EuGH in wichtigen Punkten für Klarheit. Zugleich entstanden durch das Urteil jedoch auch Unklarheiten, da nicht eindeutig ist, ob die Aussagen des EuGH unter anderem zum Verbot der Festlegung von Mindestpreisen allgemein oder nur für den Bereich Obst und Gemüse, der durch bestimmte Besonderheiten geprägt ist, verstanden werden muss. Zudem besteht das Problem, dass – wie bereits erwähnt – das Urteil nicht zu dem aktuell geltenden EU-Agrarkartellrecht erging und der EuGH auch III. IV. 56 EuGH, Urteil vom 14.11.2017, Rs. C-671/15 (APVE), ECLI:EU:C:2017:860. Generalbericht der Kommission I 257 keinerlei Hinweis gibt, inwiefern das Urteil auf die derzeit geltende Rechtslage übertragbar ist57. Ebenfalls im November 2017 einigten sich die drei EU-Organe auf agrarkartellrechtliche Änderungen im Rahmen der Omnibus-Verordnung. Größere Teile der Anliegen des Europäischen Parlaments fanden sich da‐ bei übernommen. Anschließend wurde beschlossen, den Agrarabschnitt der Omnibus-Verordnung abzutrennen und als separate Verordnung in Kraft treten zu lassen. Daraus ist im Dezember 2017 die Änderungsver‐ ordnung (EU) 2017/239358 hervorgegangen. Vor allem sieht nun die auf diese Weise geänderte Verordnung (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 eine ausdrückliche Kartellausnahme für anerkannte Erzeugerorganisationen und deren Verei‐ nigungen vor. Zugleich wurden dadurch die besonderen Bündelungsober‐ grenzen größtenteils ersetzt und der so genannte Effizienztest wieder be‐ seitigt. Insgesamt entsprechen die Resultate der Änderungsverordnung (EU) 2017/2393 in wichtigen Aspekten den Empfehlungen der Kommissi‐ on I59. Nach alledem bleibt das Thema der Kommission I von agrarrechtlicher und agrarpolitischer Relevanz. Sowohl das EuGH-Urteil als auch die Dis‐ kussionen über die Änderungsverordnung (EU) 2017/2393 haben ein‐ dringlich gezeigt, dass viele Punkte nach wie vor offen sind und diesbe‐ züglich die Empfehlungen der Kommission I als Leitlinien dienen können. Gegenwärtig beginnen die Vorbereitungen für die Verhandlungen über die nächste GAP-Reform, die 2021 in Kraft treten soll. Hierbei wird der Be‐ reich "Wettbewerbsregeln in der Landwirtschaft" eine sicherlich nicht un‐ bedeutende Rolle spielen. Schon zuvor möchte die Europäische Kommis‐ sion auf Drängen des Europäischen Parlaments bis Ende März 2018 einen Legislativvorschlag zur Bekämpfung unlauterer Handelspraktiken vorle‐ gen. Auch diesem Thema hat sich die Kommission I gewidmet, da ein fai‐ rer Umgang miteinander innerhalb der Lebensmittelkette eine wichtige 57 Vgl. für eine eingehende Analyse des Urteils Christian Busse, Klarheit oder nicht Klarheit – Das Urteil des EuGH vom 14.11.2017 zu den Kartellverbotsausnahmen im EU-Agrarmarktrecht, Wirtschaft und Wettbewerb 2018, 438-444. 58 ABl. EU Nr. L 350 vom 29.12.2017, 15. 59 Vgl. für eine genauere Gegenüberstellung der Empfehlungen der Kommission I und der Änderungsverordnung (EU) 2007/2393 Christian Busse, Der GMO-Ab‐ schnitt der Verordnung (EU) 2017/2393 im Lichte der Schlussfolgerungen der Kommission I des Liller CEDR-Kongresses, Agrarrecht – Jahrbuch 2018, 137-147. Generalbericht der Kommission I 258 Voraussetzung für eine möglichst hohe Wertschöpfung bei landwirt‐ schaftlichen Produkten darstellt. Generalbericht der Kommission I 259 Conclusions de la Commission I – Conclusions of Commission I – Schlussfolgerungen der Kommission I Version française – French version – Französische Version Version anglaise – English version – Englische Version Version allemande – German version – Deutsche Version Conclusions de la Commission I* Version française – French version – Französische Version Exceptions à la législation antitrust générale Considérations : Dans tous les pays signalés, il existe une loi antitrust gé‐ nérale avec, entre autres, une interdiction des cartels. Les exceptions à la législation antitrust dans le domaine de l'agriculture ne sont généralement pas traitées au niveau constitutionnel. Une loi nationale spéciale sur les cartels agricoles n'est disponible que dans certains pays, de sorte que la loi généralement acceptée de l'UE sur les cartels agricoles revêt une import‐ ance particulière. En général, il n'existe pas d'autorités antitrust spéciales pour le secteur agricole. Les autorités antitrust générales des Etats ont une vision très différente du secteur agricole. Dans certains pays des procédu‐ res approfondies sont en cours dans certains pays. Dans d'autres pays, on n'a signalé que des poursuites mineures, voire aucune. Le nombre d'orga‐ nisations agricoles reconnues est aussi inégalement réparti notamment dans le domaine des associations professionnelles. Dans plusieurs pays, les organisations agricoles reconnues sont inscrites dans un registre public. Recommandation 1 : Le secteur agricole présente des caractéristiques intrinsèques et structurelles par rapport à d'autres secteurs de l'économie, qui justifient de prévoir des dérogations à la législation antitrust générale. De telles exceptions sont connues dans le droit de l'Union européenne de‐ puis le début de la politique agricole commune, qui qui a souvent été mo‐ delée sur les principes des modèles nationaux. Avec la libéralisation du marché agricole de l'UE, ces réglementations deviennent de plus en plus importantes. Le secteur agricole devrait faire le meilleur usage possible des dérogations existantes. L'objectif consistant à faire de l'agriculture eu‐ ropéenne un secteur bien structuré et compétitif ne peut être atteint sans un engagement suffisant de la part du secteur agricole. A. * Traduction de l’allemand en français par Stefanie Hug, MLaw, Université de Lucer‐ ne. 263 Recommandation 2 : Outre les coopératives agricoles traditionnelles, les organisations agricoles reconnues revêtent une importance particulière. Il incombe aux États membres et à l'UE de fournir les incitations nécessai‐ res à l’application de cet instrument. Afin d'éviter les distorsions de con‐ currence et de faciliter la coopération transfrontalière dans le secteur agri‐ cole, il convient de réduire les différences existantes dans l'application des dispositions pertinentes et d'harmoniser les exigences. Les ambiguïtés de la réglementation antitrust agricole au niveau de l'UE Considérations : Les règlements antitrust agricoles au niveau de l'UE con‐ tiennent un certain nombre de points qui doivent être clarifiés, notamment le champ d'application des exemptions et la relation entre les règlements. Cela a conduit à l'incertitude et un appel général à une plus grande clarté. La situation actuelle rend la créations d'organisations agricoles reconnues et leur bon fonctionnement difficile, cela vaut également pour d'autres for‐ mes de coopération agricole. Recommandation 3 : Les organes législatifs de l'UE devraient élaborer leur législation antitrust agricole de manière à ce que les organisations agricoles reconnues et les autres formes de coopération agricole puissent poursuivre leurs activités dans le cadre des objectifs de la politique agrico‐ le commune avec la plus grande sécurité juridique possible. L'appel lancé par le groupe de travail sur les marchés agricoles dans son rapport de no‐ vembre 2016 pour que toutes les formes de coopération entre les pro‐ ducteurs et leurs associations soient exemptées des cartels aussi simple‐ ment et uniformément que possible est soutenu. Dans ce contexte, on pourrait envisager d'examiner le cas échéant, des questions telles que le bi‐ en-être des animaux et les aspects environnementaux. Interaction entre la loi nationale sur les cartels agricoles et la loi de l'UE sur les cartels agricoles Considérations : L'interaction entre le droit national et le droit communau‐ taire en matière d'ententes agricoles doit être clarifiée. Au lieu d'établir leur propre législation nationale, les législations nationales se réfèrent sou‐ B. C. Conclusions de la Commission I 264 vent uniquement à la législation communautaire sur les ententes agricoles ou exigent qu'elle soit prise en compte. Recommandation 4 : Le droit antitrust national devrait compléter le droit antitrust agricole de l'UE, conformément à la jurisprudence de la Cour de justice européenne. Dans la mesure où le droit de la concurrence agricole de l'UE n'exempte pas les interdictions nationales en matière d'en‐ tente, pour des raisons de clarté juridique, les États membres devraient ex‐ plicitement prévoir cette exemption dans leur législation antitrust nationa‐ le. Commercialisation conjointe par les producteurs agricoles Considérations : La commercialisation en commun de leurs produits est une caractéristique essentielle des formes institutionnalisées de coopérati‐ on des producteurs agricoles. Dans la mesure où la législation agricole de l'UE interdit actuellement la fixation des prix pour cette coopération, ces règles apparaissent contradictoires et inappropriées. Recommandation 5 : Les organes législatifs de l'UE devraient complé‐ ter les règles de l'UE en précisant que l'interdiction de fixation des prix ne s'applique pas à la fixation d'un prix d'achat ou de vente commun dans le cadre de la commercialisation de produits par des organisations ou coopé‐ ratives agricoles reconnues. Peu importe que la propriété des produits en question soit transférée à l'organisation agricole reconnue ou à la coopéra‐ tive avant d'être vendue. Plafonds de négociation Considérations : La législation antitrust agricole de l'UE établit des pla‐ fonds de négociation différents pour certains secteurs de produits, pour les organisations de producteurs reconnues et leurs associations. Le soi-disant test d'efficacité prévu par certaines règles et les lignes directrices publiées par la Commission européenne à ce sujet soulèvent de nombreuses questi‐ ons et rendent le regroupement efficace de l'offre plus difficile que néces‐ saire pour les producteurs agricoles. Recommandation 6 : Les organes législatifs de l'UE devraient s'efforcer de rendre les règles relatives à la négociation des plafonds aussi simples que possible. Le point de départ pourrait être le régime laitier de l'UE. D. E. Conclusions de la Commission I 265 Sous la forme d'un double plafond, celui permet de regrouper jusqu'à un tiers de la production nationale et 3,5 % de la production communautaire. En outre, il ne prévoit pas de critère d'efficacité puisque l'objectif de re‐ groupement ne devrait pas être alourdi par des critères complexes de gains d'efficacité. Dans le même temps, il convient de veiller à ce que la concur‐ rence ne soit pas exclue et que l'exemption ne fasse pas l'objet d'abus. Déclaration de force obligatoire générale des règles d'organisation Considérations : L'instrument consistant à étendre les règles des organisa‐ tions agricoles reconnues aux non-membres et à collecter les contributions financières correspondantes auprès des non-membres est appliqué dans des proportions très différentes selon les pays. Lorsqu'il est appliqué, l'ef‐ ficacité de l'instrument est parfois considérée d'un œil critique. Il semble y avoir un lien avec l'existence d'une tradition de telles mesures dans le pays concerné. Recommandation 7 : L'utilisation de la F.Déclaration de force obliga‐ toire générale des règles d'organisation devrait rester à la discrétion du pays concerné afin de tenir compte des différentes traditions. Une évalua‐ tion détaillée de l'expérience acquise jusqu’à présent serait utile pour mieux évaluer l'efficacité de l'instrument et d'élaborer une approche basée sur les meilleures pratiques. Exemptions des ententes liées à la crise Considérations : Lors de la récente crise du lait, la Commission européen‐ ne a ouvert l'exemption supplémentaire en matière d'ententes prévue par la législation antitrust agricole de l'UE afin de permettre notamment aux as‐ sociations professionnelles une planification quantitative. Toutefois, cet instrument n’était pas pratique en raison de son délai et des restrictions existantes et n'a donc pas été utilisé dans l'UE. Recommandation 8 : Afin de surmonter les crises dans le secteur agri‐ cole, il pourrait être utile d'accorder aux producteurs agricoles une marge de manœuvre supplémentaire dans le cadre du droit des ententes. Toute‐ fois, ces possibilités devraient être développées par les organes législatifs de l'UE, tant en termes de durée que de contenu, de telle sorte qu'elles puissent être utilisées dans la pratique et contribuer ainsi à la gestion des F. G. Conclusions de la Commission I 266 crises. Au même temps, les acteurs du marché devraient gérer leur propre préparation à la crise et développer leurs relations les uns avec les autres de manière à pouvoir réagir rapidement en cas de crise du marché. Mesures contre les pratiques commerciales déloyales Considérations : La valeur ajoutée dans la chaîne alimentaire est inégale‐ ment répartie entre les différents niveaux de création de valeur dans cer‐ tains domaines des produits agricoles. Alors que certains pays utilisent l'instrument des associations professionnelles pour renforcer la coopérati‐ on au sein du secteur, la plupart des pays ne l'utilisent pas. Certains pays ont pris des mesures spécifiques pour lutter contre les pratiques commer‐ ciales déloyales dans la chaîne de valeur, tandis que d'autres soulignent l'applicabilité du droit général aux ces pratiques. Bien que les dispositions relatives à ce que l'on appelle « la réglementation des contrats » puissent constituer un bon point de départ au niveau de l'UE, leur utilisation pose des difficultés. En particulier, il peut être problématique pour les person‐ nes concernées de faire valoir leurs droits. Suite aux recommandations de la task force « marchés agricoles », la Commission européenne a lancé une « analyse d'impact » pour préparer une proposition sur la lutte contre les pratiques commerciales déloyales dans la chaîne alimentaire. Recommandation 9 : Comme dans d'autres secteurs de l'économie, les opérateurs de la chaîne alimentaire se font concurrence pour la valeur ajoutée qu'ils apportent. Toutefois, cette concurrence doit être aussi équita‐ ble que possible. Les organisations professionnelles peuvent ainsi servir de forums de dialogue et de coopération entre les acteurs concernés. Lorsque des pratiques déloyales concrètes sont identifiées, des mesures devraient être prises immédiatement. L'expérience acquise à ce jour avec l'instrument de régulation des contrats devrait être évaluée de manière plus approfondie afin que l'instrument puisse être utilisé de manière plus ciblée (par exemple, un engagement à l'échelle de l'UE en faveur des contrats ob‐ ligatoires). Lorsque des mesures supplémentaires sont prises au niveau de l'UE, elles devraient se limiter à fixer des normes minimales communes afin de prendre en compte des différentes situations dans les États mem‐ bres de l'UE. (Informations sur la Commission I : Président : Prof. Dr. Ru‐ dolf Mögele/Belgique ; Rapporteur général : Prof. em. Dr. Paul Richli / Suisse et Dr. Christian Busse / Allemagne. Le questionnaire et les rapports nationaux pour la Commission I ainsi que de plus amples informations sur H. Conclusions de la Commission I 267 le Congrès et le CEDR sont disponibles sur le site CEDR/www.cedr.org. Si vous avez des commentaires sur les conclusions de la Commission I, veuillez contacter le CEDR). Conclusions de la Commission I 268 Conclusions of Commission I Version anglaise – English version – Englische Version Exceptions from general anti-trust law Considerations: All countries which were reported on have a general antitrust law in place providing i.a. for the prohibition of cartels. Exemptions from anti-trust law for the agricultural sector are in general not laid down at constitutional level. As only some countries have enacted specific na‐ tional agricultural anti-trust rules the overall accepted EU agricultural antitrust provisions are of particular importance. In general there are no spe‐ cific anti-trust supervision authorities for the agricultural sector. The su‐ pervisory focus of the national competition authorities with regard to the agricultural sector is largely differing. In some countries comprehensive anti-trust procedures are taking place. From other countries only minor or even no such procedures were reported. The number of recognized agri‐ cultural organisations is also quite unequal, in particular as regards inter‐ branch-organisations. In several countries the recognized agricultural or‐ ganisations are listed in a public register Recommendation 1: In contrast with other economic areas the agricul‐ tural sector is characterized by natural and structural specificities justify‐ ing to provide for exemptions from the application of general anti-trust law. In EU law such exemptions have been in place since the beginning of the Common Agricultural Policy, often shaped along the lines of national examples. Due to the liberalization of the EU agricultural market these provisions are steadily gaining importance. The agricultural sector should make the best possible use of the existing exemptions. Without an ad‐ equate commitment of the agricultural sector it is not possible to reach the objective to develop European agriculture into a well-structured and com‐ petitive sector. Recommendation 2: In addition to the traditional agricultural coopera‐ tives the recognized agricultural organisations are of particular impor‐ tance. It is the Member States` and the EU`s task to stimulate the compre‐ hensive application of this instrument. To avoid distortions of competition and facilitate the cross-border cooperation in the agricultural sector exist‐ A. 269 ing differences in the application of the relevant provisions should be re‐ duced and the requirements should be harmonized. Lack of clarity in the provisions of agricultural anti-trust law at EU level Considerations: The provisions in EU agricultural anti-trust law are lack‐ ing clarity on a number of points concerning i.a. the scope of exemptions and the interaction of the relevant provisions. This has led to uncertainties and to a widely spread call for more clarity. The current situation hampers the desirable establishment of recognized agricultural organisations and their proper functioning; this also applies to other types of agricultural cooperation. Recommendation 3: EU legislators should draft EU agricultural antitrust law without ambiguity so that recognized agricultural organisations and other types of agricultural co-operation can pursue their activities in the context of the objectives of the Common Agricultural Policy with the greatest possible legal certainty. The request made by the Agricultural Markets Task Force in its report of November 2016 to provide with regard of all types of cooperation between producer holdings and their asso‐ ciations for the simplest and most consistent exemption possible from anti-trust law is supported. One may con-sider taking into account in this context matters such as animal welfare and environmental aspects, as ap‐ propriate. Interaction of national agricultural anti-trust law with EU agricultural anti-trust law Considerations: The interaction of national and EU agricultural anti-trust law needs further clarification. Instead of enacting national provisions na‐ tional law often simply refers to EU agricultural anti-trust law or requires it to be taken into account. Recommendation 4: National anti-trust law should complement the pro‐ visions of EU agricultural anti-trust law accordingly, as stated in ECJ`s ju‐ risprudence. Where EU agricultural anti-trust law does not lead to the ex‐ emption of cartels from national bans Member States should introduce ex‐ B. C. Conclusions of Commission I 270 plicitly such an exemption for reasons of legal clarity in their national an‐ ti-trust law. Joint marketing by agricultural holdings Considerations: The joint marketing of their products is a key characteris‐ tic of institution-ally formalized forms of cooperation between agricultural holdings. As far as EU agricultural anti-trust law currently prohibits pricefixing with regard to these forms of cooperation the relevant rules appear to be contradictory and inappropriate. Recommendation 5: EU legislators should amend EU provisions so as to clarify that the prohibition of price fixing does not apply to the fixing of a joint purchasing or selling price in the context of the marketing of prod‐ ucts by recognized agricultural organisations or by cooperatives. It should be irrelevant in that context whether the property of the products con‐ cerned is transferred by producer before their sale to recognized agricul‐ tural organisations or cooperatives. Quantitative limits for negotiations Considerations: EU agricultural anti-trust law sets out different quantita‐ tive limits for negotiations by recognized producer organisations and their associations in certain areas of production as well as a so-called efficiency test that is further specified in European Commission Guidelines. These provisions give rise to a number of questions and thereby render the ef‐ fective concentration of supply on the side of agricultural producers more difficult than necessary. Recommendation 6: EU legislators should endeavor to regulate the is‐ sue of quantitative limits for negotiations in the most practicable way. This could be achieved on the basis of the EU rules applicable in the dairy sec‐ tor. By way of setting a two-fold upper limit these rules allow concentrat‐ ing supply up to 1/3 of national production and 3.5 % of EU production. In addition they do not encompass an efficiency test as the objective to con‐ centrate supply should not be overburdened by the need to carry out com‐ plicated efficiency gain checks. At the same time it should be ensured that competition is not excluded and the exemption not be used abusively. D. E. Conclusions of Commission I 271 Extension of rules with regard to organisational rules Considerations: The instrument to extend the rules of recognized agricul‐ tural organisations to non-members and to collect financial contributions from non-members is used to a largely different extent country by country. Where the option is used its effectiveness is to a certain extent seen in a critical light. Its perception depends apparently on whether such measures have a certain tradition in the country concerned. Recommendation 7: The decision on whether to make use of the exten‐ sion of rules set by agricultural organisations should continue to lie in the discretion of the country concerned in order to take into account the differ‐ ent traditions. It would be sensible to thoroughly evaluate the experiences gained so far in order to be able to better judge the effectiveness of the in‐ strument and to elaborate an approach based on best practices. Crisis-related exemptions of cartels Considerations: During the latest milk crisis the European Commission activated the additional cartel exemption set out in EU agricultural antitrust law to allow in particular inter-branch organisations to carry out plan‐ ning of supply. However, due to the fact that this instrument is limited in time and subject to certain restrictions it turned out not to be practicable and was therefore not used in the EU. Recommendation 8: With a view to overcome crises in the agricultural sector it may be sensible to open up additional room for maneuver under anti-trust law to agricultural producers. However, both the duration and the material conditions for the application of such options should be de‐ fined by EU legislators in such a way that they can be used in practice and that they can contribute to solve the crises. At the same time operators should take their own crisis precautions and develop the relations among each other in such a way that they can react quickly should a market crisis occur. Measures against unfair trading practices Considerations: In some areas of agricultural production the added value generated with-in the agricultural food-chain is distributed quite unequally F. G. H. Conclusions of Commission I 272 between the various levels of the added value chain. While in some coun‐ tries the instrument of interbranch organisations is used to strengthen the cooperation within the chain this is not the case in the majority of coun‐ tries. Some countries have taken specific measures against unfair trading practices in the value added chain while others make reference to the ap‐ plication of general provisions against unfair trading practices. Although the provisions on the so-called regulation of contracts at EU level may be a good starting point, their application comes with difficulties. It can in particular be problematic for interested parties to enforce their rights. Fol‐ lowing the recommendations made by the Agricultural Market Task Force the European Commission has launched an "Impact Assessment" on the basis of which a pro-posal on how to tackle unfair trading practices in the agricultural food chain is intended to be prepared. Recommendation 9: As in other sectors economic operators in the agri‐ cultural food-chain also compete among each other for the added value. Competition, however, should be as fair as possible. Interbranch organisa‐ tions may in this context serve as forums for the dialogue and the coopera‐ tion between the actors involved. Where unfair practices are identified it should be possible to tackle them immediately. The experiences gained so far with the regulation of contracts should be evaluated in greater detail to be able to use the in-strument in a more targeted way (e.g. EU-wide obli‐ gation of written contracts). Should additional measures be taken at EU level they should be limited to setting common mini-mum standards tak‐ ing account of the different situations in the EU Member States. (Information regarding Commission I: President: Prof. Dr. Rudolf Mö‐ gele/Belgium; General Re-porters: Prof. em. Dr. Paul Richli/Switzerland and Dr. Christian Busse/Germany. The questionnaire and the national re‐ ports for Commission I as well as further information on the congress and the CEDR are available on the website of CEDR/www.cedr.org. For com‐ ments on the conclusions of Commission I please contact the CEDR.) Conclusions of Commission I 273 Schlussfolgerungen der Kommission I Version allemande – German version – Deutsche Version Ausnahmen vom allgemeinen Kartellrecht Erwägungen: In allen Ländern, über die berichtet wurde, gibt es ein allge‐ meines Kartellrecht unter anderem mit einem Kartellverbot. Ausnahmen vom Kartellrecht im Bereich der Landwirtschaft werden im Allgemeinen nicht auf Verfassungsebene angesprochen. Spezielles nationales Agrarkar‐ tellrecht ist nur in einigen Ländern vorhanden, so dass dem grundsätzlich allgemein akzeptierten EU-Agrarkartellrecht eine besondere Bedeutung zukommt. Generell bestehen keine speziellen Kartellaufsichtsbehörden für den Agrarbereich. Die allgemeinen staatlichen Kartellbehörden haben einen höchst unterschiedlichen Prüfblick auf den Agrarbereich. In einigen Ländern finden umfangreiche Verfahren statt. Aus anderen Ländern sind nur geringe bis keine Verfahren mitgeteilt worden. Die Zahl der anerkann‐ ten Agrarorganisationen ist ebenfalls ungleich verteilt, vor allem im Be‐ reich der Branchenverbände. In mehreren Ländern sind die anerkannten Agrarorganisationen in einem öffentlichen Register verzeichnet. Empfehlung 1: Der Landwirtschaftsbereich weist gegenüber anderen Wirtschaftsbereichen naturbedingte und strukturelle Besonderheiten auf, die es rechtfertigen, Ausnahmen vom allgemeinen Kartellrecht vorzuse‐ hen. Derartige Ausnahmen kennt das EU-Recht seit Beginn der Gemeinsa‐ men Agrarpolitik, die oftmals den Grundlinien nationaler Vorbilder nach‐ gebildet waren. Durch die Liberalisierung des EU-Agrarmarktes gewinnen diese Regelungen stetig an Bedeutung. Der Agrarsektor sollte die beste‐ henden Ausnahmeregelungen bestmöglich nutzen. Ohne ein ausreichendes Engagement des Agrarsektors kann das Ziel, die europäische Landwirt‐ schaft zu einem gut strukturierten und wettbewerbsfähigen Sektor zu ent‐ wickeln, nicht erreicht werden. Empfehlung 2: Neben den traditionellen landwirtschaftlichen Genos‐ senschaften sind die anerkannten Agrarorganisationen von besonderer Wichtigkeit. Den Mitgliedstaaten und der EU obliegt die Aufgabe, die er‐ forderlichen Anreize für eine umfängliche Anwendung dieses Instruments zu setzen. Um Wettbewerbsverzerrungen zu vermeiden und die grenzüber‐ A. 274 schreitende Zusammenarbeit im Agrarsektor zu erleichtern, sollten beste‐ hende Unterschiede bei der Anwendung der einschlägigen Bestimmungen abgebaut und die Anforderungen aneinander angeglichen werden. Unklarheiten der agrarkartellrechtlichen Regelungen auf EU-Ebene Erwägungen: Die agrarkartellrechtlichen Regelungen auf EU-Ebene wei‐ sen eine Reihe von klärungsbedürftigen Punkten auf, die unter anderem den Umfang der Freistellungen und das Verhältnis der Regelungen unter‐ einander betreffen. Dies hat zu Unsicherheiten und einem weitverbreiteten Ruf nach mehr Klarheit geführt. Der gegenwärtige Zustand erschwert die erwünschte Gründung von anerkannten Agrarorganisationen und deren gute Funktionsfähigkeit; dies trifft auch auf andere Formen landwirt‐ schaftlicher Zusammenarbeit zu. Empfehlung 3: Die rechtsetzenden Organe der EU sollten das Agrarkar‐ tellrecht der EU so eindeutig abfassen, dass anerkannte Agrarorganisatio‐ nen und andere Formen landwirtschaftlicher Zusammenarbeit ihren Tätig‐ keiten im Rahmen der Ziele der Gemeinsamen Agrarpolitik mit größtmög‐ licher Rechtssicherheit nachgehen können. Die Forderung der Task Force "Landwirtschaftliche Märkte" in ihrem Bericht vom November 2016, für alle Formen der Zusammenarbeit zwischen Erzeugerbetrieben und deren Zusammenschlüssen eine möglichst einfach und gleichartig gehaltene Kartellfreistellung zu regeln, wird unterstützt. In diesem Zusammenhang könnte überlegt werden, gegebenenfalls Materien wie etwa Tierwohl und Umweltaspekte zu berücksichtigen. Das Zusammenspiel zwischen nationalem Agrarkartellrecht und EU- Agrarkartell-recht Erwägungen: Das Zusammenspiel von nationalem und unionsrechtlichem Agrarkartellrecht bedarf weiterer Klärung. Anstatt eigenes nationales Recht zu setzen, wird oftmals im nationalen Recht nur auf das EU-Agrar‐ kartellrecht verwiesen oder dessen Berücksichtigung gefordert. Empfehlung 4: Das nationale Kartellrecht sollte das EU-Agrarkartell‐ recht entsprechend der Judikatur des EuGH sachgerecht ergänzen. Soweit das EU-Agrarkartellrecht nicht zu einer Befreiung von nationalen Kartell‐ verboten führt, sollten die Mitgliedstaaten aus Gründen der Rechtsklarheit B. C. Schlussfolgerungen der Kommission I 275 eine solche Befreiung ausdrücklich in ihrem nationalen Kartellrecht vorse‐ hen. Gemeinsame Vermarktung durch landwirtschaftliche Erzeugerbetriebe Erwägungen: Die gemeinsame Vermarktung ihrer Erzeugnisse ist ein We‐ sensmerkmal der institutionalisierten Formen der Zusammenarbeit von landwirtschaftlichen Erzeugerbe-trieben. Soweit das EU-Agrarkartellrecht gegenwärtig für diese Zusammenarbeit ein Preisbindungsverbot enthält, erscheinen diese Regelungen widersprüchlich und nicht sachgerecht. Empfehlung 5: Die rechtsetzenden Organe der EU sollten die EU-Rege‐ lungen um die Klarstellung ergänzen, dass sich das Preisbindungsverbot nicht auf die Festsetzung eines gemeinsamen Ankaufs- oder Verkaufsprei‐ ses im Rahmen der Vermarktung von Erzeugnissen durch anerkannte Agrarorganisationen oder durch Genossenschaften bezieht. Dabei sollte unerheblich sein, ob das Eigentum an den betreffenden Produkten vor dem Verkauf auf die anerkannte Agrarorganisation oder die Genossenschaft übergeht. Verhandlungsobergrenzen Erwägungen: Das EU-Agrarkartellrecht legt für anerkannte Erzeugerorga‐ nisationen und deren Vereinigungen unterschiedlich geregelten Verhand‐ lungsobergrenzen für bestimmte Erzeugnisbereiche fest. Der in einigen Vorschriften vorgesehene so genannte Effizienztest und die dazu ergange‐ nen Leitlinien der Europäischen Kommission werfen zahlreiche Fragen auf und gestalten dadurch die effektive Bündelung des Angebots seitens der landwirtschaftlichen Erzeuger schwieriger als erforderlich. Empfehlung 6: Die rechtsetzenden Organe der EU sollten auf eine mög‐ lichst einfach handhabbare Regelung für die Frage der Verhandlungsober‐ grenzen hinwirken. Ausgangspunkt dafür könnte die EU-Regelung im Milchbereich sein. Diese gestattet in Form einer doppelten Grenze die Bündelung bis zu einem Drittel der nationalen Produktion und 3,5 Prozent der EU-Produktion. Zudem kennt sie keinen Effizienztest, da das Ziel der Bündelung nicht mit komplizierten Effizienzgewinnprüfungen belastet werden sollte. Zugleich ist sicherzustellen, dass der Wettbewerb nicht aus‐ D. E. Schlussfolgerungen der Kommission I 276 geschlossen wird und die Freistellung keine missbräuchliche Nutzung er‐ fährt. Allgemeinverbindlichkeitserklärung von Organisationsregeln Erwägungen: Das Instrument der Ausdehnung von Regeln anerkannter Agrarorganisationen auf Nichtmitglieder und der Erhebung entsprechen‐ der Finanzbeiträge von Nichtmitgliedern wird in den einzelnen Ländern in einem sehr unterschiedlichen Umfang angewendet. Soweit eine Anwen‐ dung erfolgt, wird die Effektivität des Instruments teilweise kritisch gese‐ hen. Offenbar besteht ein Zusammenhang damit, ob derartige Maßnahmen eine Tradition in dem jeweiligen Land besitzen. Empfehlung 7: Die Nutzung der Allgemeinverbindlichkeitserklärung von Organisations-regeln sollte wie bislang im Ermessen des jeweiligen Landes liegen, um den unterschiedlichen Traditionen Rechnung zu tragen. Eine eingehende Evaluierung der bislang gewonnenen Erfahrungen würde sinnvoll sein, um die Wirksamkeit des Instruments besser beurteilen zu können und einen best-practice-Ansatz zu erarbeiten. Krisenbedingte Kartellfreistellungen Erwägungen: In der jüngsten Milchkrise hat die Europäische Kommission die im EU-Agrarkartellrecht vorgesehene zusätzliche Kartellfreistellung eröffnet, um vor allem Branchenverbänden eine Mengenplanung zu ge‐ statten. Dieses Instrument war jedoch auf Grund seiner Befristung und der vorhandenen Restriktionen nicht praxistauglich und wurde daher in der EU nicht genutzt. Empfehlung 8: Zur Überwindung von Krisen im Agrarbereich kann es sinnvoll sein, den landwirtschaftlichen Erzeugern zusätzlichen kartell‐ rechtlichen Spielraum einzuräumen. Diese Möglichkeiten sollten jedoch von den rechtsetzenden Organen der EU sowohl hinsichtlich der Geltungs‐ dauer als auch inhaltlich so ausgestaltet werden, dass sie in der Praxis ge‐ nutzt werden können und damit zur Krisenbewältigung beitragen können. Zugleich sollten die Marktbeteiligten eine eigene Krisenvorsorge betrei‐ ben und ihre Beziehungen zueinander derart ausgestalten, dass sie im Falle einer Marktkrise schnell reagiert können. F. G. Schlussfolgerungen der Kommission I 277 Maßnahmen gegen unfaire Handelspraktiken Erwägungen: Die Wertzuwächse innerhalb der Nahrungsmittelkette sind in einigen Bereichen landwirtschaftlicher Erzeugnisse ungleich zwischen den verschiedenen Ebenen der Wertschöpfung verteilt. Während in eini‐ gen Ländern das Instrument des Branchenverbandes genutzt wird, um die Kooperation innerhalb der Branche zu stärken, wird es in den meisten Ländern nicht genutzt. Einige Länder haben spezifische Maßnahmen ge‐ gen unfaire Handelspraktiken innerhalb der Wertschöpfungskette ergrif‐ fen, während andere auf die Anwendbarkeit des allgemeinen Rechts gegen unlautere Handelspraktiken verweisen. Obwohl die Bestimmungen zur so genannten Vertragsregulierung auf EU-Ebene einen guten Ansatzpunkt bilden könnten, ist ihre Nutzung jedoch mit Schwierigkeiten verbunden. Insbesondere kann es für die Betroffenen problematisch sein, ihre Rechte durchzusetzen. Die Europäische Kommission hat im Anschluss an die Empfehlungen der Task Force "Landwirtschaftliche Märkte" ein "Impact Assessment" begonnen, auf dessen Grundlage ein Vorschlag über die Be‐ kämpfung unlauterer Handelspraktiken in der Lebensmittelkette vorberei‐ tet werden soll. Empfehlung 9: Wie in anderen Wirtschaftsbereichen stehen auch in der Lebensmittelkette die Marktbeteiligten in einem Wettbewerb untereinan‐ der um die erzielten Wertzuwächse. Dieser Wettbewerb sollte jedoch so fair wie möglich ablaufen. Die Branchenverbände können insofern als Fo‐ ren für den Dialog und die Kooperation der beteiligten Akteure dienen. Soweit konkrete unfaire Praktiken festgestellt werden, sollte unverzüglich dagegen vorgegangen werden können. Die bisherigen Erfahrungen mit dem Instrument der Vertragsregulierung sind tiefgehender zu evaluieren, um das Instrument gezielter einsetzen zu können (beispielsweise eine EUweite Verpflichtung zu zwingenden Verträgen). Soweit zusätzliche Maß‐ nahmen auf EU-Ebene ergriffen werden, sollten sie sich auf die Festle‐ gung gemeinsamer Mindeststandards beschränken, um dadurch den unter‐ schiedlichen Situationen in den EU-Mitgliedstaaten Rechnung zu tragen. (Information zur Kommission I: Präsident: Prof. Dr. Rudolf Mögele/ Belgien; Generalberichterstatter: Prof. em. Dr. Paul Richli/Schweiz und Dr. Christian Busse/Deutschland. Der Fragebogen und die nationalen Be‐ richte für die Kommission I sowie weitere Informationen zum Kongress und zum CEDR sind auf der Internetseite des CEDR/www.cedr.org erhält‐ lich. Soweit Sie Anmerkungen zu den Schlussfolgerungen der Kommissi‐ on I haben, wenden Sie sich bitte an den CEDR.) H. Schlussfolgerungen der Kommission I 278 III. Commission II – Kommission II President: Prof. Dr. Norbert Olszak, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne General Reporter: Dr. Luc Bodiguel, Université de Nantes Freins et moteurs juridiques nationaux à la compétitivité de l’agricul‐ ture Agricultural competitiveness: Drivers and obstacles in national law Nationale rechtliche treibende Kräfte und Hemmschuhe landwirt‐ schaftlicher Wettbewerbsfähigkeit I Questionnaires – Fragebogen II Rapport général – General Report – Generalbericht III Conclusions de la Commission II – Conclusions of Commission II – Schlussfolgerungen der Kommission II Questionnaires – Fragebogen – Commission II – Kommission II Version française – French version – Französische Version Version anglaise – English version – Englische Version Version allemande – German version – Deutsche Version Questionnaire de la Commission II – Questionnaire of Commission II – Fragebogen der Kommission II Questions – Fragen Version française – French version – Französische Version Question 1 – Les moteurs : quelles sont les règles de droit nationales favorables à la compétitivité de l’agriculture nationale ? Question 2 – Les freins : quelles sont les règles de droit nationales défavorables à la compétitivité de l’agriculture nationale ? Pour répondre à ces deux questions, vous pouvez explorer les différents champs de droit listés ci-dessous. Cette liste n’est ni limitative, ni exhaus‐ tive. Ne doivent faire l’objet de développements que les éléments perti‐ nents au vu du thème. 1. Les règles juridiques relatives au foncier : a) Accès à la terre (baux, propriété…) b) Accès à la production (par ex. quotas…) et droit d’exploiter (par ex. contrôle administratif) 2. Les règles juridiques relatives aux taxes (fiscalité) a) Niveau d'imposition des revenus b) Régime éventuel de simplification d'imposition des revenus c) Traitement des plus-values d) Traitement de la TVA 3. Les règles juridiques relatives à l’exploitant agricole a) Assurances sociales 4. Les règles juridiques relatives aux salariés agricoles a) Conditions prévues dans le contrat de travail (durée, salaire…) b) Embauche de salariés étrangers, membres de l’UE ou extérieurs à l’UE c) Représentation collective et syndicalisme d) Conventions collectives e) Cotisations et taxes A. 283 5. Les règles juridiques relatives à l’exploitation agricole a) Transmission à titre gratuit (succession) et cession de l'exploitation b) Statut de l’exploitation (sociétés…) 6. Les règles juridiques relatives à l'environnement a) Lutte contre les pollutions (Installations classées, nitrates, eau, sol…) b) Gestion de l’eau (prélèvements, eau potable…) c) Protection de la biodiversité d) Protection du voisinage 7. Les règles juridiques relatives à la commercialisation des produits a) Signes distinctifs de qualité b) Droit interne de la concurrence c) Groupements de producteurs et commercialisation 8. Les règles juridiques relatives à la mise en œuvre de la PAC a) Modalités d’attribution des aides du premier pilier (couplage des productions, calcul des surfaces…) b) Particularités dans la mise en œuvre des aides du premier pilier liée à l’écologisation (verdissement : pratiques agricoles bénéfiques pour le climat et l'environnement) c) Choix et modalités d’attribution des aides du second pilier Version anglaise – English version – Englische Version Question 1 – Drivers: Which national provisions promote the com-petitiveness of na‐ tional agriculture? Question 2 – Obstacles: Which national provisions reduce the com-petitiveness of na‐ tional agriculture? You can answer these two questions by examining the different areas of law listed below. The list is neither restrictive nor exhaustive. However, your contribution should directly refer to the subject. 1. Legal provisions on land and property: a) Access to land (leases, property rights...) b) Access to production (e.g., quotas ...) and exploitation rights (e.g., administrative controls) 2. Legal provisions on taxes a) Level of income taxation b) Possible simplification of income taxation B. Questions – Fragen 284 c) Handling of added values d) VAT regime 3. Legal provisions concerning the farm operator a) Social security 4. Legal provisions concerning agricultural workers a) Working conditions provided by contract (duration, wage ...) b) Recruitment of migrant European and non-European workers c) Employee organisations and trade unions d) Collective employment agreements e) Social security contributions and taxes 5. Legal provisions concerning the agricultural business a) Free transfer (inheritance) and assignment of the business b) Legal status of the business (companies ...) 6. Environmental regulations a) Measures to combat pollution (certification of facilities, nitrates, water, soil ...) b) Water management (extraction, drinking water ...) c) Protection of biodiversity d) Protection of the neighbourhood 7. Legal provisions on product marketing a) Marks of quality b) National competition law c) Producer associations and marketing 8. Legal provisions for implementing the CAP a) Allocation criteria for subsidies under the first pillar (coupled to production, calculation of eligible hectares ...) b) Specific provisions relating to eco-conditionality under the first pillar (greening: agricultural practices beneficial for the climate and the environment) c) Selection of options and detailed criteria for the granting of subsi‐ dies under the second pillar Version allemande – German version – Deutsche Version Frage 1 – Treibende Kräfte: Welche nationalen Bestimmungen för-dern die Wettbe‐ werbsfähigkeit der nationalen Landwirtschaft? Frage 2 – Hemmschuhe: Welche nationalen Bestimmungen mindern die Wettbe‐ werbsfähigkeit der nationalen Landwirtschaft? C. Questions – Fragen 285 Um diese zwei Fragen zu beantworten, können Sie die verschiedenen, nachfolgend aufgeführten Rechtsgebiete untersuchen. Die Aufzählung ist weder limitierend, noch abschließend. Gegenstand der Ausführungen soll‐ ten allerdings nur Punkte sein, welche einen direkten Bezug zum Thema aufweisen. 1. Rechtliche Bestimmungen zu Grund und Boden: a) Zugang zum Land (Pacht, Eigentum …) b) Zugang zu Produktion (z.B. Quoten …) und Bewirtschaftungsrech‐ te (z.B. administrative Kontrollen) 2. Rechtliche Bestimmungen zu Steuern a) Höhe der Einkommensbesteuerung b) Allfällige Vereinfachungen bei der Einkommensbesteuerung c) Behandlung der Mehrwerte d) Mehrwertsteuerregime 3. Rechtliche Bestimmungen zum landwirtschaftlichen Bewirtschafter a) Sozialversicherung 4. Rechtliche Bestimmungen zu landwirtschaftlichen Arbeitnehmern a) Vertraglich vorgesehene Arbeitsbedingungen (Dauer, Lohn …) b) Einstellung ausländischer europäischer und außereuropäischer Ar‐ beitskräfte c) Arbeitnehmerorganisation und Gewerkschaften d) Gesamtarbeitsverträge e) Sozialbeiträge und Steuern 5. Rechtliche Bestimmungen zum landwirtschaftlichen Betrieb a) Unentgeltlicher Übergang (Erbschaft) und Abtretung des Betriebs b) Rechtlicher Status des Betriebs (Gesellschaften …) 6. Umweltrechtliche Bestimmungen a) Kampf gegen die Verschmutzung (zertifizierte Anlagen, Nitrat, Wasser, Boden …) b) Wassermanagement (Entnahmen, Trinkwasser …) c) Schutz der Biodiversität d) Schutz der Nachbarschaft 7. Rechtliche Bestimmungen zur Produktevermarktung a) Qualitative Unterscheidungskriterien b) Nationales Wettbewerbsrecht c) Produzentenvereinigungen und Vermarktung 8. Rechtliche Bestimmungen zur Umsetzung der GAP Questions – Fragen 286 a) Zuteilungskriterien der Beihilfen der ersten Säule (Koppelung an die Produktion, Berechnung der Flächen …) b) Besonderheiten bei der Bereitstellung von Öko-Beiträgen der ers‐ ten Säule (Greening: dem Klima- und Umweltschutz förderliche Landbewirtschaftungsmethoden) c) Auswahl und Kriterien der Gewährung von Beiträgen der zweiten Säule Questions – Fragen 287 Rapport général de la Commission II – General Report of Commission II – Generalbericht der Kommission II Version française – French version – Französische Version Version anglaise – English version – Englische Version Version allemande – German version – Deutsche Version Rapport général de la Commission II Version française – French version – Französische Version Dr. Luc Bodiguel Université de Nantes Introduction Le débat sur la compétitivité de nos entreprises, et plus particulièrement de nos entreprises agricoles, est un sujet récurrent. Il s’impose quotidien‐ nement, comme un mantra, dans la bouche de nos hommes et femmes po‐ litiques, dans les écritures et les paroles des médias. Il imprègne les dis‐ cussions – parfois houleuses – de nos tablées familiales ou amicales. Com‐ me une résurgence de notre passé de chasseurs poussés par la nécessité, de guerriers luttant pour la survie de son espèce, de sa tribu, de son groupe, de son réseau, il ouvre la porte à un vocabulaire belliqueux et manichéen : gagnants contre perdants, une autre façon de parler des vivants contre les morts ; dominants (les grands) contre soumis (les petits), une conception autoritaire du pouvoir et de la légitimité. Ce vocabulaire est associé à des valeurs violentes que l’on retrouve dans le monde de l’entreprise : agresser (une stratégie) pour ne pas l’être ; prendre (des participations) pour ne pas être possédé ou dépossédé ; étendre son empire (économique) pour contrer les volontés expansionnistes des autres… Toutefois, le débat sur la compé‐ titivité ouvre aussi les portes à un autre paradigme, celui du dépassement de soi, du courage (voire de l’obsession ou de la folie), de l’innovation par le beau et/ou la qualité. En ce sens, les décathloniens et les lanceurs à la perche sont des compétiteurs, tout comme certains chefs d’entreprise qui inventent de nouveaux services et produits. Le débat sur la compétition débouche ainsi sur deux postures, celle du guerrier et celle de l’innovateur (on aurait pu aussi l’appeler l’illuminé). Elles ne s’opposent pas. Parfois même, elles se juxtaposent : guerrier et il‐ luminé à la fois. Elles ont en commun un but ultime : être le meilleur ou parmi les meilleurs. En sport, il faut courir plus vite, lancer plus loin, viser plus juste que les autres. En économie, il faut avoir les coûts les plus bas et/ou innover par la qualité et le service pour avoir sa place sur le marché I. 291 ou le dominer. Les spécialistes parlent alors de compétitivité par les coûts ou hors coûts. Ainsi, un chef d’exploitation agricole peut choisir d’agir suivant deux voies, deux segments (de marché), pour être compétitif : di‐ minuer au maximum ses charges pour obtenir un produit à bas prix et/ou dépasser les frontières de l’agronomie standardisée en produisant des ali‐ ments de qualité, bons, sains, respectueux de l’environnement naturel et humain. Pris par ce besoin d’être le meilleur, le guerrier, comme l’innovateur, peuvent avoir la tentation de ne pas faire attention aux moyens utilisés pour arriver à leurs fins. En sport, cela s’appelle le dopage ; en économie, on parlera d’entente, d’abus de position, de pratiques déloyales, de fraudes et tromperies. En d’autres termes, en économie, on parlera… de droit, principalement de ce droit dit « économique » qui vise à réguler les mar‐ chés et les rapports entre les acteurs économiques, dont le droit de la con‐ currence constitue le pilier central (Commission 1 du XXIXe Congrès du CEDR). Toutefois, les compétiteurs ont aussi à se frotter à d’autres familles de droit : par exemple, dans le monde économique, des règles qui permettent de faire naitre et vivre une entreprise, de la céder, de la transmettre, de la soutenir matériellement et financièrement, des règles qui concernent le tra‐ vail, celui de l’entrepreneur comme celui de ses salariés, celles relatives à son environnement naturel (biodiversité, eau…) ou social (voisinage, ur‐ banisme, fiscalité…), ainsi que celles visant les produits ou services (nor‐ mes de qualité, d’identification, de sécurité, de responsabilité…). Les agriculteurs, comme les autres compétiteurs, doivent jouer avec cette partition juridique, variable selon les pays, dans laquelle ont trouve des éléments spécifiques qui méritent d’être soulignés. Pour naitre et se développer, l’entreprise agricole a notamment souvent besoin de terres et devra se plier aux règles juridiques organisant l’accès au foncier agricole (baux, propriété, urbanisme, aménagement). Il lui faudra aussi parfois re‐ specter des procédures « administratives » (droit d’exploiter, installations classées, protection de l’eau et de la biodiversité, contingentement/quotas de production ou de commercialisation, travail agricole, fiscalité), des règles liées à sa constitution (sociétés à objet agricole, statut d’entrepre‐ neur ou d’entreprise) ou à sa transmission (successions agricoles). Le dé‐ veloppement de l’agriculture est aussi particulièrement dépendant d’une politique d’aides publiques, principalement organisée au sein de l’Union européenne (UE), par la politique agricole commune (PAC). Enfin, les produits agricoles font l’objet de réglementations spécifiques relatives à Rapport général de la Commission II 292 leur commercialisation et à leur qualité (signes distinctifs, groupements de producteurs). Il est facile de penser que toutes ces règles constituent des contraintes pour l’entreprise et qu’elles empêchent l’expression de chaque compéti‐ teur. Certains vont jusqu’à promouvoir l’idée qu’il faut les supprimer. Pourtant, il n’est point de jeu social qui ne fonctionne sans règle. Même la jungle a ses codes (ne serait-ce que biologiques), sinon le prédateur le plus fort finit seul, sans concurrent, ni proie. Assurer la compétition sur les marchés passe donc par l’établissement d’un ensemble de codes, de règles de droit, permettant à chaque compéti‐ teur d’agir dans un environnement le plus sécurisé possible. Il suffit d’imaginer un coureur qui ne saurait à l’avance quels types de piste, d’obstacles, de distance, de position de départ… pour comprendre que son entrainement sera rendu beaucoup plus difficile dans ces conditions. En d’autres termes, la règle peut être un moteur de compétitivité en ce qu’elle donne à tous un terrain de rencontre stable et connu de tous.1 Elle peut aussi être un moteur lorsqu’elle favorise directement l’entre‐ prise, par le biais d’aides publiques, d’avantage matériel ou de facilitations administratives. Tel est notamment l’objectif de la politique agricole com‐ mune. Toutefois, les règles peuvent aussi constituer des obstacles à la compéti‐ tivité. C’est le cas si une entreprise doit supporter une règle qui augmente le coût de production final ou qui empêche d’accéder à un marché alors que ses concurrents - les compétiteurs qui sont sur la même gamme de produit et sur le même marché - n’ont pas à appliquer une règle aussi re‐ strictive. Il est cependant le plus souvent impossible de trancher clairement sur les effets du droit en matière de compétitivité, tant il est difficile de con‐ sidérer l’ensemble des facteurs qui permettent une comparaison objective. C’est ce que nous apprend la lecture des douze rapports nationaux -Alle‐ magne, Belgique, Bulgarie, Espagne (2 rapports), France, Hongrie, Pays- Bas, Pologne, Roumanie, Royaume-Uni, Slovaquie - présentés dans la Commission II du XXIXe congrès du CEDR en septembre 2017 à Lille2. Au regard de ces travaux, il nous apparait en effet impossible de classer les règles de droit dans les catégories « freins » ou « moteur » de compéti‐ 1 Pour autant, le terrain juridique n’est jamais neutre. Il porte des valeurs, souvent contradictoires, qui peuvent favoriser certains. 2 Ces rapports sont disponibles sur le site du CEDR : URL : http://www.cedr.org/. Rapport général de la Commission II 293 tivité pour deux raisons : d’une part parce que, comme nous l’avons écrit précédemment, la notion de compétitivité est complexe et que le droit ré‐ pond à cette complexité (1) ; d’autre part, parce que les branches de droit exposées par les rapporteurs nationaux peuvent être à la fois des freins et des moteurs de compétitivité (2). Ce seront les deux fils rouges qui guide‐ ront nos réflexions. Un droit au service d’une compétitivité complexe Comme le montrent les rapports nationaux, le droit répond aux deux pos‐ tures de la compétitivité : le guerrier et l’innovateur. L’agriculteur « guerrier » tient à sa disposition nombre de moteurs juri‐ diques ayant pour objet ou pour effet d’abaisser ses coûts de production directement ou indirectement, favorisant ainsi sa compétitivité. Au premier rang de ces moteurs, se placent les exemptions ou spécifici‐ tés fiscales (impôts sur le revenu, TVA, taxe foncière, taxe sur le gasoil…), relevées dans la majorité des contributions (notamment rapports allemand, belge, français, hollandais, hongrois, polonais, roumain, et du Royaume-Uni), ainsi que les aides publiques en général, notamment celles visant la petite et moyenne agriculture (rapport allemand), ou les jeunes agriculteurs (rapport belge), ou les échanges de parcelles (rapport hollan‐ dais). Au second rang, nous trouvons les facilitations structurelles et fonciè‐ res : par exemple les sociétés, autorisant certains contournements face à des réglementations jugées trop rigides (voir rapport belge et français) ; ou les baux ruraux protecteurs de l’exploitation et qui évitent de devoir ache‐ ter un foncier de plus en plus cher en raison des mouvements de concen‐ tration et de pression urbaine (voir rapports belge, espagnol français, hol‐ landais et roumain) ; ou encore l’adaptation du droit des successions pour éviter le morcellement ou la fragmentation des exploitations agricoles lors des transmissions (effet de hachoir des partages successoraux en raison de l’application du principe d’égalité) avec le droit de préférence ou de prio‐ rité dans la succession (rapports belge, français, hollandais, hongrois, slovaque). Mentionnons aussi à ce titre les règles de droit organisant l’ac‐ cès à la propriété privée en Roumanie ou en Bulgarie par exemple ou les facilitations d’aménagement/remembrement ou d’échange de parcelles (rapport belge et hollandais) et les exonérations de permis de construire (rapport belge). A. Rapport général de la Commission II 294 Les tentatives de régulations des marchés forment la troisième catégorie de moteurs de compétitivité mentionnés par les rapporteurs. Sont notam‐ ment débattues les questions concernant la lutte contre les pratiques dé‐ loyales, le développement des coopératives ou des organisations des pro‐ ducteurs (rapports belge, français et polonais), même si l’efficacité de ces derniers reste limitée en raison du droit de la concurrence de l’UE (rapport français). Les garanties et assurances constituent aussi des outils de développe‐ ment de la compétitivité : par exemple, les indemnisations en cas de dégâts aux cultures ou de calamités agricoles (rapports allemand et belge) ou les assurances favorables fournies par les coopératives à leurs coopéra‐ teurs (rapport allemand). L’ensemble de ces moteurs de compétitivité peut créer des distorsions entre les pays membres de l’UE lorsque les droits créent un avantage dans un pays alors que les autres n’en bénéficient pas. L’exemple le plus frap‐ pant en la matière est le dumping fiscal ou social dont il est question nota‐ mment dans les rapports allemand, français, belge, roumain et du britanni‐ que. Notons toutefois que cette distorsion de compétitivité est le plus sou‐ vent révélée par ceux qui ne bénéficient pas de l’avantage et qui qualifient leur propre droit de frein à la mobilité. L’absence de législation spéciale en Hongrie concernant les successions en agriculture alors que d’autres pays bénéficient d’un droit spécial de préférence constitue, peut être de façon moins évidente ou plus indirecte, une forme de distorsion. L’agriculteur « innovateur » a lui aussi des instruments juridiques qui soutiennent sa compétitivité : Bien sûr, nous pouvons mentionner les signes de qualités et les aides à l’investissement de la PAC étudiés dans certains rapports (rapports belge, hongrois, polonais), mais sont aussi concernés d’autres outils juridiques auxquels on ne pense pas au premier abord. Appuyons nous sur le rapport belge pour développer cette idée. Selon ce dernier, « certaines évolutions empêchent de limiter l’examen de la compétitivité sous le seul prisme de la rentabilité et du prix. L’activité agricole met en jeu des facteurs comme l’environnement, les consommateurs, les citoyens en tant que contribuab‐ les et la société civile. Dès lors, la compétitivité dans le secteur agricole est nécessairement fonction de ces différents facteurs, plutôt difficiles à objectiver. L’activité agricole, malgré sa fonction nourricière première, ne peut pas se permettre de gaspiller les ressources sous peine de voir sa pro‐ ductivité chuter. » Il faut sans doute pousser cette idée un peu plus loin : si ces nouveaux facteurs influent sur la compétitivité, ce n’est pas seulement Rapport général de la Commission II 295 parce qu’il existe un risque à ne pas les prendre en compte mais parce qu’ils permettent à l’agriculteur « guerrier » de changer de posture pour innover : l’environnement ou la santé ne sont plus alors conçus comme des facteurs limitants mais comme des moyens pour être en meilleure po‐ sition sur le marché. En ce sens, l’ensemble des normes environnementa‐ les (installations classées, protection de l’eau, phytosanitaire, nitrates, éro‐ sion des sols, éléments topographiques…) ou sanitaires détaillés par plu‐ sieurs rapporteurs (rapports belge et roumain par ex.), deviennent des pré‐ textes – certes rudes et parfois dévastateurs - à améliorer sa compétitivité ; et tous les soutiens publiques, politique agricole en tête, qui soutiennent cette transition (rapports belge, bulgare et britannique) constituent des mo‐ teurs pour l’innovation en agriculture. Notons toutefois, que tous les rapporteurs ne semblent pas s’accorder avec cette perspective, considérant qu’il faut distinguer la compétitivité des buts environnementaux (rapports allemand et polonais) et que les nor‐ mes sanitaires et environnementales s’analysent plus comme des coûts supplémentaires (rapport français), et par conséquent comme des freins à la compétitivité de l’agriculteur et de l’entreprise agricole. Cette contradiction (ce débat) s’explique sans doute par le caractère am‐ bivalent du droit en matière de compétitivité. Un droit aux effets de compétitivité ambivalents L’hypothèse, ici, est qu’il est très probable que la plupart des règles puis‐ sent constituer à la fois un moteur et un obstacle à la compétitivité. Nous chercherons, ici, à comprendre les facteurs conduisant à cette ambivalence et non pas à exposer les freins et les moteurs juridiques discutés dans les rapports nationaux. Le premier de ces facteurs est temporel : D’une part, les effets de compétitivité peuvent évoluer dans le temps parce que le droit peut changer. Ainsi, la législation européenne a long‐ temps protégé les échanges commerciaux par son intervention sur les prix, mais à partir de la réforme Mc Sharry (1992), les agriculteurs des Etats membres ont été contraints à des efforts de compétitivité et des distorsions de compétition ont pu apparaitre entre eux (rapport français). D’autre part, les effets de compétitivité peuvent évoluer dans le temps alors que le droit peut durer plus longtemps. Ainsi, si le régime juridique du bail rural est originellement un moteur de développement pour les en‐ B. Rapport général de la Commission II 296 treprises agricoles puisqu’il permet d’acquérir à un prix modique ou rai‐ sonnable un titre sur la terre sans payer cette dernière, il conduit au‐ jourd’hui au désengagement de certains propriétaires. C’est ce que le rap‐ porteur hollandais qualifie de « dilemme des baux ruraux ». Il conclut d’ailleurs à la nécessité de réformer les baux ruraux tout en reconnaissant qu’il s’agit d’un véritable « bourbier ». L’échec pratique de la réforme française instaurant le bail cessible montre en outre que les considérations de compétitivité sont concurrencées par des éléments plus sociologiques. Le second facteur d’ambivalence du droit en matière de compétitivité est géographique : Comme le disent les rapporteurs belges en d’autres termes, ce qui est un moteur interne peut être considéré comme un frein au niveau UE ou mon‐ dial (par ex. dans le domaine de la location de biens agricoles). Ainsi, les aides du second pilier de la PAC peuvent être un moteur du point de vue global, européen, mais certains pays peuvent ne pas pouvoir s’en servir en raison de l’indisponibilité de fonds pour cofinancer ces mesures (rapport slovaque). Le moteur se transforme alors en une discrimination potentiel‐ le. En outre, les caractéristiques constitutionnelles des pays peuvent faire bouger les lignes de la distorsion de compétitivité, du supra à l’intra-natio‐ nal. Ainsi les rapporteurs espagnols rappellent l’existence de 17 commu‐ nautés autonomes et donc de 17 régimes agricoles différents, ce qui abou‐ tit à « une dispersion législative agricole et à des répercussions très négati‐ ves pour le secteur agraire » (voir aussi rapport allemand en ce sens : chaque länder a la responsabilité de sa politique agricole). Enfin - évidence qu’il faut développer - des choix nationaux peuvent conduire à des distorsions. C’est le cas en Pologne en raison des problè‐ mes administratifs de distribution des aides publiques ; ou en Slovaquie du fait de l’inorganisation institutionnelle et de problèmes de communication avec la Commission européenne. Les distorsions apparaissent aussi lorsque les pays empilent les normes, provoquant une overdose législative (rapport français sur l’agriculteur actif par ex.). La transcription des règles de l’UE illustre peut-être encore mieux cette situation : comme l’ont souli‐ gné les rapporteurs allemand (notamment à propos de la taxation du die‐ sel), belges et français, il existe des écarts de compétitivité dû aux marges de manœuvre des Etats membres dans la mise en œuvre des politiques de l’UE et les pays qui choisissent d’augmenter les niveaux de protection notamment dans les domaines environnementaux, risquent de porter att‐ einte à la compétitivité de leurs exploitations agricoles. Pour certains (rap‐ Rapport général de la Commission II 297 ports français et allemand), la solution serait de rester au niveau des nor‐ mes minimales de Bruxelles, ce qui pose la question de l’effet utile de la subsidiarité. Le troisième facteur de fluctuation du droit en matière de compétitivité est affectif : L’effet de la règle de droit sur la compétitivité des entreprises agricoles est en effet souvent apprécié en fonction d’un ressenti, d’une expérience, voire d’une conception politique du rôle du droit dans l’économie. Ainsi, la multiplication des règles de droit (l’inflation législative) serait systématiquement un obstacle à la compétitivité. De même, la complexité du droit ou l’existence de procédures administratives strictes et longues serait invariablement un frein à la compétitivité, par exemple en matière d’aménagement et de gestion foncière (rapport français à propos du con‐ trôle des structures ou rapport belge sur le droit de préemption de la région wallonne). Il en serait de même dans le cas d’intervention d’organisme chargé d’une mission de service publique (rapport français à propos des SAFER). Pourtant, à la lecture des rapports, on se rend compte que ce qui est un frein pour l’un, peut être un moteur pour l’autre. Par exemple, les rappor‐ teurs hongrois pointent l’absence de règles spéciales pour l’entreprise agri‐ cole comme un frein à la compétitivité alors que les rapporteurs français disent parfois qu’il y a trop de règles en général. De même, le rapport rou‐ main montre combien la faiblesse des rémunérations (légales) pousse les salariés à partir alors que d’autres rapports (allemand, français) montrent que le surcout (légal) des rémunérations pousse les entreprises à partir (quand elles le peuvent). Conclusion Ces constats n’ont pas pour objet de critiquer les positionnements des uns ou des autres, mais de montrer combien il est difficile de comparer et d’apprécier l’impact du droit sur la compétitivité. Le problème ne vient pas de l’analyse détaillée de chaque dispositif, mais de l’absence de données permettant de procéder à une comparaison et à une évaluation. Par exemple, les données sur le coût du travail utilisé‐ es sont intéressantes mais autorisent-elles vraiment des comparaisons et des conclusions en droit ? On ne peut qu’appeler au développement de méthodologies de droit comparé adaptée à la question de la compétitivité II. Rapport général de la Commission II 298 en agriculture. Ces recherches devraient permettre de diminuer le facteur affectif dans l’appréciation du rôle du droit en matière de compétitivité. Diminuer les effets du facteur géographique est à la fois simple et sans doute illusoire, car il touche de près à la question de la souveraineté natio‐ nale. Il nous faut ici sans doute recommander une harmonisation europé‐ enne, au moins dans le domaine fiscal et social. A défaut, le moins disant risque d’être toujours le plus compétitif. Toutefois, l’harmonisation ellemême peut avoir le défaut de promouvoir des règles juridiques ne garan‐ tissant qu’une protection minimale. Quant au facteur temporel, il est inhérent au droit et au fonctionnement des marchés. Tout évolue et il n’est pas certain que ce qui marche un jour, marche le jour d’après. Tout au plus, peut-on suggérer de tenter d’adapter plus rapidement le droit aux exigences de marché. Cependant, il ne faut pas prescrire la vitesse à tout prix. Un principe de prudence doit être appli‐ qué de manière à assurer stabilité du droit et le besoin de sécurité des opé‐ rateurs, et d’éviter des lois opportunistes ou des fausses « bonnes lois ». Rapport général de la Commission II 299 General Report of Commission II Version anglaise – English version – Englische Version Dr. Luc Bodiguel University of Nantes Introduction The debate about the competitiveness of our businesses, and more particu‐ larly our agricultural businesses, is a recurring one. It is imposed daily, like a mantra, in the speeches of our politicians, or in the writings and words of the media. It permeates the discussions - sometimes heated - of our household or social gatherings. Analogously to the resurgence of our past as hunters driven by necessity, or as warriors fighting for the survival of his species, tribe, group, or network, this debate opens the door to a bel‐ licose and Manichean vocabulary: winners against losers, another way of speaking of the living against the dead; the dominant (the great) against the submissive (the small), an authoritarian conception of power and legit‐ imacy. This vocabulary is associated with violent values found in the cor‐ porate world: to aggress (a strategy) and thus avoid being aggressed; to take (participations) so as not to be possessed or dispossessed; extending one's (economic) empire to counter the expansionist wills of others ... However, the debate on competitiveness also opens the doors to another paradigm, that of self-surpassing, courage (or even obsession or madness), innovation through beauty and/or quality. In this sense, decathletes and javelin throwers are competitors, as are some business CEOs who invent new services and products. The debate on competition thus leads to two postures, that of the war‐ rior and that of the innovator (one could have also called him the enlight‐ ened one). They are not opposed. Sometimes, they are even juxtaposed: when at the same time warrior and illuminated. Both have one ultimate and common goal: to be the best or among the bests. In sport, you have to run faster, to throw further, to aim more accurately than others. In eco‐ nomics, it is necessary to have the lowest costs and/or innovate by the quality and service in order to have a place on the market or to dominate I. 300 it. Specialists then speak of competitiveness with costs or without costs. Thus, a farm manager can choose to act in two ways, in two (market) seg‐ ments, in order to be competitive: to reduce his costs as much as possible and to obtain a product at a low price and/or to surpass the borders of stan‐ dardized agronomy by producing quality food, which is good, healthy, and respectful of the natural and human environment. Taken by this need to be the best, the warrior, as much as the innovator may be tempted not to pay attention to the means used to achieve their ends. In sport, this is called doping; in economics, it will be referred to as agreement, abuse of position, unfair practices, and fraud or deception. In other words, in economics, one will speak of law, mainly of this so-called "economic" law which aims at regulating markets and relations between economic actors, of which competition law constitutes the central pillar (Commission 1 of the XXIXth CEDR Congress). However, competitors also have to rub shoulders with other bodies of law: for example, in the economic world, rules that make it possible to create and sustain a company, to sell it, to transfer it, to support it material‐ ly and financially, rules that concern work, that of the entrepreneur as well as of his employees, those relating to his natural environment (biodiversi‐ ty, water...) or social environment (neighborhood, urban planning, taxa‐ tion...), as well as those targeting products or services (standards of quali‐ ty, identification, safety, responsibility...). Farmers, as other competitors, have to play with this legal partition, which varies from state to state, and which contains specific elements that deserve to be highlighted. To be born and to get developed, the agricultur‐ al enterprise often needs lands and thus will have to comply with the legal rules regulating the access to agricultural land (leases, property, urban planning, development). Sometimes, it will also have to comply with "ad‐ ministrative" procedures (right to exploit, classified installations, protec‐ tion of water and biodiversity, production or marketing contingents/ quotas, agricultural work, taxation), rules relating to its incorporation (agricultural companies, entrepreneurial or business status) or to its trans‐ fer (agricultural successions). The development of agriculture is also par‐ ticularly dependent on policies of public aid, mainly organized within the European Union (EU), by the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). Final‐ ly, agricultural products are subject to specific regulations relating to their marketing and quality (distinctive signs, producer groups). It is easy to presume that all these rules are constraints for companies and that they prevent the expression of each competitor. Some even pro‐ General Report of Commission II 301 mote the idea that they should be removed. Yet there is no social game that works without rules. Even the jungle has its codes (even if only bio‐ logical) otherwise the strongest predator ends up alone, without competi‐ tor or prey. Therefore, ensuring competition on the markets requires the establish‐ ment of a set of codes, rules of law, to enable each competitor to act in the most secure environment possible. To simply imagine a runner who would not know in advance what types of track, obstacles, distance, starting pos‐ ition... is sufficient to understand that these conditions will make his train‐ ing much more difficult. In other words, rules can be an engine of compet‐ itiveness in that they give to everyone a stable and known meeting ground1. It can also be a driving force when it directly favors the enterprise, by means of public aid, material advantages or administrative facilities. This is in particular the objective of the common agricultural policy. However, rules can also be barriers to competitiveness. This is the case if a company has to bear a rule that increases the final production cost or prevents access to a market while its competitors – competitors in the same product range and market – do not have to comply with such a re‐ strictive rule. However, it is often impossible to decide clearly on the effects of the law on competitiveness, since it is difficult to consider all the factors that allow an objective comparison. This is what we learn from the twelve na‐ tional reports – Germany, Belgium, Bulgaria, Spain (2 reports), France, Hungary, Netherlands, Poland, Romania, United Kingdom, Slovakia – presented in Commission II of the XXIXth CEDR Congress in September 2017 in Lille2. In the light of this work, it seems impossible to classify le‐ gal rules in the categories of "obstacles" or "mainsprings" of competitive‐ ness for two reasons: on the one hand because, as we have written earlier, the notion of competitiveness is complex and the legislation responds to this complexity (1); on the other hand, because the branches of law ex‐ posed by the national rapporteurs can be both obstacles and mainsprings of competitiveness (2). These will be the two red threads that will guide our reflections. 1 However, the legal field is never neutral. It carries values, often contradictory, which can favor some. 2 These reports are available on the CEDR website : URL : http://www.cedr.org/. General Report of Commission II 302 A right at the service of complex competitiveness As national reports show, the legislation responds to the two postures of competitiveness: the warrior and the innovator. The "warrior" farmer has at his disposal a number of legal drivers whose purpose or effect is to lower his production costs directly or indi‐ rectly, thus promoting his competitiveness. In first place of these engines are tax exemptions or tax specificities (in‐ come tax, VAT, property tax, fuel tax, etc.), detected in the majority of contributions (in particular Report Germany, Belgium, France, Nether‐ lands, Hungary, Poland, Romania and UK), as well as public aid in gener‐ al, in particular aid for small and medium-sized agriculture (Report Ger‐ many), or young farmers (Report Belgium), or plot exchanges (Report Netherlands). In second place, we find structural and land facilities: for example, companies, allowing certain bypasses in the face of regulations considered too rigid (see Report Belgium and France); or rural leases that protect farms and avoid having to buy more and more expensive land because of concentration movements and urban pressure (see Report Belgium, Spain, France, Netherlands and Romania); or even the adaptation of inheritance law to avoid the partition or fragmentation of agricultural holdings during transfers (chopping effect of inheritance divisions due to the application of the principle of equality) with the right of preference or priority in the suc‐ cession (Report Belgium, France, Netherlands, Hungary and Slovakia). Other examples are the legal rules governing access to private property in Romania or Bulgaria, for example, or the facilities for planning/re-par‐ celling or exchanging plots (Report Belgium and Netherlands) and exemp‐ tions from building permits (Report Belgium). Attempts to regulate markets are the third category of competitiveness drivers mentioned by the rapporteurs. In particular, questions concerning the fight against unfair practices, the development of cooperatives or pro‐ ducer organizations are discussed (Report Belgium, France and Poland), even if their effectiveness remains limited due to EU competition law (Re‐ port France). Guarantees and insurances are also tools for the development of com‐ petitiveness: for example, compensation in the event of crop damage or agricultural disasters (Report Germany and Belgium) or the favorable in‐ surance provided by cooperatives to their co-operators (Report Germany). A. General Report of Commission II 303 All of these drivers of competitiveness can create distortions between EU member states when tariffs create an advantage in one State while in others not. The most striking example of this is the fiscal or social dump‐ ing mentioned in the German, French, Belgian, Romanian and British re‐ ports. However, it should be noted that those who do not benefit from the advantage and who describe their own right as an obstacle to mobility most often expose this distortion of competitiveness. The absence of spe‐ cial legislation in Hungary regarding inheritance in agriculture whilst oth‐ er states enjoy a special preferential right constitutes, perhaps less obvi‐ ously or more indirectly, a form of distortion. The "innovative" farmer also has legal instruments that support his competitiveness: Of course, we can mention the signs of quality and the CAP investment aid studied in some reports (Report Belgium, Hungary, Poland), but there are also other legal tools, which are not considered at first sight. Let us re‐ ly on the Belgian report to develop this idea. According to this report, "certain developments prevent the examination of competitiveness from being limited solely to the prism of profitability and price. Agricultural ac‐ tivity involves factors such as the environment, consumers, citizens as tax‐ payers and civil society. Consequently, competitiveness in the agricultural sector is necessarily a function of these various factors, which are rather difficult to objectify. Agricultural activity, despite its primary nourishing function, cannot afford to waste resources or risk seeing its productivity fall." This idea should probably be taken a little further: If these new fac‐ tors influence the competitiveness, it is not only because there is a risk not to take them into account but because they allow the "warrior" farmer to change his posture in order to innovate: the environment or health are no longer conceived as limiting factors but as means to be in a better position on the market. In this sense, all the environmental standards (classified in‐ stallations, water protection, plant health, nitrates, soil erosion, topograph‐ ical elements, etc.) or the sanitary standards detailed by several rappor‐ teurs (Report Belgium and Romania, for example) become pretexts - ad‐ mittedly harsh and sometimes devastating - to improve the competitive‐ ness; and all the public support, led by agricultural policies, which support this transition (Report Belgium, Bulgaria and UK) constitute motors for innovation in agriculture. It should be noted, however, that not all the rapporteurs seem to agree with this perspective, considering that it is necessary to distinguish com‐ petitiveness from environmental goals (Report Germany and Poland) and General Report of Commission II 304 that health and environmental standards are analyzed more as additional costs (Report France), and consequently as obstacles to the competitive‐ ness of the farmer and the agricultural enterprise. This contradiction (debate) is undoubtedly explained by the ambivalent nature of competitiveness law. A right to ambivalent competitiveness effects The hypothesis here is that most rules are very likely to be both an a main‐ spring and an obstacle to competitiveness. We will seek here to understand the factors leading to this ambivalence and not to expose the legal obsta‐ cles and drivers discussed in the national reports. The first of these factors is temporal: On the one hand, competitiveness effects may change over time be‐ cause the legislation may change. For example, the European legislation has long protected trade through its intervention on prices, but since the Mc Sharry reform (1992), farmers in Member States have been forced to compete and distortions of competition have appeared between them (Re‐ port France). On the other hand, competitiveness effects may evolve over time whereas the legislation may last longer. Thus, if the legal system of the ru‐ ral lease is originally an engine of development for the agricultural com‐ panies since it makes it possible to acquire at a moderate or reasonable price a title on the land without paying the latter, it leads today to the dis‐ engagement of certain owners. This is what the Dutch rapporteur calls the "rural lease dilemma". He concludes that rural leases need to be reformed while recognizing that they are a real "quagmire". The practical failure of the French reform introducing the transferable lease also shows that com‐ petitiveness considerations are competing with more sociological ele‐ ments. The second factor of legal ambivalence in competitiveness is geograph‐ ical: As the Belgian rapporteurs put it in other words, what is an internal en‐ gine can be seen as a brake at EU or world level (e.g. in the field of agri‐ cultural property leases). For example, support under the second pillar of the CAP can be a driving force from a global, European point of view, but some states may not be able to use it due to the unavailability of funds to B. General Report of Commission II 305 co-finance these measures (Report Slovakia). This engine then becomes a potential discrimination. Moreover, the constitutional characteristics of states can shift the lines of competitiveness distortion from supra to intra-national. Thus, the Span‐ ish rapporteurs recall the existence of 17 autonomous communities and thus 17 different agricultural regimes, which leads to "a legislative disper‐ sion in agriculture and very negative repercussions for the agrarian sector" (see also German report in this sense: each Bundesland is responsible for its agricultural policy). Finally – the obvious shall be stated - national choices can lead to dis‐ tortions. This is the case in Poland because of administrative problems in the distribution of public aid, or in Slovakia because of the lack of institu‐ tional organization and communication problems with the European Com‐ mission. Distortions also arise when states stack standards, causing a le‐ gislative overdose (Report France on the active farmer for example). The transcription of EU rules is perhaps an even better illustration of this situa‐ tion: as the German (particularly on the taxation of diesel), Belgian and French rapporteurs have pointed out, there are differences in competitive‐ ness due to the Member States' margin of maneuver in the implementation of EU policies and states that choose to increase their levels of protection, particularly in environmental areas, risking to damage the competitiveness of their farms. For some (Report France and Germany), the solution would be to remain at the level of the Brussels minimum standards, which raises the question of the useful effect of subsidiarity. The third factor in the fluctuation of the law in terms of competitiveness is emotional: The effect of the rule of law on the competitiveness of agricultural en‐ terprises is often assessed on the basis of emotions, experience or even the political conception of the role of the legislation in the economy. Thus, the multiplication of legal rules (legislative inflation) would sys‐ tematically be an obstacle to competitiveness. Similarly, the complexity of the legislation or the existence of strict and lengthy administrative proce‐ dures would invariably be an obstacle on competitiveness, for example in land development and management (Report France on the control of struc‐ tures or Report Belgium on the pre-emptive right of the Walloon region). The same would apply in the case of intervention by an organisation en‐ trusted with a public service mission (Report France on SAFER). Yet, when we read the reports we realize that, what is an obstacle for one can be a mainspring for the other. For example, the Hungarian rappor‐ General Report of Commission II 306 teurs point to the absence of special rules for agricultural enterprises as an obstacle on competitiveness, while the French rapporteurs sometimes say that there are in general too many rules. Similarly, the Romanian report shows how low (legal) remuneration pushes employees to leave, while other reports (Germany, France) show that (legal) remuneration surcharges push companies to leave (when they can). Conclusion These findings are not intended to criticize the positions of one or the oth‐ er, but to show how difficult it is to compare and assess the impact of the law on competitiveness. The origin of the problem is not the detailed analysis of each device, but the lack of data for comparison and evaluation. For instance, the labor cost data used are interesting, but do they really support legal comparisons and legal conclusions? One can only call for the development of compara‐ tive law methodologies adapted to the question of competitiveness in agri‐ culture. The latter should enable the reduction of the emotional factor in assessing the role of the legislation in competitiveness. Reducing the effects of the geographical factor is at the same time sim‐ ple and undoubtedly illusory, because it closely touches on the question of national sovereignty. Thus, an European harmonization has to be recom‐ mended, at least in the tax and social field. Otherwise, the lowest bidder may always be the most competitive. However, harmonization may have the default to promote legal rules that will only guarantee a minimal pro‐ tection. As for the temporal factor, it is inherent to the law and the performance of the markets. Everything evolves and it is not certain that what works one day will work the next. At best, we can suggest trying to adapt the law faster to the market requirements. However, speed should not be pre‐ scribed at all costs. A precautionary principle must be applied in order to ensure the stability of the law and the operators’ need for safety, and to avoid opportunistic laws or false "good laws". II. General Report of Commission II 307 Generalbericht der Kommission II* Version allemande – German version – Deutsche Version Dr. Luc Bodiguel Universität Nantes Einleitung Die Debatte über die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit unserer Unternehmen und ins‐ besondere über unsere landwirtschaftlichen Betriebe ist ein immer wieder‐ kehrendes Thema. Es wird täglich, wie ein Mantra, in den Reden unserer Politiker, in den Schriften und Worten der Medien behandelt. Es wird – manchmal hitzig - im Familien- und Freundeskreis darüber diskutiert. Wie ein Wiederaufleben unserer Vergangenheit als von der Not getriebene Jä‐ ger und Krieger, die für das Überleben ihrer Spezies, ihres Stammes, ihrer Gruppe, ihres Netzwerks kämpfen, öffnet diese Debatte die Tür zu einem kriegerischen und manichäischen Vokabular: Sieger gegen Verlierer, an‐ ders gesagt, Lebende gegen Tote; Überlegene (die Großen) gegen Unter‐ würfige (die Kleinen), eine autoritäre Auffassung von Macht und Legiti‐ mität. Dieses Vokabular wird mit gewalttätigen Werten in der Unterneh‐ menswelt assoziiert: Aggression (eine Strategie), um nicht angegriffen zu werden; erwirbt man (Beteiligungen), um nicht Besitzer oder Enteigneter zu werden; Ausweitung des (wirtschaftlichen) Imperiums, um dem expan‐ sionistischen Willen anderer entgegenzuwirken ... Aber die Debatte über Wettbewerbsfähigkeit öffnet auch die Türen zu einem anderen Paradigma, nämlich sich selbst zu übertreffen, Mut (gar Besessenheit oder Wahnsinn), Innovation durch Schönheit und/oder Qualität. In diesem Sinne sind Zehn‐ kämpfer und Speerwerfer Konkurrenten, ebenso wie einige Firmenchefs, die neue Dienstleistungen und Produkte erfinden. Die Debatte über den Wettbewerb führt in zwei Haltungen, die des Kriegers und die des Innovators (man hätte ihn auch den Erleuchteten nen‐ I. * Übersetzung vom Französischen ins Deutsche von Steeve Guillod, LL.M., Univer‐ sität Neuenburg. 308 nen können). Sie konkurrieren nicht miteinander. Manchmal entsprechen sich die beiden Haltungen einander sogar: Die des Kriegers und des Er‐ leuchteten. Sie haben ein gemeinsames Ziel: die Besten zu sein oder zu den Besten zu gehören. Im Sport muss man schneller laufen, weiter wer‐ fen, oder genauer zielen als andere. In der Wirtschaft ist es notwendig, die niedrigsten Kosten zu haben und/oder durch Qualität und Service zu inno‐ vieren, um seinen Platz auf dem Markt zu haben oder ihn zu dominieren. Die Spezialisten sprechen dann von Wettbewerbsfähigkeit durch Kosten oder ohne Kosten. So kann ein Betriebsleiter einer Farm auf zwei Arten, d.h. in zwei (Markt-)Segmenten handeln, um wettbewerbsfähig zu sein: die Kosten müssen so weit wie möglich gesenkt werden, damit die Pro‐ dukte zu möglichst tiefen Preisen abgesetzt werden und/oder über die Grenzen der standardisierten Landwirtschaft hinausgehen, indem qualita‐ tiv hochwertige Lebensmittel produziert werden, die gut und gesund sind und die natürliche und menschliche Umwelt respektieren. Aufgrund des Bedürfnisses, der Beste zu sein, kann der Krieger, als auch der Innovator versucht sein, nicht auf die Mittel zu achten, die zur Erreichung ihrer Ziele eingesetzt werden. Im Sport spricht man von Do‐ ping, in der Wirtschaft von Abkommen, Amtsmissbrauch, unlauteren Praktiken, Betrug oder Täuschung. Mit anderen Worten, in der Wirtschaft spricht man vom Recht, vor allem vom sogenannten "ökonomischen" Recht, das darauf abzielt, die Märkte und die Beziehungen zwischen den Wirtschaftsakteuren zu regeln, wobei das Wettbewerbsrecht die zentrale Säule darstellt (Kommission 1 des XXIX. CEDR-Kongresses). Auch Mitbewerber müssen sich mit anderen Rechtsgebieten auseinan‐ dersetzen: Z.B. in der Wirtschaft mit Regeln, die es ermöglichen, ein Un‐ ternehmen zu gründen und zu erhalten, es zu verkaufen, zu übertragen, materiell und finanziell zu unterstützen, Regeln, die die Arbeit, die des Unternehmers und seiner Mitarbeiter, seine natürliche Umwelt (Biodiver‐ sität, Wasser ...) oder soziale Umwelt (Nachbarschaft, Stadtplanung, Steu‐ ern ...) sowie Produkte oder Dienstleistungen (Qualitätsstandards, Identifi‐ kation, Sicherheit, Verantwortung ...) betreffen. Die Landwirte müssen allerdings, wie andere Wettbewerber auch, mit diesen verschiedenen Rechtsgebieten umgehen, die von Land zu Land un‐ terschiedlich sind und spezifische Elemente aufweisen, die es verdienen, hervorgehoben zu werden. Um gegründet und entwickelt zu werden, benö‐ tigt das landwirtschaftliche Unternehmen oft Land und muss sich an die gesetzlichen Regeln halten, die den Zugang zu landwirtschaftlichen Flä‐ chen regeln (Pachtverträge, Eigentum, Stadtplanung, Anlagen). Manchmal Generalbericht der Kommission II 309 müssen auch "administrative" Verfahren (Betriebsrecht, klassifizierte An‐ lagen, Schutz von Wasser und Biodiversität, Produktions- oder Vermark‐ tungskontingente/-quoten, Landarbeit, Besteuerung), Vorschriften zur Gründung (landwirtschaftliche Unternehmen, Unternehmens- oder Be‐ triebsstatus) oder ihre Übertragung (landwirtschaftliche Erbfolge) einge‐ halten werden. Die Entwicklung der Landwirtschaft ist auch besonders ab‐ hängig von einer Politik der öffentlichen Beihilfen, die hauptsächlich in‐ nerhalb der Europäischen Union (EU) durch die gemeinsame Agrarpolitik (GAP) organisiert wird. Landwirtschaftliche Erzeugnisse unterliegen be‐ sonderen Vorschriften in Bezug auf ihre Vermarktung und Qualität (Unter‐ scheidungsmerkmale, Erzeugergemeinschaften). Es ist einfach zu denken, dass all diese Regeln Beschränkungen für das Unternehmen darstellen und dass sie Äußerungen jedes Konkurrenten ver‐ hindern. Einige fördern die Idee, diese abzuschaffen. Es gibt jedoch kein soziales Spiel, das ohne Regeln funktioniert. Sogar der Dschungel hat sei‐ ne Codes (wenn auch nur biologische), ansonsten bleibt das stärkste Raub‐ tier allein, ohne Konkurrenten oder Beute. Um den Wettbewerb auf den Märkten zu gewährleisten, bedarf es daher einer Reihe von Codes, Rechtsnormen, die es jedem Wettbewerber ermög‐ lichen, in einem möglichst sicheren Umfeld zu agieren. Stellen Sie sich einen Läufer vor, der im Voraus nicht weiß, welche Strecken, Hindernisse, Entfernungen, Startpositionen ihn erwarten um zu verstehen, dass sein Training unter diesen Bedingungen viel schwieriger wird. Mit anderen Worten, die Regeln können ein Motor für die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit sein, indem sie jedermann eine stabile Grundlage bieten.1 Die Richtlinien können auch treibende Kräfte sein, wenn sie das Unter‐ nehmen durch öffentliche Beihilfen, materielle Vorteile oder Verwaltungs‐ einrichtungen direkt begünstigen. Dies ist insbesondere das Ziel der ge‐ meinsamen Agrarpolitik. Regeln können jedoch aber auch Hemmschuhe für die Wettbewerbsfä‐ higkeit sein. Dies ist der Fall, wenn einem Unternehmen eine Regel aufer‐ legt wird, die die endgültigen Produktionskosten erhöht oder den Zugang zu einem Markt verhindert, während bei einem Konkurrenten im gleichen Produktesortiment und im gleichen Markt dieselben restriktiven Regeln keine Anwendung finden. 1 Das juristische Terrain ist jedoch nie neutral. Es trägt Werte, die oft widersprüchlich sind und einige begünstigen können. Generalbericht der Kommission II 310 Allerdings ist es oft unmöglich, die Auswirkungen des Gesetzes auf die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit klar zu bestimmen, da es schwierig ist, alle Fakto‐ ren zu berücksichtigen, die einen objektiven Vergleich ermöglichen. Dies ist aus zwölf nationalen Berichten ersichtlich – Deutschland, Belgien, Bul‐ garien, Spanien (2 Berichte), Frankreich, Ungarn, Niederlande, Polen, Ru‐ mänien, Vereinigtes Königreich, Slowakei –, die in der Kommission II des XXIX. Europäischen Agrarrechtskongresses im September 2017 in Lille2 präsentiert wurden. Angesichts dieser Arbeit scheint es unmöglich, die Rechtsnormen in die Kategorien "Hemmschuhe" oder "treibende Kräfte" der Wettbewerbsfähigkeit einzuordnen, und zwar aus zwei Gründen: ei‐ nerseits, weil der Begriff der Wettbewerbsfähigkeit komplex ist und das Recht auf diese Komplexität reagiert (1); andererseits, weil die von den nationalen Berichterstattern dargestellten Rechtszweige sowohl Hemm‐ schuhe als auch treibende Kräfte der Wettbewerbsfähigkeit sein können (2). Das sind die beiden roten Fäden, die unsere Reflexionen leiten. Ein Recht im Dienste komplexer Wettbewerbsfähigkeit Wie die nationalen Berichte zeigen, reagiert das Gesetz auf die beiden Haltungen der Wettbewerbsfähigkeit: den Krieger und den Innovator. Der "kriegerische" Landwirt verfügt über eine Reihe von legalen Hilfs‐ mitteln, deren Zweck oder Wirkung es ist, seine Produktionskosten direkt oder indirekt zu senken und damit seine Wettbewerbsfähigkeit zu fördern. An erster Stelle dieser treibenden Kräfte stehen Steuerbefreiungen oder -besonderheiten (Einkommensteuer, Mehrwertsteuer, Grundsteuer, Treib‐ stoffsteuer usw.), die in den meisten Beiträgen genannte werden (insbe‐ sondere in den Berichten Deutschland, Belgien, Frankreich, Niederland, Ungarn, Polen, Rumänien und Vereinigtes Königreich), sowie öffentliche Beihilfen im Allgemeinen, insbesondere Beihilfen für die kleine und mitt‐ lere Landwirtschaft (Bericht Deutschland) Junglandwirte (Bericht Belgi‐ en) oder Grundstücktäusche (Bericht Niederlande). An zweiter Stelle finden wir strukturelle und bodenbezogene Einrich‐ tungen: z.B. Unternehmen, die bestimmte Umgehungsmöglichkeiten zu‐ lassen, weil die Vorschriften als zu starr gelten (Bericht Belgien und Frankreich); oder Pachtverträge, die die landwirtschaftlichen Betriebe A. 2 Diese Berichte sind auf der Website des CEDR abrufbar: http://www.cedr.org/. Generalbericht der Kommission II 311 schützen und den Kauf von immer teurerem Land aufgrund von Konzen‐ tration und städtischem Druck vermeiden (siehe Bericht Belgien, Spanien, Frankreich, Niederlande und Rumänien); oder sogar die Anpassung des Erbrechts, um die Zerstückelung oder Fragmentierung von landwirtschaft‐ lichen Betrieben bei der Übertragung zu vermeiden (Hash-Effekt von Erb‐ teilungen aufgrund der Anwendung des Gleichheitsgrundsatzes) mit dem Recht auf Präferenz oder Priorität in der Erbfolge (Bericht Belgien, Frank‐ reich, Niederlande, Ungarn, Slowakei). Weitere Beispiele sind gesetzliche Bestimmungen über den Zugang zu Privateigentum in Rumänien oder Bulgarien, Möglichkeiten der Bebauung/Umschichtung oder des Grund‐ stücktauschs (Bericht Belgien und Niederlande) und Ausnahmen von der Baugenehmigung (Bericht Belgien). Versuche der Marktregulierung bilden die dritte Kategorie von Treibern der Wettbewerbsfähigkeit, die von Berichterstattern genannt wurden. Ins‐ besondere werden Fragen betreffend die Bekämpfung unlauterer Prakti‐ ken, über die Entwicklung von Genossenschaften oder Branchenverbände erörtert (Bericht Belgien, Frankreich und Polen), auch wenn ihre Wirk‐ samkeit aufgrund des EU-Wettbewerbsrechts begrenzt bleibt (Bericht Frankreich). Garantien und Versicherungen sind ebenfalls Instrumente zur Entwick‐ lung der Wettbewerbsfähigkeit: z.B. Entschädigungen bei Ernteausfällen oder Agrarkrisen (Bericht Deutschland und Belgien) oder die vergünstig‐ ten Versicherungen der Genossenschaften für ihre Genossenschafter (Be‐ richt Deutschland). Alle diese Faktoren der Wettbewerbsfähigkeit können zu Verzerrungen zwischen den EU-Mitgliedstaaten führen, wenn die Regelungen in einem Land einen Vorteil verschaffen, in anderen jedoch nicht. Das auffälligste Beispiel dafür, ist das in den Berichten von Deutschland, Frankreich, Bel‐ gien, Rumänien und Großbritannien erwähnte Steuer- oder Sozialdum‐ ping. Es ist jedoch darauf hinzuweisen, dass diese Wettbewerbsverzerrung am häufigsten von denjenigen aufgedeckt wird, die nicht von diesem Vor‐ teil profitieren, es für sie selber ein Nachteil darstellt. Beispielsweise fehlt in Ungarn eine Sondergesetzgebung für das landwirtschaftliche Erbrecht, während andere Länder von einem solchen bevorzugenden Spezialrecht profitieren, vielleicht weniger evident oder mehr indirekt, aber eine Form der Verzerrung. Generalbericht der Kommission II 312 Der "innovative" Landwirt verfügt über Rechtsinstrumente, die seine Wettbewerbsfähigkeit unterstützen: Natürlich können wir die Qualitätssiegel und die GAP-Investitionsbei‐ hilfen, die in einigen Berichten (Bericht Belgien, Ungarn und Polen) un‐ tersucht werden, erwähnen, aber es gibt auch andere Rechtsinstrumente, an die man auf den ersten Blick nicht denkt. Verlassen wir uns bei der Ent‐ wicklung dieser Idee auf den belgischen Bericht. Demnach "verhindern bestimmte Entwicklungen, dass sich die Prüfung der Wettbewerbsfähig‐ keit allein auf das Prisma der Rentabilität und des Preises beschränkt. Die landwirtschaftliche Tätigkeit umfasst Faktoren wie die Umwelt, die Kon‐ sumenten, die Bürger als Steuerzahler und die Zivilgesellschaft. Folglich ist die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit im Agrarsektor zwangsläufig eine Funktion dieser verschiedenen Faktoren, die nur schwer zu objektivieren sind. Die landwirtschaftliche Tätigkeit sollte trotz ihrer primären Ernährungsfunkti‐ on nicht verschwenderisch mit Ressourcen umgehen oder riskieren, dass ihre Produktivität sinkt." Ohne Zweifel muss diese Idee etwas weiter ver‐ folgt werden: Wenn diese neuen Faktoren die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit beein‐ flussen, dann nicht nur, weil die Gefahr besteht, sie nicht zu berücksichti‐ gen, sondern weil sie es dem "kriegerischen" Landwirt erlauben, seine Haltung zu ändern, um innovativ zu sein: Die Umwelt oder die Gesund‐ heit werden nicht mehr als begrenzende Faktoren, sondern als Mittel zur besseren Positionierung auf dem Markt verstanden. In diesem Sinne wer‐ den Umweltvorschriften (klassifizierte Anlagen, Gewässerschutz, Pflan‐ zengesundheit, Nitrate, Bodenerosion, topographische Elemente usw.) oder Hygienevorschriften, die von mehreren Berichterstattern (z.B. Be‐ richt Belgien und Rumänien) genannt werden, zu Vorwänden – zweifellos harsch und manchmal verheerend – , um ihre Wettbewerbsfähigkeit zu verbessern; und die gesamte öffentliche Unterstützung, angeführt von der Agrarpolitik, die diesen Übergang unterstützt (Bericht Belgien, Bulgarien und Vereinigtes Königreich), bilden Motoren für Innovationen in der Landwirtschaft. Es ist darauf hinzuweisen, dass nicht alle Berichterstatter welche diese Meinung vertreten zustimmen, da es notwendig ist, die Wettbewerbsfähig‐ keit von den Umweltzielen zu unterscheiden (Bericht Deutschland und Polen) und dass Gesundheits- und Umweltstandards eher als zusätzliche Kosten (Bericht Frankreich) und folglich als Hemmschuhe für die Wettbe‐ werbsfähigkeit der Landwirte und der landwirtschaftlichen Betriebe ange‐ sehen werden. Generalbericht der Kommission II 313 Dieser Widerspruch wird zweifellos durch den ambivalenten Charakter des Wettbewerbsrechts erklärt. Ein Recht auf ambivalente Wettbewerbseffekte Die Hypothese hier lautet, dass die meisten Regeln sehr wahrscheinlich sowohl treibende Kräfte als auch Hemmschuhe für die Wettbewerbsfähig‐ keit darstellen. Es soll hiermit versucht werden, die Faktoren zu verstehen, welche zu dieser Ambivalenz führen, hingegen sollen nicht die rechtlichen Hindernisse und treibenden Kräfte, die in den nationalen Berichten disku‐ tiert werden, behandelt werden. Der erste Faktor ist zeitlicher Natur: Einerseits können sich die Auswirkungen auf die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit im Laufe der Zeit ändern, da sich Gesetze verändern. So hat die europäi‐ sche Gesetzgebung mit ihrer Intervention in die Preisgestaltung den Han‐ del lange Zeit geschützt, seit der Mc Sharry-Reform (1992) sind die Land‐ wirte in den Mitgliedstaaten jedoch zum Wettbewerb gezwungen, und es sind Wettbewerbsverzerrungen zwischen ihnen aufgetreten (Bericht Frankreich). Andererseits können sich Wettbewerbseffekte im Laufe der Zeit entwi‐ ckeln, während das Gesetz möglicherweise länger andauert. Das Land‐ pachtrecht ist ursprünglich ein Motor der Entwicklung für landwirtschaft‐ liche Unternehmen, weil es erlaubt, zu einem moderaten oder vernünftigen Preis einen Titel über das Land zu erwerben, ohne dieses letztlich zu be‐ zahlen, führt es heutzutage zu einem Rückzug von bestimmten Eigentü‐ mern. Der niederländische Berichterstatter nennt dies das "Dilemma der Landpacht". Er kommt zum Schluss, dass Landpachtverträge reformiert werden müssen, anerkennend, dass es sich dabei um einen echter "Pat‐ sche" handelt. Das praktische Scheitern der französischen Reform zur Ein‐ führung der übertragbaren Pacht zeigt auch, dass die Wettbewerbsfähig‐ keit mit soziologischen Elementen konkurriert. Der zweite Faktor der Ambivalenz im Wettbewerbsrecht ist die geogra‐ phische Lage: Wie es die belgischen Berichterstatter mit anderen Worten ausdrückten, kann das, was intern ein Motor ist, auf EU- oder globaler Ebene als Brem‐ se angesehen werden (z.B. im Bereich der Verpachtung landwirtschaftli‐ cher Güter). Also kann die Unterstützung im Rahmen der zweiten Säule der GAP aus globaler, europäischer Sicht eine treibende Kraft sein, aber B. Generalbericht der Kommission II 314 einige Länder können möglicherweise nicht davon profitieren, weil keine Mittel zur Kofinanzierung dieser Maßnahmen zur Verfügung stehen (Be‐ richt Slowakei). Der Motor wird dann zu einer potenziellen Diskriminie‐ rung. Desweiteren können die konstitutionellen Merkmale der Länder die Li‐ nien der Wettbewerbsverzerrung von supranational auf intra-national ver‐ lagern. So weisen die spanischen Berichterstatter auf die Existenz von 17 autonomen Gemeinschaften hin und hiermit auf 17 verschiedene Agrarregime, was zu "einer legislativen Streuung in der Landwirtschaft und sehr negativen Auswirkungen auf den Agrarsektor" führt (siehe auch den Bericht Deutschland in diesem Sinne: Jedes Bundesland ist für seine Agrarpolitik verantwortlich). Schlussendlich – entsprechende Nachweise müssten noch ausgeführt werden – können nationale Entscheidungen zu Verzerrungen führen. Dies ist der Fall in Polen wegen administrativer Probleme bei der Verteilung öf‐ fentlicher Beihilfen; oder in der Slowakei wegen institutioneller Unorgani‐ siertheit und Kommunikationsproblemen mit der Europäischen Kommissi‐ on. Verzerrungen entstehen auch dann, wenn Länder Normen aufstellen, was zu einer legislativen Überdosis führt (z.B. Bericht Frankreich über den aktiven Landwirt). Die Transkription der EU-Vorschriften illustrieren vielleicht noch besser diese Situation: Wie die deutschen (namentlich zur Besteuerung von Dieseltreibstoff), belgischen und französischen Bericht‐ erstatter hervorgehoben haben, gibt es Unterschiede in der Wettbewerbsfä‐ higkeit aufgrund des Handlungsspielraums der Mitgliedstaaten bei der Umsetzung der EU-Politik und der Länder, die sich dafür entscheiden, das Schutzniveau insbesondere im Umweltbereich zu erhöhen, was die Wett‐ bewerbsfähigkeit ihrer Betriebe beeinträchtigen könnte. Für einige (Be‐ richt Frankreich und Deutschland) würde die Lösung darin bestehen, auf dem Niveau der Mindeststandards aus Brüssel zu bleiben, was die Frage nach der nützlichen Wirkung der Subsidiarität aufwirft. Der dritte Unsicherheitsfaktor des Gesetzes in Bezug auf die Wettbe‐ werbsfähigkeit ist emotionaler Natur: Die Auswirkungen der Rechtsnormen auf die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit landwirtschaftlicher Betriebe werden oft anhand eines Gefühls, einer Er‐ fahrung oder gar einer politischen Vorstellung von der Rolle des Rechts in der Wirtschaft beurteilt. Die Vervielfachung der gesetzlichen Vorschriften (Inflation der Gesetz‐ gebung) wäre somit systematisch ein Hindernis für die Wettbewerbsfähig‐ keit. Auch die Komplexität des Gesetzes oder das Vorhandensein strenger Generalbericht der Kommission II 315 und langwieriger Verwaltungsverfahren würde sich negativ auf die Wett‐ bewerbsfähigkeit, beispielsweise bei der Landentwicklung und -manage‐ ment, auswirken (Bericht Frankreich über die Kontrolle der Strukturen oder Bericht Belgien über das Vorkaufsrecht der wallonischen Region). Dasselbe gilt für den Fall, dass eine mit einem öffentlichen Auftrag be‐ traute Organisation eingreift (Bericht Frankreich über die SAFER). Doch wenn man die Berichte liest, erkennt man, dass das was für den einen ein Hemmschuh ist, eine treibende Kraft für den anderen sein kann. Beispielsweise weisen die ungarischen Berichterstatter darauf hin, dass es keine Sonderregelungen für landwirtschaftliche Betriebe gibt, die die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit bremsen, während die französischen Berichterstatter manchmal sagen, dass es im Allgemeinen zu viele Vorschriften gibt. Ebenso zeigt der rumänische Bericht, wie niedrige (legale) Löhne die Ar‐ beitnehmer zum Austritt zwingen, während andere Berichte (Deutschland, Frankreich) zeigen, dass (legale) Lohnerhöhungen die Unternehmen zum Aufgeben zwingen (wenn sie können). Fazit Diese Ergebnisse sollen nicht die Positionen des einen oder anderen kriti‐ sieren, sondern zeigen, wie schwierig es ist, die Auswirkungen von Geset‐ zen auf die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit zu vergleichen und zu bewerten. Das Problem ist nicht die detaillierte Analyse der einzelnen Instrumen‐ te, sondern das Fehlen von Daten zum Vergleich und zur Auswertung. Sind zum Beispiel die verwendeten Daten zu Lohnkosten interessant, aber lassen sie wirklich Vergleiche und Schlussfolgerungen im Recht zu? Man kann nur die Entwicklung rechtsvergleichender Methoden fordern, die der Wettbewerbsfähigkeit der Landwirtschaft angepasst sind. Die Forschung soll es ermöglichen, den emotionalen Faktor bei der Bewertung der Rolle des Rechts in der Wettbewerbsfähigkeit zu reduzieren. Die Verringerung der Auswirkungen des geografischen Faktors ist so‐ wohl einfach als auch zweifellos illusorisch, da sie die Frage der nationa‐ len Souveränität berührt. Hier müssen wir wahrscheinlich den Weg einer europäischen Harmonisierung gehen, zumindest im steuerlichen und so‐ zialen Bereich. Andernfalls wird der niedrigste Bieter immer der wettbe‐ werbsfähigste sein. Allerdings kann die Harmonisierung selbst keine Rechtsnormen fördern, die nur einen minimalen Schutz gewährleisten. II. Generalbericht der Kommission II 316 Hinsichtlich des Zeitfaktors wohnt dieser dem Recht und dem Funktio‐ nieren der Märkte inne. Alles entwickelt sich und es ist nicht sicher, ob das, was an einem Tag funktioniert, auch am nächsten funktioniert. Man kann höchstens vorschlagen, das Gesetz schneller an die Markterfordernis‐ se anzupassen. Geschwindigkeit sollte jedoch nicht um jeden Preis vorge‐ schrieben werden. Ein Prinzip von Vorsicht muss angewendet werden, um die Stabilität des Rechts und das Sicherheitsbedürfnis der Betreiber zu ge‐ währleisten und um opportunistische Gesetze oder vermeintlich "gute Ge‐ setze" zu vermeiden. Generalbericht der Kommission II 317 Conclusions de la Commission II – Conclusions of Commission II – Schlussfolgerungen der Kommission II Version française – French version – Französische Version Version anglaise – English version – Englische Version Version allemande – German version – Deutsche Version Conclusions de la Commission II Version française – French version – Französische Version Recommandations Vu les douze rapports nationaux présentés lors des travaux de la Commis‐ sion II, Allemagne, Belgique, Bulgarie, Espagne (2), France, Hongrie, Pays-Bas, Pologne, Roumanie, Royaume-Uni, Slovaquie. Vu le rapport général exposé à la fin des travaux de la Commission, La Commission II soumet une série de quatre conclusions : 1. Il est très difficile de comparer et d’apprécier l’impact du droit sur la compétitivité. Le problème ne vient pas de l’analyse détaillée de chaque dispositif, mais de l’absence de données permettant de procéder à une comparaison et à une évaluation. La Commission II appelle donc au développement de méthodologies de droit comparé adaptées à l’en‐ jeu de compétitivité. Ces recherches devraient permettre de diminuer le facteur AFFECTIF dans l’appréciation du rôle du droit en matière de compétitivité. En effet, il s’avère souvent que l’effet de la règle de droit sur la compétitivité des entreprises agricoles dépend moins de données objectives que d’un ressenti, d’une expérience, voire d’une conception politique du rôle du droit dans l’économie. En ce domaine, une recherche centrée sur la sur-transposition des textes pourrait être opportune. 2. Les différents rapports révèlent que ce qui est un moteur interne peut être considéré comme un frein au niveau de l’Union européenne ou mondial, que les caractéristiques constitutionnelles des pays peuvent faire bouger les lignes de la distorsion de compétitivité et que des choix purement nationaux peuvent conduire à des distorsions. Diminu‐ er les effets de ce facteur TERRITORIAL est à la fois simple et sans doute illusoire, car il touche de près à la question de la souveraineté na‐ tionale. La Commission II recommande cependant une harmonisation européenne, au moins dans le domaine fiscal et social. A défaut, le I. 321 moins disant risque d’être toujours le plus compétitif. Toutefois, la Commission 2 est consciente qu’une harmonisation ne peut toucher toutes les branches du droit et risque de conduire à une protection mi‐ nimum. En outre, il lui semble que certains domaines doivent rester de la compétence nationale: droit civil agricole (location, succession/ préférence, famille, foncier/aménagement). 3. Une analyse transversale des rapports montre aussi que, d’une part, les effets de compétitivité peuvent évoluer dans le temps parce que le droit peut changer et que, d’autre part, les effets de compétitivité peuvent évoluer dans le temps alors que le droit reste le même. Ce facteur tem‐ porel est inhérent au droit et au fonctionnement des marchés : tout évo‐ lue et il n’est pas certain que ce qui marche un jour, marche le jour d’après. La Commission II recommande donc de tenter d’adapter rapi‐ dement le droit aux exigences de marché. Cependant, un principe de prudence doit être appliqué de manière à assurer la stabilité du droit et le besoin de sécurité des opérateurs, et d’éviter des lois opportunistes. 4. Enfin, la Commission II recommande, pour la future réforme de la po‐ litique agricole commune, que les aides du second pilier soient plus ci‐ blées sur l’exploitation agricole. Conclusions de la Commission II 322 Conclusions of Commission II* Version anglaise – English version – Englische Version Recommandations Having regard to the twelve national reports presented during the work of Commission II, Belgium, Bulgaria, France, Germany, Hungary, Netherlands, Poland, Ro‐ mania, Slovakia, Spain (2), United Kingdom. Having regard to the general report presented at the end of the Commis‐ sion's work, Commission II submits a series of four conclusions: 1. It is very difficult to compare and assess the impact of the law on com‐ petitiveness. This is due to the lack of data for comparison and evalua‐ tion. Commission II therefore calls for the development of comparative law methodologies adapted to the challenge of competitiveness. This research should make it possible to reduce the AFFECTIVE factor in assessing the role of law in competitiveness. Indeed, it often turns out that the effect of the rule of law on the competitiveness of agricultural enterprises depends less on objective data than on a feeling, experience or even a political conception of the role of law in the economy. In this area, research focused on the over-transposition of texts may be appro‐ priate. 2. The various reports reveal that what is an internal driving force can be considered as an obstacle at European Union or global level, that the constitutional characteristics of countries can shift the lines of distor‐ tion of competitiveness and that purely national choices can lead to distortions. Reducing the effects of this TERRITORIAL factor is both simple and probably illusory as it closely affects the question of nation‐ al sovereignty. However, Commission II recommends European har‐ * Translation from French to English by Stefanie Hug, MLaw, University of Lucerne. 323 monisation, at least in the tax and social law. Otherwise, the lowest bidder may always be the most competitive. However, Commission II is aware that harmonisation cannot affect all branches of law and may lead to minimum protection. In addition, it seems to him that certain areas should remain within national competence: agricultural civil law (rental, succession/preferential right, family, land/planning). 3. A cross-cutting analysis of the reports also shows that, on the one hand, competitiveness effects can change over time because the law can change and, on the other hand, competitiveness effects can change over time while the law remains the same. This temporal factor is in‐ herent in the law and the functioning of markets: everything changes and it is not certain that what works on one day will work the next. Commission II therefore recommends that an attempt is made to adapt the law quickly to market requirements. However, a precautionary principle must be applied in order to ensure legal stability and the need for operator safety and to avoid opportunistic laws. 4. Finally, Commission II recommends, for the future reform of the Com‐ mon Agricultural Policy, that aid under the second pillar should be closely linked to agricultural exploitation. Conclusions of Commission II 324 Schlussfolgerungen der Kommission II* Version allemande – German version – Deutsche Version Empfehlungen Unter Berücksichtigung der zwölf nationalen Berichte, die während der Arbeit der Kommission II vorgelegt wurden, Belgien, Bulgarien, Frankreich, Deutschland, Ungarn, Niederlande, Polen, Rumänien, Slowakei, Spanien (2), Vereinigtes Königreich. unter Berücksichtigung des am Ende der Arbeiten der Kommission vorge‐ legten Gesamtberichts, legt die Kommission II folgende vier Schlussfolgerungen vor: 1. Die Auswirkungen des Rechtes auf die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit zu ver‐ gleichen und zu bewerten gestaltet sich schwierig. Das Problem liegt nicht in der detaillierten Analyse der einzelnen Beiträge, sondern da‐ ran, dass es für Vergleich und Auswertung an Daten mangelt. Die Kommission II fordert daher die Entwicklung rechtsvergleichender Methoden, die an die Herausforderungen der Wettbewerbsfähigkeit an‐ gepasst sind. Dies sollte es ermöglichen, den AFFEKTIVEN Faktor bei der Bewertung der Rolle des Rechts in Bezug auf die Wettbewerbs‐ fähigkeit zu verringern. Tatsächlich stellt sich oft heraus, dass die Wir‐ kung des Rechts auf die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit der landwirtschaftlichen Betriebe weniger von objektiven Werten abhängt, als von einem Ge‐ fühl, einer Erfahrung oder gar einer politischen Vorstellung der Rolle des Rechts in der Wirtschaft. In diesem Bereich ist wohl Forschung, die sich auf die Umsetzung von Texten konzentriert, notwendig. 2. Die verschiedenen Berichte zeigen, dass eine nationale treibende Kraft auf europäischer oder globaler Ebene als Hemmschuh angesehen wer‐ den kann, dass die verfassungsmässigen Merkmale der Länder die * Übersetzung vom Französischen ins Deutsche von Stefanie Hug, MLaw, Universi‐ tät Luzern. 325 Grenzen der Wettbewerbsverzerrung verschieben können und dass rein nationale Entscheidungen selbst zu Verzerrungen führen können. Die Verringerung der Auswirkungen dieses TERRITORIALEN Faktors ist sowohl einfach als auch illusorisch, da sie die Frage der nationalen Souveränität stark berührt. Die Kommission II empfiehlt jedoch eine europäische Harmonisierung, zumindest im Bereich Steuern und So‐ ziales. Andernfalls besteht die Möglichkeit, dass das günstigste Ange‐ bot immer auch das wettbewerbsfähigste sein wird. Die Kommission II ist sich jedoch bewusst, dass die Harmonisierung nicht alle Rechtsge‐ biete betreffen sollte und zu einem Mindestschutz führen kann. Zudem sollten bestimmte Bereiche generell in der nationalen Zuständigkeit bleiben wie zum Beispiel das landwirtschaftliche Zivilrecht (Vermie‐ tung, Nachfolge/Vorzug, Familie, Land/Planung). 3. Eine Querschnittsanalyse der Berichte zeigt auch, dass sich die Aus‐ wirkungen auf die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit im Laufe der Zeit ändern kön‐ nen, einerseits, weil sich das Gesetz ändert und andererseits obwohl das Gesetz unverändert bleibt. Dieser zeitliche Faktor ist dem Gesetz und den Marktmechanismen inhärent: Alles ändert sich und es ist nicht sicher, ob das, was an einem Tag funktioniert, am nächsten Tag eben‐ falls noch funktioniert. Die Kommission II empfiehlt daher, das Recht rasch an die Markterfordernisse anzupassen. Es muss jedoch das Vor‐ sorgeprinzip angewandt werden, um die Rechtssicherheit sowie das Si‐ cherheitsbedürfnis des Rechtsanwenders zu gewährleisten und oppor‐ tunistische Gesetze zu vermeiden. 4. Schließlich empfiehlt die Kommission II für die künftige Reform der gemeinsamen Agrarpolitik, dass die Beihilfen im Rahmen der zweiten Säule stärker auf die landwirtschaftlichen Betriebe ausgerichtet werden sollten. Schlussfolgerungen der Kommission II 326 IV Commission III – Kommission III President: Prof. Dr. Michael Cardwell, University of Leeds General Reporter: Dr. Ludivine Petetin, Cardiff University Les évolutions récentes et significatives du droit rural Significant current developments in rural law Bedeutende aktuelle Entwicklungen im Recht des ländlichen Raums I Questionnaires – Fragebogen II Rapport général – General Report – Generalbericht III Conclusions de la Commission III – Conclusions of Commission III – Schlussfolgerungen der Kommission III Questionnaires – Fragebogen – Commission III – Kommission III Version française – French version – Französische Version Version anglaise – English version – Englische Version Version allemande – German version – Deutsche Version Questionnaire de la Commission III – Questionnaire of Commission III – Fragebogen der Kommission III Questions – Fragen Version française – French version – Französische Version 1. Quelles sont les principales évolutions du droit rural depuis le dernier congrès ? Veuillez développer un ou plusieurs des thèmes présentés cidessous à titre d’exemple : 1.1. L’utilisation de nouvelles technologies (les nouveaux aliments, les biotechnologies, les nanotechnologies…) 1.2. L’élevage dans l'agriculture (l’utilisation d'antibiotiques et de son impact sur la résistance aux antibiotiques et la santé publique ; les systèmes automatisés de distribution d’aliments ; les propositions de l’UE sur la législation zootechnique ...) 1.3. Les débats et appels aux réformes agricoles et de la PAC, mettant l'accent sur, par exemple, l’alimentation, l’environnement et les services écosystémiques (dans le cadre du développement dura‐ ble), et les agriculteurs (plutôt que l'agriculture en général) 1.4. Brexit et ses conséquences sur l’agriculture, par rapport à la Gran‐ de-Bretagne et le reste de l’UE 1.5. La sécurité alimentaire et démocratie alimentaire 1.6. La sureté alimentaire 1.7. Les accords de libre-échange entre l’UE et les Etats-Unis (TTIP), et entre l’UE et le Canada (CETA) 2. Lorsque vous discutez de ces développements dans votre pays, con‐ sidérez les questions suivantes : 2.1. Quelles sont les sources de chaque évolution ? 2.2. Sont-elles liées à des obligations ou des orientations internationa‐ les, européennes, nationales et/ou régionales ? Ces évolutions sont-elles compatibles et conformes aux obligations ou orientati‐ ons internationales, européennes, nationales et/ou régionales ? A. 331 2.3. Quel sont les éléments principaux de chaque évolution ? 2.4. Quels en sont les effets ; quelles sont les difficultés d'application ? Version anglaise – English version – Englische Version 1. What are the main developments in rural law since the last Congress? If possible, please include one or more of the following topics: 1.1. Use of new technologies (novel foods, modern biotechnologies, nanotechnologies…) 1.2. Livestock in farming (antibiotic use and its impact on bacterial re‐ sistance and public health; automated livestock feeding systems; EU proposals on zootechnical legislation…) 1.3. Calls for CAP/agricultural reforms, for instance, with a greater fo‐ cus on food, the environment and ecosystem services (sustainabili‐ ty generally), and farmers (rather than agriculture per se) 1.4. Brexit and its impact on agriculture, both in the UK and in the EU 1.5. Food security and food democracy 1.6. Food safety 1.7. Free trade agreements between the EU and the USA (TTIP), and the EU and Canada (CETA) 2. As you discuss these developments in your country, please address the following questions: 2.1. What are the sources for each of these developments? 2.2. In particular, are they linked to international, European, national and/or regional obligations or guidelines? Are the developments compatible and in conformity with international, European, nation‐ al and/or regional obligations or guidelines? 2.3. What are the main elements of each of these developments? 2.4. What are their effects; and do any difficulties in implementation arise? Version allemande – German version – Deutsche Version 1. Nennen Sie die wichtigsten Entwicklungen im Agrarrecht in Ihrem Land seit dem letzten Agrarrechtskongress. Wenn möglich, sollte in Ihrem Bericht eines oder mehrere der folgenden Themen enthalten sein: B. C. Questions – Fragen 332 1.1. Einsatz neuer Technologien (Novel Food, Biotechnologie, Nano‐ technologie …) 1.2. Viehzucht in der Landwirtschaft (Verwendung von Antibiotika und deren Einfluss auf Bakterienresistenzen und öffentliche Gesund‐ heit; automatisierte Fütterungssysteme; EU-Vorschläge zum Tier‐ zuchtrecht) 1.3. Ruf nach GAP-/Agrarreformen, zum Beispiel mit verstärktem Fo‐ kus auf Lebensmittel, Umwelt und Ökosysteme (Nachhaltigkeit) sowie Landwirte (anstatt Landwirtschaft per se) 1.4. Brexit und dessen Einfluss auf die Landwirtschaft, sowohl in Großbritannien als auch der EU 1.5. Ernährungssicherheit (food security) und Ernährungsdemokratie 1.6. Lebensmittelsicherheit (food safety) 1.7. Freihandelsabkommen zwischen der EU und den USA (TTIP) und zwischen der EU und Kanada (CETA) 2. Im Rahmen der Diskussion der vorstehend genannten Entwicklungen in Ihrem Land berücksichtigen Sie bitte die folgenden Fragestellungen: 2.1. Welches sind die Rechtsquellen dieser einzelnen Entwicklungen? 2.2. Sind sie an internationalen, europäischen, nationalen und/oder re‐ gionalen Verpflichtungen oder Leitlinien ausgerichtet? Sind diese Entwicklungen kompatibel und konform mit den internationalen, europäischen, nationalen und/oder regionalen Verpflichtungen oder Leitlinien? 2.3. Welches sind die Hauptelemente der jeweiligen Entwicklungen? 2.4. Was sind deren Auswirkungen; wo bestehen Anwendungsschwie‐ rigkeiten? Questions – Fragen 333 Rapport général de la Commission III – General Report of Commission III – Generalbericht der Kommission III Version française – French version – Französische Version Version anglaise – English version – Englische Version Version allemande – German version – Deutsche Version Rapport général de la Commission III* Version française – French version – Französische Version Dr. Ludivine Petetin Université de Cardiff Introduction Depuis le XXVIIIe Congrès Européen de Droit Rural qui s'est tenu à Pots‐ dam, des changements se sont produits qui opèrent sur différents axes. L’axe central est l'intégration des préoccupations environnementales (défi‐ nies au sens large pour inclure les caractéristiques alimentaires, sociales, éthiques et culturelles) dans les activités agricoles et les produits alimen‐ taires qui en résultent. Un autre thème transversal qui émerge est la relati‐ on entre l'agriculture et les instruments juridiques. En effet, de multiples rapports mettent en évidence la nature et le statut souvent faibles des in‐ struments législatifs existants pour traiter de l'agriculture et protéger les agriculteurs. Ces instruments s'accompagnent souvent d'un excès de bu‐ reaucratie et de formalités administratives à de multiples niveaux, ce qui empêche parfois l'innovation. Leur capacité à traiter les questions et les demandes actuelles est fortement remise en question. En particulier, des questions ont été soulevées quant aux données et à l'expertise (scientifi‐ que) utilisées pour établir de nouvelles dispositions et de nouveaux méca‐ nismes. Une modernisation des instruments juridiques et réglementaires existants, tant en termes qualitatifs que quantitatifs, a été jugée nécessaire pour actualiser la politique agricole commune (PAC), en particulier ceux qui s'appliquent à l'économie agraire, à la polyvalence climatique, à la vo‐ latilité des prix et à la compétitivité.1 I. * Traduction de l’anglais en français par Chloé Vida Martins, MLaw, Université de Neuchâtel. 1 Ces objectifs sont confirmés dans la Communication de la Commission sur la PAC de 2017. Voir la Communication de la Commission "L'avenir de l'alimentation et de l'agriculture" COM (2017) 713 final. 337 Les rapports nationaux soumis à la Commission III ont établi des liens étroits entre les initiatives et la législation au niveau de l'Union européen‐ ne (UE) et au niveau national.2 Dans l'ensemble, les rapporteurs nationaux ont établi des perspectives positives sur des questions difficiles mais cru‐ ciales concernant l'agriculture. Par conséquent, cinq thèmes généraux ont été identifiés, à savoir : • La situation dans le secteur laitier • L'utilisation des nouvelles technologies dans l'agriculture • Multifonctionnalité dans l'agriculture • Accès à la terre • le Brexit et l'agriculture La situation dans le secteur laitier De nombreux rapports nationaux soulignent les difficultés rencontrées par l'industrie laitière suite à la fin des quotas laitiers en mars 2015. Jusqu'à cette date, le marché du lait dans l'UE était l'un des marchés les plus régle‐ menté et subventionné au monde. La suppression des quotas laitiers, qui est l'instrument juridique de base du fonctionnement de ce marché, a ent‐ raîné des modifications considérables du marché et des rapports de force au sein de ce marché. Les producteurs agricoles ont perdu des garanties qui permettaient de stabiliser les approvisionnements. Les prix du lait sont en baisse constante depuis avril 2015. Des actes législatifs nationaux et de l'UE supplémentaires ont été adoptés pour soutenir les producteurs de lait. En Espagne, des mesures ont été mises en place pour soutenir l'indus‐ trie laitière en difficulté (Espagne p. 3). Des paiements directs provenant du budget national espagnol et du budget européen (en vertu du règlement délégué (UE) 2015/1853 de la Commission du 15 octobre 2015 arrêtant des mesures exceptionnelles de soutien temporaire en faveur des agricult‐ eurs dans les secteurs de l’élevage3) ont été mis en place pour absorber les chocs et les déséquilibres du marché laitier international. De même, la Po‐ logne - bien qu'elle occupe la 12e place dans la production mondiale de lait II. 2 Commission III comprenait onze rapports nationaux et un rapport individuel. 3 Règlement délégué (UE) 2015/1853 de la commission du 15 octobre 2015 arrêtant des mesures exceptionnelles de soutien temporaire en faveur des agriculteurs dans les secteurs de l'élevage [2015] JO L271/25. Rapport général de la Commission III 338 et de produits laitiers - a été particulièrement touchée par la disparition des quotas laitiers et a également bénéficié de l'aide européenne aux pro‐ ducteurs de lait (Pologne p. 19). La France a également promulgué en dé‐ cembre 2016 une loi visant à renforcer le rôle des producteurs de lait lors de la signature de contrats avec les entreprises. En vertu de ce statut, les agriculteurs sont considérés comme la partie faible du contrat et bénéfici‐ ent d'une protection spécifique (France p. 16). De même, en Espagne, le Code espagnol de bonnes pratiques commerciales en matière d'approvisi‐ onnement alimentaire vise à améliorer les moyens d'existence des agricult‐ eurs (y compris les producteurs laitiers) en créant un « environnement contractuel plus équitable » dans lequel ils opèrent, puisque les agricult‐ eurs sont le maillon le plus faible de la relation contractuelle (Rapport in‐ dividuel, p. 4). Au contraire, les Pays-Bas ont anticipé la suppression des quotas lai‐ tiers et perçu ce changement comme une opportunité économique (Pays- Bas p. 3). Les médias ont surnommé la fin des quotas laitiers : le « jour de la libération ». En 2013-14, la production laitière néerlandaise a atteint plus de 4 % du quota laitier national et en 2014-15, la production a encore augmenté de 4,1 %,4 alors que le nombre de vaches est passé de 1,55 mil‐ lions à 1,57 millions. Environ 70 % des producteurs laitiers néerlandais ont construit de nouvelles étables ou prévoient d'étendre prochainement la taille de leurs infrastructures agricoles. Cependant ces changements aug‐ mentent problématiquement la production de phosphate des animaux. Les Pays-Bas (Pays-Bas, p. 3) et l'Espagne (Espagne, p. 4) ont tous deux fixé des limites au nombre de bovins autorisés dans une même ex‐ ploitation pour des raisons différentes. En Espagne, cela a été entrepris pour ne pas encourager la production laitière afin de renforcer la position de l'agriculteur dans la chaîne d'approvisionnement alimentaire. Aux Pays- Bas, il s'agit de diminuer la production de fumier. En effet, pour résoudre le problème de la surproduction de fumier, le gouvernement néerlandais a introduit un nouvel instrument de production (Pays-Bas p. 4). Les droits sur les phosphates visent à réduire le nombre de bovins pour passer sous le plafond national de phosphate.5 Ces droits consistent en un plafond de production basé sur le niveau de production de 2014, assorti d'une inter‐ diction d'expansion au-delà de ce niveau. Ces droits sont cessibles entre 4 Kamerstukken II, 2014/15, 33979, N. 99. 5 W. Bruil – Onder het Fosfaatplafond! TVAR 2017/3, p. 99. Rapport général de la Commission III 339 agriculteurs. Il est intéressant de noter que cela a conduit à la disparition de l'excédent de fumier et à l'émergence d'un marché noir. En Allemagne, il y a généralement moins de vaches dans les exploitati‐ ons agricoles parce que les conditions d'élevage, telles qu'elles existent, ne sont plus acceptées par la population pour des raisons de santé et de bien- être animal ainsi que pour des raisons éthiques et culturelles. Cela s'appli‐ que également à d'autres types de bétail. L’utilisation des nouvelles technologies dans l’agriculture Les nouvelles technologies agricoles peuvent offrir des possibilités écono‐ miques, comme des rendements plus élevés et une meilleure compétitivité, mais elles peuvent soulever des problèmes structurels et des préoccupati‐ ons en matière d'environnement et de santé. Les biotechnologies et les or‐ ganismes génétiquement modifiés (OGM) en sont des exemples. Par ex‐ emple, l'Espagne veut éviter la « pollution transfrontalière » due à la cul‐ ture d'OGM (Espagne p. 2). Conformément au principe de subsidiarité et pour résoudre l'impasse de l'autorisation des OGM dans l'UE, la directive 2015/412 modifiant la directive 2001/18 a été adoptée.6 Les dispositions modifiées créent une clause, communément appelée, « opt-out », qui don‐ ne aux États membres et à leurs régions la flexibilité et l'autonomie néces‐ saires pour interdire ou restreindre la culture d'OGM autorisée sur leur ter‐ ritoire. L'Italie a renoncé à la culture de six variétés de maïs génétique‐ ment modifié. Au Royaume-Uni, le Pays de Galles, l'Écosse et l'Irlande du Nord ont décidé d'interdire les OGM, mais l'Angleterre n'a pas pris la même direction politique. Après le Brexit, ces choix contrastés pourraient conduire à la création d’obstacles au sein du marché intérieur britannique.7 III. 6 Directive (UE) 2015/412 du Parlement Européen et du Conseil du 11 mars 2015 modifiant la directive 2001/18/CE en ce qui concerne la possibilité pour les États membres de restreindre ou d'interdire la culture d'organismes génétiquement modi‐ fiés (OGM) sur leur territoire JO 68/1. 7 L. Petetin, ‘GMO Cultivation in the UK: Brexit, the Devolved Administrations and International Trade’ (Brexit and Environment Network, The UK in Changing Euro‐ pe) (11 Janvier 2018), https://www.brexitenvironment.co.uk/2018/01/11/gmos-de‐ volution-trade/. A lire aussi, L. Petetin, ‘Managing novel food technologies and Member States’ interests: shifting more powers towards the Member States?’ in M. Varju (eds) Between Compliance and Particularism: Member State Interests and European Union Law (Springer, 2019) sous presse. Rapport général de la Commission III 340 Les enjeux relatifs à l'utilisation des antibiotiques pour les animaux d'élevage et les produits phytopharmaceutiques ont été soulevés en raison de leurs impacts sur l'environnement et la santé humaine – par exemple la résistance aux antibiotiques (Argentine p. 6 ; États-Unis p. 8 ; France p. 2). En outre, le brevetage des variétés végétales a également fait l'objet d'une législation dans différents États (Allemagne p. 14 ; Pologne p. 14 ; France p. 8). Aux États-Unis, par exemple, les obtenteurs qui ont mis au point des semences sont protégés par la loi sur les brevets et la loi sur la protection des variétés végétales.8 En 2016, un ressortissant chinois (qui était un rési‐ dent permanent des États-Unis) a été poursuivi, reconnu coupable et con‐ damné à une peine d'emprisonnement de 36 mois pour conspiration en vue de voler des secrets commerciaux (Etats-Unis p. 6). Les semences de maïs naturel ou parental volées étaient des secrets commerciaux de DuPont Pioneer et de Monsanto.9 Les grandes bases de données et la numérisation ont été identifiées comme offrant d'énormes opportunités et semblent être la clé des futures réformes de la PAC (Espagne p. 7). Elles suscitent également des préoc‐ cupations croissantes, telles que l'utilisation, le stockage, l'échange, la pro‐ priété et la protection des données. Bien que l'Allemagne souhaite être en tête avec le haut débit, l'accès à l'internet et, plus particulièrement, au haut débit fait défaut dans les zones rurales. La législation vise à améliorer la situation mais, selon les experts, elle n’a pas atteint son but jusqu'à pré‐ sent. Le manque d’accès à un internet de bonne qualité en Allemagne est problématique. Ainsi, dans le domaine de l'agriculture de précision, s'il y a une erreur ou un accident dû à un manque d’accès à un internet de bonne qualité avec, par exemple, un tracteur qui sera responsable ou devra rendre des comptes ? Les anciennes lois et les cadres réglementaires ne peuvent pas faire face à ces nouveaux types de technologies. Le secteur agricole pourrait souffrir d'erreurs technologiques (et réglementaires). Enfin, le coût de l'agrotechnologie entraîne une autre série de problèmes dans le monde agricole. Les petites exploitations agricoles ainsi que celles qui éprouvent des difficultés financières ne peuvent pas s’offrir ces nouvelles 8 Pub. L. N. 91-577, 84 Stat. 1542 (1970) (codifiée telle que modifiée dans la section de l’USC titre 7 et 28). 9 US Federal Bureau of Investigation, Protecting Vital Assets: Pilfering of Corn Seeds Illustrates Intellectual Property Theft (19 Decembre 2016), https:// www.fbi.gov/news/stories/sentencing-in-corn-seed-intellectual-property-theft-case. Rapport général de la Commission III 341 technologies coûteuses, ce qui risque de creuser davantage l'écart entre les petites et les grandes exploitations. La multifonctionnalité dans l’agriculture La multifonctionnalité de l'agriculture se concentre progressivement sur des approches alternatives aux activités agricoles tout en respectant la qua‐ lité du produit final, les citoyens et l'environnement. Agriculture sociale De plus en plus les cadres législatifs permettent l'expansion de l'aspect so‐ cial de l'agriculture, y compris le rôle des communautés rurales. Le légis‐ lateur réglemente de nouveaux domaines de relations sociales dans l'agri‐ culture et en relation avec l'agriculture10 ainsi que l'extension des régle‐ mentations légales pour inclure des solutions plus détaillées concernant, par exemple, les critères de sélection des groupes qui peuvent obtenir un financement de l'UE ou le commerce de biens immobiliers agricoles (Po‐ logne p. 24). L'agriculture sociale se concentre sur le développement d’éléments so‐ ciaux, socio-sanitaires, éducatifs et socioprofessionnels ainsi que sur l'amélioration de la qualité de vie des agriculteurs. Elle vise également à améliorer l'accès aux services ruraux et devient un moyen essentiel pour les communautés rurales de prospérer et de maintenir les liens sociaux au sein des zones rurales et, en particulier, des régions défavorisées. Le légis‐ lateur italien encourage la participation de toute la population, y compris des travailleurs handicapés et défavorisés, à l'agriculture et assure égale‐ ment leur éducation (Italie p. 5). L'État polonais a récemment décidé de faciliter la vente au détail et la vente de produits agricoles à la ferme en permettant aux agriculteurs d'ex‐ ercer des activités de transformation à petite échelle au sein de l'exploitati‐ IV. A. 10 R. Budzinowski, Problemy ogólne prawa rolnego: Przemiany podstaw legislacy‐ jnych i koncepcji doktrynalnych [General Problems of Agricultural Law: Transfor‐ mations of Legislative Bases and Doctrinal Concepts], Poznań 2008, p. 42. Rapport général de la Commission III 342 on agricole (Pologne p. 8).11 Les agriculteurs qui se lancent dans de telles activités bénéficient d'incitations fiscales. Les changements introduits vi‐ sent à améliorer la situation économique des petits agriculteurs et à donner aux consommateurs un accès direct et plus large aux produits frais. L'agri‐ culture sociale est un exemple de démocratie alimentaire12 pour restau‐ rer « le rôle traditionnel de l'agriculteur en tant que producteur et transfor‐ mateur d'aliments, tout en ouvrant un nouveau marché d'aliments naturels et sains pour les consommateur » 13 (Pologne p. 12 ; Italie p. 5 ; Argentine p. 34). Pour de nombreux États membres, les paiements directs sont essentiels pour soutenir les agriculteurs et devraient être limités aux agriculteurs ac‐ tifs (réels ?) et non aux propriétaires fonciers. En Espagne, le soutien de la PAC est perçu comme un moyen de créer une équité entre l'industrie agri‐ cole et d'autres industries/secteurs productifs et d'assurer la multifonc‐ tionnalité et la sécurité alimentaire (Espagne p. 5 et 8). La rentabilité des fermes est un autre problème auquel l’agriculture est confrontée. Au con‐ traire, les jeunes veulent vivre de leur entreprise et gagner leur vie avec leur travail et leurs produits. C'est souvent l'une des raisons pour lesquelles le nombre de jeunes entrants est faible. Nourriture Le gaspillage alimentaire devient une priorité politique importante et con‐ stitue l'un des principaux moyens de parvenir à la sécurité alimentaire (Es‐ pagne, Argentine, Pologne, Italie, Allemagne). Le rapport italien explique comment cette problématique est devenue une question gouvernementale centrale, régionale et locale. Le gouvernement italien établit une distinc‐ tion entre le gaspillage dans la chaîne d'approvisionnement alimentaire ou dans les magasins d'alimentation et les restaurants, et le gaspillage alimen‐ taire ménager (Italie p. 7). Pour la première fois en 2015, le ministère itali‐ B. 11 Loi du 16 novembre 2016 sur la modification de certaines lois en vue de faciliter la vente de denrées alimentaires par les agriculteurs. Entrée en force le 1er janvier 2017 (Journal des lois, item 1961). 12 L. Petetin, ‘Food Democracy in Food Systems’ in P.B. Thompson and D.M. Ka‐ plan (eds), Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics (seconde edition, Springer, 2016) p. 1. 13 Voir les motifs de la loi du 16 novembre 2016. (N. 11). Rapport général de la Commission III 343 en de l'Environnement a alloué 500 000 euros pour entreprendre des ac‐ tivités de recherche, de communication et de sensibilisation pour la prévention du gaspillage alimentaire (Italie p. 11). Quinze des vingt régi‐ ons italiennes ont légiféré ou sont en train de légiférer contre le gaspillage alimentaire. En outre, plus de 700 municipalités ont adopté des politiques similaires.14 En 2016, une nouvelle loi italienne15 a été promulguée pour faciliter la récupération et le don des excédents alimentaires et pharmaceu‐ tiques et limiter les impacts négatifs du gaspillage sur l'environnement et les ressources naturelles causés par le cycle de vie du produit (Italie p. 11). Le législateur italien a encouragé la réduction du gaspillage alimentaire et la solidarité sociale avant l'intervention de l'UE.16 En Allemagne, seules des initiatives de marché ont été adoptées jusqu'à présent pour traiter le gaspillage alimentaire. Il n'y a pas de loi applicable. Il n'existe que des déclarations gouvernementales programmatiques (Alle‐ magne p. 43). La sécurité alimentaire a cependant été au centre de l'attenti‐ on du législateur allemand. En 2017, la nouvelle loi sur l’assurance de la santé et la sécurité alimentaire (ESVG) a fusionné deux lois existantes (Allemagne p. 32). L'objectif de la nouvelle loi est de fournir un approvisi‐ onnement alimentaire de base à la population en cas de situation militaire, ainsi qu'en cas de crise d'approvisionnement non militaire, par exemple, de catastrophes naturelles ou de grèves. Les citoyens s'intéressent progressivement à la provenance et à l'origine de leurs aliments (Argentine, passim). La Hongrie a adopté un décret17 sur l'étiquetage des denrées alimentaires et aliments pour animaux sans OGM lorsque les producteurs souhaitent indiquer que leurs produits sont ex‐ empts d'OGM (Hongrie p. 16). Ce décret a été promulgué parce qu'il a été estimé que l'obligation de l'UE d'étiqueter les denrées alimentaires et les aliments pour animaux génétiquement modifiés en vertu du règlement de 2003 sur les denrées alimentaires et les aliments pour animaux et du règle‐ 14 Bologna, 24 Novembre 2014. Stop Food Waste – Feed the Planet: La Carta di Bo‐ logna contro gli Sprechi Alimentari. 15 Loi du 19 août 2016, N. 166. Dispositions concernant le don et la distribution de produits alimentaires et pharmaceutiques pour la solidarité sociale et la limitation du gaspillage (JO 30 Août 2016, N. 202). 16 Résolution du Parlement européen du 16 mai 2017 sur l’initiative relative à l’utili‐ sation efficace des ressources: réduire le gaspillage alimentaire, améliorer la sécu‐ rité alimentaire (2016/2223(INI)). 17 FM décret 61/2016 (IX.15.). Rapport général de la Commission III 344 ment sur la traçabilité18 contenait trop d'exceptions. Selon le décret, un produit peut contenir au maximum 0,1 % d'OGM autorisé par l'UE (c'est le niveau qui peut être mesuré par les technologies actuelles). Les poissons, la viande, le lait ou les œufs et les denrées alimentaires ne peuvent être considérés comme exempts d'OGM que si l'aliment donné à l'animal ré‐ pond aux exigences du décret sur les aliments pour animaux exempts d'OGM. Aux États-Unis, cet intérêt s'élargit et comprend de nombreux produits. Les revendications marketing comprennent des produits de viande pro‐ venant d'animaux qui n'ont pas reçu d'hormones ou de bêta-agonistes (Etats-Unis p. 6) ou produits sans OGM. Plus important encore, le Con‐ grès américain a adopté la loi de 2016 sur les standards nationaux de pu‐ blication d’aliments issus de bio-ingénierie, qui exige des étiquettes pour les aliments génétiquement modifiés19 (Etats-Unis p. 4). En Italie, il y a eu une augmentation de la demande de la population pour identifier l'origine des aliments de base, y compris le lait, les pâtes et le riz (Italie p. 20). Le public s'intéresse aussi à la qualité, à l'éthique et à la sécurité des aliments qu'ils consomment. La France a des priorités similaires avec un débat na‐ tional sur l'alimentation (les Etats Généraux de l'Alimentation de 2017) qui apportera des changements législatifs et des modifications relatives à la production agricole. Cependant, quand les opérations de traitement se passent dans différents pays, la problématique de l’étiquetage devrait être résolue au niveau européen. 18 Règlement (CE) 1829/2003 du Parlement Européen et du Conseil du 22 septembre 2003 concernant les denrées alimentaires et les aliments pour animaux génétique‐ ment modifiés [2003] JO L268/1; et Règlement (CE) 1830/2003 du Parlement Eu‐ ropéen et du Conseil du 22 septembre 2003 concernant la traçabilité et l'étiquetage des organismes génétiquement modifiés et la traçabilité des produits destinés à l'alimentation humaine ou animale produits à partir d'organismes génétiquement modifiés, et modifiant la directive 2001/18/CE [2003] JO L268/24. Pour plus d'in‐ formations sur les aliments génétiquement modifiés, voir L. Petetin, ‘Precaution and Equivalence – The Critical Interplay in EU Biotech Foods’ (2017) 42 Euro‐ pean Law Review 831. 19 Public Law 114-216, 130 Stat. 834 (2016), modifiant la loi sur la commercialisati‐ on des produits agricoles de 1946 par l’ajout des sous-titres E et F, codifié à l’art. 7 USC §§ 1639-1639c, §§ 1639i-1639j, § 6524. Toutefois, l'USDA est en train de fi‐ xer le seuil pour l'étiquetage des OGM. Un seuil élevé conduirait à ce que peu de produits soient étiquetés comme contenant des ingrédients génétiquement modi‐ fiés. Rapport général de la Commission III 345 Une Agriculture plus verte Dans de nombreux rapports, l'élan en faveur d'une agriculture plus durable se fait sentir (Bulgarie p. 2 ; Allemagne p. 34 ; Pologne, passim). Plus gé‐ néralement, en France, le nouvel article L. 110-1 II du Code de l'environ‐ nement établit des principes environnementaux fondamentaux pour guider l'élaboration de nouvelles normes environnementales : le principe de soli‐ darité écologique ; le principe d'utilisation durable ; la complémentarité entre environnement, agriculture, aquaculture et gestion durable des forêts ; et le principe de non-régression (France p. 6). Aux Pays-Bas, une importante opération législative est en cours pour rassembler une trentaine d'actes formels dans un seul Code de l'environnement physique. La loi sur le zonage, la loi sur la gestion de l'environnement, la loi sur la conservati‐ on de la nature ainsi que d'autres lois sur l'agriculture et sur l'utilisation des terres y sont inclues. Le Code entrera en vigueur en 2019 (Pays-Bas, p. 1). Aux États-Unis, l'État du Maryland est devenu le premier État à rest‐ reindre l'application de néonicotinoïdes (insecticides qui pourraient nuire aux insectes bénéfiques, comme les abeilles) par le public, dans la loi de 2016 sur la protection des pollinisateurs,20 et l'utilisation du glyphosate (comme dans l'UE) suscite de plus en plus de préoccupations (p. 11 et 12 aux États-Unis). En outre, le Royaume-Uni et la Pologne appellent à une agriculture durable en plaçant au cœur de ses services écosystémiques (Royaume-Uni p. 19 ; Pologne p. 5). Accès à la terre Plusieurs États membres ont pris des mesures pour restreindre l'acquisition de terres par des sociétés (étrangères) afin d'empêcher l'accaparement des terres. La Pologne a modifié sa législation relative à l'acquisition de terres agricoles en Pologne dans la loi sur le système agricole. La loi limite l'ac‐ quisition de terres agricoles exclusivement aux agriculteurs actifs (« agri‐ culteurs individuels » dans le texte de la loi) qui gèrent des exploitations C. V. 20 Maryland SB 198/HB 211, codifié comme Annotated Code of Maryland, §§ 5-2A-01 to 5-2A-05. À compter du 1er janvier 2018, seuls les applicateurs de pesticides certifiés, les agriculteurs qui utilisent les pesticides à des fins agricoles ou les vétérinaires peuvent utiliser des néonicotinoïdes. Rapport général de la Commission III 346 agricoles familiales.21 Avant cette réforme, les dispositions de la loi sur le système agricole avaient conduit à des acquisitions spéculatives et à la vente de terres à des non agriculteurs. Ce phénomène a conduit à un re‐ groupement des propriétés foncières entre les mains d'un petit nombre de personnes, y compris des sociétés étrangères, qui ne s'intéressent pas à la production agricole mais à la propriété foncière (Pologne p. 6). Toutefois, les règles actuelles semblent rendre l'achat de terres difficile pour les jeu‐ nes agriculteurs en raison des conditions établies. La loi définit les « agri‐ culteurs individuels » comme des personnes physiques possédant les qua‐ lifications spécifiées dans la loi sur le système agricole, qui exploitent une exploitation agricole familiale de 300 hectares au maximum depuis au moins cinq ans et qui résident pendant toute cette période sur le territoire de la commune où se trouve au moins un bien immobilier faisant partie de l'exploitation agricole (Pologne, p. 6). La loi prévoit néanmoins des excep‐ tions pour le plus proche parent et les membres de la famille en général. Une autre exception existe si l'acheteur veut établir une ferme familiale pendant au moins 10 ans (Pologne p. 7). La Commission européenne a lancé des procédures en manquement contre les réformes de d’acquisition de terres dans plusieurs États mem‐ bres, dont la Hongrie et la Bulgarie (Bulgarie, p. 1). En Hongrie, l'interdic‐ tion des personnes morales propriétaires de terres est au cœur de la réfor‐ me pour « éviter la chaîne de propriété incontrôlable qui empêche la popu‐ lation de maintenir leur capacité à préserver le pays ».22 La France a égale‐ ment pris des mesures pour empêcher l'accaparement des terres sur son territoire. Les lois récentes garantissent que les terrains ne sont pas achetés uniquement par des entreprises (France p. 1).23 En Allemagne, l'acquisiti‐ on de terres était également problématique car seuls les grands investis‐ seurs achetaient des terres, ce qui a modifié le paysage agricole. Au‐ jourd’hui de nouvelles mesures gouvernementales empêchent la vente de terres à de grands investisseurs non agricoles (Allemagne p. 10). L'abandon des terres est devenu un problème majeur dans de nombreux pays d'Europe (Espagne, Allemagne, Italie). Ce phénomène a de nombreu‐ 21 Loi du 14 avril 2016 sur la suspension de la vente de biens immobiliers inclus dans le stock de biens agricoles du Trésor public et modifiant certaines autres lois, qui est entrée en vigueur le 30 avril 2016. 22 R. Anikó, ‘Topical Issues of the Hungarian Land-Transfer Law’, CEDR Journal of Rural Law, 2017/1, sous presse. 23 Loi du 20 mars 2017, N. 348. Rapport général de la Commission III 347 ses conséquences négatives allant de l'absence de changement intergénéra‐ tionnel (en raison du vieillissement de la population rurale et agricole) à un manque de successeurs ainsi qu'à des risques accrus d'incendies dans les régions plus sèches d'Europe en raison du manque d'entretien des ter‐ res. Moins de terres cultivées signifie moins de terres disponibles pour produire de la nourriture, ce qui nuit à la sécurité alimentaire. En Espagne, il y a un manque de fonds disponibles pour l'achat de ter‐ res, en particulier pour les jeunes agriculteurs. En outre, la location de ter‐ res agricoles en Espagne est trop coûteuse et les régimes juridiques sont favorables au propriétaire. Le rôle des banques dans l'octroi de prêts, en particulier aux jeunes entrants, devrait être développé et pourrait donner un élan au changement intergénérationnel. De plus, en Espagne, un grand nombre des successions agricoles ne sont plus utilisées comme exploitati‐ ons agricoles. La terre est gardée par la famille mais pas pour cultiver. En Italie, une banque recensant les terres agricoles a été créée pour assurer une utilisation appropriée des terres agricoles et faciliter l'acquisition de terres par les jeunes agriculteurs (moins de 40 ans).24 Cette banque de données a été complétée par des mesures visant à encourager l'auto-entre‐ preneuriat agricole et l'établissement de jeunes agriculteurs, ainsi que par des aides financières correspondantes.25 En outre, les campagnes alleman‐ des sont de plus en plus désertées en raison de leur manque d'attractivité et de vitalité rurale. Le Brexit et l’Agriculture Le Brexit a été identifié comme une problématique actuelle et future qui devrait être abordée par l'UE et le Royaume-Uni (Allemagne p. 40 ; Espa‐ gne p. 6). Au Royaume-Uni, le Brexit offre une occasion unique de rena‐ tionaliser les droits précédemment exercés par l'UE. Cette opportunité s'accompagne de défis qu'il faut aborder pour assurer une transition en douceur entre un Royaume-Uni pré-Brexit et post-Brexit. Le rapatriement des compétences de l'UE vers le Royaume-Uni en matière de protection de VI. 24 Loi sur 28 Juillet 2016, N. 154, spécialement l’article 16. 25 Décret ministériel, N. 1192, 8 Janvier 2016; et Décret ministériel, N. 8254, 3 août 2016 (Avisn° 60690 du 10/08/2017 - Concernant les Caractéristiques, les Modali‐ tés et les Formulaires de Soumission des Demandes d'Accès aux Contrats de Filiè‐ re et de District). Rapport général de la Commission III 348 l'environnement et d'agriculture fait l'objet d'une attention particulière, ces domaines ayant été transférés à l'Assemblée d'Irlande du Nord, au Parle‐ ment écossais et à l'Assemblée nationale du Pays de Galles. Actuellement, les régions décentralisées peuvent fixer leurs propres normes et cadres tant qu'elles restent conformes au droit de l'UE. Après le Brexit, les divergen‐ ces dans les normes entre les quatre nations du Royaume-Uni pourraient entraîner des problèmes en ce qui concerne le marché unique/intérieur bri‐ tannique parce que le commerce à l'intérieur du Royaume-Uni pourrait être restreint. Pour le gouvernement britannique, il est crucial d'assurer l'harmonisation et l'absence de barrières commerciales au sein de son mar‐ ché intérieur.26 Divers projets de loi (dont un sur l'agriculture) sont en cours d'élaboration afin de répondre à ces questions. Un autre point de discorde concerne la manière de soutenir les agricult‐ eurs une fois que l'application de la PAC aura pris fin. Le Royaume-Uni s'oriente vers un système de soutien basé sur le paiement des services écosystémiques (Royaume-Uni p. 19). Toutefois, la compatibilité de ce fu‐ tur cadre avec l'Accord sur l'agriculture de l'Organisation mondiale du commerce, en particulier la question de savoir si un tel soutien relèverait de la catégorie verte (par opposition à la catégorie orange), est remise en question. Actuellement, il semble que les paiements pour les services écosystémiques ne pourraient pas relever de la définition de l'annexe 2 de l'Accord sur l'agriculture et être considérés comme des subventions de la catégorie verte (lorsque les paiements reçus peuvent être illimités) (Royaume-Uni, p. 17). Cela pose problème pour le Royaume-Uni car si les paiements pour les services écosystémiques étaient effectivement des subventions de la catégorie orange, ils seraient automatiquement considé‐ rés comme des entorses aux règles de commerce et seraient soumis à des limites quant au montant des paiements autorisés.27 26 L. Petetin (n 7). 27 L. Petetin, ‘Post-Brexit Agricultural Support and the WTO: Using Both the Amber and Green Boxes?’ Brexit and Environment Network (2018) https://www.brex‐ itenvironment.co.uk/2018/06/21/post-brexit-agricultural-support-wto-using-am‐ ber-green-boxes/. Rapport général de la Commission III 349 General Report of Commission III Version anglaise – English version – Englische Version Dr. Ludivine Petetin Cardiff University Introduction The period since the XXVIIIth European Congress on Rural Law held in Potsdam has seen changes along various axes. A central axis is the inte‐ gration of environmental concerns (broadly defined to include food, so‐ cial, ethical and cultural characteristics) into farming activities and result‐ ing food products. Another cross-cutting theme that emerges is the rela‐ tionship between agriculture and legal instruments. Indeed, multiple re‐ ports highlight the often-weak nature and status of the existing legislative instruments to deal with farming and protect farmers. Crucially, these in‐ struments are often accompanied by too much bureaucracy and too much red tape at multiple levels – sometimes preventing innovation. Their abili‐ ty to handle current issues and demands is strongly questioned. In particu‐ lar, questions were raised as to the data and (scientific) expertise used to establish new provisions and mechanisms. A modernisation of existing le‐ gal and regulatory instruments, both in qualitative and quantitative terms, felt required to update the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), especially those applicable to the rural economy, climate versatility, price volatility and competitivity.1 National Reports submitted to Commission III developed strong links between initiatives and legislation at European Union (EU) and national level.2 Overall, National Rapporteurs have set positive outlooks and per‐ spectives on difficult but critical issues over agriculture. Accordingly, five broader themes have been identified, these being as follows: I. 1 These objectives are confirmed in the 2017 CAP Communication from the Com‐ mission. See Communication from the Commission, ‘The Future of Food and Farming’ COM(2017) 713 final. 2 Commission III included eleven National Reports and one Individual Report. 350 • The situation in the dairy sector • The use of new technologies in farming • Multifunctionality in agriculture • Access to land • Brexit and agriculture The Situation in the Dairy Sector Many national reports highlight the difficulties the dairy farming industry is experiencing following the end of the milk quotas in March 2015. Until that date, the milk market in the EU was one of the most regulated and subsidised worldwide. The removal of milk quotas, that is the basic legal instrument functioning in this market, led to considerable modifications of the market and the power relationships within it. Agricultural producers lost guarantees that used to stabilise supplies. Milk prices have been steadily falling since April 2015. Additional EU and national legislative acts were adopted to support milk producers. In Spain, measures were established to support the struggling dairy in‐ dustry (Spain p. 3). Direct payments coming from the national Spanish budget and the European budget (under the Commission Delegated Regu‐ lation (EU) 2015/1853 of 15 October 2015 providing for temporary excep‐ tional aid to farmers in the livestock sectors3) have been put in place to absorb shocks and imbalances in the international dairy market. Similarly, Poland – despite being ranked 12th in the worldwide production of milk and dairy products – has been particularly affected by the disappearance of milk quotas and has also been the recipient of European aid for milk pro‐ ducers (Poland p. 19). France also enacted a law in December 2016 that aims to strengthen the role of milk producers when signing contracts with companies. Under this statute, farmers are considered as the weak party in the contract and beneficiate from specific protection (France p. 16). Simi‐ larly in Spain, the Spanish Code of Good Business Practices in Food Pro‐ curement Contracting aims to improve farmers’ livelihoods (including dairy farmers) by creating a ‘fairer contractual environment’ in which they II. 3 Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2015/1853 of 15 October 2015 Providing for Temporary Exceptional Aid to Farmers in the Livestock Sectors [2015] OJ L271/25. General Report of Commission III 351 operate since farmers are the weakest link in the contractual relationship (Individual Report, p. 4). In contrast, the Netherlands anticipated the removal of milk quotas and perceived this change as an economic opportunity (Netherlands p. 3). The media nicknamed the end of milk quotas: ‘liberation day’. In 2013-14, the Dutch milk production reached above 4 % of the national milk quota and in 2014-15 the production raised another 4.1 %,4whilst the number of cows grew from 1,55 million to 1,57 million. Around 70 % of the Dutch dairy farmers have built new cowsheds or planned to expand the size of their farming infrastructures shortly. However, these changes are problem‐ atically increasing the phosphate production of animals. Both the Netherlands (Netherlands p. 3) and Spain (Spain p. 4) have set limits to the number of cattle permissible on a single farm for different reasons. In Spain, this was undertaken to not encourage milk production in order to strengthen the position of the farmer in the food supply chain. In the Netherlands, it is to diminish the production of manure. Indeed, to solve the issue of overproduction of manure, the Dutch government intro‐ duced a new production instrument (Netherlands p. 4). Phosphate-rights aim to reduce the number of cattle to get under the national phosphate ceiling.5 These rights consist of a production ceiling based on the 2014 production level attached to a prohibition to expand beyond that level. These rights are transferable between farmers. Interestingly, this has led to the disappearance of the surplus of manure and to the emergence of a black market. In Germany, there are generally fewer cows on the farm because live‐ stock farming conditions as they stand are no longer accepted by the popu‐ lation due to animal health and welfare concerns as well as ethical and cul‐ tural factors. This is also applicable to other types of livestock. The Use of New Technologies in Farming New technologies in farming can provide economic opportunities, such as higher yields and improved competitivity, but can raise structural issues and environmental and health concerns. Biotechnologies and genetically III. 4 Kamerstukken II, 2014/15, 33979, No. 99. 5 W. Bruil – Onder het Fosfaatplafond! TVAR 2017/3, p. 99. General Report of Commission III 352 modified organisms (GMOs) are such examples. For instance, Spain wants to avoid ‘cross-border pollution’ from GMO cultivation (Spain p. 2). In line with the principle of subsidiarity and to solve the EU GMO authorisa‐ tion deadlock, Directive 2015/412 amending Directive 2001/18 was adopt‐ ed.6 The amended provisions create an ‘opt-out’ clause, as it is often called, that gives flexibility and autonomy to Member States and their re‐ gions to ban or restrict the cultivation of authorised GMOs on their territo‐ ries. Italy opted-out from the cultivation of six GM corn varieties. In the UK, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland have decided to ban GMOs but England has not chosen the same policy decision. After Brexit, these con‐ trasting choices could lead to the establishment of obstacles within the UK internal market.7 Issues of the utilisation of antibiotics for farmed animals and plant pro‐ tection products have come to the fore because of their impact on the envi‐ ronment and human health – for instance antibiotics resistance (Argentina p. 6; US p. 8; France p. 2). Further, the patenting of plant varieties has also been the subject of the legislator in different states (Germany p. 14; Poland p. 14; France p. 8). In the US, for example, plant breeders who have developed seed are protected by patent law and the Plant Variety Pro‐ tection Act.8In 2016, a Chinese national (who was a permanent US resi‐ dent) was prosecuted, convicted and sentenced to a 36-month prison term for conspiracy to steal trade secrets (US p. 6). The stolen inbred, or parent, corn seeds were the trade secrets of DuPont Pioneer and Monsanto.9 6 Directive (EU) 2015/412 of the European Parliament and of the Council amending Directive 2001/18/EC as regards the Possibility for the Member States to Restrict or Prohibit the Cultivation of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) in their Terri‐ tory [2015] OJ 68/1. 7 L. Petetin, ‘GMO Cultivation in the UK: Brexit, the Devolved Administrations and International Trade’ (Brexit and Environment Network, The UK in Changing Euro‐ pe) (11 January 2018), https://www.brexitenvironment.co.uk/2018/01/11/gmos-de‐ volution-trade/; See also, L. Petetin, ‘Managing Novel Food Technologies and Member States’ Interests: Shifting More Powers Towards the Member States?’ in M. Varju (eds) Between Compliance and Particularism: Member State Interests and European Union Law (Springer, 2019) in press. 8 Pub. L. No. 91-577, 84 Stat. 1542 (1970) (codified as amended in sections of USC titles 7 and 28). 9 US Federal Bureau of Investigation, Protecting Vital Assets: Pilfering of Corn Seeds Illustrates Intellectual Property Theft (19 December 2016), https:// www.fbi.gov/news/stories/sentencing-in-corn-seed-intellectual-property-theft-case. General Report of Commission III 353 Big data and digitalisation have been identified as offering tremendous opportunities and appear key to future CAP reforms (Spain p. 7). They also generate growing concerns, such as the use, storage, exchange, own‐ ership and protection of data. In Germany, access to internet, and more specifically broadband, is lacking in rural areas, whilst Germany wants to be leading with broadband. The legislation aims to improve the situation but it has been unsuccessful so far, according to experts. The lack of good quality internet in Germany is problematic. For instance, with precision farming if there is a mistake or an accident due for instance to the poor quality of the internet, with for example a tractor, who will be responsible or accountable? Old laws and regulatory frameworks cannot cope with these newer types of technologies. The farming sector could suffer from technological (and regulatory) mistakes. Finally, the cost of agri-technolo‐ gy leads to another set of problems in the farming world. Small farms as well as those who are financially struggling cannot offer these new expen‐ sive technologies, potentially widening further the gap between small and large farms. Multifunctionality in Agriculture The multifunctionality of agriculture progressively focuses on alternative approaches to farming activities whilst respecting the quality of the endproduct, citizens and the environment. Social agriculture Increasingly, legislative frameworks allow for the expansion of the social side of farming, including the role of rural communities. The legislator is regulating new areas of social relations in agriculture and in connection with agriculture10, as well as expanding legal regulations to include more detailed solutions, concerning, for example, the criteria of selection of groups that may obtain EU financing or the trade of agricultural real prop‐ erty (Poland p. 24). IV. A. 10 R. Budzinowski, Problemy ogólne prawa rolnego: Przemiany podstaw legislacy‐ jnych i koncepcji doktrynalnych [General Problems of Agricultural Law: Transfor‐ mations of Legislative Bases and Doctrinal Concepts], Poznań 2008, p. 42. General Report of Commission III 354 Social agriculture focuses on the development of social, socio-sanitary, educational and socio-professional features as well as improving the quali‐ ty of life of farmers. It also intends to improve access to rural services and is evolving into a key means for rural communities to thrive and to main‐ tain social links within rural areas and in particular disadvantaged regions. The Italian legislator is also encouraging the participation of all part of the population in farming, including from handicapped and disadvantaged workers as well as ensuring their education (Italy p. 5). The Polish State has recently decided to facilitate the retail and sale of agricultural products on the farm by allowing farmers to run small-scale processing activities within the farm holding (Poland p. 8).11 Farmers tak‐ ing up such activities benefit from tax incentives. The introduced changes aim to improve the economic situation of small farmers and to give con‐ sumers direct access to a wider access of fresh products. Social agriculture is an example of food democracy12to restore ‘the traditional role of farmer as producer and processor of food, while opening up a new market of nat‐ ural and healthy food for consumers’13 (Poland p. 12; Italy p. 5; Argentina p. 34). For many Member States, direct payments are crucial to support farm‐ ers and should be confined to active (real?) farmers – not owners of land. In Spain, CAP support is perceived as a way to create fairness between the agricultural industry and other productive industries/sectors as well as en‐ suring multifunctionality and food security (Spain p. 5 and 8). Another problem with farming is that many farms are not profitable. In contrast, young people want to live off their business and making a living with their work and produce. Often, this is one of the reasons why the number of young entrants is low. 11 Act of 16 November 2016 on the Amendment of Certain Acts in order to Facilitate the Sale of Food by Farmers. It entered into force on 1 January 2017 (Journal of Laws, item 1961). 12 L. Petetin, ‘Food Democracy in Food Systems’ in P.B. Thompson and D.M. Ka‐ plan (eds), Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics (2nd edn, Springer, 2016) p. 1. 13 See grounds of the Act of 16 November 2016 (n 11). General Report of Commission III 355 Food Food waste is becoming an important policy focus and constitutes one of the main pathways to achieve food security (Spain; Argentina; Poland; Italy; Germany). The Italian report explains how this issue has become a central governmental, regional and local issue. The Italian government distinguishes between waste within the food supply chain or in food out‐ lets and restaurants, and household food waste (Italy p. 7). For the first time in 2015, the Italian Environment Ministry allocated 500k euros to un‐ dertake research, communication and sensitisation for the prevention against food waste (Italy p. 11). Fifteen out of twenty Italian regions have or are in the process of legislating against food waste. Further, over 700 municipalities have adopted similar policies.14 In 2016, a new Italian act15 was promulgated to facilitate the recovery and donation of food and phar‐ maceutical surpluses and limit the negative impacts of waste on the envi‐ ronment and natural resources caused by the product’s life cycle (Italy p. 11). The Italian legislator encouraged the reduction of food waste and social solidarity prior to EU intervention.16 In Germany, only market initiatives have so far been adopted to deal with food waste. There is no law applicable. There are only programmatic governmental declarations (Germany p. 43). Food security has, however, been at the centre of the attention of the German legislator. In 2017, the new Food Safety and Health Assurance Act (ESVG) merged two existing laws (Germany p. 32). The purpose of the new act is to provide a basic supply of food to the population in the event of a military situation, as well as in the event of a non-military supply crisis, for example, natural disasters or strikes. Citizens are gradually interested in the provenance and origin of their food (Argentina, passim). Hungary has adopted a decree17 on the labelling of GM-free food and feedstuffs when producers wish to indicate the B. 14 Bologna, 24 November 2014. Stop Food Waste – Feed the Planet: La Carta di Bo‐ logna contro gli Sprechi Alimentari. 15 Law of 19 August 2016, No. 166. Provisions Concerning the Donation and Distri‐ bution of Food and Pharmaceutical Products for Social Solidarity and the Limita‐ tion of Waste (OJ 30 August 2016, No. 202). 16 European Parliament Resolution of 16 May 2017 on Initiative on Resource Effi‐ ciency: Reducing Food Waste, Improving Food Safety (2016/2223(INI)). 17 FM decree 61/2016 (IX.15.). General Report of Commission III 356 GM-free nature of their produce (Hungary p. 16). This decree was enacted because it was felt that the EU obligation to label GM foods and feed un‐ der the 2003 Food and Feed Regulation and Traceability Regulation18 con‐ tained too many exceptions. According to the decree, a product is allowed to contain a maximum of 0.1 % of a GMO authorised by the EU (which is the level that can be measured by current technologies). Fish, meat, milk or egg, and foods can be considered as GM-free only if the feed given to the animal meets the requirements of the decree on GM-free feed. In the US, this interest is becoming wider and includes many products. Marketing claims include meat products that came from animals that did not receive hormones or beta agonists (US p. 6) or GM-free products. More importantly, the US Congress enacted the 2016 National Bioengi‐ neered Food Disclosure Standard (GM Disclosure Law), which requires labels for GM food19 (US p. 4). In Italy, there has been a rise in public de‐ mand to identify the origin of staple foods, including milk, pasta and rice (Italy p. 20). People are also interested in the quality, the ethics and the safety of the foods they eat. France has similar priorities with a nationwide debate on food (the 2017 Etats Généraux de l’ Alimentation) that will bring change to the law and to agricultural production. However, when op‐ erations of processing occur in different countries, issues of labelling the origin of the food remain to be solved at EU level. 18 Respectively Regulation (EC) 1829/2003 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 September 2003 on Genetically Modified Food and Feed [2003] OJ L268/1; and Regulation (EC) 1830/2003 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 September 2003 concerning the Traceability and Labelling of Ge‐ netically Modified Organisms and the Traceability of Food and Feed Products pro‐ duced from Genetically Modified Organisms and amending Directive 2001/18/EC [2003] OJ L268/24. For more on GM foods, see L. Petetin, ‘Precaution and Equiv‐ alence – The Critical Interplay in EU Biotech Foods’ (2017) 42 European Law Re‐ view 831. 19 Public Law 114-216, 130 Stat. 834 (2016), amending the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946 by adding Subtitles E and F, codified at 7 USC §§ 1639-1639c, §§ 1639i-1639j, § 6524. However, the USDA is in the process of setting the threshold for GMO labelling. A high threshold would lead to few products being labelled as containing GM ingredients. General Report of Commission III 357 A Greener Agriculture In multiple reports, the drive for a more sustainable agriculture can be felt (Bulgaria p. 2; Germany p. 34; Poland, passim). More generally, in France, the new article L. 110-1 II of the Environment Code establishes fundamental environmental principles to guide the drafting of further envi‐ ronmental norms: the principle of ecological solidarity; the principle of sustainable use; the complementarity between the environment, agricul‐ ture, aquaculture and sustainable forest management; and the principle of non-regression (France p. 6). In the Netherlands, a major legislative opera‐ tion is underway to compile around thirty formal acts in one Code for the Physical Environment. The Zoning Act, the Environmental Management Act, Nature Conservancy Act are included as well as other acts on land use and agriculture. The Code will enter into effect in 2019 (Netherlands p. 1). In the US, the state of Maryland became the first state to restrict the application of neonicotinoids (insecticides that could harm beneficial in‐ sects, such as bees) by consumers, in the Pollinator Protection Act of 201620and there is growing concerns in relation to the use of glyphosate (as in the EU) (US p. 11 and 12). Further, the UK and Poland call for a sustainable agriculture placing at its heart ecosystem services (UK p. 19; Poland p. 5). Access to Land Various Member States have established measures to restrict the acquisi‐ tion of land by (foreign) companies to prevent land grabbing. Poland has modified its laws relating to the acquisition of farming land in Poland in the Act on the Agricultural System (AAS). The act restricts the acquisition of farming land exclusively to active farmers (‘individual famers’ in the text of the act) running family farm holdings.21Prior to this reform, the C. V. 20 Maryland SB 198/HB 211, codified as Annotated Code of Maryland, §§ 5-2A-01 to 5-2A-05. Beginning 1 January 2018, only certified pesticide applicators, farm‐ ers using the pesticide for agricultural purposes, or veterinarians may use neoni‐ cotinoids. 21 Act of 14 April 2016 on Suspending the Sale of Real Properties included in the Agricultural Property Stock of the State Treasury and amending some other acts, which took effect on 30 April 2016. General Report of Commission III 358 provisions of the AAS led to speculative acquisitions and to land being sold to non-farmers. This resulted in a concentration of land ownership in a few hands, including foreign companies, not interested in agriculture production but property ownership (Poland p. 6). However, the current rules appear to make it difficult for young farmers to buy land due to the conditions established. The act defines ‘individual farmers’ as natural per‐ sons with qualifications specified in the AAS, who have been running a family farming holding of no more than 300 hectares for at least 5 years and residing throughout this period within the territory of the municipality in which at least one real property forming part of the farming holding is located (Poland p. 6). The act nonetheless provides for exceptions to the next of kin and family members more generally. Another exception exists if the buyer wants to establish a family farm for at least 10 years (Poland p. 7). The EU Commission has launched infringement procedures against the land acquisition reforms in various Member States, including Hungary and Bulgaria (Bulgaria p. 1). In Hungary, a ban on legal entities owning land is central to the reform to ‘avoid the uncontrollable chain of ownership which would be in contradiction with keeping the population preserving ability of the country’.22France has also enacted measures to prevent land grabbing on its territory. Recent laws ensure that land is not bought by companies only (France p. 1).23 In Germany, land acquisition was also problematic because only big investors were purchasing land modifying the agricultural landscape. New governmental measures prevent the sale of land to big non-agricultural investors (Germany p. 10). Land abandonment has become a salient problem in many countries across Europe (Spain; Germany; Italy). This phenomenon has many nega‐ tive consequences ranging from the lack of intergenerational change (due to an ageing rural and farming population) to a lack of successors as well greater risks of fires in drier parts of Europe because of the lack of mainte‐ nance of the land. Less land being farmed means less land available to produce food, which is detrimental to food security. In Spain, there is a lack of funds available to purchase land, especially for young farmers. Further, leasing agricultural land in Spain is too costly and the legal regimes are favourable to the owner. The role of banks in 22 R. Anikó, ‘Topical Issues of the Hungarian Land-Transfer Law’, CEDR Journal of Rural Law, 2017/1, in press. 23 Act 20 March 2017, No. 348. General Report of Commission III 359 providing loans, especially to young entrants, should be developed and could provide impetus to intergenerational change. Also in Spain, a great number of farm successions are no longer used as farms. The land is kept by the family but not to farm. In Italy, a bank of agricultural land has been created to ensure the appropriate use of agricultural land and to facilitate the acquisition of land by young farmers (under 40 years old).24 This data bank has been complemented with measures to encourage agricultural self-entrepreneurship and the establishment of young farmers, as well as some corresponding financial aid.25 Further, Germany’s countryside is be‐ coming increasingly deserted because of its lack of attractiveness and rural vitality. Brexit and Agriculture Brexit was identified as a current and future issue that ought to be ad‐ dressed by the EU as well as the UK (Germany p. 40; Spain p. 6). In the UK, Brexit presents a ‘once-in-a-generation’ chance to renationalise rights previously exercised by the EU. This opportunity comes with challenges that need to be addressed to ensure a smooth transition between a pre- Brexit and post-Brexit UK. The repatriation of competences from the EU to the UK on matters of environmental protection and agriculture is at‐ tracting particular attention as these areas have been devolved to the Northern Ireland Assembly, the Scottish Parliament and the National As‐ sembly for Wales. Currently, the devolved regions can set their own stan‐ dards and frameworks so long as they remain compliant with EU Law. Af‐ ter Brexit, divergences in standards between the four Nations of the UK could lead to problems, especially relating to the UK single/internal mar‐ ket as trade within the UK could be restricted. For the British Govern‐ ment, ensuring harmonisation and the absence of barriers to trade within the UK internal market is crucial.26 Various bills (including one on agri‐ culture) are in the process of being drafted to tackle these issues. VI. 24 Act 28 July 2016, No. 154, especially Article 16. 25 Ministerial Decree, No. 1192, 8 January 2016; and Ministerial Decree, No. 8254, 3 August 2016 (Avis n ° 60690 du 10/08/2017 - Concernant les Caractéristiques, les Modalités et les Formulaires de Soumission des Demandes d'Accès aux Contrats de Filière et de District). 26 L. Petetin (n 7). General Report of Commission III 360 Another point of contention is how to support farmers once the applica‐ tion of the CAP comes to an end. The UK is moving towards a support system based on payments for ecosystem services (UK p. 19). However, the compatibility of this future framework with the Agreement on Agricul‐ ture of the World Trade Organization, especially whether such support would fall under the Green Box (as opposed to the Amber Box) is ques‐ tioned. Currently, it appears that payments for ecosystem services could not fall under the definition of Annex 2 of the Agreement on Agriculture and be considered as Green Box subsidies (where received payments can be unlimited) (UK p. 17). This is problematic for the UK because if pay‐ ments for ecosystem services were indeed Amber Box subsidies, they would automatically be considered as trade distorting and be subject to limits in the amount of payments allowed.27 27 For more, please see L. Petetin, ‘Post-Brexit Agricultural Support and the WTO: Using Both the Amber and Green Boxes?’ Brexit and Environment Network (2018) https://www.brexitenvironment.co.uk/2018/06/21/post-brexit-agricultural-s upport-wto-using-amber-green-boxes/. General Report of Commission III 361 Generalbericht der Kommission III* Version allemande – German version – Deutsche Version Dr. Ludivine Petetin Universität Cardiff Einleitung Seit dem XXVIII. Europäischen Kongress für Agrarrecht in Potsdam ha‐ ben sich Veränderungen in verschiedenen Richtungen vollzogen. Eine zen‐ trale Rolle spielt die Integration von Umweltbelangen (welche breit ge‐ fasst Lebensmittel, soziale, ethische und kulturelle Merkmale einschlies‐ sen) in landwirtschaftliche Tätigkeiten und daraus resultierende Lebens‐ mittel. Ein weiteres Querschnittsthema ist die Beziehung zwischen Land‐ wirtschaft und rechtlichen Instrumenten. In mehreren Berichten wird auf die oft schwache Natur und den Status der bestehenden Legislativinstru‐ mente für die Landwirtschaft und den Schutz der Landwirte hingewiesen. Entscheidend ist, dass diese Instrumente oft von übermäßiger Bürokratie auf mehreren Ebenen begleitet werden, was manchmal Innovationen ver‐ hindert. Ihre Fähigkeit, mit aktuellen Themen und Herausforderungen um‐ zugehen, wird stark in Frage gestellt. Insbesondere stellen sich Fragen zu Daten und der (wissenschaftlichen) Expertise, die für die Einführung neu‐ er Bestimmungen und Mechanismen verwendet wurden. Eine Modernisie‐ rung der bestehenden Rechts- und Regulierungsinstrumente, sowohl in qualitativer als auch in quantitativer Hinsicht, war erforderlich, um die Gemeinsame Agrarpolitik (GAP) zu aktualisieren, insbesondere die für die ländliche Wirtschaft, Klimavielfalt, Preisvolatilität und Wettbewerbsfähig‐ keit.1 I. * Übersetzung aus dem Englischen ins Deutsche von Chloé Vida Martins, MLaw, Universität Neuenburg. 1 Diese Ziele werden in der GAP-Mitteilung 2017 der Kommission bestätigt. Siehe Mitteilung der Kommission "Ernährung und Landwirtschaft der Zukunft", COM(2017) 713 final. 362 Aus die nationalen Berichten, die der Kommission III vorgelegt worden sind, entwickelten sich enge Verbindungen zwischen Initiativen und Ge‐ setzgebung auf EU- und nationaler Ebene.2 Insgesamt haben die nationa‐ len Berichterstatter positive Prognosen und Perspektiven für schwierige, aber entscheidende Angelegenheiten bezüglich Landwirtschaft dargelegt. Dementsprechend wurden fünf weiter gefasste Themen definiert, nämlich: • Situation im Milchsektor • Einsatz neuer Technologien in der Landwirtschaft • Multifunktionalität in der Landwirtschaft • Zugang zu Land • Brexit und Landwirtschaft Situation im Milchsektor In vielen nationalen Berichten wird auf die Schwierigkeiten der Milch‐ wirtschaft nach dem Ende der Milchquoten im März 2015 hingewiesen. Bis zu diesem Zeitpunkt war der Milchmarkt in der EU einer der am stärksten regulierten und subventionierten weltweit. Die Abschaffung der Milchquoten, welche das grundlegende Rechtsinstrument ist, hat zu erheb‐ lichen Veränderungen des Marktes und der Machtverhältnisse in diesem geführt. Die landwirtschaftlichen Erzeuger verloren Garantien, die zur Stabilisierung des Angebots dienten. Die Milchpreise sind seit April 2015 kontinuierlich gesunken. Zur Unterstützung der Milcherzeuger wurden weitere Rechtsakte der EU und der Mitgliedstaaten erlassen. In Spanien wurden Maßnahmen zur Unterstützung der angeschlagenen Milchwirtschaft eingeführt (Spanien S. 3). Direktzahlungen aus dem spa‐ nischen Staatshaushalt und dem europäischen Haushalt (gemäß der Dele‐ gierten Verordnung (EU) 2015/1853 vom 15. Oktober 2015 über befristete Sonderbeihilfen für Erzeuger der Tierhaltungssektoren3) wurden einge‐ führt, um Schocks und Ungleichgewichte auf dem internationalen Milch‐ markt auszugleichen. Ebenso ist Polen – obwohl es bei der weltweiten Produktion von Milch und Milcherzeugnissen auf Platz 12 liegt – vom Wegfall der Milchquoten besonders betroffen und hat ebenfalls europäi‐ II. 2 Die Kommission III umfasste elf nationale Berichte und einen Einzelbericht. 3 Delegierte Verordnung (EU) 2015/1853 über eine befristete Sonderbeihilfe für Er‐ zeuger der Tierhaltungssektoren, ABl. L 271/25. Generalbericht der Kommission III 363 sche Beihilfen für Milcherzeuger erhalten (Polen S. 19). Frankreich hat außerdem im Dezember 2016 ein Gesetz erlassen, das die Rolle der Milcherzeuger bei der Unterzeichnung von Verträgen mit Unternehmen stärken soll. Nach diesem Statut gelten die Landwirte als schwache Ver‐ tragspartei und genießen einen besonderen Schutz (Frankreich S. 16). Auch in Spanien zielt das spanische Gesetzbuch für gute Geschäftsprakti‐ ken in der Lebensmittelversorgung darauf ab, die Existenzgrundlage der Landwirte (einschließlich der Milchbauern) zu verbessern, indem ein "fai‐ reres Vertragsumfeld" geschaffen wird, in dem sie tätig sind, da die Land‐ wirte das schwächste Glied in der Vertragsbeziehung sind (Einzelbericht, S. 4). Die Niederlande hingegen nahmen die Abschaffung der Milchquoten vorweg und sahen diese Veränderung als wirtschaftliche Chance (Nieder‐ lande S. 3). Die Medien nannten das Ende der Milchquoten "Befreiungs‐ tag". In den Jahren 2013-14 erreichte die niederländische Milchproduktion über 4 % der nationalen Milchquote und 2014-15 stieg die Produktion um weitere 4,1 %4, während die Zahl der Kühe von 1,55 Millionen auf 1,57 Millionen anstieg. Rund 70 % der niederländischen Milchviehhalter haben neue Ställe gebaut oder planen in Kürze den Ausbau ihrer landwirtschaft‐ lichen Infrastruktur. Diese Veränderungen erhöhen jedoch die Phosphat‐ produktion der Tiere. Sowohl die Niederlande (Niederlande S. 3) als auch Spanien (Spanien S. 4) haben aus unterschiedlichen Gründen Beschränkungen für die An‐ zahl der im selben Betrieb zugelassenen Rinder festgelegt. In Spanien wurde dies unternommen, um nicht die Milchproduktion zu fördern son‐ dern damit die Position des Landwirts in der Lebensmittelversorgungsket‐ te zu stärken. In den Niederlanden soll damit die Produktion von Gülle verringert werden. Um das Problem der Überproduktion von Gülle zu lö‐ sen, hat die niederländische Regierung ein neues Produktionsinstrument eingeführt (Niederlande S. 4). Phosphatrechte zielen darauf ab, die Zahl der Rinder zu verringern, um unter die nationale Phosphatobergrenze zu gelangen.5 Diese Rechte bestehen aus einer Produktionsobergrenze auf der Grundlage der Produktionsniveaus des Jahres 2014, verbunden mit einem Verbot über diese Obergrenze hinauszugehen. Diese Rechte sind zwischen den Landwirten übertragbar. Interessanterweise hat dies zum Verschwin‐ 4 Kamerstukken II, 2014/15, 33979, Nr. 99. 5 Bruil, Onder het Fosfaatplafond!, TVAR 2017/3, S. 99. Generalbericht der Kommission III 364 den des Gülleüberschusses und zur Entstehung eines Schwarzmarkts ge‐ führt. In Deutschland gibt es in der Regel weniger Kühe pro Hof, weil die Tierhaltungsbedingungen in ihrer jetzigen Form aus Gründen des Wohlbe‐ findens und der Gesundheit der Tiere sowie aus ethischen und kulturellen Gründen von der Bevölkerung nicht mehr akzeptiert werden. Dies gilt auch für andere Tierarten. Einsatz neuer Technologien in der Landwirtschaft Neue Technologien in der Landwirtschaft können wirtschaftliche Chan‐ cen, wie z.B. höhere Erträge und verbesserte Wettbewerbsfähigkeit, bie‐ ten, aber auch strukturelle Probleme sowie Umwelt- und Gesundheitsbe‐ denken hervorrufen. Biotechnologien und gentechnisch veränderte Orga‐ nismen (GVO) sind solche Beispiele. So will Spanien beispielsweise die "grenzüberschreitende Verschmutzung" durch den Anbau von GVO ver‐ meiden (Spanien S. 2). In Übereinstimmung mit dem Subsidiaritätsprinzip und um den Stillstand bei der Zulassung von GVO in der EU zu überwin‐ den, wurde die Richtlinie 2015/412 zur Änderung der Richtlinie 2001/18 angenommen.6 Die geänderten Bestimmungen schaffen eine "Opt-out- Klausel", wie sie oft genannt wird, die den Mitgliedstaaten und ihren Re‐ gionen Flexibilität und Autonomie gibt, um den Anbau zugelassener GVO in ihrem Hoheitsgebiet zu verbieten oder einzuschränken. Italien hat sich aus dem Anbau von sechs gentechnisch veränderten Maissorten zurückge‐ zogen. Im Vereinigten Königreich haben Wales, Schottland und Nordir‐ land beschlossen, GVO zu verbieten, während England nicht dieselbe po‐ litische Entscheidung getroffen hat. Nach dem Brexit könnten diese ge‐ gensätzlichen Entscheidungen zur Schaffung von Hindernissen auf dem britischen Binnenmarkt führen.7 III. 6 Richtlinie (EU) 2015/412 zur Änderung der Richtlinie 2001/18/EG zu der den Mit‐ gliedstaaten eingeräumten Möglichkeit, den Anbau von gentechnisch veränderten Organismen (GVO) in ihrem Hoheitsgebiet zu beschränken oder zu untersagen, ABl. L 68/1. 7 Petetin, GMO Cultivation in the UK: Brexit, the Devolved Administrations and In‐ ternational Trade (Brexit and Environment Network, The UK in Changing Europe) (11 Januar 2018), https://www.brexitenvironment.co.uk/2018/01/11/gmos-devolu‐ tion-trade/; siehe auch: L. Petetin, ‘Managing Novel Food Technologies and Mem‐ ber States’ Interests: Shifting More Powers Towards the Member States?’ in M. Generalbericht der Kommission III 365 Herausforderung bezüglich der Verwendung von Antibiotika bei Nutz‐ tieren und Pflanzenschutzmitteln sind aufgrund ihrer Auswirkungen auf die Umwelt und die menschliche Gesundheit in den Vordergrund gerückt – zum Beispiel Antibiotikaresistenz (Argentinien S. 6; USA S. 8; Frankreich S. 2). Auch die Patentierung von Pflanzensorten beschäftigte in verschie‐ denen Staaten den Gesetzgeber (Deutschland S. 14; Polen S. 14; Frank‐ reich S. 8). In den USA beispielsweise sind Pflanzenzüchter, die Saatgut entwickelt haben, durch das Patentrecht und das Pflanzensortenschutzge‐ setz geschützt.8 Im Jahr 2016 wurde ein chinesischer Staatsangehöriger (der in den USA wohnhaft war) wegen einem Komplott zum Diebstahl von Geschäftsgeheimnissen verfolgt, für schuldig erklärt und zu einer Freiheitsstrafe von 36 Monaten verurteilt (USA S. 6). Die gestohlene In‐ zucht- oder Muttersaatgut von Maispflanzen war ein Geschäftsgeheimnis von DuPont Pioneer und Monsanto.9 Big Data und Digitalisierung bieten enorme Chancen und scheinen der Schlüssel zu künftigen GAP-Reformen zu sein (Spanien S. 7). Sie erzeu‐ gen auch wachsende Bedenken bezüglich Verwendung, Speicherung, Aus‐ tausch, Besitz und Schutz von Daten. In ländlichen Regionen Deutsch‐ lands ist der Zugang zum Internet, insbesondere zum Breitband, mangel‐ haft, obwohl Deutschland bei Breitband führend sein will. Die Gesetzge‐ bung zielt darauf ab, die Situation zu verbessern, aber sie ist nach Ansicht von Experten bisher erfolglos geblieben. Der Mangel an guter Internetqua‐ lität in Deutschland ist problematisch. Zum Beispiel stellt sich die Frage, wer in der Präzisionslandwirtschaft beim Auftreten eines Fehlers oder ei‐ nes Unfalls, zum Beispiel mit einem Traktor, der auf die schlechte Inter‐ netqualität zurückzuführen ist, verantwortlich bzw. rechenschaftspflichtig ist. Alte Gesetze und Regelwerke genügen bei diesen neueren Technologi‐ en nicht. Der Agrarsektor könnte unter technologischen (und regulatori‐ schen) Fehlern leiden. Schließlich führen die Kosten der Landwirtschafts‐ technologie zu einer Reihe von weiteren Problemen in der Landwirtschaft. Sowohl kleine als auch finanziell angeschlagene Betriebe können diese Varju (eds) Between Compliance and Particularism: Member State Interests and European Union Law (Springer, 2019) in press. 8 Pub. L. Nr. 91-577, 84 Stat. 1542 (1970) (kodifiziert in der Fassung der Abschnitte von USC Titel 7 und 28). 9 US Federal Bureau of Investigation, Protecting Vital Assets: Pilfering of Corn Seeds Illustrates Intellectual Property Theft (19 Dezember 2016), https:// www.fbi.gov/news/stories/sentencing-in-corn-seed-intellectual-property-theft-case. Generalbericht der Kommission III 366 neuen, teuren Technologien nicht anbieten, was die Kluft zwischen klei‐ nen und großen Betrieben noch vergrößern könnte. Multifunktionalität in der Landwirtschaft Die Multifunktionalität der Landwirtschaft konzentriert sich allmählich auf alternative Ansätze für landwirtschaftliche Tätigkeiten unter Berück‐ sichtigung der Qualität des Endprodukts, der Bürger und der Umwelt. Soziale Landwirtschaft Zunehmend ermöglichen gesetzliche Rahmenbedingungen die Auswei‐ tung der sozialen Seite der Landwirtschaft, einschließlich der Rolle der ländlichen Gemeinden. Der Gesetzgeber regelt neue Bereiche der sozialen Beziehungen in der Landwirtschaft und im Zusammenhang mit der Land‐ wirtschaft10 sowie erweitert gesetzliche Regelungen, um detailliertere Lö‐ sungen,beispielsweise hinsichtlich der Kriterien für die Auswahl von Gruppen, die eine EU-Finanzierung erhalten könnten, oder des Handels mit landwirtschaftlichen Immobilien (Polen S. 24). Die soziale Landwirtschaft konzentriert sich auf die Entwicklung sozia‐ ler, sozi-sanitärer, erzieherischer und sozio-professioneller Merkmale so‐ wie auf die Verbesserung der Lebensqualität der Landwirte. Sie will auch den Zugang zu ländlichen Dienstleistungen verbessern und entwickelt sich zu einem wichtigen Instrument für ländliche Gemeinschaften, um zu pros‐ perieren und die sozialen Beziehungen in ländlichen Gebieten und insbe‐ sondere in benachteiligten Regionen aufrechtzuerhalten. Der italienische Gesetzgeber fördert auch die Beteiligung aller Bevölkerungsgruppen an der Landwirtschaft, inklusive behinderten und benachteiligten Arbeitneh‐ mern, sowie deren Ausbildung (Italien S. 5). Der polnische Staat hat kürzlich beschlossen, den Einzelhandel und den Verkauf landwirtschaftlicher Erzeugnisse auf dem Hof zu erleichtern, in‐ dem er den Landwirten die Möglichkeit gibt, im landwirtschaftlichen Be‐ IV. A. 10 Budzinowski, Problemy ogólne prawa rolnego: Przemiany podstaw legislacyjnych i koncepcji doktrynalnych [General Problems of Agricultural Law: Transforma‐ tions of Legislative Bases and Doctrinal Concepts] (2008), S. 42. Generalbericht der Kommission III 367 trieb kleine Verarbeitungsbetriebe zu führen (Polen S. 8).11 Landwirte, die solche Tätigkeiten aufnehmen, profitieren von steuerlichen Anreizen. Die eingeführten Änderungen zielen darauf ab, die wirtschaftliche Situation der Kleinbauern zu verbessern und den Verbrauchern einen direkten Zu‐ gang zu frischen Produkten zu ermöglichen. Die soziale Landwirtschaft ist ein Beispiel für food democracy für die Wiederherstellung12 "der traditio‐ nellen Rolle des Landwirts als Erzeuger und Verarbeiter von Lebensmit‐ teln, während gleichzeitig ein neuer Markt für natürliche und gesunde Le‐ bensmittel für die Verbraucher erschlossen wird"13 (Polen S. 12; Italien S. 5; Argentinien S. 34). Für viele Mitgliedstaaten sind Direktzahlungen zur Unterstützung der Landwirte von entscheidender Bedeutung und sollten auf aktive (echte?) Landwirte und nicht auf Grundeigentümer beschränkt werden. In Spanien wird die GAP-Unterstützung als Mittel zur Schaffung von Fairness zwi‐ schen der Landwirtschaft und anderen produktiven Industrien/Sektoren so‐ wie zur Gewährleistung von Multifunktionalität und Ernährungssicherheit angesehen (Spanien S. 5 und 8). Ein weiteres Problem der Landwirtschaft ist, dass viele Betriebe nicht rentabel sind. Im Gegensatz dazu wollen jun‐ ge Menschen von ihrem Geschäft leben und ihren Lebensunterhalt mit ihrer Arbeit und Produktion bestreiten. Oft ist dies einer der Gründe, war‐ um die Zahl junger Berufsanfänger gering ist. Lebensmittel Lebensmittelverschwendung wird zu einem wichtigen politischen Schwer‐ punkt und stellt einen der wichtigsten Wege um Ernährungssicherheit zu erreichen dar (Spanien; Argentinien; Polen; Italien; Deutschland). Der ita‐ lienische Bericht erläutert, wie dieses Thema zu einer zentralen Regie‐ rungs-, Regional- und Kommunalangelegenheit geworden ist. Die italieni‐ sche Regierung unterscheidet zwischen Abfällen innerhalb der Lebensmit‐ telversorgungskette oder in Lebensmittelgeschäften und Restaurants sowie B. 11 Gesetz vom 16. November 2016 über die Änderung bestimmter Gesetze zur Er‐ leichterung des Verkaufs von Lebensmitteln durch Landwirte. Es ist am 1. Januar 2017 in Kraft getreten (Gesetzblatt, item 1961). 12 Petetin, Food Democracy in Food Systems, in: Thompson/Kaplan (Hrsg.), Ency‐ clopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics, 2. Auflage (2016), S. 1. 13 Siehe Erwägungsgründe des Gesetzes vom 16. November 2016 (Fn. 11). Generalbericht der Kommission III 368 Haushaltsabfällen (Italien S. 7). Im Jahr 2015 hat das italienische Umwelt‐ ministerium erstmals 500.000 Euro für Forschung, Kommunikation und Sensibilisierung zur Vermeidung von Lebensmittelabfällen bereitgestellt (Italien S. 11). Fünfzehn von zwanzig italienischen Regionen haben oder sind dabei, Rechtsvorschriften gegen Lebensmittelverschwendung zu er‐ lassen. Darüber hinaus haben über 700 Gemeinden eine ähnliche Politik verfolgt.14 Im Jahr 2016 wurde ein neues italienisches Gesetz15 erlassen, um die Verwertung und Spende von Nahrungsmittel- und Arzneimittel‐ überschüssen zu erleichtern sowie die negativen Auswirkungen von Ab‐ fällen auf Umwelt und natürliche Ressourcen durch den Lebenszyklus des Produkts zu begrenzen (Italien S. 11). Der italienische Gesetzgeber förder‐ te die Reduzierung von food waste und soziale Solidarität vorrangig einer EU-Intervention.16 In Deutschland gibt es bisher nur Marktinitiativen für Lebensver‐ schwendung. Es existiert jedoch kein anwendbares Recht. Es bestehen nur programmatische Regierungserklärungen (Deutschland S. 43). Die Ernäh‐ rungssicherheit stand jedoch im Mittelpunkt der Aufmerksamkeit des deutschen Gesetzgebers. Das neue Ernährungssicherstellungs- und -vor‐ sorgegesetz (ESVG) hat im Jahre 2017 zwei bestehende Gesetze zusam‐ mengeführt (Deutschland S. 32). Ziel des neuen Gesetzes ist die Grund‐ versorgung der Bevölkerung im Falle einer militärischen Situation sowie im Falle einer nichtmilitärischen Versorgungskrise, beispielsweise bei Na‐ turkatastrophen oder Streiks. Die Bürger sind nach und nach an Herkunft und Ursprung ihrer Lebens‐ mittel interessiert (Argentinien, passim). Ungarn hat ein Dekret17 über die Kennzeichnung von gentechnikfreien Lebens- und Futtermitteln verab‐ schiedet, wenn die Hersteller die Gentechnikfreiheit ihrer Erzeugnisse an‐ geben wollen (Ungarn S. 16). Dieses Dekret wurde erlassen, weil die EU- Verpflichtung zur Kennzeichnung gentechnisch veränderter Lebens- und Futtermittel nach der Lebens- und Futtermittelverordnung und der Rück‐ 14 Bologna, 24 November 2014. Stop Food Waste – Feed the Planet: La Carta di Bo‐ logna contro gli Sprechi Alimentari. 15 Gesetz vom 19. August 2016, Nr. 166. Bestimmungen über die Spende und Vertei‐ lung von Nahrungsmitteln und Arzneimitteln für die soziale Solidarität und die Begrenzung von Abfällen (ABl 30 August 2016, Nr. 202). 16 Entschließung des Europäischen Parlaments vom 16. Mai 2017 über die Initiative für Ressourceneffizienz: Verringerung der Verschwendung von Lebensmitteln, Verbesserung der Lebensmittelsicherheit (2016/2223(INI)). 17 FM Dekret 61/2016 (IX.15.). Generalbericht der Kommission III 369 verfolgbarkeitsverordnung von 200318 zu viele Ausnahmen enthielt. Nach dem Erlass darf ein Produkt maximal 0,1 % eines von der EU zugelasse‐ nen GVO enthalten (das ist der Wert, der mit den aktuellen Technologien gemessen werden kann). Fisch, Fleisch, Milch oder Eier und Lebensmittel können nur dann als gentechnikfrei angesehen werden, wenn das dem Tier verabreichte Futter den Anforderungen der Verordnung über gentechnik‐ freies Futter entspricht. In den USA wird dieses Interesse immer größer und umfasst viele Pro‐ dukte. Zu den Marketingangaben gehören Fleischprodukte, die von Tieren stammen, die keine Hormone oder Beta-Agonisten erhalten haben (US S. 6) oder gentechnikfreie Produkte. Noch wichtiger ist, dass der US-Kon‐ gress das Gesetz von 2016 über nationale Standards für die Veröffentli‐ chung von biotechnologisch hergestellten Lebensmitteln verabschiedet hat, das die Kennzeichnung von gentechnisch veränderten Lebensmitteln vorschreibt19 (US S. 4). In Italien ist die öffentliche Nachfrage nach der Herkunft von Grundnahrungsmitteln wie Milch, Pasta und Reis gestiegen (Italien S. 20). Die Menschen sind auch an der Qualität, den ethischen Standards und an einem gefahrlosen Verzehr der Lebensmittel interessiert, die sie essen. Frankreich hat ähnliche Prioritäten mit einer landesweiten Debatte über Lebensmittel (Etats Généraux de l'Alimentation 2017), die eine Änderung des Gesetzes und der landwirtschaftlichen Produktion mit sich bringen wird. Wenn jedoch Verarbeitungsvorgänge in verschiedenen Ländern stattfinden, müssen die Fragen der Kennzeichnung der Herkunft der Lebensmittel auf EU-Ebene gelöst werden. 18 Verordnung (EG) Nr. 1829/2003 über genetisch veränderte Lebensmittel und Fut‐ termittel, ABl. L 268/1; Verordnung (EG) Nr. 1830/2003 über die Rückverfolgbar‐ keit und Kennzeichnung von genetisch veränderten Organismen und über die Rückverfolgbarkeit von aus genetisch veränderten Organismen hergestellten Le‐ bensmitteln und Futtermitteln sowie zur Änderung der Richtlinie 2001/18/EG, ABl L 268/24. Für weitere Informationen über gentechnisch veränderte Lebens‐ mittel siehe Petetin, Precaution and Equivalence – The Critical Interplay in EU Biotech Foods (2017) 42 European Law Review 831. 19 Public Law 114-216, 130 Stat. 834 (2016), zur Änderung des Agrarvermarktungs‐ gesetzes von 1946 durch Hinzufügung der Untertitel E und F, kodifiziert am 7 USC §§ 1639-1639c, §§ 1639i-1639j, § 6524. Das USDA ist jedoch dabei, den Schwellenwert für die GVO-Kennzeichnung festzulegen. Ein hoher Schwellen‐ wert würde dazu führen, dass nur wenige Produkte als GVO-haltig gekennzeichnet werden. Generalbericht der Kommission III 370 Eine grünere Landwirtschaft In mehreren Berichten ist das Streben nach einer nachhaltigeren Landwirt‐ schaft spürbar (Bulgarien S. 2; Deutschland S. 34; Polen, passim). In Frankreich legt der neue Artikel L. 110-1 II des Umweltgesetzbuches grundlegende Umweltprinzipien fest, die bei der Ausarbeitung weiterer Umweltnormen als Richtschnur dienen: das Prinzip der ökologischen Soli‐ darität, das Prinzip der nachhaltigen Nutzung, die Komplementarität zwi‐ schen Umwelt, Landwirtschaft, Aquakultur und nachhaltige Waldbewirt‐ schaftung und das Prinzip der Nichtregression (Frankreich S. 6). In den Niederlanden wird derzeit eine wichtige legislative Maßnahme durchge‐ führt, um etwa dreißig formelle Rechtsakte in einem einzigen Gesetzbuch für die physikalische Umwelt zusammenzufassen. Dazu gehören das Raumplanungsgesetz, das Umweltmanagementgesetz, das Naturschutzge‐ setz sowie weitere Gesetze zur Landnutzung und Landwirtschaft. Das Ge‐ setzbuch wird 2019 in Kraft treten (Niederlande S. 1). In den USA war Maryland der erste Staat, der die Anwendung von Neonicotinoiden (Insek‐ tiziden, die Nutzinsekten wie Bienen schädigen könnten) durch die Ver‐ braucher im Pollenschutzgesetz von 201620 einschränkte, zudem gibt es wachsende Bedenken in Bezug auf die Verwendung von Glyphosat (wie in der EU) (US S. 11 und 12). Darüber hinaus fordern das Vereinigte König‐ reich und Polen eine nachhaltige Landwirtschaft, die die Ökosystemleis‐ tungen in den Mittelpunkt stellt (UK S. 19; Polen S. 5). Zugang zu Land Verschiedene Mitgliedstaaten haben Maßnahmen getroffen, um den Er‐ werb von Grundstücken durch (ausländische) Unternehmen zu beschrän‐ ken, um Landnahme (land grabbing) zu verhindern. Polen hat seine Ge‐ setze über den Erwerb von landwirtschaftlichen Flächen durch das Gesetz über das Agrarsystem (AAS) geändert. Das Gesetz beschränkt den Erwerb von Ackerland ausschließlich auf aktive Landwirte (im Text des Gesetzes als "individuelle Landwirte" bezeichnet), die landwirtschaftliche Familien‐ C. V. 20 Maryland SB 198/HB 211, kodifiziert als Annotated Code of Maryland, §§ 5-2A-01 to 5-2A-05. Ab dem 1. Januar 2018, dürfen nur noch zertifizierte Pes‐ tizidapplikatoren, Landwirte, die das Pestizid für landwirtschaftliche Zwecke ver‐ wenden, oder Tierärzte Neonicotinoide verwenden. Generalbericht der Kommission III 371 betriebe betreiben.21 Vor dieser Reform führten die Bestimmungen des AAS zu spekulativen Übernahmen und zum Verkauf von Grundstücken an Nicht-Landwirte. Dies führte zu einer Konzentration von Landbesitz in wenigen Händen, einschließlich ausländischer Unternehmen, die nicht an landwirtschaftlicher Produktion, sondern an Immobilienbesitz interessiert sind (Polen S. 6). Die derzeitigen Vorschriften scheinen es den Jungland‐ wirten jedoch aufgrund der festgelegten Bedingungen schwer zu machen, Land zu kaufen. Das Gesetz definiert "individuelle Landwirte" als natürli‐ che Personen mit den im AAS genannten Qualifikationen, die seit mindes‐ tens 5 Jahren einen landwirtschaftlichen Familienbetrieb mit einer Fläche von höchstens 300 Hektar betreiben und während dieses Zeitraums auf dem Gebiet der Gemeinde wohnen, in der sich mindestens ein zum land‐ wirtschaftlichen Betrieb gehörendes Grundstück befindet (Polen S. 6). Das Gesetz sieht jedoch Ausnahmen für die nächsten Angehörigen und Famili‐ enmitglieder im Allgemeinen vor. Eine weitere Ausnahme besteht, wenn der Käufer einen Familienbetrieb für mindestens 10 Jahre gründen möchte (Polen S. 7). Die EU-Kommission hat Vertragsverletzungsverfahren gegen die Grundstücksverkehrsreformen in verschiedenen Mitgliedstaaten, darunter Ungarn und Bulgarien (Bulgarien S. 1), eingeleitet. In Ungarn ist ein Ver‐ bot für juristische Personen, die Land besitzen, von zentraler Bedeutung, um "die unkontrollierbare Eigentumskette zu vermeiden, die im Wider‐ spruch zur Möglichkeit der Bevölkerung stünde, ihr Land zu erhalten".22 Frankreich hat ebenfalls Maßnahmen ergriffen, um land grabbing auf sei‐ nem Territorium zu verhindern. Neuere Gesetze stellen sicher, dass Land nicht nur von Unternehmen gekauft wird (Frankreich S. 1)23. Auch in Deutschland war der Grunderwerb problematisch, da nur große Investoren Grundstücke kauften, die die Agrarlandschaft veränderten. Neue staatliche Maßnahmen verhindern den Verkauf von Grundstücken an große, nichtlandwirtschaftliche Investoren (Deutschland S. 10). 21 Gesetz vom 14. April 2016 über die Aussetzung des Verkaufs von Immobilien, die im Bestand des Staatsschatzes für landwirtschaftliches Eigentum enthalten sind, und zur Änderung einiger anderer Gesetze, die am 30. April 2016 in Kraft getreten sind. 22 Raisz, Topical Issues of the Hungarian Land-Transfer Law, CEDR-JRL 1/2017, in press. 23 Gesetz vom 20. März 2017, Nr. 348. Generalbericht der Kommission III 372 In vielen Ländern Europas (Spanien, Deutschland, Italien) ist die Auf‐ gabe von Land zu einem herausragenden Problem geworden. Dieses Phä‐ nomen hat viele negative Folgen, die von fehlenden Generationenwech‐ seln (aufgrund einer alternden ländlichen und landwirtschaftlichen Bevöl‐ kerung) bis hin zu einem Mangel an Nachfolgern und einem erhöhten Ri‐ siko von Bränden in trockeneren Teilen Europas aufgrund fehlender Bo‐ denerhaltung reichen. Weniger Anbaufläche bedeutet weniger Fläche für die Produktion von Nahrungsmitteln, was der Ernährungssicherheit ab‐ träglich ist. In Spanien fehlen die Mittel für den Erwerb von Land, insbesondere für Junglandwirte. Außerdem ist das Pachten landwirtschaftlicher Flächen in Spanien zu kostspielig und die gesetzlichen Regelungen sind eigentümer‐ freundlich. Die Rolle der Banken bei der Kreditvergabe, insbesondere an junge Marktteilnehmer, sollte ausgebaut werden und könnte Impulse für einen Generationswechsel geben. Auch in Spanien werden ein Großteil der Betriebe von den Nachfolgern nicht mehr landwirtschaftlich genutzt. Das Land wird zwar von der Familie gehalten, jedoch ohne landwirt‐ schaftliche Nutzung. In Italien wurde eine Datenbank für landwirtschaftli‐ che Flächen geschaffen, um eine angemessene Nutzung der landwirt‐ schaftlichen Flächen zu gewährleisten und den Erwerb von Flächen durch Junglandwirte (unter 40 Jahren) zu erleichtern.24 Diese Datenbank wurde durch Maßnahmen zur Förderung des landwirtschaftlichen Unternehmer‐ tums und der Niederlassung von Junglandwirten sowie durch entsprechen‐ de Finanzhilfen ergänzt.25 Zudem wird der ländliche Raum in Deutschland wegen mangelnder Attraktivität und ländlicher Vitalität zunehmend men‐ schenleer. 24 Gesetz vom 28. Juli 2016, Nr. 154, insbesondere Artikel 16. 25 Ministerialerlass, Nr. 1192, 8. Januar 2016; und Ministerialerlass, Nr. 8254, 3. Au‐ gust 2016 (Avis n ° 60690 du 10/08/2017 - Concernant les Caractéristiques, les Modalités et les Formulaires de Soumission des Demandes d'Accès aux Contrats de Filière et de District). Generalbericht der Kommission III 373 Brexit und Landwirtschaft Der Brexit wurde als ein aktuelles und zukünftiges Thema erkannt, das so‐ wohl von der EU als auch vom Vereinigten Königreich behandelt werden sollte (Deutschland S. 40; Spanien S. 6). Im Vereinigten Königreich bietet der Brexit eine einmalige Chance, die bisher von der EU angewendeten Rechtsregime zu renationalisieren. Diese Gelegenheit bringt Herausforde‐ rungen mit sich, die angegangen werden müssen, um einen reibungslosen Übergang zwischen dem Vor-Brexit- und Nach-Brexit-UK zu gewährleis‐ ten. Die Rückführung der Zuständigkeiten der EU an das Vereinigte Kö‐ nigreich betreffend Umweltschutz und Landwirtschaft findet besondere Beachtung, da diese Bereiche der Nordirland-Versammlung, dem Schotti‐ schen Parlament und der Nationalversammlung für Wales übertragen wur‐ den. Derzeit können die dezentralen Regionen ihre eigenen Standards und Rahmenbedingungen festlegen, solange sie das EU-Recht einhalten. Nach dem Brexit könnten Unterschiede in den Standards zwischen den vier Na‐ tionen des Vereinigten Königreichs zu Problemen führen, insbesondere im Hinblick auf den britischen Binnenmarkt, da der Handel innerhalb des Vereinigten Königreichs eingeschränkt werden könnte. Für die britische Regierung ist die Gewährleistung der Harmonisierung und das Fehlen von Handelshemmnissen innerhalb des britischen Binnenmarktes von ent‐ scheidender Bedeutung.26 Verschiedene Gesetzesentwürfe (u.a. zur Land‐ wirtschaft) werden derzeit ausgearbeitet, um diese Probleme anzugehen. Ein weiterer Streitpunkt betrifft die Frage, wie die Landwirte nach dem Ende der Anwendung der GAP unterstützt werden können. Das Vereinigte Königreich bewegt sich in Richtung eines Unterstützungssystems, das auf Zahlungen für Ökosystemleistungen basiert (UK S. 19). Allerdings wird die Vereinbarkeit dieses künftigen Rahmens mit dem Übereinkommen über Landwirtschaft der Welthandelsorganisation, insbesondere ob eine solche Unterstützung unter die Green Box (im Gegensatz zur Amber Box) fallen würde, in Frage gestellt. Gegenwärtig scheint es so zu sein, dass Zahlungen für Ökosystemleistungen nicht unter die Definition von An‐ hang 2 des Übereinkommens über Landwirtschaft fallen und als Green Box-Subventionen (wo die erhaltenen Zahlungen unbegrenzt sein können) betrachtet werden können (UK S. 17). Dies ist für das Vereinigte König‐ reich problematisch, denn wenn Zahlungen für Ökosystemleistungen tat‐ VI. 26 Petetin (Fn 7). Generalbericht der Kommission III 374 sächlich Amber-Box-Subventionen wären, würden sie automatisch als handelsverzerrend angesehen und Beschränkungen in der Höhe der zuläs‐ sigen Zahlungen unterliegen.27 27 Für weitere Informationen siehe auch: L. Petetin, ‘Post-Brexit Agricultural Sup‐ port and the WTO: Using Both the Amber and Green Boxes?’ Brexit and Environ‐ ment Network (2018) https://www.brexitenvironment.co.uk/2018/06/21/post-brex‐ it-agricultural-support-wto-using-amber-green-boxes/. Generalbericht der Kommission III 375 Conclusions de la Commission III – Conclusions of Commission III – Schlussfolgerungen der Kommission III Version française – French version – Französische Version Version anglaise – English version – Englische Version Version allemande – German version – Deutsche Version Conclusions de la Commission III* Version française – French version – Französische Version Une approche globale de la chaîne alimentaire et de l'agriculture doit être adoptée, qui s’étendrait de la production primaire jusqu'au secteur de la vente au détail et au-delà (y compris les déchets alimentaires). Toutefois, des difficultés ont été identifiées dans l’examen des instruments juridiques les plus efficaces à cette fin et points suivants doivent être ex‐ aminés : • Minimiser autant que possible l'utilisation d'une approche silo/compar‐ timentée (par exemple, des règles distinctes pour l'environnement et le bien-être des animaux). • Comment créer une base pour de bonnes pratiques agricoles et com‐ ment formuler des normes au-delà de cette base qui établissent un juste équilibre entre l'agriculteur et les autres acteurs de la chaîne alimen‐ taire jusqu'au consommateur final ? • Assurer la crédibilité des normes non étatiques/privées (si nécessaire, avec la participation des associations et ONG concernées) • Un processus décisionnel renforcé par la connaissance des différents acteurs et acteurs de la chaîne alimentaire La technologie offre des possibilités et des risques pour la communauté agricole, l'environnement et le public. Parmi les facteurs les plus importants à considérer sont : • L'utilisation accrue des technologies (telles que le GPS et l'agriculture de précision) s'accompagne d'un manque d'accès pour des raisons de couverture internet/internet haut débit faible et de coûts associés. • L'échange, l'utilisation et le stockage sécurisés et éthiques des données. I. II. * Traduction de l’anglais en français par Stefanie Hug, MLaw, Université de Lucerne. 379 • L'inquiétude persistante est que les biotechnologies agricoles (OGM / organismes génétiquement modifiés et nanotechnologies) bé‐ néficieront d'un étiquetage et d'une traçabilité sains afin de garantir la circulation de l'information en tant que fondement des décisions des consommateurs La réglementation de l'accès à la terre reste une priorité élevée dans certains États membres, mais cet impératif politique peut soulever des questions difficiles en droit national et européen. • Dans le cadre de ces contraintes juridiques, trois défis majeurs se po‐ sent actuellement : • Changements importants dans la propriété et l'occupation des terres • Tentatives de restreindre la propriété/l’occupation aux agricult‐ eurs « authentiques » / « actifs »/ « familiaux ». • Garantir l'accès à la terre aux nouveaux arrivants et aux jeunes agri‐ culteurs afin de promouvoir le changement intergénérationnel. III. Conclusions de la Commission III 380 Conclusions of Commission III Version anglaise – English version – Englische Version A holistic approach to the food chain and agriculture is to be adopted which would extend from primary production to the table and beyond (including food waste). Difficulties, however, were identified in lighting upon the most effective legal instruments for this purpose and issues to explore include: • Minimising the use of a silo/compartmental approach as far as possible (for example, separate regimes for the environment and animal wel‐ fare) • How to establish a baseline of good agricultural practice and how to formulate standards above that baseline that strike the right balance be‐ tween the farmer and the other actors in the food chain as far as the ultimate consumer • Ensuring the credibility of non-state/‘private’ standards (if necessary, in accordance with the participation of the relevant associations and NGOs) • A decision-making process strengthened by knowledge of different ac‐ tors and participants in the food chain Technology offers opportunities for and threats to the agricultural community, the wider environment and the public. Key factors to consider include: • Advanced use of technologies (such as GPS and precision farming) ac‐ companied by a lack of access by reasons of internet/broadband cover‐ age and associated costs • The safety, security and ethical use of data sharing and storage • Ongoing concerns over agricultural biotechnology (GM/GE organisms and nanotechnologies) with robust labelling and traceability so as to ensure consumer information and choice considered a sine qua non I. II. 381 Regulating access to land remains a high priority in a number of Member States but this policy imperative may generate difficult questions in EU and national law. Within these legal constraints, three key ongoing challenges are: • Significant changes to land ownership and occupation • Attempts to restrict ownership/occupation to "genuine"/"active"/"fami‐ ly" farmers • Securing access to land for new entrants and young farmers so as to promote inter-generational change III. Conclusions of Commission III 382 Schlussfolgerungen der Kommission III Version allemande – German version – Deutsche Version I. Es ist ein ganzheitlicher Ansatz für die Lebensmittelkette und die Landwirtschaft zu wählen, der sich von der Urerzeugungsseite bis zum Einzelhandel und darüber hinaus (einschließlich Lebensmittelabfälle) erstreckt. Bei der Betrachtung der für diesen Zweck wirksamsten Rechtsinstrumente wurden Schwierigkeiten festgestellt und es gilt folgende Punkte zu unter‐ suchen: • Minimierung des Einsatzes eines silo-/gebietsbezogenen Ansatzes, so‐ weit möglich (z.B. getrennte Regelungen für Umwelt und Tierschutz). • Wie man eine Grundlage für gute Landbewirtschaftungsmethoden schaffen und wie man über diese Grundlage hinaus Normen formulie‐ ren kann, die das richtige Gleichgewicht zwischen dem Landwirt und den anderen Akteuren in der Lebensmittelkette bis hin zum Endver‐ braucher herstellen. • Sicherstellung der Glaubwürdigkeit nichtstaatlicher/"privater" Normen (gegebenenfalls unter Beteiligung der einschlägigen Verbände und NRO). • Stärkung des Entscheidungsprozesses vor allem auch durch das Wissen verschiedener Akteure und Teilnehmer an der Lebensmittelkette. II. Die Technologie bietet Chancen und Gefahren für die Agrargemein‐ schaft, die Umwelt und die Öffentlichkeit. Zu den wichtigsten zu berücksichtigenden Faktoren gehören: • Vermehrter Einsatz von Technologien (wie GPS und "Precision Far‐ ming") bei gleichzeitig fehlendem Zugang aufgrund schlechter Inter‐ net-/Breitbandabdeckung und der damit verbundenen Kosten. • Die sichere und ethisch unbedenkliche Transfer Nutzung und Speiche‐ rung von Daten. • Anhaltende Besorgnis darüber, dass die landwirtschaftliche Biotechno‐ logie (GVO/GE-Organismen und Nanotechnologien) mit einer soliden Kennzeichnung und Rückverfolgbarkeit ausgestattet wird, um den In‐ 383 formationsfluss als Basis für Entscheidungen der Endverbraucher si‐ cherzustellen. III. Die Regelung des Zugangs zu Land hat in einer Reihe von Mitglied‐ staaten nach wie vor hohe Priorität, aber diese politische Notwendig‐ keit kann zu schwierigen Fragen im EU- und nationalen Recht führen. Innerhalb dieser rechtlichen Rahmenbedingungen gibt es drei wesentliche aktuelle Herausforderungen: • Signifikante Veränderungen in Bezug auf Grundeigentum und -besitz • Versuche, das Eigentum/den Besitz auf "genuine" und "aktive" Land‐ wirte bzw. "Familienbetriebe"zu beschränken. • Sicherstellung des Zugangs zu Land für Neueinsteiger und Jungland‐ wirte, um den Generationswechsel zu fördern. Schlussfolgerungen der Kommission III 384 V. Rapport de Synthese – Synthesis Report – Synthesebericht Prof. Dr. Roland Norer General Delegate CEDR, Universität Luzern (Switzerland) Version française – French version – Französische Version Version anglaise – English version – Englische Version Version allemande – German version – Deutsche Version Rapport de Synthese* Version française – French version – Französische Version Prof. Dr. Roland Norer Délégué général du CEDR, Université de Lucerne Introduction et remerciements Monsieur le Président, Mesdames et Messieurs, Chers collègues,1 Avec ce rapport de synthèse, je suis traditionnellement autorisé à conclure le programme académique du XXIXe Congrès européen de droit agricole. Avant cela, cependant, quelques mots de remerciement. Mes remerciements vont tout d’abord au Président M. le Bâtonnier Jacques Druais et au Secrétaire Général M. Jean-Baptiste Millard ainsi qu'à leur équipe de la Société Française du Droit Agricole pour leur orga‐ nisation extrêmement réussite. Leur dévouement, la bonne ambiance, le cadre impressionnant, et leur hospitalité nous ont permis de passer un mer‐ veilleux séjour ici à Lille. Merci beaucoup pour cela. En même temps, je remercie également les rapporteurs généraux et les Présidents des commissions. Ils ont étudié les rapports nationaux, les ont compilés, les ont comparés et ont mené les travaux de la Commission avec charme et, si nécessaire - en vue de la gestion du temps - aussi un peu plus strictement. Ceux-ci sont pour la Commission I Prof. Dr. Rudolf Mögele, Prof. em. Dr. Paul Richli et Dr. Christian Busse, pour la Commission II Prof. Dr. Norbert Olszak et Dr. Luc Bodiguel, pour la Commission III, Prof. Dr. Michael Cardwell et Dr. Ludivine Petetin. I. * Traduction de l’allemande en français par Stefanie Hug, MLaw, Université de Lu‐ cerne. 1 Version élargie et complétée pour le système de notes de bas de page, le style de l’exposé a été conservé. 387 En outre, tous les rapporteurs nationaux et individuels méritent nos re‐ merciements. Ces rapports ont été, en quelque sorte, l'épine dorsale de ce Congrès et de ses travaux. Un total de 32 rapports de nationaux de 19 pays en plus de trois rapports individuels. Enfin, mes remerciements s'adressent à vous, chers participants. Votre engagement, votre intérêt et vos contributions à la discussion ont encore une fois enrichi et animé le Congrès européen de droit agricole cette an‐ née. A l'occasion du 60ème anniversaire de notre organisation, cet événe‐ ment a prouvé, à mon avis, que nous sommes capables d'aborder des sujets complexes et, à première vue, peut-être encombrants. J'espère que les ré‐ sultats obtenus ici seront inclus dans les discussions en cours. Après ces mots de remerciement, je voudrais passer à l'analyse scienti‐ fique du Congrès. En tant que Délégué Général, l'un des avantages est d'avoir l'opportunité de - presque à la fin de notre réunion - vous empêcher d’aller au Déjeuner sur place. Je ne veux pas abuser de ce privilège, mais je vous invite cordialement à passer en revue le programme scientifique de ce XXIXe Congrès et Colloque du CEDR. Cours d'introduction académique Dans le cadre de l'introduction scientifique de ce jeudi, un exposé intro‐ ductif académique en plénière nous a mis dans l'ambiance pour les travaux suivants de la Commission. Prof. Dr. Patrick Meunier a heureusement re‐ pris cette partie et a donné une conférence sur « Politique agricole com‐ mune et concurrence : une corrélation génétiquement modifiée ». Dans son exposé, il a présenté le système du droit européen de la concurrence et ses implications pour l'agriculture. Il a évoqué les spécificités structurelles et naturelles complexes de l'agriculture (par exemple, le paiement des ai‐ des). Avec cet aperçu des bases juridiques européennes pertinentes et leurs références les bases des travaux de la Commission ont été posées. Thèmes Les travaux ultérieurs ont été repris comme d'habitude dans trois commis‐ sions. Comme déjà lors du dernier congrès à Potsdam, cette réunion se dé‐ II. III. Rapport de Synthese 388 roulera à nouveau sous un thème général, qui forme le cadre des travaux de la commission. Cette fois, sur la suggestion des cercles de la Commis‐ sion européenne, le conseil de direction a opté pour le thème « Agriculture et concurrence ». Aujourd'hui, l'agriculture et ses installations de traite‐ ment et de transformation sont confinées entre un secteur amont très con‐ centré (produits phytosanitaires, engrais, semences, industrie des machines agricoles) et un secteur aval très concentré (distribution alimentaire). Ce n'est pas sans raison qu'il existe de nombreuses initiatives au niveau de l'UE concernant la chaîne d'approvisionnement alimentaire et la protection des petites et moyennes entreprises (PME) contre les pratiques commer‐ ciales déloyales de partenaires commerciaux puissants. Des propositions concrètes ont récemment été élaborées par le groupe de travail sur les mar‐ chés agricoles. Des sujets comparables ont été discutés jusqu'à présent lors des congrès de 1967 et 2003.2 Un moyen essentiel de renforcer la position des producteurs dans la chaîne d'approvisionnement est recherché en fusionnant avec les organisa‐ tions de producteurs. La France, en particulier, a une longue tradition dans ce domaine. C'est pourquoi le thème du congrès, développé par la Société française en collaboration avec le CEDR, convient parfaitement à Lille. De nombreuses questions restent sans réponse, en particulier la relation entre la politique agricole commune (PAC) et le droit de la concurrence de l’UE et le droit de la concurrence national. Ces questions ont fait l'objet de la Commission I « Règles de concurrence en agriculture ». 11 rapports na‐ tionaux ont été reçus. La Commission II a élargi le sujet en abordant la législation nationale qui affecte de manière significative l'agriculture et sa compétitivité. Le thème était « Freins et moteurs juridiques nationaux à la compétivité de l’agriculture". Dans ce vaste domaine, il est important d'examiner tout d’abord les conditions de production, de transformation et de commercia‐ lisation dans lesquelles les États membres déterminent les conditions dans lesquelles l'agriculture peut être pratiquée. Cependant, les réglementations concernant le terraim et le sol, le droit fiscal rural, le droit du travail et de la sécurité sociale ou la protection de l'environnement peuvent également avoir une influence directe ou indirecte sur la compétitivité de l'agriculture 2 Ainsi 1967 à Bad Godesberg ("Le droit des cartels agricoles"); 2003 à Almerimar ("L'Économie agricole face au droit de la concurrence européenne et nationale"). Rapport de Synthese 389 ou de certaines branches de la production agricole. 12 rapports nationaux ont été reçus. Comme à chaque congrès, la Commission III s'est consacrée au thè‐ me « Les évolutions récentes et significatives du droit rural ». Il s'agit de poursuivre l'observation et l'analyse des lignes de développement et des tendances et de discuter des développements juridiques remarquables dans les différents pays. Malheureusement, Prof.em. Margaret Rosso Grossman a du annulé sa participation en tant que Présidente de cette Commission en raison d'un accident dans sa famille. Prof. M. Michael Cardwell a généreu‐ sement accepté de prendre ses fonctions à court terme. Les thèmes propo‐ sés dans les questionnaires, tels que les nouvelles technologies, l'élevage, la sécurité alimentaire et la sécurité sanitaire des aliments, ainsi que le Brexit et les accords de libre-échange tels que TTIP et CETA, ont été élar‐ gis par de nombreux autres points intéressants. L'hétérogénéité du tableau qui s'en est dégagé a une fois de plus donné lieu à une abondance étonnan‐ te de développements juridiques différents dans le vaste monde du droit agricole. Depuis le Congrès de Cambridge en 2009, ce format ouvert a une fois de plus fait ses preuves. 9 rapports nationaux ont été reçus. Au mieux, les rapports nationaux et individuels ont suivi les questionn‐ aires établis par les rapporteurs généraux en consultation avec le délégué général. En outre, il n'a pas été possible, d'intégrer les exposés suivant cet‐ te structure dans toutes les commissions ainsi que de tenir des débats structurés et d'en tirer des conclusions. Permettez-moi de souligner certains des éléments des rapports et des discussions que je considère particulièrement importants. Commission I et II Les Commissions I et II devaient traiter un sujet d'actualité très exigeant. D'une part, cela s'est produit au sein de la Commission I pour ce qui est du droit de la concurrence, où le champ d'application possible de la réglemen‐ tation dépend essentiellement de la distinction entre l'article 42 du TFUE et le droit agricole de l’UE ou les régimes de droit de la concurrence na‐ tionaux. D'autre part, un grand nombre d'autres domaines et normes juridi‐ ques, d'origine nationale et supranationale, ont un impact sur la compétiti‐ vité de l'agriculture, cela a été identifié par la Commission II. Les principales conclusions des deux commissions sont rassemblées ici et présentées séparément selon les perspectives dans droit européennes et IV. Rapport de Synthese 390 nationales. Dans l'ensemble, le travail engagé de toutes les parties les membres des deux commissions a permis d’obtenir une image qui montre clairement où et comment l'agriculture pourrait être renforcée dans la con‐ currence. Droit européen Droit de la concurrence La première priorité était d'examiner la relation complexe entre le droit agricole de l'UE et le droit communautaire de la concurrence. Cette relati‐ on a souvent été décrite dans la littérature3, mais moins souvent - il me semble - elle a été clarifiée de manière satisfaisante et sans ambiguïté. L'examen des commentaires pertinents soulève au moins quelques questi‐ ons en détail.4 L'article 42 du TFUE, selon lequel les règles de concurrence ne s'appli‐ quent à l'agriculture que dans la mesure où le Parlement européen et le Conseil le déterminent d'une manière spécifique, a toujours été une cause de désapprobation. Le législateur de l'UE a décidé, dans le règlement de l'organisation commune de marché unique (UE) n° 1308/2013 (eGMO)5, que les règles générales de concurrence pour l'agriculture sont généralement applicables, A. 1. 3 Cf. de Bronett, Landwirtschaftliche Erzeugnisse, in: Wiedemann (Hrsg.), Handbuch des Kartellrechts, 2. Ed. (2008), P. 1123; Busse, Agrarkartellrecht. Kommentar zu § 28 GWB und seinen EU-rechtlichen Bezügen, 2. Ed. (2015); Frenz, Agrarwettbe‐ werbsrecht, AUR 2010, p. 193 ss.; Gerbrandy/de Vries, Agricultural Policy and EU Competition Law. Possibilities and Limits for Self-Regulation in the Dairy Sector (2011); Gruber, Wettbewerb in der Landwirtschaft, OZK 2009, p. 132 ss.; Martìnez, Landwirtschaft und Wettbewerbsrecht – Bestandsaufnahme und Perspek‐ tiven, EuZW 2010, p. 368 ss.; Sitar, Gemeinschaftlicher Verkauf und Mengensteue‐ rung durch Vereinigungen landwirtschaftlicher Erzeuger – neue Entwicklungen der Rechtsprechung und des Agrarrechts der EU im Spannungsfeld des Kartellverbots, in: Norer/Holzer (Hrsg.), Agrarrecht Jahrbuch 2018 (2018), p. 119 ss. 4 Cf. seulement Busse, in: Lenz/Borchardt, EU-Verträge, Art. 42 AEUV, n. 2 s.; Lo‐ renzmeier, in: Vedder/Heintschel v. Heinegg, EVV, Art. 42 AEUV, n. 3; Bittner, in: Schwarze, EU-Kommentar, Art. 42 AEUV, n. 4; Norer, in: Pechstein/Nowak/Häde, Frankfurter Kommentar zu EUV, GRC und AEUV, Bd. II, Art. 42 AEUV, n. 4 ss. 5 VO (EU) N° 1308/2013 portant organisation commune des marchés des produits agricoles, ABl. L 347/671. Rapport de Synthese 391 mais il existe des exceptions importantes. Il convient de mentionner, d'une part, que le droit du marché agricole prime sur l'application du droit géné‐ ral de la concurrence [article 206, paragraphe 1, du règlement (UE) no 1308/2013] et, d'autre part, que la coopération entre producteurs agricoles n'est largement pas couverte par l'interdiction du droit générale de la con‐ currence [article 209, paragraphe 1, deuxième alinéa, du règlement (UE) no 1308/2013]. Toutefois, pour les produits agricoles non soumis à un règlement de l'organisation de marché, le règlement (CE) n°1184/20066 portant certai‐ nes règles de concurrence est applicable à la production de certains produ‐ its agricoles. Ce règlement pplique également les règles de concurrence re‐ latives aux entreprises [article 1 du règlement (CE) n°1184/2006], mais prévoit des restrictions pour les groupements de producteurs et leurs asso‐ ciations [article 2 du règlement (CE) n°1184/2006]. Cependant, étant don‐ né que l'eGMO a fait une référence générale à tous les produits de l'annexe I, la question du champ d'application de ce règlement doit être posée. Dans les conclusions de l'avocat général Wahl dans l'affaire C-671/15 du 6 avril 2017 devant la CJCE concernant la fixation des prix de la chico‐ rée (endive), il est également indiqué d'emblée : « La politique agricole commune (PAC) et la politique européenne de concurrence, qui constitu‐ ent des piliers de la construction européenne, peuvent, prima facie, s’avé‐ rer difficilement conciliables. »7 Il constate ensuite qu'une définition préci‐ se de la portée de la « dérogation agricole » consacrée par les traités, telle que précisée par le droit dérivé, s’impose. Par la suite, l'avocat général s'efforce de donner une réponse aussi différenciée. Essentiellement, la question est de savoir si, outre les exceptions de l'OCM, qui ne sont pas en cause en l'espèce, il existe également des exceptions spécifiques à l'appli‐ cation des règles de concurrence de l'UE, qui résultent implicitement de tâches confiées à des organisations de producteurs.8 Il reste à voir com‐ ment la CJCE décidera dans cette affaire fondamentale.9 6 VO (EG) N° 1184/2006 portant application de certaines règles de concurrence à la production et au commerce des produits agricoles, ABl. L 214/7. 7 Conclusions de l’avocat général Wahl pour Rs. C-671/15, ABl. C 2017 281/1, Rz. 1. 8 Conclusions de l’avocat général Wahl pour Rs. C-671/15, ABl. C 2017 281/1, Rz. 3. 9 Note : La CJCE a pris sa décision le 14 novembre 2017 et donc après le Congrès ; affaire C-671/15. Dans son arrêt, elle rappelle dans que la politique agricole com‐ mune prime sur les objectifs en matière de concurrence, c'est pourquoi le législateur de l'Union peut exclure du champ d'application du droit de la concurrence certains pratiques qui sont en principe anticoncurrentiels. Toutefois, cela ne signifie pas que Rapport de Synthese 392 Toutefois, le droit de l’UE prévoit déjà des instruments appropriés pour traiter cette relation difficile, mais leur utilisation effective par les États membres révèle des différences considérables. En particulier il faut penser aux organisations de producteurs reconnues, aux associations d'organisati‐ ons de producteurs et d'associations professionnelles, qui, selon les rap‐ ports nationaux, sont nombreux : 642 en Allemagne et 341 en Pologne, mais seulement 35 en Autriche et 23 aux Pays-Bas. Les deux premiers ont un registre correspondant, tandis que les deux derniers ne l'ont pas. L'instrument d'une déclaration de force obligatoire générale doit égale‐ ment être pris en considération. Bien qu'elle ait une longue tradition, en particulier dans les pays romans, et qu'elle soit largement utilisée, elle est en jachère dans d'autres pays. Des autres examples sont des limites de re‐ groupement ou la réglementation des contrats. Les différentes traditions et structures des États membres semblent avoir une forte influence si les in‐ struments prévus par le droit communautaire sont utilisés et, si oui, de quelle manière. Par conséquent, non seulement une clarification ou une clarification du droit de la concurrence agricole de l'UE est nécessaire, mais plutôt une dé‐ cision fondamentale. La décision de savoir si le législateur de l'UE devrait proposer un large sélection d'instruments, dont l'adoption ou la formulati‐ on concrète sera ensuite laissée au droit national - ce qui peut donner des les organisations communes des marchés des produits agricoles constituent une zo‐ ne sans concurrence. En outre, une exception à la restriction de la concurrence pour les organisations de producteurs reconnues ne pourrait être justifiée que pour certai‐ nes formes de coordination ou de coordination, et uniquement entre les producteurs d'une seule et même association reconnue. Par conséquent, le comportement entre plusieurs organisations et d'autres parties intéressées non reconnues par un État membre serait soumis au droit de la concurrence. En ce qui concerne le comportement des producteurs d'une seule et même organisa‐ tion de producteurs reconnue, la CJCE déclare que seules les pratiques poursuivant précisément les objectifs confiés à l'organisation en question peut-être exempté de l’interdiction des ententes, par exemple : l'échange d'informations stratégiques, les accords sur les quantités ou la coordination des prix. Toutefois, ce comportement est subordonné à la condition qu'il que ces pratiques ont effectivement servi à att‐ eindre les objectifs dont l'organisation de producteurs est chargée et qu'il soit égale‐ ment proportionnées. Toutefois, la fixation en commun de prix minimaux de vente au sein d'une organisation en vue de stabiliser les prix à la production et de mettre grouper l'offre n'est pas proportionnée si elle ne permet pas aux producteurs qui vendent leurs produits eux-mêmes de pratiquer un prix inférieur à ces prix mini‐ maux fixés. Cela affaiblirait encore de plus la concurrence dans l'agriculture, qui de toute façon n'est pas très exposée à la concurrence. Rapport de Synthese 393 résultats structurellement parfaitement adaptés mais totalement divergents - ou si le législateur de l'UE devrait rendre obligatoires certaines instru‐ ments, qui ne seraient peut-être pas appropriés pour toutes les structures agricoles mais devraient conduire à des mesures uniformes et légalement sûres. Autres domaines du droit Si vous examinez les thèmes de la Commission II, vous remarquerez que des nombreux forces vives et obstacles sont présents dans le domaine de l'application du droit de l’UE. Permettez-moi de ne donner que quelques exemples des domaines - divisés en trois groupes - qui sont également mentionnés dans les rapports : Production agricole Il n'y a essentiellement aucune implication supranationale. Marché • La mise en œuvre de la PAC au niveau national apparaît essentielle ici : le dernier congrès de l'agriculture à Potsdam a montré à quel point les États membres ont la possibilité d'en faire un usage différencié.10 • Dans le domaine de l'organisation des marchés, les rapports nationaux mentionnent, par exemple, les filets de sécurité, les mesures de crise11, les droits de production (quotas de sucre 30.09.2017)12 et le paiement unique par exploitation. • Dans les zones rurales, beaucoup dépend de la conception des pro‐ grammes nationaux 2. 10 Martìnez, Rapport général de la Commission I, in: CEDR ( ed. ), CAP Reform: Market Organisation and Rural Areas. Legal Framework and Implementation. XXVIIIe Congrès et Colloque Européen de Droit Rural, Potsdam, 9-13 septembre 2015 (2017), p. 109 ss., en particulier p. 116 ss. Voir également rapports nationaux Belgique, Pologne et Roumanie. 11 Rapport national Allemagne. 12 Rapport national Hongrie. Rapport de Synthese 394 Environnement et protection des consommateurs • Des influences significatives résultent de ce que l'on appelle la com‐ mercialisation de la production, notamment avec la mention de la lé‐ gislation alimentaire (règles d'hygiène, traçabilité, contrôles), des indi‐ cations de provenance protégées (AOC) et de l'utilisation des OGM. • Un autre sujet mentionné est le droit de l'environnement13, en particu‐ lier l’étude de l'impact sur l'environnement (EIE), la directive sur les nitrates, protection contre les immissions, Natura 200014 et la protec‐ tion des animaux. • En outre, la législation sur les ressources d'exploitation joue également un rôle important, notamment en ce qui concerne la mise sur le marché et l'autorisation des produits phytosanitaires15, des engrais16, etc. Droit national Droit de la concurrence • L'importance du droit des cartels nationale semble diminuer dans le secteur agricole, y compris dans le sens d'égalité de traitement entre les différents États membres. En ce qui concerne les distorsions de concur‐ rence, l'objectif devrait être d'exempter toutes les entreprises d'une in‐ terdiction des cartels nationale par le droit des cartels agricole de l'UE. Autres domaines juridiques Cependant, l'impact de la législation purement nationale sur la compétiti‐ vité de l'agriculture est beaucoup plus important. Encore une fois, on ne peut citer que quelques exemples, qui à nouveau peuvent être diviser gros‐ sièrement en trois groupes : B. 1. 2. 13 Rapport national Allemagne, Hongrie et Espagne. 14 Rapport national Roumanie. 15 Rapport national France. 16 Rapport national Allemagne. Rapport de Synthese 395 Production agricole • Le droit foncier joue un rôle central dans des domaines tels que l'acqui‐ sition de terrains et de sol, le droit relatif aux cessions de biens agri‐ coles ou l'acquisition par des étrangers (en particulier dans les nou‐ veaux États membres17). • Bail rural18. • aménagement du territoire. • Commassage19 et mélioration zur pour améliorer la structure agricole. • Réglementation concernant le transfert des exploitations agricoles, à la fois parmi les vivants ou à la dévolution20. • Un autre apect est la réglementation de l'accès à la profession d'agricul‐ teur. • Il faut également considérer les types de sociétés pour les entreprises agricoles21. • Dans le domaine du droit agricole et social, les coûts salariaux (salaire minimum22, contrats collectives23), les assurances sociales24 et l'emploi des étrangers25 sont mentionnés. • Enfin, le droit fiscal a une influence considérable, notamment en ce qui concerne l'impôt sur le revenu, les franchises, les limites comptables, la TVA, les impôts sur les successions, les droits de mutation immobilière et la taxe sur les véhicules à moteur26. 17 Rapports nationaux Hongrie et Pologne. 18 Rapport nationaux Roumanie et Espagne; rapport individuel Zumaquero Gil. 19 En particulier Rapport nationaux Pays-Bas, Roumanie et Espagne. 20 Rapport nationaux Hongrie, Pologne et Espagne. 21 Rapport national Pologne. 22 Rapport national Allemagne. 23 Rapport national Pologne. 24 Rapport nationaux Allemagne, Hongrie et Pologne. 25 Rapport nationaux Hongrie, Pologne et Roumanie. 26 Rapport nationaux Allemagne, Hongrie, Pologne et Roumanie. Rapport de Synthese 396 Marché • Dans la commercialisation de la production27, la législation alimentaire (en partie), les "trademarks"28 nationales ou les réglementations sur le marketing direct sont citées. Environnement et protection des consommateurs • Le droit de l'environnement29 fait référence à la législation sur la pro‐ tection des sols, de la gestion de l'eau30 ou de la biodiversité31. • Dans la législation sur les resources il faut mentionés, les règles d’app‐ lication pour les pesticides, les engrais etc. Résumé Si l'on évalue maintenant la question centrale de la compétitivité de l'agri‐ culture d'un point de vue de l'ensemble du congrès, il faut se poser la ques‐ tion d'une manière différenciée : Il s’agit de la compétitivité de qui vraiment ? S'agit-il de l'ensemble du secteur, peut-être même avec les entreprises de transformation ? S'agit-il de certains types d'entreprises comme les entreprises familiales, les PME ou les entreprises agro-industrielles ? La compétitivité par rapport à qui tout cela concerne-t-il ? Au produc‐ teur concurrent de la région, de l'État membre, de l'UE ou du monde ent‐ ier ? À l'agrogroupe actif au niveau mondial ou au petit paysan d’un pays en développement, pour poser la question d’une manière provocante ? Si vous y regardez encore plus près, vous constaterez que, étonnam‐ ment, de nombreuses règles ne ne se révèle pas clairement comme un‐ de « force motrice » ou une « pierre d'achoppement ». En général, il sera correct que les règles des groupes entreprise et marché soient perçues comme un moyen d'améliorer la compétitivité et les règles du groupe envi‐ ronnement et protection des consommateurs comme une contrainte. Ce‐ pendant, les rapports montrent, parfois de manière frappante, une ambiva‐ C. 27 Rapport national Roumanie. 28 Rapport nationaux Hongrie (Hungarikum) et Pologne. 29 Rapport nationaux Allemagne, Hongrie et Espagne. 30 Rapport national Pologne. 31 Rapport national Pologne. Rapport de Synthese 397 lence32 de nombreux règlements. Les systèmes de quotas, par exemple, peuvent protéger le secteur en tant que tel de la surproduction et le rendre compétitif dans son ensemble, mais peuvent être perçus par les agricult‐ eurs individuels comme une restriction de leur liberté d'entreprise. Par ex‐ emple, l'interdiction ou la restriction de l'utilisation des ressources d'ex‐ ploitation sera considérée comme un frein au développement concurrentiel des exploitations agricoles et, d'autre part, la pollution de l'environnement qui se produit en l'absence de telles directives peut également entraîner des désavantages économiques pour les exploitations. Le rapport allemand tente de rendre justice à ces problèmes avec son propre système d'évaluati‐ on.33 Que faut-il donc améliorer ? De mon point de vue - et cela a été claire‐ ment démontré par les travaux des Commissions I et II – il y a deux cho‐ ses : D'une part, la situation particulière du secteur agricole, dont les pro‐ ducteurs polypolaires sont faibles, doit être prise en compte encore plus qu'avant, notamment par une démarcation plus claire et plus généreuse entre le droit communautaire des marchés agricoles et, plus particulière‐ ment le droit communautaire des cartels agricoles. D'autre part, le cas échéant, les législateurs nationaux devraient - en cas de doute - être satisfaits de la mise en œuvre du niveau minimum suprana‐ tional dans le domaine de la mise en œuvre du droit communautaire li‐ mitant la concurrence et devraient mettre en œuvre les mesures proposées aussi complètement que possible dans le domaine de la mise en œuvre du droit communautaire favorisant la concurrence. Toutefois, dans le droit des États membres qui est exclusivement national, une politique agricole nationale doit être développée qui permette à long terme, d’obtenir un équilibre dans les pays et les régions d’Europe.34 32 Cf. rapport national Allemagne. 33 Rapport national Allemagne. 34 Rapport national France: "Mais ceci implique deux réflexions. La première con‐ cerne l’abandon par les Pouvoirs publics français du réflexe d’introduire des con‐ traintes excessives dans la réglementation. La seconde est de proscrire toute mesu‐ re allant au-delà des exigences minimales d’une directive et de s’aligner sur le ni‐ veau des contraintes formulées par l’Union européenne. Pour la réduction des dis‐ torsions en matière de concurrence au sein du marché unique européen, il est né‐ cessaire d’une part «de renforcer l'unité des économies (des pays membres) et d'en assurer le développement harmonieux en réduisant l'écart entre les différentes régi‐ ons et le retard des (pays membres) moins favorisés»"; Rapport d’orientation 71e Congrès de la FNSEA, Brest 2017. Rapport de Synthese 398 Commission III Comme d'habitude, la Commission III a examiné les développements ac‐ tuels importants dans le cadre des domaines thématiques proposés et audelà. Cette vue d'ensemble aux multiples facettes montre une fois de plus où les exigences législatives sont observées dans le droit agricole - au ni‐ veau européen, voire mondial. À mon avis, il y a trois points essentiels qui sont étonnamment cohérents : la structure agricole, l'environnement natu‐ rel et les produits agricoles. Structure agricole En ce qui concerne la structure agricole, l'accent est clairement mis sur la sécurisation des terres agricoles pour les agriculteurs en activité. On parle même de "Global Land Rush"35. La disponibilité de terres cultivées – comme ressources non renouvelables – est une condition préalable indis‐ pensable à la production agricole et donc aussi à l'approvisionnement ali‐ mentaire. Il est effrayant de voir à quel point les anciens États membres craignent la liquidation par des investisseurs non agricoles et les nouveaux États membres craignent l’acquisition par de riches étrangers en particu‐ lier. Diverses mesures défensives peuvent être observées : En Allemagne, par exemple, les lois sur les transactions immobilières des États fédéraux ont été renforcées36 dans le but de diversifier largement la propriété fon‐ cière37. Plusieurs États ont essayé de s'entraider avec des lois nationales. En France, par exemple, la loi n° 2017-348 sur la préservation des terres V. A. 35 Rapport national Allemagne, voir là aussi pour les raisons. 36 Le rapporteur allemand constate que les risques liés aux structures agricoles pour le marché foncier résultent principalement des investisseurs non agricoles et de « l'industrialisation » des exploitations agricoles ; rapport national Allemagne. Cf. sur le projet d'une nouvelle loi sur l'assurance des structures agricoles pour les terres agricoles en Basse-Saxe, Booth, Mischt das Amt bald gehörig mit?, DLG- Mitteilungen 7/2017, p. 31 ss. Ainsi, le permis peut être refusé ou limité si un nonagriculteur acquiert un terrain ou si l'agriculteur acquiert une position dominante par l'acquisition. 37 Pour les raisons évoquées, voir rapport national Allemagne. Rapport de Synthese 399 agricoles a été promulguée 38, en Pologne la loi sur le système agricole (AAS)39 et en Italie une Banque des terres agricoles a été adoptée40. En outre, la Résolution du Parlement européen (PE) du 27 avril 2017 sur l’état des lieux de la concentration agricole dans l’Union européenne: comment faciliter l’accès des agriculteurs aux terres?, P8_TA(2017)019741 souligne l'importance de lutter contre l'exclusion croissante des agricult‐ eurs de l'achat de terres.42 Dans ce document, les États membres sont invi‐ tés, entre autres, à mieux prendre en compte la préservation du foncier agricole et sa maîtrise dans leurs politiques publiques, et à en faciliter la transmission. La Commission devrait créer un observatoire de la collecte d’informations et de données sur le niveau de concentration des terres agricoles et les droits d’exploitation des terrains dans l’Union). Environnement La tendance à l'écologisation du droit agricole est ininterrompue. De nom‐ breuses nouvelles réglementations visent à protéger l'environnement des effets de la production agricole. La France fait état d'un nouvel article dans le Code de l'environnement sur la biodiversité43, en Allemagne la loi sur les engrais est renforcée44 et aux Pays-Bas il y a de nouveaux développe‐ B. 38 Cela contient entre outre l’obligation, pour les sociétés qui font l’acquisition de terres, de constituer des structures dédiées dont l’objet principal est la propriété agricole ; art. 3 a été censuré par le Conseil constitutionnel au motif que ces dispo‐ sitions portaient une atteinte disproportionnée au droit de propriété et à la liberté d’entreprendre ; Rapport national France. 39 Rapport national Pologne. L'objectif est la reduction de l'acquisition spéculative de terres agricoles. Voir aussi Act on suspending the sale of real properties included in the Agricultural Property Stock of the State Treasury. 40 Rapport national Italie. 41 http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?pubRef=-//EP//TEXT+TA+P8-T A-2017-0197+0+DOC+XML+V0//FR. 42 Rapport national Pologne. 43 Rapport national France. Le nouvel article L. 110-1 II du Code de l’environnement énonce de nouveaux principes directeurs qui doivent en inspirer la portée des nor‐ mes du droit de l’environnement (le principe de solidarité écologique ; le principe de l’utilisation durable ; le principe de complémentarité entre l’environnement, l’agriculture, l’aquaculture et la gestion durable des forêts ; le principe de non-ré‐ gression). 44 Rapport national Allemagne. Rapport de Synthese 400 ments concernant le nitrogène45 et l’inscription de phosphate, tandis que le système du droit de production pour l’élevage des porcs et la volaille n'a pas encore été supprimé comme prévu.46 D'autres sujets incluent la mortalité des abeilles et l'interdiction de l'uti‐ lisation des insecticides néonicotinoïdes47 ou la protection des poulets pondeurs aux Etats-Unis48. Aliments Le troisième domaine concerne de nombreuses initiatives liées au produit agricole final, à savoir l'alimentation. Elle peut être décrite par les termes sécurité sanitaire des aliments, sécurité alimentaire et gaspillage alimen‐ taires. Dans le cas de la sécurité alimentaire, il est fait référence aux nouvelles technologies (nouveaux aliments, aliments fonctionnels, biotechnologies modernes, nanotechnologies, etc.)49, où les législateurs risquent de prend‐ re du retard par rapport aux évolutions scientifiques, c’est pourquoi il y a un besoin juridique de s'adapter à la base de connaissances actuelle.50 L'Argentine est un exemple frappant d'une approche étatique différen‐ ciée : d’une part, la législation sur l'utilisation des antibiotiques, leurs ef‐ fets sur la résistance aux antibiotiques et la santé publique ainsi que l'éle‐ vage.51 D'autre part, les lignes directrices pour une alimentation saine52. Même dans cette approche combinée utilisant des mesures de réglementa‐ C. 45 Voir rapport national Pays-Bas: Programmatic Approach Nitrogen (PAS). 46 Rapport national Pays-Bas, surplus de phosphate et droit de phosphate. Voir aussi Norer, Rapport de Synthese, in: CEDR ( ed. ), CAP Reform: Market Organisation and Rural Areas. Legal Framework and Implementation. XXVIIIe Congrès et Col‐ loque Européen de Droit Rural, Potsdam, 9-13 septembre 2015 (2017), p. 383 s. 47 Rapport nationaux France et États-Unis. 48 Rapport national États-Unis. 49 Rapport nationaux Pologne et États-Unis. 50 Rapport national Pologne. Aussi rapport national Argentine, après ce qu'il reste encore beaucoup à faire sur le plan législatif en ce qui concerne les nouvelles tech‐ nologies. 51 Landesbericht Argentine. 52 Directives pour la population argentine en tant qu'outil fondamental pour promou‐ voir des connaissances qui contribuent à une alimentation plus équitable et plus saine et à des comportements nutritionnels plus sains de la part de la population. Rapport de Synthese 401 tion et de pilotage, l'application et le contrôle sont des éléments cen‐ traux.53 Le deuxième développement préoccupant, outre la menace qui pèse sur les terres cultivées, concerne les nombreuses activités dans le domaine de la sécurité alimentaire. On parle de crises d'approvisionnement (possibles) qui, selon la FAO, se sont également rapprochées par le changement cli‐ matique54. La Suisse a réagi avec l'adoption d'un nouvel article constituti‐ onnel sur la sécurité alimentaire55, l'Allemagne avec une nouvelle loi sur la sécurité alimentaire et la prévention (ESVG)56. Cet article, qui a été ad‐ optée à une large majorité de la population suisse, oblige la Confédération à créer les conditions nécessaires pour assurer l'approvisionnement de la population en denrées alimentaires, entre autres, pour préserver les bases de la production agricole, en particulier les terres cultivées, pour une pro‐ duction de denrées alimentaire adaptée aux conditions locales et utilisant les ressources de manière efficiente, pour une agriculture et un secteur agroalimentaire répondant aux exigences du marché et pour une utilisation des denrées alimentaires qui préserve les ressources (Art. 104a CF). L'ESVG allemande définit le terme « crise de l'offre » et contient dans ce contexte des dispositions visant à garantir la fourniture de services de base et des mesures de précaution. Idéalement, tout cela devrait se faire dans le cadre d'un vaste consensus social de la démocratie alimentaire57, c'est-à-dire d'une politique étatique fondée sur le consensus et avec la participation de représentants des secteurs public et privé, de la société civile et des organisations internatio‐ nales.58 Enfin, un autre problème soulevé dans les rapports nationaux est l'aug‐ mentation des pertes alimentaires. Les gaspillage alimentaires a provoqué diverses initiatives et projets, comme en Allemagne59, ou ont déjà donné 53 Rapport nationaux Allemagne et États-Unis, le dernier avec le concept de "gene‐ rally recognized as safe" (GRAS). 54 Aussi rapport national Italie. 55 https://www.sbv-usp.ch/themen/ernaehrungsinitiative/. 56 Rapport national Allemagne. 57 Voir Petetin, Food Democracy in Food Systems, in: Thompson/Kaplan (Hrsg.), Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics, 2. Ed. (2016), p. 1 ss. 58 Rapport national Argentine. cf. aussi dans le Code of Good Business Practices in Food Procurement Contracting espagnol; Rapport individuel Cachón. 59 Rapport national Allemagne. Rapport de Synthese 402 lieu à des mesures législatives, comme en Italie60, en France ou en Finlan‐ de.61 L'importance de ces réglementations, qui s'adressent bien entendu principalement à l'industrie alimentaire, continuera à augmenter en raison de la grande importance sociale actuelle. Résumé L'agriculture (encore une fois dans son histoire) est confrontée à des chan‐ gements majeurs. Outre les thèmes susmentionnés ou le changement cli‐ matique, la numérisation croissante (l'agriculture intelligente ; ce qu'on ap‐ pellee aussi l'agriculture 4.0) soulève également un certain nombre de questions juridiques en suspens, notamment en ce qui concerne la protec‐ tion des données, la propriété/le droit d'utilisation des données62 ou l'attri‐ bution et la responsabilité.63 La liste des sujets pourrait être poursuivie. Dans certains domaines, cela s'accompagne d'un appel à une normalisa‐ tion élargie, mais en même temps, il y a aussi des plaintes concernant la poursuite de la légalisation dans le secteur agricole. La mise en œuvre des normes européennes continue d'y contribuer, mais les législateurs nation‐ aux ne peuvent pas non-plus être libérés de leurs obligations correspon‐ dantes. Le rapport national français parle également d'une « overdose nor‐ mative »64. Dans l'ensemble, on constate néanmoins que le droit actuel est de plus en plus passif défensive plutôt qu'actif dans l'élaboration des politiques. Dans le domaine de l'environnement, l’espace naturel est protégé des éventuels effets négatifs de la production agricole. Dans le domaine ali‐ mentaire, c'est le consommateur qui doit être protégé des crises d'approvi‐ sionnement et des scandales alimentaires. Enfin, dans le domaine des D. 60 Rapport national Italie. 61 Indications dans le rapport national Allemagne. 62 Mot-clé Big Data : les données de l'agriculture sont devenues des produits com‐ mercialisables avec une valeur commerciale considérable.; rapport national Alle‐ magne. 63 Rapport national Allemagne. cf. seulement Martìnez, Landwirtschaft 4.0 – Recht‐ licher Rahmen und Herausforderungen der Digitalisierung der Landwirtschaft (Teil 1), AUR 2016, p. 401 ss., (Teil 2), AUR 2016, p. 453 ss.; Eisenberger/Hödl/ Huber/Lachmayer/Mittermüller, "Smart Farming" – Rechtliche Perspektiven, in: Norer/Holzer (Hrsg.), Agrarrecht Jahrbuch 2017 (2017), p. 207 ss. 64 "Les agriculteurs sont au bord de l’overdose normative"; Rapport national France. Rapport de Synthese 403 structures agricoles, le droit agricole semble refléter ses origines histori‐ ques et agit plus que jamais comme une législation protectrice qui restreint notamment la libre circulation des terres agricoles pour le profit des agri‐ culteurs producteurs. Fin Nous avons travaillé dur ces derniers jours. Quel est le résumé total après 12 heures de travail en commission, environ 400 pages de rapports nation‐ aux, de rapports généraux et de conclusions, deux dîners, dont un dîner de gala, qui nous a donner la possibilité de rencontrer d'anciens et de nou‐ veaux amis et à discuter avec eux de ce que nous avons dû attendre depuis le dernier congrès il y deuyx ans (par exemple l'article 209 du Règlement n° 1308/2013) ? Dans le domaine du droit de la concurrence, les Commissions I et II ont présenté un droit agricole actif, je dirais même, combatives. Les excepti‐ ons de l'agriculture au régime de concurrence sont justifiables et réalisa‐ bles, du moins d'un point de vue juridique. D'autres développements se‐ ront passionnants, notamment en raison des nombreuses initiatives politi‐ ques. Avec et sans chicorée. La Commission III, en revanche, non moins intéressante et vivante, a présenté une loi agricole essentiellement protectrice que l'on pourrait qua‐ lifier de moins amicale et craintive. Les sujets dominants des rapports étai‐ ent la sécurité alimentaire et la défense contre les investisseurs non-agri‐ coles et étrangers à l'accès aux terres agricoles. Nous sommes confrontés ici à une législation de protection classique qui semble se concentrer plus que jamais sur sa fonction de protection. Ce n'est peut-être pas inhabituel dans une période d'incertitude comme celle que nous traversons dans le monde, mais ce n'est pas le droit agricole formateur et actif que j'aimerais voir - et vous partagez peut-être ce constat. Qui aurait cru qu'en ce début de XXIe siècle, nous parlerions à nouveau d'une sécurité alimentaire et d'un renforcement du droit relatif aux cessions de biens agricoles ? Le temps nous le dira. Viennois de naissance, je n'appartiens pas généti‐ quement aux optimistes. Mais le droit agricole a toujours été bon pour des surprises. J'attends avec impatience notre discours au prochain Congrès européen de droit agricole en 2019. Merci pour votre attention. VI. Rapport de Synthese 404 Synthesis Report* Version anglaise – English version – Englische Version Prof. Dr. Roland Norer General Delegate CEDR, University of Lucerne Introduction and Acknowledgements Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen, Dear colleagues,1 I have the honour to close the academic program of the XXIXth European Congress of Agricultural Law with the traditional presentation of the Syn‐ thesis Report. First, I would like to say a few words of acknowledgement. I would like to thank President le Bâtonnier Jacques Druais and the Secretary General Jean-Baptiste Millard and their team of the French Agricultural Law Association for the successful organisation of the congress. Their effort and hospitality made this beautiful stay in Lille pos‐ sible. Thank you very much. I would like to extend my thanks to the General Reporters and the Pres‐ idents of the Commissions. They have studied, compiled and compared the National Reports, and have led the Commissions’ work in a charming way while keeping an eye on time management. Commission I was led by Prof. Dr. Rudolf Mögele, Prof. em. Dr. Paul Richli and Dr. Christian Bus‐ se, Commission II by Prof. Dr. Norbert Olszak and Dr. Luc Bodiguel and Commission III by Prof. Dr. Michael Cardwell and Dr. Ludivine Petetin. Thank you also to all National and Individual Reporters. Their Reports constitute the backbone of this Congress and its work. In total, 32 National I. * Translation from German into English by Christa Preisig, MLaw und RAin, Univer‐ sity of Lucerne. 1 This is an expanded version of the original address, with added footnotes. The oral style has been retained. 405 Reports from 19 countries and 3 Individual Reports have been submitted and presented. Last but not least I would like to extend my gratitude to you, dear par‐ ticipants. Your dedication, effort and contributions during the discussions have enriched this Congress. In the year of the 60th anniversary of our organization, this Congress proves that we also tackle complex issues that might be considered un‐ wieldy at first glance. I hope that our conclusions will find their way into the current debates. After these words of acknowledgement, I am leading over to the aca‐ demic analysis of this Congress. We are almost at the end of our conven‐ tion and it is thus one of my tasks as General Delegate to keep you from the déjeuner sur place. I do not want to overstretch this duty, but I do want to invite you to pass the scientific program of this XXIXth Congress and Colloquium of the CEDR in review once more. Introductory academic presentation At the occasion of the scientific introduction on Thursday, a plenary intro‐ ductory academic presentation prepared us for the Commissions’ work to follow. We are grateful that Prof. Dr. Patrick Meunier was ready to give us a presentation about the topic of « Politique agricole commune et concur‐ rence: une corrélation génétiquement modifiée". In his presentation, he outlined the system of the EU competition law and its implications for agriculture taking the complex structural and natural characteristics of the agricultural sector into account (e.g. for the allocation of aids). His concise overview on the relevant EU law established the basis for the Commission work. Topics As usual, three Commissions took up the subsequent work. A general top‐ ic defined the framework for the Commissions’ work – an approach we had applied in Potsdam already. The Board of Management – inter alia on the suggestion of the European Commission – picked the topic "agricul‐ ture and competition". Agriculture and the processing industries are em‐ bedded in an environment of highly concentrated upstream (crop protec‐ II. III. Synthesis Report 406 tion, fertilisers, seed, agricultural machinery industries) and downstream (retail food industry) sectors. It is no surprise that there are several initia‐ tives on the EU level addressing the supply chain of food and the protec‐ tion of small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) from unfair commer‐ cial practices of commercially important trading partners. The Agricultural Markets Task Force has proposed concrete recommendations. Similar top‐ ics were discussed at the Congresses of 1967 and 2003.2 A pivotal possibility to strengthen the producers’ position in the supply chain is to join forces in the form of producer organisations. France in par‐ ticular has a long tradition with this approach, which is why the Congress topic chosen by the French Association of Agriculture in collaboration with the CEDR is a perfect match for the Congress here in Lille. Many questions – such as the relationship between the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) and the EU competition law as well as the national competi‐ tion law – remain unsolved. These topics were discussed in Commission I "Competition rules in Agriculture", where 11 National Reports have been handed in. Commission II extended the scope of the topic and treated the issue of national regulation that has a significant influence on agriculture and its competitiveness. The topic was called "Agricultural competiveness: Drivers and obstacles in national law". Production, processing and market‐ ing regulation with whom states lay down the conditions under which agriculture can be carried out may first come to mind when confronted with this topic. Furthermore, regulation concerning land, agricultural taxa‐ tion, work conditions and social insurance or environmental protection may directly or indirectly influence the competitiveness of agriculture or specific agricultural sectors of production. For this topic, 13 National Re‐ ports have been submitted. Following the tradition of the preceding Congresses, Commission III addressed the topic of "Significant Current Developments in Rural Law". This allows the observation, analysis and discussion of trends and signifi‐ cant regulatory developments in the participating countries. Unfortunately, due to an accident in her family, Prof. em. Margaret Rosso Grossman could not preside the Commission. Thankfully, Prof. Michael Cardwell agreed to take her position. The topics proposed in the questionnaire in‐ 2 E.g. 1967 in Bad Godesberg ("Le droit des cartels agricoles"); 2003 in Almerimar ("L'Économie agricole face au droit de la concurrence européenne et nationale "). Synthesis Report 407 cluded issues such as new technologies, livestock breeding, food security and food safety, but also Brexit and free trade agreement such as TTIP and CETA. The heterogeneous picture showed a surprising variety of different regulatory developments in the wide world of agricultural law. This open format for Commission III that has been introduced at the Congress in Cambridge in 2009 has once more proven its worth. 8 national reports have been submitted. The national and individual reports in the best case followed the ques‐ tionnaires composed by the General Reporters in accordance with the General Delegate. In addition, all Commissions succeeded in integrating presentations that did not follow the structure of the questionnaires and having structured debates as well as elaborating conclusions. Allow me now to highlight a few of the elements taken from the reports and discussions that seem particularly important to me. Commission I and II The Commissions I and II have taken on a highly relevant and challenging topic. Commission I examined it from the angle of competition law where the regulatory leeway depends essentially on the difference between Art. 42 TFEU and the agricultural law of the EU as well as the national competition law. In addition, a multitude of other regulatory areas and norms of national and supranational origin affect the competitiveness of agriculture, as Commission II has identified. The essential findings of both Commissions will be joined here and ex‐ amined along the lines of EU and national law. In its entirety, the diligent work of all participants in both Commissions clearly shows where and how the competitiveness and competition in agriculture could be strength‐ ened. European law Competition law Before starting the actual discussion, the complex interactions between the agricultural law of the EU and EU competition law needed to be broken IV. A. 1. Synthesis Report 408 down. This relationship has often been described in literature3, yet – as it seems – less often been clarified in a satisfactory manner. A look into the relevant commentaries raises a few questions when it comes to the de‐ tails.4 According to art. 42 TFEU, competition law is only applicable for agri‐ culture as far as the European Parliament and the Council do not deter‐ mine it. This has raised some eyebrows ever since the adoption of the arti‐ cle. The EU legislator has decided in its single common market organisation Regulation (EU) No 1308/20135 that the general regulation of competition law are – in principle – applicable for agriculture, although there remain important exceptions as for instance the fact that the regulation on agricul‐ tural markets has priority over the general competition law [art. 206 sub‐ paragraph 1 Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013] or that the collaboration of farmers’ associations is largely excluded from competition law [art. 209 paragraph 1 subparagraph 2 Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013]. For agricultural products that are not submitted to market organisation regulations, Council Regulation (EC) No 1184/20066 applying certain rules of competition to the production of, and trade in, agricultural prod‐ ucts is applicable. Said regulation also applies the competition rules [art. 1 3 Cf. de Bronett, Landwirtschaftliche Erzeugnisse, in: Wiedemann (ed.), Handbuch des Kartellrechts, 2. edition (2008), p. 1123; Busse, Agrarkartellrecht. Kommentar zu § 28 GWB und seinen EU-rechtlichen Bezügen, 2. edition (2015); Frenz, Agrar‐ wettbewerbsrecht, AUR 2010, p. 193 et seqq.; Gerbrandy/de Vries, Agricultural Po‐ licy and EU Competition Law. Possibilities and Limits for Self-Regulation in the Dairy Sector (2011); Gruber, Wettbewerb in der Landwirtschaft, OZK 2009, p. 132 et seqq.; Martìnez, Landwirtschaft und Wettbewerbsrecht – Bestandsaufnahme und Perspektiven, EuZW 2010, p. 368 et seqq.; Sitar, Gemeinschaftlicher Verkauf und Mengensteuerung durch Vereinigungen landwirtschaftlicher Erzeuger – neue Ent‐ wicklungen der Rechtsprechung und des Agrarrechts der EU im Spannungsfeld des Kartellverbots, in: Norer/Holzer (ed.), Agrarrecht Jahrbuch 2018 (2018), p. 119 et seqq. 4 Cf. e.g. Busse, in: Lenz/Borchardt, EU-Verträge, Art. 42 AEUV, n. 2 et seq.; Lo‐ renzmeier, in: Vedder/Heintschel v. Heinegg, EVV, Art. 42 AEUV, n. 3; Bittner, in: Schwarze, EU-Kommentar, Art. 42 AEUV, n. 4; Norer, in: Pechstein/Nowak/Häde, Frankfurter Kommentar zu EUV, GRC und AEUV, Bd. II, Art. 42 AEUV, n. 4 et seqq. 5 Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 establishing a common organisation of the markets in agricultural products, OJ L 347/671. 6 Council Regulation (EC) No 1184/2006 applying certain rules of competition to the production of, and trade in, agricultural products, OJ L 214/7. Synthesis Report 409 Council Regulation (EC) No 1184/2006], but statues restrictions concern‐ ing farmers’ associations and associations of such associations [art. 2 Council Regulation (EC) No 1184/2006]. Since Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 makes a general reference to all Annex I products, the question as to the scope of application arose. In Advocate General Wahl’s Opinion in Case C-671/15 at the ECJ con‐ cerning agreements on the price of endives delivered on 6 April 2017, the beginning states: "The common agricultural policy (CAP) and European competition policy, both pillars in the construction of Europe, may at first sight appear difficult to reconcile."7 Subsequently, Wahl finds that recon‐ ciling the two "require[s] a precise definition of the scope of the ‘agricul‐ tural derogation’ laid down in the Treaties, as defined by secondary legis‐ lation." The Advocate General then tries to give the required differentiated analysis. In short, the core issue is the question whether certain tasks given to farmers’ associations justify further exceptions from the scope of appli‐ cation of the EU competition law, similar to the already recognized excep‐ tions for GMOs – which are for once not matters of the court case.8 We will have to wait how the ECJ will decide this fundamental question.9 7 Advocate General Wahl’s Opinion, Case C-671/15, OJ C 2017 281/1, n. 1. 8 Advocate General Wahl’s Opinion, Case C-671/15, OJ C 2017 281/1, n. 3. 9 Note: The ECJ delivered its decision on 14 November 2017, thus after the Congress; Case C-671/15. Essentially, the court points out that the Common Agri‐ cultural Policy prevails over the competition law’s goals, which is why the EU leg‐ islator can exempt certain conducts that are – in principle – anti-competitive, from the scope of competition law. According to the ECJ, this does not mean that the common organisation of the market for agricultural products is an area that is not subject to competition at all. An exemption from the ban on cartels is only justified for certain forms of coordination and concertation between agricultural producers of the same farmers’ association. Therefore, the concerted practices between sever‐ al organisations and other participants that are not recognised by a Member State fall under the scope of the cartel ban. Concerning the practices of members of the same producer organisation or the same association of producer organisations recognised by a Member State, the ECJ finds that only the ones which are strictly necessary for the pursuit of one or more of the objectives assigned to the producer organisation or association of producer organi‐ sations may escape the prohibition of agreements, e.g. practices that relate to a con‐ certation on prices or quantities put on the market or exchanges of strategic infor‐ mation. The practices must serve the pursuit of the objectives assigned to the orga‐ nisation and they must be proportionate. A concertation on prices within an organi‐ sation in order to stabilise prices or quantities are not proportionate if they do not allow the producer who sells his/her products directly to set a price below the col‐ Synthesis Report 410 The EU law already provides instruments to solve this difficult relation‐ ship, although the Member States differ substantially when it comes to their application. Examples are mostly the recognised producer organisa‐ tions, associations of producer organisations or inter-branch organisations. Germany for instance has 642, Poland 341, Austria on the other hand only 35 and the Netherlands only 23. The former two countries have a corre‐ sponding register, the latter two do not. We should also have a look at the instrument of the declaration of gen‐ eral applicability. Especially Romance countries have a long tradition of using this instrument, whereas it lies dormant in other countries. Other ex‐ amples are bundling limits or contract regulations. Traditions and struc‐ tures in the Member States evidently have a very strong influence as to if and how instruments of the EU law are being used and implemented. Therefore, we should not only demand a revision and clarification of the agricultural competition law, but much rather a decision in principle. A decision whether the EU legislator should provide a broad range of instru‐ ments, whereas their adoption and implementation remains in the realm of the Member states – which can lead to structurally perfectly aligned or then completely divergent results –, or whether the legislator should make a few selected instruments legally binding, which may not be a perfect fit for every sector, but would lead to uniform and legally secured measures. Other areas of law If we have a broader look at the topics of Commission II, we notice that many driving forces and impediments can be discerned in the implementa‐ tion of EU law. I allow myself to cite a few areas – taken from the reports – by way of example, coarsely divided into three groups: Agricultural holding There are, in essence, no supranational implications. 2. lectively fixed minimum sale price. This practice would further weaken agriculture, a sector that is to a large extent already not subject to competition. Synthesis Report 411 Market • The national implementation of the CAP seems to be paramount here: The last Congress in Potsdam has shown the leeway for Member States and how they are using this scope in a differentiated manner.10 • In the area of Market Organisation, the National Reports name safety nets, crisis measures11, production rights (sugar quotas 30 September 2017)12 or the single payment scheme as examples. • For Rural Areas, a lot depends on the actual implementation and struc‐ ture of the national programmes. Environmental and consumer protection • Crucial influences are the so-called commercialisation of the produc‐ tion, examples are mainly food law (hygiene regulations, product traceability, controls), designation of origin (AOC) or the use of GMOs. • Environmental protection13 is another topic taken up in the reports, es‐ pecially the environmental impact assessment, Nitrates Directive, emission control, Natura 200014 and animal welfare. • Furthermore, regulation on aids to production plays an important role, in particular for the admission of plant protection15 or fertilisers16 and placing them on the market 10 Martìnez, General Report of Commission I, in: CEDR (ed.), CAP Reform: Market Organisation and Rural Areas. Legal Framework and Implementation. XXVIII European Congress and Colloquium of Agricultural Law, Potsdam, 9-13 septem‐ ber 2015 (2017), p. 123 et seqq., in particular p. 130 et seqq. Cf. also National Re‐ ports Belgium, Poland and Romania. 11 National Report Germany. 12 National Report Hungary. 13 National Reports Germany, Hungary and Spain. 14 National Report Romania. 15 National Report France. 16 National Report Germany. Synthesis Report 412 National law Competition law The importance of the national competition law seems to be declining, which improves the equality of treatment between the Member States. Concerning the distortion of competition, it would be desirable if the EU competition law puts an end to the prohibition of national cartels. Other areas of law Far more important are the consequences of purely national areas of law on the competitiveness of agriculture. Here as well, I can only point out a few examples – split down into three groups: Agricultural holding • Land law is of vital importance here, encompassing topics such as ac‐ quisition of land, real estate law or acquisition of land by foreigners (the latter is an issue particularly in the new Member States17). • Agricultural lease18. • Spatial planning. • Land consolidation19 and melioration in order to improve the agricul‐ tural structures. • Regulation concerning the handover of agricultural businesses (among living, but also by way of inheritance20). • Another important issue is the regulation of access to the profession as farmer. • Furthermore, the forms of society for agricultural businesses21 are im‐ portant. B. 1. 2. 17 National Reports Hungary and Poland. 18 National Reports Romania and Spain; Individual Report Zumaquero Gil. 19 In particular National Reports Netherlands, Romania and Spain. 20 National Reports Hungary, Poland and Spain. 21 National Report Poland. Synthesis Report 413 • Concerning labour law and social law, labour costs (minimum wages22, collective agreements23), social insurance24 as well as the employment of foreign nationals25 were enumerated as important topics. • Finally, tax law has a far-reaching influence, especially when it comes to income tax, tax allowances, accounting limits, sales tax, inheritance tax, land transfer tax and motor vehicle tax26. Market • Concerning the commercialisation of the production27, food law, na‐ tional trademarks28 or regulation on direct marketing are enumerated. Environmental and consumer protection • In environmental law29, soil protection law, water management30 or biodiversity31 are named in the national reports. • Concerning the regulation of aids to production, the reports elaborate on output regulation for crop protection, fertilisers etc. Summary Pondering this Congress’s central topic of competitiveness in agriculture from an overarching perspective, one must ask a differentiated question: Whose competitiveness is concerned? Does it concern the entire sector, maybe including the processing units? Is it about certain forms of busi‐ nesses such as family businesses, small and medium-sized enterprises or agro-industrial businesses? C. 22 National Report Germany. 23 National Reports Poland. 24 National Reports Germany, Hungary and Poland. 25 National Reports Hungary, Poland and Romania. 26 National Reports Germany, Hungary, Poland and Romania. 27 National Report Romania. 28 National Reports Hungary (Hungarikum) and Poland. 29 National Reports Germany, Hungary and Spain. 30 National Report Poland. 31 National Report Poland. Synthesis Report 414 Competitiveness against whom are we talking about here? The compet‐ ing producer from the region, from the own Member State, within the EU or worldwide? To put it provocatively: is the competition against globally operating agro-industrial companies or the small farmer from the develop‐ ing country concerned? If we take a closer look, we notice that surprisingly many regulations are in fact neither "drivers" nor "obstacles". Generally, we can assume that regulation concerning farming business and market are perceived as mea‐ sures to improve competitiveness, whereas regulation concerning environ‐ mental and consumer protection are considered as restrictions. However, it is striking that many reports show a distinctly double-faced identity of some regulations32. Regulations on quotas for instance may prevent over‐ production and therefore contribute to the overall competitiveness, for the single farmer though they may be perceived as restriction on his en‐ trepreneurial freedom. Thus, bans and restrictions for the output of crop protection or fertilis‐ ers are seen as barriers for a competitive development of agricultural busi‐ nesses; on the other hand, the lack of such restrictions would eventually lead to economic disadvantages for the business due to the negative im‐ pacts on the environment. The German National Report tries to respond to these problems with its own assessment scheme.33 So what needs to be improved? In my opinion – and that is what the work of the Commissions I and II have showed very clearly – there are two starting points: On the one hand, the special situation of agriculture with its weak poly‐ poly producers should receive – even more than before – particular atten‐ tion, especially by the introduction of a clear-cut and more generous dis‐ tinction from the regulation on the EU agricultural commodity market and the EU competition law. On the other hand – wherever it proves reasonable – the national legis‐ lators should, when in doubt, limit themselves to the supranational mini‐ mum when it comes to the implementation of anti-competitive EU law, but should fully embrace measures of EU legislation and its corresponding instruments which support and foster competition. In the realm of purely national law, the Member States should adopt a national agricultural poli‐ 32 Cf. National Report Germany. 33 National Report Germany. Synthesis Report 415 cy that – in the long run – enables a balance between the European coun‐ tries and regions.34 Commission III Commission III had provided a broad range of topics and significant other developments. The diverse overall picture shows once more where the ac‐ tors see a need for legislative action in the field of European, if not global, agricultural law. In my opinion, there is a surprising unanimity and three focal points can be distilled: agricultural structure, natural environment and agricultural products. Agricultural structure When it comes to agricultural structure, the safeguard of agricultural land is paramount. There are even voices talking about a global land rush35. The availability of the non-renewable resource of land is an indispensable condition for agricultural production and subsequently for food produc‐ tion. It is alarming how the old Member States fear the sale to non-agricul‐ tural investors and how the new Member States are distressed by the pur‐ chase of land by solvent foreign nationals. A variety of different defensive measures can be observed: Germany for instance has tightened its real estate law in the Bundesländer36 and V. A. 34 National Report France: "Mais ceci implique deux réflexions. La première concer‐ ne l’abandon par les Pouvoirs publics français du réflexe d’introduire des contrain‐ tes excessives dans la réglementation. La seconde est de proscrire toute mesure allant au-delà des exigences minimales d’une directive et de s’aligner sur le niveau des contraintes formulées par l’Union européenne. Pour la réduction des distorsi‐ ons en matière de concurrence au sein du marché unique européen, il est nécessai‐ re d’une part « de renforcer l'unité des économies (des pays membres) et d'en assu‐ rer le développement harmonieux en réduisant l'écart entre les différentes régions et le retard des (pays membres) moins favorisés » " (Rapport d’orientation 71e Congrès de la FNSEA, Brest 2017). 35 National Report Germany, elaborating on the reasons for the land rush. 36 The German National Reporter perceives agro-structurally relevant threats for the land market primarily in non-agricultural investors and in the industrialisation of agricultural businesses; National Report Germany. Synthesis Report 416 aims at a broad distribution of land ownership37. Various countries try to intervene with national laws. France for instance enacted the Act n° 2017-348 on the preservation of agricultural lands38, Poland the Act on the agricultural system (AAS)39 and Italy launched a databank on the use of agricultural lands40. Furthermore, the European Parliament (EP) resolution of 27 April 2017 on the state of play of farmland concentration in the EU: how to facilitate the access to land for farmers, P8_TA(2017)019741 emphasises the impor‐ tance of intervention against the increasing exclusion of farmers from pur‐ chasing land.42 Besides other proposals, the resolution calls on the Mem‐ ber States to take greater account of farmland conservation and manage‐ ment as well as the transfer of land in the context of their political mea‐ sures. The Commission is requested to establish an observatory service for the collection of information and data on the level of farmland concentra‐ tion and tenure throughout the EU. Environment The trend towards a greener, more ecological agricultural law is unwaver‐ ing. Numerous new regulations aim at protecting the environment from the effects of agricultural production. France reports on a new article on B. For the draft on a new law intending the preservation of agricultural structures and agricultural land in Lower Saxony Booth, Mischt das Amt bald gehörig mit?, DLG-Mitteilungen 7/2017, p. 31 et seqq. According to the law, the approval can be denied or restricted if a non-agricultural person purchases land or if the pur‐ chase of land leads to a dominant position of the farmer. 37 As to the reasons, cf. National Report Germany. 38 The law includes, among other measures, the obligation of agricultural businesses purchasing agricultural land that their business purpose is agricultural. Its art. 3 however has been deemed unconstitutional by the "Conseil constitutionnel" due to the disproportionate consequences for the property rights and entrepreneurial free‐ dom. National Report France. 39 National Report Poland. The Act aims at the reduction of speculative acquisition of agricultural real property. Cf. also the Act on suspending the sale of real proper‐ ties included in the Agricultural Property Stock of the State Treasury. 40 National Report Italy. 41 http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?pubRef=-//EP//TEXT+TA+P8- TA-2017-0197+0+DOC+XML+V0//EN. 42 National Report Poland. Synthesis Report 417 biodiversity in its Code de l’environnement43, Germany tightens its legis‐ lation on fertilisers44 and the Netherlands give account of new develop‐ ments concerning nitrogen45 and phosphate, while the production right system for pigs and poultry has – against the original plan – not been re‐ pealed yet.46 Further topics are bee mortality and bans on the use of neonicotinoids47 or the protection of egg-laying hens in the USA48. Food The third field concerns numerous initiatives in context of agricultural fi‐ nal products: food. They can be summarised under the notions of food safety, food security and food waste. In the case of food safety, some reports point out the new technologies (novel food, functional food, modern biotechnologies, nanotechnology etc.)49 and hint at the risk that the legislator falls behind the progress of science and thus the law requires adjustments to the existing state of scien‐ tific knowledge)50. Argentina brings forward an illustrative example for a differentiated governmental approach: On the one hand, with its legislation on the use of antibiotics, their impact on antibiotic resistance and public health and C. 43 National Report France. The new art. 10 L. 110-1 II Code de l’environnement (En‐ vironment Act) enumerates the new guiding principles of environmental law (eco‐ logical solidarity, sustainable use, complementarity between environment, agricul‐ ture, acquaculture and the sustainable forest management, non-regression). 44 National Report Germany. 45 Cf. National Report Netherlands: Programmatic Approach Nitrogen (PAS). 46 National Report Netherlands, surplus of phosphates and phosphate-rights (cf. also Norer, Synthesis Report, in: CEDR (ed.), CAP Reform: Market Organisation and Rural Areas. Legal Framework and Implementation. XXVIII European Congress and Colloquium of Agricultural Law, Potsdam, 9-13 September 2015 (2017), p. 405. 47 National Reports France and USA. 48 National Report USA. 49 National Reports Poland and USA. 50 National Report Poland. Cf. also National Report Argentina, according to which there is a long way to go in order to enable the legislation to take the modern tech‐ nical facts into account. Synthesis Report 418 breeding of farm animals51, on the other hand with its food guidelines for a healthy diet52. In this combined approach with regulatory and guidelines, implementation and control are central pillars.53 The second alarming development besides the loss of agricultural land concerns food security. The reports refer to potential supply crises, which, according to the FAO, are accelerated by climate change54. Switzerland re‐ acted by adopting a new article in the constitution concerning food securi‐ ty55, Germany with a new Ernährungssicherstellungs- und -vorsorgege‐ setz (ESVG; Food Security Law)56. Switzerland has adopted the new arti‐ cle in its constitutions with a great majority. It requires the federal govern‐ ment to ensure the secure supply of the population with food by creating the necessary conditions for a locally adapted, resource efficient agricul‐ tural production, especially by the preservation of the necessary farmland, for a market-oriented agriculture and a resourceful handling of foodstuff and consumption (art. 104a of the Swiss Constitution). The German ESVG defines the term of supply crisis and contains regulation on how to secure the basic supply as well as precautionary measures. All of these developments are ideally carried by the broad social con‐ sensus of food democracy57, thus a governmental policy with the input of and supported by actors of public and private life, civil society and inter‐ national organisations.58 Finally, the reports refer to the problem of increasing losses of food. Food waste has led to various initiatives and projects (e.g. in Germany59) or to legislative measures (e.g. in Italy60, France or Finland61). The impor‐ 51 National Report Argentina. 52 Guidelines for the Argentinian Population as fundamental tool to promote knowl‐ edge that contributes to more equitable and healthy eating and nutrition behaviors by the population; National Report Argentina. 53 National Reports Germany and USA, the latter presenting the concept of "general‐ ly recognized as safe" (GRAS). 54 Cf. National Report Italy. 55 https://www.sbv-usp.ch/themen/ernaehrungsinitiative/. 56 National Report Germany. 57 See Petetin, Food Democracy in Food Systems, in: Thompson/Kaplan (ed.), Ency‐ clopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics, 2. edition (2016), p. 1 et seqq. 58 National Report Argentina. Cf. also the Spanish Code of Good Business Practices in Food Procurement Contracting; Individual Report Cachón. 59 National Report Germany. 60 National Report Italy. 61 References in the National Report Germany. Synthesis Report 419 tance of these regulations, which primarily concern the food industry, will – corresponding with their currently high social relevance – increase. Summary Once more in its history, agriculture is facing great changes. In addition to the aforementioned topics or climate change, the increasing digitisation (smart farming, so-called agriculture 4.0) raises questions, especially con‐ cerning data protection, property/right of use of data62 or liability.63 These developments do prompt some voices to call for an expansion of regulation, at the same time there are statements bemoaning the ever-in‐ creasing number of legislation in the agricultural sector. The implementa‐ tion of EU regulation adds to this impression, while the national legisla‐ tors cannot be released from their corresponding obligations. The French National Report graphically speaks of a "normative overdose"64. Overall, it is striking that the legislation is increasingly being less ac‐ tively shaped, but is rather acting passively and defensively. As to the en‐ vironment, nature is protected from the effects of agricultural production. For food, the consumer is protected from supply crises and food scandals. Finally, when it comes to agricultural structures, agricultural law apparent‐ ly seems to come back to its historical origins and acts as protective legis‐ lation more strongly than ever, especially concerning agricultural land transfers which are reserved to producing farmers. Conclusion We have worked hard in the past few days. So after 12 hours of commis‐ sion work, about 400 pages of reports, general reports and conclusions, two dinners – one as gala evening – allowing us to meet old and new D. VI. 62 Buzzword Big Data: data from agriculture have become tradable goods with a considerable market value; National Report Germany. 63 National Report Germany. Cf. only Martìnez, Landwirtschaft 4.0 – Rechtlicher Rahmen und Herausforderungen der Digitalisierung der Landwirtschaft (Teil 1), AUR 2016, p. 401 et seqq., (Teil 2), AUR 2016, p. 453 et seqq.; Eisenberger/Hödl/ Huber/Lachmayer/Mittermüller, "Smart Farming" – Rechtliche Perspektiven, in: Norer/Holzer (ed.), Agrarrecht Jahrbuch 2017 (2017), p. 207 et seqq. 64 "Les agriculteurs sont au bord de l’overdose normative"; National Report France. Synthesis Report 420 friends and to debate with them, which are our conclusions and answers to the questions that we have been waiting for since the last Congress two years ago (e.g. concerning art. 209 Regulation No 1308/2013)? In the area of competition law, the Commissions I and II have showed a very active if not to say combative agricultural law. Exceptions and ex‐ emptions for agriculture from competition law are justified and feasible, at least from a legal point of view. With or without endives: it remains excit‐ ing and we will follow the further developments with interest – also due to numerous forthcoming political initiatives. Commission III on the other hand – equally interestingly and lively – has presented an agricultural law that primarily fulfils protective func‐ tions; if you are less clement, you might be tempted to call this aspect of agricultural law fearful. The predominant topics of the reports were food security and the prevention of non-agricultural or foreign investors from access to agricultural land. Agricultural law here takes on a classic ap‐ proach as protective legislation and is more cautious than ever. Perhaps this is not uncommon in unstable times as we are experiencing all over the world these days. Yet this is not the creative and active agricultural law I am wishing for – maybe you agree with this conclusion. Who would have thought that at the beginning of the 21st century we would be talking about secure food supplies and the aggravation of agricultural land transfers? Time will tell us. Born and raised in Vienna, I certainly do not consider myself an optimist; it is just not in our DNA. However, agricultural law has never ceased to surprise us. I am looking forward to our discussions at the occasion of our next European Congress of Rural Law in 2019. Thank you for your attention. Synthesis Report 421 Synthesebericht Version allemande – German version – Deutsche Version Prof. Dr. Roland Norer Generaldelegierter des CEDR, Universität Luzern Einleitung und Dank Sehr geehrter Herr Präsident, Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren, Liebe Kolleginnen und Kollegen,1 Mit dem Synthesebericht darf ich traditionsgemäß das akademische Pro‐ gramm des XXIX. Europäischen Agrarrechtskongresses beschließen. Zu‐ vor jedoch ein paar Worte des Dankes. Mein Dank gilt zunächst dem Präsidenten M. le Bâtonnier Jacques Druais und dem Generalsekretär M. Jean-Baptiste Millard sowie ihrem Team der Französischen Agrarrechtsgesellschaft für die überaus gelunge‐ ne Organsiation. Ihr Einsatz und Ihre Gastfreundschaft haben uns einen wunderschöneen Aufenthalt hier in Lille ermöglicht. Dafür herzlichen Dank. Dank gebührt aber natürlich auch den Generalberichterstattern und Prä‐ sidenten der Kommissionen. Sie haben die Länderberichte studiert, kom‐ piliert, verglichen und die Kommissionsarbeit charmant und wenn nötig – mit Blick auf die Uhr – auch einmal etwas strikter geleitet. Es sind dies für die Kommisison I Prof. Dr. Rudolf Mögele, Prof. em. Dr. Paul Richli und Dr. Christian Busse, für die Kommission II Prof. Dr. Norbert Olszak und Dr. Luc Bodiguel sowie für die Kommission III Prof. Dr. Michael Card‐ well und Dr. Ludivine Petetin. Darüberhinaus verdienen alle nationalen und individuellen Berichter‐ statterinnen und Berichterstatter unseren Dank. Diese Berichte bildeten I. 1 Erweiterte und um den Fußnotenapparat ergänzte Fassung, der Vortragsstil wurde beibehalten. 422 gleichsam das Rückgrat dieses Kongresses und seiner Arbeiten. Insgesamt wurden 32 Länderberichte aus 19 Ländern präsentiert, zusätzlich wurden 3 Individualberichte erstattet. Schließlich geht mein Dank an Sie, werte Teilnehmerinnen und Teil‐ nehmer. Ihr Engagement, Ihr Interesse und Ihre Diskussionsbeiträge haben den Europäischen Agrarrechtskongress auch dieses Jahr wieder bereichert und belebt. Gerade im Jubiläumsjahr zum 60. Geburtstag unserer Organisation hat diese Veranstaltung aus meiner Sicht bewiesen, dass wir auch komplexe und auf den ersten Blick vielleicht sperrige Themen anpacken können. Ich hoffe, dass die hier erzielten Ergebnisse Eingang in die laufenden Diskus‐ sionen finden werden. Nach diesen Dankesworten darf ich zur wissenschaftlichen Analyse des Kongresses überleiten. Als Generaldelegierter zählt es zu den Vorzügen, die Gelegenheit zu erhalten, Sie jetzt fast am Ende unserer Zusammen‐ kunft vom Déjeuner sur place abhalten zu können. Ich will das nicht über Gebühr strapazieren, aber Sie herzlich einladen gemeinsam nocheinmal das wissenschaftliche Programm dieses XXIX. Kongresses und Kolloqui‐ ums des CEDR Revue passieren zu lassen. Akademischer Einführungsvortrag Im Rahmen der wissenschaftlichen Einführung am Donnerstag hat uns im Plenum ein akademischer Einführungsvortrag auf die folgende Kommissi‐ onsarbeit eingestimmt. Dankenswerterweise hat Prof. Dr. Patrick Meunier diesen Part übernommen und zum Thema « Politique agricole commune et concurrence : une corrélation génétiquement modifiée" referiert. Er skiz‐ zierte in seinem Vortrag das System des europäischen Wettbewerbsrecht und dessen Implikationen für die Landwirtschaft. Dabei nahm er Bezug auf die komplexen strukturellen und natürlichen Besonderheiten der Land‐ wirtschaft (z.B. bezüglich der Auszahlung von Beihilfen. Mit diesem Überblick über die einschlägigen europarechtlichen Grund‐ lagen und deren Bezüge war der Grundstein für die Kommissionsarbeit gelegt. II. Synthesebericht 423 Themen Die sich daran anschließenden Arbeiten wurden wie gewohnt in drei Kommissionen aufgenommen. Wie bereits beim letzten Kongress in Pots‐ dam, steht auch diese Zusammenkunft dabei wieder unter einem General‐ thema, das den Rahmen der Kommissionsarbeit bildet. Der Direktionsrat hat sich diesmal, auch auf die Anregung aus den Kreisen der Europäischen Kommission hin, für das Thema "Landwirtschaft und Wettbewerb" ent‐ schieden. Die Landwirtschaft und ihre Be- und Verarbeitungsbetriebe sind heute zwischen einem hoch konzentrierten vorgelagerten Bereich (Pflan‐ zenschutzmittel, Düngemittel, Saatgut, Landmaschinenindustrie) und einem hoch konzentrierten nachgelagerten Bereich (Lebensmitteleinzel‐ handel) gleichsam eingeschlossen. Nicht umsonst gibt es auf EU-Ebene zahlreiche Initiativen, die sich mit der Lieferkette im Bereich Lebensmittel und den Schutz von kleinen und mittleren Unternehmen (KMU) vor un‐ lauteren Geschäftspraktiken marktstarker Handelspartner befassen. Kon‐ krete Vorschläge wurden zuletzt in der Agricultural Markets Task Force erarbeitet. Vergleichbare Themenstellungen fanden sich bisher bei den Kongressen 1967 und 2003.2 Eine zentrale Möglichkeit der Stärkung der Position der Erzeuger in der Versorgungskette wird im Zusammenschluss zu Erzeugerorganisationen gesucht. Hier weist insbesondere Frankreich eine lange Tradition auf, wes‐ halb das Kongressthema, das von der Französischen Gesellschaft gemein‐ sam mit dem CEDR entwickelt worden ist, perfekt hierher nach Lille passt. Dabei sind noch viele Fragen ungeklärt, insbesondere das Verhältnis der Gemeinsamen Agrarpolitik (GAP) zum EU-Wettbewerbsrecht sowie zum nationalen Wettbewerbsrecht. Diese Themen waren Gegenstand der Kommission I "Wettbewerbsregeln in der Landwirtschaft". Hierzu sind 11 Landesberichte eingegangen. Kommission II weitete das Thema und beschäftigte sich mit den natio‐ nalen Rechtsvorschriften, welche die Landwirtschaft und ihre Wettbe‐ werbsfähigkiet wesentlich beeinflussen. "Nationale rechtliche treibende Kräfte und Hemmschuhe landwirtschaftlicher Wettbewerbsfähigkeit" lau‐ tete das Thema. Bei diesem weiten Feld ist in erster Linie an Produktions-, Verarbeitungs- und Vermarktungsbedingungen zu denken, mit denen die III. 2 So 1967 in Bad Godesberg ("Le droit des cartels agricoles"); 2003 in Almerimar ("L'Économie agricole face au droit de la concurrence européenne et nationale"). Synthesebericht 424 Staaten die Voraussetzungen festlegen, unter denen Landwirtschaft betrie‐ ben werden darf. Aber auch Regelungen betreffend Grund und Boden, landwirtschaftliches Steuer-, Arbeits- und Sozialversicherungsrecht oder Umweltschutz können die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit der Landwirtschaft oder einzelner landwirtschaftlicher Produktionszweige direkt oder indirekt be‐ einflussen Dazu wurden 12 Landesberichte erstattet. Wie bei jedem Kongress widmete sich die Kommission III dem Thema "Bedeutende aktuelle Entwicklungen im Recht des ländlichen Raums". Damit werden Beobachtung und Analyse von Entwicklungslinien und Trends fortgeschrieben und bemerkenswerte Rechtsentwicklungen in den einzelnen Ländern diskutiert. Bedauerlicherweise musste Prof.em. Marga‐ ret Rosso Grossman ihre Mitwirkung als Präsidentin dieser Kommission aufgrund eines Unfalls in ihrer Familie absagen. Dankenswerterweise er‐ klärte sich Prof. Michael Cardwell kurzfristig bereit, ihre Position einzu‐ nehmen. Die in den Fragebögen vorgeschlagenen Themen wie neue Tech‐ nologien, Viehzucht, Ernährungssicherheit (food security) und Lebensmit‐ telsicherheit (food safety) aber auch Brexit und Freihandelsabkommen wie TTIP und CETA wurden letztlich um viele weitere interessante Punkte deutlich erweitert. Das sich dabei abzeichnende heterogene Bild ergab ein‐ mal mehr eine erstaunliche Fülle an unterschiedlichen Rechtsentwicklun‐ gen aus der weiten agrarrechtlichen Welt. Seit dem Kongress in Cam‐ bridge 2009 hat sich dieses offene Format einmal mehr bestens bewährt. Insgesamt wurden 8 Landesberichte eingereicht. Die nationalen und individuellen Berichte folgten im besten Fall den Fragebögen, die von den Generalberichterstattern in Absprache mit dem Generaldelegierten erstellt worden waren. Darüberhinaus gelang es jedoch in allen Kommissionen auch nicht dieser Struktur folgende Präsentationen zu integrieren und strukturierte Debatten abzuhalten sowie entsprechende Schlussfolgerungen zu erarbeiten. Gestatten Sie mir nun einige der mir besonders wichtig erscheinenden Elemente der Berichte und Diskussionen herauszustreichen. Kommissionen I und II Kommission I und II hatten ein aktuelles und dabei höchst anspruchsvol‐ les Thema zu bearbeiten. Zum einen erfolgte dies in der Kommission I von seiten des Wettbewerbsrechts, wo der mögliche Regelungsspielraum ganz wesentlich von der Abgrenzung zwischen Art. 42 AEUV und dem IV. Synthesebericht 425 EU-Agrarrecht bzw. den nationalen wettbewerbsrechtlichen Regimen ab‐ hängt. Zum anderen aber wirken sich eine Vielzahl anderer Rechtsberei‐ che und Normen, nationalen aber auch supranationalen Ursprungs, auf die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit der Landwirtschaft aus, die in der Kommission II identifiziert worden sind. Die wesentlichen Erkenntnisse beider Kommissionen sollen hier zu‐ sammengeführt und getrennt nach europarechtlichen und nationalen Ge‐ sichtspunkten dargestellt werden. Im Gesamten hat die engagierte Arbeit aller Beteiligten in beiden Kommissionen ein Bild ergeben, dass deutlich aufzeigt, wo und wie die Landwirtschaft im Wettbewerb gestärkt werden könnte. Europarecht Wettbewerbsrecht Hier galt es sich zuvorderst mit der komplexen Beziehung zwischen dem EU-Agrarrecht und dem EU-Wettbewerbsrecht auseinanderzusetzen. Die‐ ses Verhältnis wurde in der Literatur3 oft beschrieben, weniger oft jedoch – so scheint es mir – befriedigend und eindeutig geklärt. Ein Blick in ein‐ schlägige Kommentare wirft zumindest im Detail einige Fragen auf.4 A. 1. 3 Vgl. de Bronett, Landwirtschaftliche Erzeugnisse, in: Wiedemann (Hrsg.), Hand‐ buch des Kartellrechts, 2. Aufl. (2008), S. 1123; Busse, Agrarkartellrecht. Kommen‐ tar zu § 28 GWB und seinen EU-rechtlichen Bezügen, 2. Aufl. (2015); Frenz, Agrarwettbewerbsrecht, AUR 2010, S. 193 ff.; Gerbrandy/de Vries, Agricultural Policy and EU Competition Law. Possibilities and Limits for Self-Regulation in the Dairy Sector (2011); Gruber, Wettbewerb in der Landwirtschaft, OZK 2009, S. 132 ff.; Martìnez, Landwirtschaft und Wettbewerbsrecht – Bestandsaufnahme und Perspektiven, EuZW 2010, S. 368 ff.; Sitar, Gemeinschaftlicher Verkauf und Mengensteuerung durch Vereinigungen landwirtschaftlicher Erzeuger – neue Ent‐ wicklungen der Rechtsprechung und des Agrarrechts der EU im Spannungsfeld des Kartellverbots, in: Norer/Holzer (Hrsg.), Agrarrecht Jahrbuch 2018 (2018), S. 119 ff. 4 Vgl. nur Busse, in: Lenz/Borchardt, EU-Verträge, Art. 42 AEUV, Rn. 2 f.; Lorenz‐ meier, in: Vedder/Heintschel v. Heinegg, EVV, Art. 42 AEUV, Rn. 3; Bittner, in: Schwarze, EU-Kommentar, Art. 42 AEUV, Rn. 4; Norer, in: Pechstein/Nowak/ Häde, Frankfurter Kommentar zu EUV, GRC und AEUV, Bd. II, Art. 42 AEUV, Rn. 4 ff. Synthesebericht 426 Art. 42 AEUV, wonach die Wettbewerbsregeln auf die Landwirtschaft nur insofern Anwendung finden, als das Europäische Parlament und der Rat dies in bestimmter Weise bestimmen, hat seit je Anlass zum Stirnrun‐ zeln geboten. Der EU-Gesetzgeber hat ja in der einheitlichen Gemeinsamen Marktor‐ ganisation VO (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 (eGMO)5 entschieden, dass die allge‐ meinen Wettbewerbsregeln für die Landwirtschaft grundsätzlich anwend‐ bar sind, es bestehen jedoch wichtige Ausnahmen. Zu nennen ist zum einen, dass das Agrarmarktrecht der Anwendung des allgemeinen Kartell‐ rechts vorgeht [Art. 206 UAbs. 1 VO (EU) Nr. 1308/2013], zum anderen, dass die Zusammenarbeit landwirtschaftlicher Erzeugerbetriebe weitge‐ hend vom allgemeinen Kartellverbot nicht erfasst wird [Art. 209 Abs. 1 UAbs. 2 VO (EU) Nr. 1308/2013]. Für landwirtschaftliche Erzeugnisse jedoch, die keiner Marktordnungs‐ regelung unterliegen, gilt die VO (EG) Nr. 1184/20066 zur Anwendung bestimmter Wettbewerbsregeln auf die Produktion landwirtschaftlicher Er‐ zeugnisse und den Handel mit diesen Erzeugnissen. Diese wendet die un‐ ternehmensbezogenen Wettbewerbsregeln ebenfalls an [Art. 1 VO (EG) Nr. 1184/2006], sieht jedoch Einschränkungen bei Erzeugerzusammen‐ schlüssen und deren Vereinigungen vor [Art. 2 VO (EG) Nr. 1184/2006]. Seit der pauschalen Bezugnahme der eGMO auf alle Anhang-I-Erzeugnis‐ se muss allerdings die Frage nach dem Anwendungsbereich dieser Rege‐ lung gestellt werden. In den Schlussanträgen des Generalanwalts Wahl in der Rs. C-671/15 vor dem EuGH betreffend Preisabsprachen bei Chicorée (Endivien) vom 6. April 2017 wird denn auch zu Beginn wie folgt ausgeführt: "Die ge‐ meinsame Agrarpolitik (GAP) und die europäische Wettbewerbspolitik, beides Grundpfeiler der europäischen Integration, scheinen auf den ersten Blick schwer miteinander vereinbar zu sein."7 In der Folge findet er es sei "eine genaue Definition der Tragweite der durch die Verträge vorgesehe‐ nen und durch das begleitete Recht näher bestimmten ,Ausnahme Land‐ 5 VO (EU) Nr. 1308/2013 über eine gemeinsame Marktorganisation für landwirt‐ schaftliche Erzeugnisse, ABl. L 347/671. 6 VO (EG) Nr. 1184/2006 zur Anwendung bestimmter Wettbewerbsregeln auf die Produktion landwirtschaftlicher Erzeugnisse und den Handel mit diesen Erzeugnis‐ sen, ABl. L 214/7. 7 Schlussanträge des Generalanwalts Wahl zu Rs. C-671/15, ABl. C 2017 281/1, Rz. 1. Synthesebericht 427 wirtschaft` vonnöten." In der Folge versucht der Generalanwalt eine sol‐ che differenzierte Antwort zu geben. Im Wesentlichen geht es um die Fra‐ ge, ob neben den GMO-Ausnahmen, um die es in diesem Fall für einmal nicht geht, auch spezielle Ausnahmen von der Anwendung den EU-Wett‐ bewerbsregeln anzuerkennen sind, die sich implizit aus den Erzeugerorga‐ nisationen übertragenen Aufgaben ergeben.8 Es bleibt abzuwarten, wie der EuGH in diesem grundlegenden Fall entscheiden wird.9 Geeignete Instrumente, um dieses schwierige Verhältnis zu meistern, stellt das EU-Recht aber schon jetzt zur Verfügung, die tatsächliche Inan‐ spruchnahme derselben durch die Mitgliedstaaten offenbart jedoch teil‐ weise beträchtliche Unterschiede. Zu denken ist dabei vornehmlich an die anerkannten Erzeugerorganisationen, Vereinigungen von Erzeugerorgani‐ sationen und Branchenverbände, von denen es laut den Landesberichten 8 Schlussanträge des Generalanwalts Wahl zu Rs. C-671/15, ABl. C 2017 281/1, Rz. 3. 9 Anmerkung: Der EuGH hat seine Entscheidung am 14. November 2017 und somit nach dem Kongress gefällt; Rs. C-671/15. Im Wesentlichen weist er in seinem Ur‐ teil darauf hin, dass die gemeinsame Agrarpolitik Vorrang vor den Zielen im Be‐ reich des Wettbewerbs hat, weshalb der Unionsgesetzgeber bestimmte Verhaltens‐ weisen, die grundsätzlich wettbewerbswidrig wären, vom Anwendungsbereich des Wettbewerbsrecht ausnehmen könne. Dies bedeute allerdings nicht, dass die ge‐ meinsamen Organisationen der Märkte für landwirtschaftliche Erzeugnisse einen wettbewerbsfreien Raum darstellten. Eine Ausnahme vom Kartellverbot sei für an‐ erkannte Erzeugerorganisationen überdies nur für bestimmte Formen der Koordi‐ nierung oder Abstimmung und zwar einzig unter den Erzeugern ein und derselben anerkannten Vereinigung zu rechtfertigen. Daher würden Verhaltensweisen zwi‐ schen mehreren Organisationen und weiteren Beteiligten, die nicht von einem Mit‐ gliedstaat anerkannt sind, dem Kartellverbot unterliegen. Bezüglich der Verhaltensweisen von Erzeugern ein und derselben anerkannten Er‐ zeugerorganisation führt der EuGH aus, dass nur Verhaltensweisen, mit denen tat‐ sächlich genau die Ziele verfolgt werden, mit denen die betreffende Organisation betraut worden sei, dem Kartellverbot entzogen sein könnten, d.h. z.B. der Aus‐ tausch strategischer Informationen, Absprachen über die Mengen oder die Koordi‐ nierung von Preisen. Vorausgesetzt sei jedoch, dass diese Verhaltensweisen tatsäch‐ lich der Verwirklichung der Ziele, mit denen die Erzeugerorganisation betraut seien, dienten und zudem verhältnismäßig seien. Die gemeinsame Festsetzung von Min‐ destverkaufspreisen innerhalb einer Organisation im Hinblick auf die Stabilisierung der Erzeugerpreise und der Bündelung des Angebots sei jedoch dann nicht verhält‐ nismäßig, wenn sie den Erzeugern, die ihre Produkte selbst absetzten, nicht erlaub‐ ten, einen Preis unter diesen festgesetzten Mindestpreisen zu erheben. Dadurch werde der Wettbewerb in der ohnehin nicht stark dem Wettbewerb ausgesetzten Landwirtschaft noch mehr geschwächt. Synthesebericht 428 bspw. in Deutschland 642 gibt, in Polen 341, aber etwa in Österreich nur 35 oder in den Niederlanden 23. Die ersten beiden genannten Länder ken‐ nen denn auch ein entsprechendes Register, die letzten beiden nicht. Auch das Instrument der Allgemeinverbindlichkerklärung ist in Be‐ tracht zu ziehen. Weist dieses speziell in romanischen Ländern eine lange Tradition auf und wird auch dementsprechend rege genutzt, liegt es in an‐ deren Ländern wiederum brach. Die Beispiele lassen sich etwa mit Bünde‐ lungsobergrenzen oder Vertragsregulierung noch länger fortsetzen. Unter‐ schiedliche mitgliedstaatliche Traditionen und Strukturen beeinflussen of‐ fenbar ganz stark, ob vom EU-Recht zur Verfügung gestellte Instrumente überhaupt und wenn ja in welcher Weise genutzt werden. Deshalb ist nicht nur eine Bereinigung bzw. Klarstellung des EU-Agrar‐ wettbewerbsrechts zu fordern, sondern vielmehr eine Grundsatzentschei‐ dung. Eine Entscheidung darüber, ob der Unionsgesetzgeber eine breite Palette an Instrumenten zur Auswahl anbieten soll, deren konkrete Annah‐ me bzw. Ausgestaltung dann dem nationalen Recht überlassen wird – was zu strukturell perfekt angepassten aber völlig divergenten Ergebnissen führen kann –, oder aber, ob der Unionsgesetzgeber einige wenige Instru‐ mente verpflichtend setzen soll, was vielleicht nicht für alle Agrarstruktu‐ ren passen würde aber zu einheitlichen und rechtlich abgesicherten Maß‐ nahmen führen sollte. Weitere Rechtsbereiche Weitet man den Bick um die Themen der Kommission II dann fällt auf, dass viele treibende Kräfte und Hemmschuhe im Bereich der Umsetzung von EU-Recht angelegt sind. Ich darf exemplarisch nur einige Bereiche – grob gegliedert nach drei Gruppen – nennen, die auch in den Berichten er‐ wähnt werden: Betrieb Hier bestehen im Wesentlichen keine supranationalen Implikationen. Markt • Zentral erscheint hier die nationale Umsetzung der GAP: Der letzte Agrarrechtskongress in Potsdam hat gezeigt, wieviele Spielräume für 2. Synthesebericht 429 die Mitgliedstaaten bestehen, die diese denn auch differenziert ausnüt‐ zen.10 • Im Bereich Marktordnung werden in den Landesberichten bspw. Si‐ cherheitsnetze, Krisenmaßnahmen11, Produktionsrechte (Zuckerquoten 30.09.2017)12 sowie die Einheitliche Betriebsprämie genannt. • Im Bereich des Ländlichen Raums hängt schließlich viel von der Aus‐ gestaltung der nationalen Programme ab. Umwelt und Verbraucherschutz • Wesentliche Einflüsse resultieren hier aus der sog. Kommerzialisierung der Produktion, womit insbesondere Lebensmittelrecht (Hygienevor‐ schriften, Rückverfolgbarkeit, Kontrollen), geschützte Herkunftsanga‐ ben (AOC) sowie der Einsatz von GVO genannt werden. • Als weiteres Thema wird das Umweltrecht13, insbesondere Umwelt‐ verträglichkeitsprüfung (UVP), Nitratrichtlinie, Immissionsschutz, Na‐ tura 200014 und Tierschutz, genannt. • Daneben spielt aber auch das Betriebsmittelrecht eine wichtige Rolle, insbesondere Inverkehrbringen und Zulassung von Pflanzenschutzmit‐ teln15, Düngemitteln16 etc. Nationales Recht Wettbewerbsrecht Die Bedeutung des nationalen Kartellrechts scheint im Agrarbereich abzu‐ nehmen, auch im Sinne einer Gleichbehandlung zwischen den einzelnen B. 1. 10 Vgl. Martìnez, Generalbericht der Kommission I, in: CEDR (Hrsg.), CAP Reform: Market Organisation and Rural Areas. Legal Framework and Implementation. XXVIII. Europäischer Agrarrechtskongress mit Kolloquium, Potsdam, 9-13 Sep‐ tember 2015 (2017), S. 137 ff., insbesondere S. 144 ff. Siehe auch Landesbericht Belgien, Polen und Rumänien. 11 Landesbericht Deutschland. 12 Landesbericht Ungarn. 13 Landesbericht Deutschland, Ungarn und Spanien. 14 Landesbericht Rumänien. 15 Landesbericht Frankreich. 16 Landesbericht Deutschland. Synthesebericht 430 Mitgliedstaaten. In Bezug auf Wettbewerbsverzerrungen wäre anzustre‐ ben, dass das EU-Agrarkartellrecht überall von einem nationalen Kartell‐ verbot befreit. Weitere Rechtsbereiche Ungleich bedeutender sind jedoch die Auswirkungen rein nationaler Rechtsmaterien auf die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit der Landwirtschaft. Auch hier können nur wenige Beispiele herausgegriffen werden, die wieder grob in die drei Gruppen eingeteilt werden können: Betrieb • Zentral ist das Bodenrecht mit Themen wie Aquisition von Grund und Boden, Grund(stück)verkehr oder Erwerb durch Ausländer (speziell ein Thema in den neuen Mitgliedstaaten17). • Landpacht18. • Raumplanung. • Kommassierung19 und Melioration zur Verbesserung der Agrarstruktur. • Regelungen betreffend die Übertragung landwirtschaftlicher Betriebe, sowohl unter Lebenden als auch im Erbgang20. • Eine weitere Stellschraube ist die Regelung des Zugangs zum Beruf Landwirt. • Zu beachten sind überdies die Gesellschaftsformen für landwirtschaft‐ liche Betriebe21. • Im Bereich Landarbeits- und Sozialrecht werden Lohnkosten (Min‐ destlohn22, Kollektivverträge23), Sozialversicherung24 sowie Beschäfti‐ gung von Ausländern25 genannt. 2. 17 Landesbericht Ungarn und Polen. 18 Landesbericht Rumänien und Spanien; Individualbericht Zumaquero Gil. 19 Insbesondere Landesbericht Niederlande, Rumänien und Spanien. 20 Landesbericht Ungarn, Polen und Spanien. 21 Landesbericht Polen. 22 Landesbericht Deutschland. 23 Landesbericht Polen. 24 Landesbericht Deutschland, Ungarn und Polen. 25 Landesbericht Ungarn, Polen und Rumänien. Synthesebericht 431 • Weitgehenden Einfluss hat schließlich das Steuerrecht, insbesondere in Bezug auf Einkommensteuer, Freibeträge, Buchführungsgrenzen, Um‐ satzsteuer, Erbschaftsteuer, Grunderwerbsteuer und Kfz-Steuer26. Markt • Bei der Kommerzialisierung der Produktion27 werden das Lebensmit‐ telrecht (teilweise), nationale Trademarks28 oder die Regelungen über Direktvermarktung angeführt. Umwelt und Verbraucherschutz • Im Umweltrecht29 werden etwa Bodenschutzrecht, Wassermanage‐ ment30 oder Biodiversität31 genannt. • Im Betriebsmittelrecht folgen die Ausbringungsvorschriften für Pflan‐ zenschutzmittel, Düngemittel etc. Resümee Beurteilt man nun aus einer übergeordneten Perspektive des Gesamtkon‐ gresses die zentrale Frage der Wettbewerbsfähigkeit der Landwirtschaft dann muss man sich differenziert fragen: Um wessen Wettbewerbsfähigkeit geht es eigentlich? Geht es um den gesamten Sektor, eventuell plus Verarbeitungsbetriebe? Geht es um be‐ stimmte Betriebsformen wie Familienbetriebe, KMU oder agroindustrielle Betriebe? Um die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit gegenüber wem geht es eigentlich? Dem konkurrierenden Erzeuger aus der Region, dem eigenen Mitgliedstaat, in der EU oder weltweit? Gegenüber dem weltweit tätigen Agrokonzern oder dem Kleinbauern aus dem Entwicklungsland, um das provokant zu fra‐ gen? C. 26 Landesbericht Deutschland, Ungarn, Polen und Rumänien. 27 Landesbericht Rumänien. 28 Landesbericht Ungarn (Hungarikum) und Polen. 29 Landesbericht Deutschland, Ungarn und Spanien. 30 Landesbericht Polen. 31 Landesbericht Polen. Synthesebericht 432 Sieht man dann noch genauer hin, muss man bemerken, dass überra‐ schend viele Regeln sich nicht eindeutig als "treibende Kraft" oder "Hemmschuh" erweisen. Generell wird es seine Richtigkeit haben, wenn die Vorschriften aus den Gruppen Betrieb und Markt als Mittel zur Verbes‐ serung der Wettbewerbsfähigkeit wahrgenommen werden und die Vor‐ schriften aus der Gruppe Umwelt und Verbraucherschutz als Einschrän‐ kung. Doch die Berichte zeigen teilweise frappierend eine ausgeprägte Ja‐ nusköpfigkeit vieler Regelungen32 auf. So können bspw. Kontingentsrege‐ lungen zwar den Sektor als solchen vor Überproduktion bewahren und als ganzen wettbewerbsfähig machen, vom einzelnen Landwirt jedoch als Einschränkung seiner unternehmerischen Freiheit wahrgenommen wer‐ den. So werden bspw. Ausbringungsverbote bzw. -beschränkungen für Be‐ triebsmittel als Bremse einer wettbewerbsfähigen Entwicklung landwirt‐ schaftlicher Betriebe gelten, andererseits können ohne solche Vorgaben eintretende Umweltbelastungen letztlich auch zu ökonomischen Nachtei‐ len für die Betriebe führen. Der deutsche Bericht versucht diesen Proble‐ men mit einem eigenen Bewertungsschema gerecht zu werden.33 Was gilt es also zu verbessern? Aus meiner Sicht – und das hat die Ar‐ beit der Kommission I und II ganz deutlich gezeigt – zweierlei: Zum einen muss der besonderen Situation im Agrarsektor mit den marktschwachen polypolen Erzeugern noch stärker als bisher Rechnung getragen werden, insbesondere mit einer klareren und großzügigeren Ab‐ grenzung von EU-Agrarmarktrecht und speziell EU-Agrarkartellrecht. Zum anderen sollten sich – wo immer sinnvoll – nationale Gesetzgeber im Bereich der Umsetzung von wettbewerbsbeschränkendem EU-Recht im Zweifel mit der Implementierung des supranationalen Mindestlevels begnügen und im Bereich der Umsetzung von wettbewerbsunterstützen‐ dem EU-Recht die angebotenen Maßnahmen möglichst umfassend umset‐ zen. Im ausschließlich mitgliedstaatlichen Recht aber gilt es eine nationale Agrarpolitik zu gestalten, die langfristig einen Ausgleich innerhalb der Länder und Regionen Europas ermöglicht.34 32 Vgl. Landesbericht Deutschland. 33 Landesbericht Deutschland. 34 Landesbericht Frankreich: "Mais ceci implique deux réflexions. La première con‐ cerne l’abandon par les Pouvoirs publics français du réflexe d’introduire des con‐ traintes excessives dans la réglementation. La seconde est de proscrire toute mesu‐ re allant au-delà des exigences minimales d’une directive et de s’aligner sur le ni‐ veau des contraintes formulées par l’Union européenne. Pour la réduction des dis‐ Synthesebericht 433 Kommission III Kommission III beleuchtete wie gewohnt im Rahmen vorgeschlagener Themenfelder und darüber hinaus bedeutende aktuelle Entwicklungen. Diese vielfältige Gesamtschau zeigt einmal mehr auf, wo im Agrarrecht – europaweit, wenn nicht weltweit – legislativer Bedarf gesehen wird. Aus meiner Sicht tun sich überraschend einheitlich drei Brennpunkte auf: die Agrarstruktur, die natürliche Umgebung und die landwirtschaftlichen Er‐ zeugnisse. Agrarstruktur Was die Agrarstruktur betrifft, steht eindeutig die Sicherung landwirt‐ schaftlicher Nutzflächen für praktizierende Landwirte im Vordergrund. Sogar von einem "Global Land Rush" ist die Rede35. Die Verfügbarkeit der nicht erneuerbaren Ressource Kulturland ist unabdingbare Vorausset‐ zung für die produzierende Landwirtschaft und damit auch für die Nah‐ rungsmittelversorgung. Es ist erschreckend zu sehen, wie die alten Mit‐ gliedstaaten den Ausverkauf durch nicht-landwirtschaftliche Investoren und die neuen Mitgliedstaaten insbesondere den Erwerb durch zahlungs‐ kräftige Ausländer fürchten. Dabei lassen sich verschiedene Abwehrmaßnahmen beobachten: So wurden in Deutschland die Grundstücksverkehrsgesetze der Länder nach‐ geschärft36 mit dem Ziel einer breiten Streuung des Bodeneigentums37. V. A. torsions en matière de concurrence au sein du marché unique européen, il est né‐ cessaire d’une part «de renforcer l'unité des économies (des pays membres) et d'en assurer le développement harmonieux en réduisant l'écart entre les différentes régi‐ ons et le retard des (pays membres) moins favorisés»"; Rapport d’orientation 71e Congrès de la FNSEA, Brest 2017. 35 Landesbericht Deutschland, siehe dort auch zu den Gründen. 36 Der deutsche Berichterstatter sieht agrarstrukturrelevante Gefahren für den Boden‐ markt vorrangig durch nicht-landwirtschaftliche Kapitalanleger und eine "Indus‐ trialisierung" der landwirtschaftlichen Betriebe; Landesbericht Deutschland. Vgl. zum Entwurf eines neuen Agrarstruktursicherungsgesetzes für landwirtschaft‐ liche Flächen in Niedersachsen Booth, Mischt das Amt bald gehörig mit?, DLG- Mitteilungen 7/2017, S. 31 ff. Demnach kann die Genehmigung versagt bzw. ein‐ geschränkt werden, wenn ein Nichtlandwirt Flächen erwirbt oder der Landwirt eine marktbeherrschende Stellung durch den Erwerb erlangt. 37 Zu den Gründen siehe Landesbericht Deutschland. Synthesebericht 434 Verschiedene Staaten versuchten sich mithilfe nationaler Gesetze zu hel‐ fen. So wurde bspw. in Frankreich das Gesetz Nr. 2017-348 zur Erhlatung von Agrarflächen erlassen38, in Polen der Act on the agricultural system (AAS)39, in Italien eine Datenbank über die landwirtschaftlichen Flä‐ chen40. Überdies unterstreicht die Entschließung des Europäischen Parlaments (EP) vom 27. April 2017 zu dem Thema "Aktueller Stand der Konzentra‐ tion von Agrarland in der EU: Wie kann Landwirten der Zugang zu Land erleichtert werden?", P8_TA(2017)019741 die Wichtigkeit, gegen den zu‐ nehmenden Ausschluss der Landwirte vom Bodenerwerb vorzugehen.42 Darin werden die Mitgliedstaaten u.a. aufgefordert, die Erhaltung und Be‐ wirtschaftung von landwirtschaftlichen Nutzflächen und die Übertragung von Land im Rahmen ihrer politischen Maßnahmen stärker zu berücksich‐ tigen. Die Europäische Kommission soll eine Beobachtungsstelle für die Sammlung von Informationen und Daten über das Ausmaß der Konzentra‐ tion von Agrarland und Landnutzungsrechten in der EU einrichten. Umwelt Der Trend zur Ökologisierung des Agrarrechts ist ungebrochen. Zahlrei‐ che neue Regelungen zielen auf den Schutz der Umwelt vor den Auswir‐ kungen landwirtschaftlicher Produktion ab. Frankreich berichtet von einem neuen Artikel im Code de l’environnement über die Biodiversität43, B. 38 Dieses enthält u.a. die Pflicht von landerwerbenden Gesellschaften, Strukturen einzurichten, deren primärer Gesellschaftszweck der Besitz von Landwirtschafts‐ land darstellt. Art. 3 des Gesetzes wurde allerdings durch den Conseil constituti‐ onnel als verfassungswidrig qualifiziert, da er einen unverhältnismässigen Eingriff in das Eigentumsrecht und die unternehmerische Freiheit darstelle. Landesbericht Frankreich. 39 Landesbericht Polen. Ziel ist die Reduktion spekulativen Erwerbs von Landwirt‐ schaftsland. Siehe auch den Act on suspending the sale of real properties included in the Agricultural Property Stock of the State Treasury. 40 Landesbericht Italien. 41 http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?pubRef=-//EP//TEXT+TA+P8-T A-2017-0197+0+DOC+XML+V0//DE. 42 Landesbericht Polen. 43 Landesbericht Frankreich. Der neue Art. L. 110-1 II Code de l’environnement (Umweltgesetz) enthält erneut die Hauptprinzipien des Umweltrechts, die alle um‐ weltrechtlich relevante Gesetzgebung beeinflussen soll (Prinzip der ökologischen Synthesebericht 435 in Deutschland wird das Düngerecht verschärft44 und in den Niederlanden gibt es neue Entwicklungen betreffend Stickstoff45 und Phosphateeinträge, während das Produktionsrechtssystem für Schweine- und Hühnerhaltung noch nicht wie geplant aufgehoben wurde.46 Weitere Themen betreffen das Bienensterben und Verbote des Einsatzes von Neonicotinoiden47 oder der Schutz von eierlegenden Hühnern in den USA48. Lebensmittel Das dritte Themenfeld betrifft zahlreiche Initiativen im Zusammenhang mit dem landwirtschaftlichen Endprodukt, nämlich den Nahrungsmitteln. Es lässt sich mit den Begriffen food safety, food security und food waste umschreiben. Im Fall von food safety (Lebensmittelsicherheit) wird auf die neuen Technologien (novel food, functional food, modern biotechnologies, Na‐ notechnologie etc.)49 hingewiesen, wo die Gefahr besteht, dass der Ge‐ setzgeber den naturwissenschaftlichen Entwicklungen hinterherhinkt, wes‐ halb rechtlicher Anpassungsbedarf an den aktuellen Wissensbestand be‐ steht.50. Ein anschauliches Beispiel für eine differenzierte staatliche Vorgangs‐ weise stellt Argentinien dar: Zum einen die Gesetzgebung bezüglich des Gebrauchs von Antibiotika, deren Auswirkungen auf Antibiotikaresisten‐ zen und der öffentlichen Gesundheit sowie der Viehzucht51, zum anderen C. Solidarität, der nachhaltigen Nutzung, der Komplementarität zwischen Land-, Wasser- und Forstwirtschaft, sowie der Nicht-Regression). 44 Landesbericht Deutschland. 45 Siehe Landesbericht Niederlande: Programmatic Approach Nitrogen (PAS). 46 Landesbericht Niederlande, Phosphorüberschüsse und Phosphatrechte. Siehe auch Norer, Synthesebericht, in: CEDR (Hrsg.), CAP Reform: Market Organisation and Rural Areas. Legal Framework and Implementation. XXVIII. Europäischer Agrar‐ rechtskongress mit Kolloquium, Potsdam, 9-13 September 2015 (2017), S. 427 ff. 47 Landesbericht Frankreich und USA. 48 Landesbericht USA. 49 Landesbericht Polen und USA. 50 Landesbericht Polen. So auch Landesbericht Argentinien, wonach noch viel ge‐ setzgeberische Arbeit bezüglich des Umgangs mit neuen Technologien besteht. 51 Landesbericht Argentinien. Synthesebericht 436 die Lebensmittel-Leitlinien für gesunde Ernährung52. Auch in dieser kom‐ binierten Vorgangsweise mittels regulativer und lenkender Maßnahmen stellen Vollzug und Kontrolle zentrale Elemente dar.53 Die zweite besorgniserregende Entwicklung neben der Gefährdung von Kulturland betrifft die zahlreichen Aktivitäten im Bereich der food securi‐ ty (Ernährungssicherheit). Da ist von (möglichen) Versorgungskrisen die Rede, die nach Ansicht der FAO auch durch den Klimawandel näher ge‐ rückt seien54. Die Schweiz reagierte mit der Annahme eines neuen Verfas‐ sungsartikels zur Ernährungssicherheit55, Deutschland mit einem neuen Ernährungssicherstellungs- und -vorsorgegesetz (ESVG)56. In der vom schweizerischen Volk mit großer Mehrheit angenommen Bestimmung wird der Bund verpflichtet, zur Sicherstellung der Versorgung der Bevöl‐ kerung mit Lebensmitteln Voraussetzungen u.a. für die Sicherung der Grundlagen für die landwirtschaftliche Produktion, insbesondere des Kul‐ turlandes, für eine standortangepasste und ressourceneffiziente Lebensmit‐ telproduktion, für eine auf den Markt ausgerichtete Land- und Ernäh‐ rungswirtschaft sowie für einen ressourcenschonenden Umgang mit Le‐ bensmitteln zu schaffen (Art. 104a Bundesverfassung). Das deutsche ES‐ VG definiert den Terminus der Versorgungskrise und enthält in diesem Zusammenhang Vorschriften zur Sicherstellung der Grundversorgung und Maßnahmen zur Vorsorge. Dies alles vollzieht sich idealerweise in einem breiten gesellschaftli‐ chen Konsens der food democracy57, also einer staatlichen Politik im Kon‐ sens und unter Mitwirkung von Vertretern des öffentlichen und privaten Sektors, der Zivilgesellschaft und internationaler Organisationen.58 Schließlich sind ein weiteres in den Landesberichten aufgeworfenes Problem die steigenden Lebensmittelverluste. Food waste (Lebensmittel‐ 52 Guidelines for the Argentine Population as fundamental tool to promote knowl‐ edge that contributes to more equitable and healthy eating and nutrition behaviors by the population); Landesbericht Argentinien. 53 Landesbericht Deutschland und USA, letztere mit dem Konzept des "generally re‐ cognized as safe" (GRAS). 54 Siehe Landesbericht Italien. 55 https://www.sbv-usp.ch/themen/ernaehrungsinitiative/. 56 Landesbericht Deutschland. 57 Siehe Petetin, Food Democracy in Food Systems, in: Thompson/Kaplan (Hrsg.), Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics, 2. Aufl. (2016), S. 1 ff. 58 Landesbericht Argentinien. Vgl. auch den Spanischen Code of Good Business Practices in Food Procurement Contracting; Individualbericht Cachón. Synthesebericht 437 verschwendung) hat diverse Initiativen und Projekte auf den Plan gerufen, wie bspw. in Deutschland59, oder bereits legislative Maßnahmen zur Folge gehabt, wie bspw.in Italien60, Frankreich oder Finnland.61 Die Bedeutung dieser Regelungen, die sich natürlich primär an die Ernährungswirtschaft richten, wird aufgrund ihrer derzeit hohen gesellschaftlichen Relevanz weiterhin zunehmen. Resümee Die Landwirtschaft steht (wieder einmal in ihrer Geschichte) vor großen Veränderungen. Neben den genannten Themenfeldern oder dem bereits er‐ wähnten Klimawandel wirft etwa auch die zunehmende Digitalisierung (Smart farming; sog. Landwirtschaft 4.0) eine Reihe offener Rechtsfragen auf, insbesondere in Bezug auf Datenschutz, Eigentum/Nutzungsrecht an Daten62 oder Zurechnung und Haftung.63 Die Themenliste ließe sich lange fortsetzen. Damit verbunden wird in bestimmten Bereichen durchaus der Ruf nach ausgeweiterter Normierung laut, gleichzeitig wird aber auch die anhalten‐ de Verrechtlichung im Landwirtschaftsbereich beklagt. Dazu trägt nach wie vor die Umsetzung europarechtlicher Normen bei, aber auch die natio‐ nalen Gesetzgeber können nicht aus ihrer dementsprechenden Pflicht ent‐ lassen werden. Der französische Landesbericht spricht denn auch anschau‐ lich von einer "normativen Überdosis"64. Insgesamt fällt gleichwohl auf, dass das aktuelle Recht immer weniger aktiv gestaltend als vielmehr passiv verteidigend agiert. Im Themenfeld D. 59 Landesbericht Deutschland. 60 Landesbericht Italien. 61 Hinweise im Landesbericht Deutschland. 62 Stichwort Big Data: die Daten aus der Landwirtschaft sind handelbare Wirt‐ schaftsgüter geworden, die einen erheblichen kommerziellen Wert haben; Landes‐ bericht Deutschland. 63 Landesbericht Deutschland. Vgl. nur Martìnez, Landwirtschaft 4.0 – Rechtlicher Rahmen und Herausforderungen der Digitalisierung der Landwirtschaft (Teil 1), AUR 2016, S. 401 ff., (Teil 2), AUR 2016, S. 453 ff.; Eisenberger/Hödl/Huber/ Lachmayer/Mittermüller, "Smart Farming" – Rechtliche Perspektiven, in: Norer/ Holzer (Hrsg.), Agrarrecht Jahrbuch 2017 (2017), S. 207 ff. 64 "Les agriculteurs sont au bord de l’overdose normative"; Landesbericht Frank‐ reich. Synthesebericht 438 Umwelt wird der Naturraum vor den möglichen negativen Auswirkungen landwirtschaftlicher Produktion geschützt. Im Themenfeld Lebensmittel ist es der Konsument, der vor Versorgungskrisen und Lebensmittelskanda‐ len geschützt werden soll. Im Themenfeld Agrarstruktur schließlich be‐ sinnt sich das Agrarrecht offenbar seines historischen Ursprungs und agiert stärker denn je als Schutzgesetzgebung, die insbesondere den freien Grund(stück)verkehr mit landwirtschaftlichen Flächen zugunsten produ‐ zierender Bewirtschafter einschränkt. Abschluss Wir haben hart gearbeitet die letzten Tage. Was ist nun das Gesamtresü‐ mee nach 12 Stunden Kommissionsarbeit, rund 400 Seiten Landesberich‐ ten, Generalberichten und Schlussfolgerungen, zwei Abendessen, eines davon als Galadinner, das uns zwang alte und neue Freunde zu treffen und mit ihnen das zu diskutieren, worauf wir jetzt seit dem letzten Kongress zwei Jahre warten mussten (z.B. den Art. 209 der Verordnung Nr. 1308/2013)? Im Bereich des Wettbewerbsrechts zeigten Kommission I und II ein ak‐ tives, ich möchte sagen kämpferisches Agrarrecht. Ausnahmen der Land‐ wirtschaft vom Wettbewerbsregime sind begründbar und machbar, zumin‐ dest aus juristischer Sicht. Die weitere Entwicklung dürfte – nicht zuletzt aufgrund der zahlreichen politischen Initiativen – spannend werden. Mit und ohne Endivien. Kommission III hingegen – nicht minder interessant und lebhaft – prä‐ sentierte ein primär schützendes Agrarrecht, das man weniger freundlich auch als ängstlich bezeichnen könnte. Die dominierenden Themen der Be‐ richte waren food security und die Abwehr außerlandwirtschaftlicher bzw. ausländischer Investoren beim Zugang zu Agrarland. Hier tritt uns eine klassische Schutzgesetzgebung entgegen, die sich mehr auf ihre Schutz‐ funktion zu besinnen scheint als je zuvor. Vielleicht ist das nicht unge‐ wöhnlich in unsicheren Zeiten, wie wir sie gerade weltweit erleben müs‐ sen, aber das ist nicht das gestaltende und aktive Agrarrecht, das ich mir wünsche – und vielleicht teilen Sie diesen Befund. Wer hätte gedacht, dass wir Anfang des 21. Jahrhunderts wieder über sichere Lebensmittelversor‐ gung und Verschärfung des landwirtschaftlichen Grund(stück)verkehrs re‐ den? VI. Synthesebericht 439 Die Zeit wird es weisen. Als geborener Wiener zähle ich schon gene‐ tisch nicht zu den Optimisten. Aber das Agrarrecht war schon immer für Überraschungen gut. Ich bin gespannt auf unseren Diskurs am nächsten Europäischen Agrarrechtskongress in 2019. Danke für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit. Synthesebericht 440 VI. Rapports Nationaux – National Reports – Landesberichte Résumés – Summaries – Zusammenfassungen A. Commission I – Kommission I Règles de concurrence en agriculture Competition rules in agriculture Wettbewerbsregeln in der Landwirtschaft Rapports nationaux – National Reports – Landesberichte Résumés – Summaries – Zusammenfassungen Austria Dr. Anton Reinl Vizepräsident der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Agrar- und Umwelt‐ recht, Wien Die Landwirtschaft in Österreich (ebenso auch in Europa) ist zwischen einem hoch konzentrierten vorgelagerten Bereich (Pflanzenschutzmittel, Düngemittel, Saatgut, Landmaschinenindustrie) und einem hoch konzen‐ trierten nachgelagerten Bereich (Lebensmitteleinzelhandel) umgeben. So haben in Österreich die 3 größten Unternehmen im Lebensmitteleinzel‐ handel einen Marktanteil von 86 %. Als eine Antwort auf diese Konzentration wird eine stärkere Angebots‐ bündelung im Bereich der Verarbeitung in Form von Genossenschaften und auch Erzeugerorganisationen gesehen. So befindet sich ein Branchen‐ verband (für Obst und Gemüse) in der Gründungsphase. Die Errichtung einer Whistleblower-Hotline für Wettbewerbsverletzungen wurde kürzlich in Österrich beschlossen. Diskutiert werden weiters die Stärkung der Her‐ kunftskennzeichnung insbesondere in der Gemeinschaftsverpflegung, die Einführung des Bestbieterprinzips im öffentlichen Vergabewesen, die Schaffung einer Ombudsstelle sowie verbindliche Regeln über unfaire Ge‐ schäftspraktiken. Als neue Herausforderungen werden die vertikale Inter‐ gration des Lebensmitteleinzelhandels (zB Fleischverarbeitung, Bäckerei) und die Zunahme der Eigenmarken des Lebensmitteleinzelhandels gese‐ hen. Die Abgrenzung EU-Wettbewerbsrecht zu den Regeln der Gemeinsa‐ men Agrarpolitik ist dringend reformbedürftig, um die Position der Land‐ wirte in der Lebensmittelkette zu stärken. Konkrete Vorschläge wurden zuletzt in der Agricultural Markets Task Force unter dem Vorsitz von Cees Veerman erarbeitet (Siehe Bericht: https://ec.europa.eu/agriculture/sites/ag riculture/files/agri-markets-task-force/improving-markets-outcomes_en .pdf) bzw. wurden einige mit der sogenannten "Omnibus-Verordnung" (VO 2017/2393 des Europäischen Parlaments und des Rates, ABl L 350 v 29.12.2017, 15ff) auch schon umgesetzt. 445 Ziel eines reformierten EU-Agrarwettbewerbrechts sollte sein: • Sonderstellung für landwirtschaftliche Genossenschaften und Erzeu‐ gerorganisationen schaffen (Art 206 der VO 1308/2013) • Vorabentscheidung der Wettbewerbsbehörden soll ermöglicht werden (Art 209 der VO 1308/2013) • Stärkung der rechtlichen Möglichkeiten von Branchenverbänden (Art 210 der VO 1308/2013) • Europäische Rahmenregelung gegen unfaire Geschäftspraktiken • Verkauf unter dem Einstandspreis strenger handhaben und EU-weit verbieten • Krisenmaßnahmen müssen weiterhin möglich sein • Regionalität und Herkunftsschutz ausbauen • Definition von "relevanter Markt" auf Produzentenseite soll Gegenge‐ wicht zur Konzentration auf Seiten des Lebensmitteleinzelhandels er‐ möglichen. Reinl 446 Germany RAin Birgit Buth Rechtsanwältin, Geschäftsführerin Deutscher Raiffeisenverband e.V. Zur Missbrauchsaufsicht über marktbeherrschende Unternehmen, zur Fu‐ sionskontrolle und zum Kartellverbot gibt es in Deutschland ein Gesetz gegen Wettbewerbsbeschränkungen, kurz GWB, das Regelungen für alle drei genannten Themen enthält. Kartellrecht In Deutschland regelt § 28 des Gesetzes gegen Wettbewerbsbeschränkun‐ gen, kurz GWB, dass Vereinbarungen von landwirtschaftlichen Erzeuger‐ betrieben, Vereinbarungen und Beschlüsse von Vereinigungen solcher Be‐ triebe und Vereinigungen solcher Vereinigungen über Erzeugung oder Ab‐ satz landwirtschaftlicher Erzeugnisse und die Benutzung gemeinsamer Einrichtungen für die Lagerung, Be- oder Verarbeitung landwirtschaftli‐ cher Erzeugnisse vom Kartellverbot ausgenommen sind, sofern sie keine Preisbindungen enthalten oder den Wettbewerb nicht ausschließen. Die Landwirtschaft wurde kartellrechtlich im letzten Jahrzehnt durch Sektoruntersuchungen durch das Bundeskartellamt, insbesondere im Sek‐ tor Milch geprägt. Im Januar 2012 wurde die Sektoruntersuchung Milch mit einem Endbericht durch das Bundeskartellamt abgeschlossen. Im Rah‐ men dieser Untersuchung hat das Bundeskartellamt den gesamten nationa‐ len Milchmarkt untersucht und insbesondere die Konzentration der Mol‐ kereien, die Vertragsbeziehungen auf dem Rohmilchmarkt sowie Marktin‐ formationssysteme einschließlich Referenzpreissysteme näher durchleuch‐ tet. Im Jahr 2016 begann das Bundeskartellamt erneut mit Untersuchungen der Milchlieferbeziehungen auf Basis eines Pilotverfahrens bei einer Mol‐ kerei. Im März 2017 hat das Bundeskartellamt einen Sachstandsbericht herausgegeben. Kritisch betrachtet das Bundeskartellamt insbesondere die Vollablieferungspflicht durch die Milcherzeuger einschließlich der hiermit verbundenen Vollannahmepflicht der Molkereien sowie die mit in der Re‐ gel zwei Jahren aus Sicht des Bundeskartellamtes langen Kündigungsfris‐ I. 447 ten und die nachträgliche Festsetzung der Milchpreise. Das Bundeskartell‐ amt hat zudem die Entkoppelung von Lieferpflichten und Mitgliedschaft geprüft. Anfang 2018 wurde das Verfahren eingestellt, wobei die kriti‐ schen Anmerkungen nach wie vor bestehen. Diese Auffassung wird von der Molkereiwirtschaft äußerst kritisch ge‐ sehen. Anders als in nicht genossenschaftlichen Molkereien ist die Milch‐ lieferung bei Molkereigenossenschaften gesellschaftsrechtlich geregelt. Die Vollablieferungsverpflichtung ist in der Satzung verankert und wird in der auf Basis der Satzung verabschiedeten Milchanlieferungsordnung wei‐ ter ausgestaltet. Im Falle der Genossenschaft trägt der Milcherzeuger als Mitglied und Produzent das unternehmerische Risiko zweifach und auch bewusst. Die Wahl der Vollablieferung stellt daher aus Sicht der Genos‐ senschaftsmolkereien keinen Verstoß gegen das Kartellrecht dar. Das sei‐ tens des Bundeskartellamtes gesehene Erfordernis grundsätzlich kurzer Kündigungsfristen für Lieferverhältnisse ist bereits betriebswirtschaftlich nicht vertretbar. Unfaire Praktiken Zu der Frage einer rechtlichen Regelung oder eines unverbindlichen code of conduct über unfaire Praktiken in der Lebensmittelkette kann festgehal‐ ten werden, dass umfassende gesetzliche Regelungen sowohl im GWB als auch um Gesetz gegen unlauteren Wettbewerb (UWG) vorhanden sind. Das GWB regelt in § 20 im Rahmen der Missbrauchsaufsicht insbesonde‐ re verbotenes Verhalten für Unternehmen mit relativer oder überlegener Marktmacht. Hierzu gehört auch das Verbot des Verkaufs von Lebensmit‐ teln unter dem Einstandspreis (§ 20 Abs. 3 GWB), es sei denn dieser ist beispielsweise wegen der Verderblichkeit sachlich gerechtfertigt. Mit einer erst am 02.06.2017 in Kraft getretenen Ergänzung wird der Einstandspreis im Gesetz nunmehr auch definiert. Im UWG finden sich umfassende Ver‐ botsregelung für unlautere, aggressive oder irreführende geschäftliche Handlungen einschließlich Regelungen zur Anspruchsdurchsetzung und Bußgeld- und sogar Strafvorschriften. Diese Regelungen gelten allgemein. Somit ist aus nationaler Sicht kein Regelungsbedarf vorhanden. Allerdings muss darauf geachtet werden, dass im internationalen Handel keine Wett‐ bewerbsverzerrungen durch fehlende freiwillige oder rechtliche Regelun‐ gen entstehen. II. Buth 448 Vertragsregulierung Art. 148, 168 der Verordnung [EU] Nr. (308/2013) Zum Instrument der Vertragsregulierung (Art. 148 und 168 der Verord‐ nung [EU] Nr. (308/2013) wird auf Folgendes verwiesen. In Deutschland werden Lieferbeziehungen grundsätzlich auf Basis von schriftlichen Rege‐ lungen getroffen. Diese werden bei Genossenschaften in der Regel auf Ba‐ sis der gesellschaftsrechtlichen Regelwerke, bestehend aus Mustersatzung und Anlieferungsordnungen festgelegt, so dass ein zusätzlicher schuld‐ rechtlicher Vertrag überflüssig ist. Im Übrigen sollte die Vertragsfreiheit gewahrt bleiben und eine staatliche Eingriffsregulierung in diese Vertrags‐ hoheit zwischen den Vertragsparteien unterbleiben. Insoweit wird kein großer Nutzen in den genannten Regelungen gesehen. Folgerichtig werden diese derzeit national nicht angewendet. Eingriffe in die Vertragshoheit zwischen den Parteien sollten unterbleiben oder auf ein absolutes Mindest‐ maß beschränkt bleiben. Sie sind in jedem Fall äußerst kritisch zu hinter‐ fragen, da sie geeignet sind eine freie Marktwirtschaft auszuhebeln. Grundsätzlich ist in Gesamtbetrachtung des Kartellrechtes eine Reform‐ bedürftigkeit zwar nicht gegeben, da die vorhandenen Regelungen hinrei‐ chende Spielräume geben. Allerdings wäre es wünschenswert, wenn die Auslegungspraxis der Kartellbehörden weniger restriktiv wäre. Unter die‐ sem Gesichtspunkt wären einige klarstellende Regelungen sowohl in den europäischen Verordnungen als auch im GWB wünschenswert, auch ohne grundlegende Reform. Das gilt beispielsweise für den Handlungsspiel‐ raum, inklusive Preisfestlegungen von anerkannten oder nicht anerkannten Erzeugerorganisationen ebenso wie für Definitionen von Erfassungsmärk‐ ten oder Auslegung eines Wettbewerbsausschlusses und der Berücksichti‐ gung der Marktgegenseite. Wichtig ist in diesem Zusammenhang auch die marktmächtige und auf wenige Unternehmen fokussierte Lebensmittel‐ handelsseite. Ein Reformergebnis hierzu ist die in 2017 verabschiedete Aufhebung der Befristung des Verbots des Verkaufs unter dem Einstands‐ preis. III. Germany 449 Italy Ass. Prof. Dr. Luigi Russo University of Ferrara A brief overview over antitrust law in Italy Before a few critical remarks about the specific EU antitrust discipline for the agricultural sector, it is useful to provide some information with regard to the internal one in Italy. In our Country we have a general (not specific for the agriculture sec‐ tor) antitrust law (n. 287/1990), and its enforcement is assigned to the Na‐ tional Antitrust Authority. Law 287/1990 does not set out any privilege for agricultural producers but it contains the provision that the whole law has to be interpreted in ac‐ cordance with the EU antitrust rules, so it could be doubtful that the do‐ mestic law has to grant to the agricultural producers the same privileges of the EU legislation. The question is substantially so far open. Apart from the legal framework relating to competition, legal provi‐ sions on unfair trading practices have been set out with Article 62 of Law Decree no. 1 of 2012 (converted, with amendments, into Law no. 27 of 2012), with specific reference to both the agricultural and food sectors. Previously, our legal system set out the provisions contained in art. 9, law n. 98/1992 (that it is still in force), prohibiting the abuse, in the con‐ tractual relationship between professional parties, of the economic depen‐ dence by the stronger one. That provision is so far poorly used, because of the limits of its application. The power to engage in contractual negotiations attributed to some POs under Regulation (EU) No. 1308/2013: a too shy approach by the European legislator? Regulation EU 1308/2013, in articles 169, 170 and 171, grants some POs (or their associations) – and in particular those operating in the olive oil and beef sectors, as well as those representing producers of the arable I. II. 451 crops listed in Article 171 (and milk and milk products sector under Arti‐ cle 149) the power to engage in "contractual negotiations" (as per the heading of the cited articles). In this case as well, the rules are substantially similar to those intro‐ duced with Regulation (EU) No. 261/12 specifically for the milk sector. Under the aforementioned provisions, the POs in the sectors considered (or their associations: see paragraph 3 of the articles in question) that pur‐ sue such aims as concentration of supply, placing on the market of the products produced by its members, or optimisation of production costs, can "negotiate", on behalf of members, in relation to all or part of their production, the content of future contracts for the delivery of their respec‐ tive products. The articles in question make this power subject to the con‐ dition that the negotiating activity leads to an integration of activities and that as a result it is probable that significant improvements will be made in the efficiency of the system, so that such activity of the POs contributes to attaining the objectives of the CAP as per Article 39 TFEU. The aforementioned provisions raise numerous questions. Firstly, it is not clear why the provisions make the power to engage in negotiations conditional on the fact that the POs in the sectors concerned already pur‐ sue the aim of concentrating the supply of their members, placing on the market of the products received from the latter. It is difficult to understand the purpose and usefulness of giving such contract negotiating powers to POs that already carry out activities of direct marketing, selling the aggre‐ gate production of their members directly to purchasers and thus acting as the sole contractual counterparty of the latter. From an abstract perspec‐ tive, the POs in sectors in which contractual negotiations are an option can decide to directly concentrate production, selling the products of members in their own name and on their own behalf after receiving them; or else they can decide to limit themselves only to indirect concentration activi‐ ties, negotiating, precisely, on behalf of their members, the best contractu‐ al conditions to be subsequently applied to contracts concluded on an indi‐ vidual basis. However, it seems difficult to imagine that a same PO can engage both in an activity of direct marketing and an activity of only negotiating on be‐ half of its members: direct marketing activity requires the presence of an organisation and facilities of a certain size, which could not be justified in the case of a mixed – as it were – activity not entirely dedicated to direct marketing, as the investments necessary for that purpose would not be amortised. Russo 452 The reference to such tasks as concentration of supply and placing members’ products on the market should probably be interpreted in a broad sense, i.e. the aim is to grant the power of carrying out contractual negotiations to POs whose statutes envisage the option of concentrating supply, which can take place in two ways: directly, so that the PO is the seller and operates in its own name and on its own behalf, having procured the products made available by its members; or only indirectly, through the conclusion of framework agreements, i.e. contracts that do not entail a transfer of ownership, but rather whose purpose is to establish terms and conditions that will be binding for purchasers, and from which members may benefit, as negotiations conducted by a PO on behalf of all its mem‐ bers can undoubtedly lead to more favourable terms than negotiations car‐ ried out by a single producer. In either case, empowering POs to engage in contractual negotiations seems a quid minus compared to the possibility, already provided for un‐ der European legislation, of directly marketing the products of members, thereby achieving what is no less than a concentration of supply: in fact, negotiations carried out by a producer organisation can be considered only an indirect concentration of supply, which is undertaken directly by indi‐ vidual agricultural producers with the counterparties on the basis of nego‐ tiations previously conducted by the representative organisation. The guidelines approved by Commission do not seem a useful tool for interpreting the provisions in question. They have been drafted for the pur‐ pose of providing specific indications to the producers involved, particu‐ larly as regards defining the requirements laid down by the provisions themselves with respect to the integration of activities and significant im‐ provements in efficiency that should ensue from the negotiations. Indeed, a reading of the guidelines reveals that the subject of contractu‐ al negotiations is far from having received any actual clarification, since the guidelines provided do not seem to distinguish clearly between the two cases described above, namely, direct concentration of supply and indirect concentration of supply, the latter taking place through the conclusion of framework agreements or collective agreements negotiated by POs. For example, the Commission made no effort to provide any indications as to how the conducting of contractual negotiations on behalf of members can coexist with pursuit of the objectives of concentrating supply and placing members’ products on the market, where the PO acts in its own name and on its own behalf. Italy 453 Among the provisions that are difficult to interpret, we may also in‐ clude paragraph 2(a) of Articles 169, 170 and 171, according to which ne‐ gotiations by the PO may take place whether or not there is a transfer of ownership of the agricultural products by members to the PO: the rule, therefore, is that contractual negotiations can also be carried out by a PO after it has acquired ownership of the products received from member pro‐ ducers. However, it is not clear why a PO that has become owner of the products to be marketed should only engage in a pre-contractual negotiat‐ ing activity (or conclude a framework contract) rather than directly mar‐ keting the product it is now owner of to purchasers. As will be amply discussed in the section that follows, there is no doubt that the contractual negotiations carried out by POs can also establish the subsequent selling prices and that, as a consequence, the legislation in question has for the first time expressly addressed what has been referred to, precisely, as the "taboo" issue of prices. Similar considerations have been taken by the Agricultural Markets Task Force in its recent Report (Improving market outcomes. Enhancing the position of farmers in the supply chain, Brussels, November 2016) in which has been stressed "the lack of clarity concerning the rules which ap‐ ply to collective action by producers"; at the same time, "the new provi‐ sions may have exacerbated the legal complexity", so that "the Commis‐ sion should unambiguously exempt joint planning and joint selling from competition law if carried out by a recognised producer organisation or as‐ sociation of producer organisations" (par. 14, Executive summary). Antitrust rules in Regulation (EU) No. 1308/2013 and their inadequacy for the purposes of protecting agricultural producers vis- à-vis the market Reiterating what was already provided for in the former legislation, Arti‐ cle 206(1) of Regulation No. 1308/2013 establishes that, in principle, arti‐ cle 101 et seq. TFEU shall apply to all agreements, decisions and practices referred to in Article 101(1) and Article 102 TFEU which relate to the pro‐ duction of, or trade in, agricultural products, unless otherwise provided in the Regulation itself. After that, Article 209 (under the heading "Excep‐ tions for the objectives of the CAP and farmers and their associations") represents the "heart" of the legislation, as it outlines a special regime for the agricultural sector, together with Article 210, dedicated to "agreements III. Russo 454 and concerted practices of recognised interbranch organisations". Such a draft has been criticized by the Agricultural Markets Task Force that, in its Report, notes "we are surprised that EU laws does not feature a general and explicit derogation from the prohibition on cartels enshrined in Article 101(1) TFEU in favour of agricultural cooperatives or producer organisa‐ tions" (par. 144). In particular, Article 209(1), echoing a solution that had been adopted since Regulation (EEC) No. 26/62, establishes the non-applicability of the prohibition under Article 101(1) TFEU to the agreements, decisions and concerted practices "necessary for the attainment of the objectives set out in Article 39 TFEU". The subjective qualification of the parties who con‐ clude such agreements is irrelevant, so it is not necessary, for the purposes of the derogation, that they all be "agricultural" parties. What is relevant is whether the agreement, decision or concerted practice is essential for at‐ taining the objectives of the CAP; this has been clearly affirmed on more than one occasion in the interpretations of the Court of Justice, which has always judged it necessary to demonstrate the indispensability of the agreement whose admissibility is in question with respect to the pursuit of the objectives set out Article 39 TFEU. As mentioned above, paragraph 1(2) affirms the non-applicability of Article 101(1) TFEU to agreements, decisions and concerted practices of farmers, farmers' associations, or POs recognised under Article 152, or associations of POs recognised under Article 156, which concern the pro‐ duction or sale of agricultural products or the use of joint facilities for the storage, treatment or processing of agricultural products, unless the objec‐ tives of Article 39 TFEU are jeopardised. As regards this second specific case, the subjective qualification of the parties to the agreement, decision or concerted practice clearly takes on essential importance; again, the le‐ gislative provisions are in line with what has been established by Commu‐ nity law since Regulation (EEC) No. 26/62, with the introduction of an ex‐ plicit reference to recognised POs and their associations as negotiating en‐ tities. However, the third pre-existing exception related to agreements falling within the framework of a national market organisation was finally for‐ mally removed, given that such organisations have no longer existed for some time, having been replaced by the European market organisation. Once again, it is established (third subparagraph of Article 209(1)) that the whole of paragraph 1 will not apply to agreements, decisions and practices which entail an obligation to charge identical prices or have the Italy 455 effect of excluding competition: consequently, agreements that lead to such effects are to be considered in any case prohibited. It is difficult to understand the persistent prohibition (also in the new regulation) concerning prices, which continues to apply both for the agree‐ ments and decisions of farmers or farmers associations and the agreements necessary for the attainment of the objectives of the CAP; it is also seem‐ ingly not compatible with the power granted to POs in certain sectors to conduct contractual negotiations, which could result in a price being set for subsequent sales transactions. Moreover, there seems to be no doubt as to the fact that the negotiations conducted by POs can also define the prices of subsequent sales: besides considerations of a systematic and logical character, both recital 139 and paragraph 2(b) of article 149 articles 169 to 171, in which there is an ex‐ press reference to a "negotiated price", imply the possibility of setting prices. In any case, the specific provision, contained expressis verbis in the new regulation, with respect to the setting of prices in the sectors in which POs are authorised to carry out contractual negotiations, necessarily im‐ plies a derogation from the general prohibition against charging identical prices which is established by the same regulation. The reason lies also in the principle of speciality, as the special rule is destined to prevail over the general one. This is clarified by Article 206 of the regulation: after estab‐ lishing the applicability of Article 101 et seq. TFEU, it reaffirms, precise‐ ly, the rules laid down by other provisions of the same regulation. This seems, finally, also the opinion of Advocate General in the Case C-671/15 recently delivered, though he had examined the former provisions laid down in Reg. 1234/2007 (which ignored the provision granting the power to engage in "contractual negotiations" for some PO’s), where he observes that agreements, decisions or practices of PO’s, associations of PO’s and professional organisations escape from prohibition laid down in Art. 101 TFUE when that behaviour is necessary or permitted for the accomplish‐ ment of the tasks assigned to such organisations and has been adopted in the context of and in accordance with the regulations on the CMO of the markets considered, while excluding the legitimacy of price-fixing agree‐ ments. However, it would not have been inappropriate to define this derogation with more clarity, especially as the negotiations for the adoption of the new text dragged on for two years, with the involvement of all institutions taking part in ordinary legislative procedures. Russo 456 It thus appears necessary to coordinate the provisions of Article 209 with those dealing with contractual negotiations conducted by POs, inter‐ preting them to mean that it is prohibited to conclude binding agreements giving rise to an obligation to charge identical prices, with the exception of the specific cases for which the same regulation attributes bargaining powers to the POs (and with the exception of the cases in which the POs – or, where possible, the IOs – directly sell, in their own name and on their own behalf, the products they receive from members). Antitrust rules and unequal bargaining power in the agricultural sector It is worth underlining another relevant topic: which are the best tools to combat the inequalities between agricultural producers and purchasers in terms of information and bargaining power? It must be highlighted that the written contract as a such instrument, equally disciplined by Reg. 1308/2013, does not seem to assume relevance for the purpose of applying antitrust legislation. The latter enters into play, for example, in order to prevent horizontal agreements among purchasers, as well as in the above-described cases regarding agreements among agri‐ cultural producers or supply chain agreements; to prevent abuses of domi‐ nant position, where the potential exists; and to control concentrations be‐ tween undertakings that intend to expand their size and thereby gain undue strength in the market. The inequality of bargaining power and the possi‐ ble abuses by the party with greater power (whenever – as in the majority of cases – the latter does not have a dominant position in the market) are not generally taken into consideration by European competition law. In fact, the protection of the weak contracting party against possible abusive behaviours of the counterparty is substantially left up to the Mem‐ ber States, given that, at least as regards business-to-business relations, EU law only ventured a first timid approach with Regulation (EU) No. 261/12 in relation to formal written contracts with first purchasers of milk and milk products, later extending that solution to all sectors of the CMO with Article 168 of regulation (EU) No. 1308/2013. Lacking any direct intervention on the part of EU law, this aspect is thus substantially left up the Member States, some of which have taken initiatives in this regard, exploiting the possibility of being able to address abusive conduct through regulatory provisions, even where the individual IV. Italy 457 or entity that engages in such behaviour does not hold a dominant pos‐ ition. However, as pointed out by the Commission itself, though on the one hand the rules established by a number of Member States in this regard highlight how widespread the problem is, not being confined within one or more Member States, but rather common to all undertakings operating throughout EU territory, on the other hand they lack uniformity – nor could it be otherwise, in the absence of any harmonising legislation – both as far as the identification of abusive conducts is concerned and with re‐ spect to penalties. It would thus certainly not be inappropriate to address the issue within the framework of EU law, also because, as pointed out previously, the present situation implies a patchwork of national provi‐ sions which inevitably affect transnational contractual relations as well, not to mention the proper functioning of the internal market. With specific reference to the agri-food sector, a few reservations, how‐ ever, should be expressed in respect of the affirmation made by antitrust law scholars that unfair or abusive practices regarding individual contrac‐ tual relations and resulting from the inequality between the parties in terms of bargaining power are irrelevant for the purposes of competition legislation. That is because such cases, notwithstanding the presence of as‐ pects that are pathological in some respects, allegedly do not affect the structure of the market as a whole, being limited to the single contractual relationship concerned, which involves parties – businesses in this case – having different bargaining power. Yet in the case of relations in the agricultural and food supply chain, the existence of a marked difference in bargaining power cannot be consid‐ ered an isolated phenomenon, limited to a number of specific contractual relations or characterising only a few specific businesses. On the contrary, the situation in question has relevance at a system level, as it concerns a whole set of contracts between sellers, on the one hand, and purchasers, on the other. Therefore, although from a theoretical perspective the distinc‐ tion between aspects tied to unequal bargaining power and buyer power is clear and precise, if we examine the contractual relations among business‐ es operating in the agricultural and food products supply chain as a whole, we can easily understand that the distinction becomes fuzzy, to the point of disappearing, since the undisputed greater bargaining power of pur‐ chasers in general implies – if and to the extent that it enables abusive or unfair practices – a serious risk of undermining the proper functioning not only of individual contractual relationships, but of the entire market. Un‐ Russo 458 expected and/or retroactive modifications of contract terms and condi‐ tions, abrupt withdrawals devoid of any real justification and penalising price policies not only impose a severe burden on a business that falls vic‐ tim to them, but, if they occur on a large scale, they can induce sellers to make fewer investments in the absence of adequate certainty about the profit they can expect. This means less product innovation and less choice for consumers; furthermore, it has been clearly shown that although the greater bargaining power of distribution or processing companies means lower prices for suppliers, it does not always imply that the benefits ob‐ tained by the stronger contracting party will trickle down to consumers. Italy 459 Poland Dr. mult. Adam Niewiadomski University of Lodz Dr. Przemysław Litwiniuk University of Lodz Dr. Konrad Marciniuk University of Lodz The first section of the report pertained to national competition law in ref‐ erence to agricultural law. The report described that in Poland, anti-trust and competition law is regulated mainly by the Act of 16 February 2007 – Competition and Consumer Protection Act. This Act sets out the condi‐ tions for the development and protection of competition, and the principles for the protection of the interests of undertakings, and of consumers, in the general public interest. The Act also contains anti-trust provisions with re‐ gard to the prohibition of cartels, the control of abuse of dominant position and merger control. The Act is exercised by the President of the Office of Competition and Consumer Protection. The Act states that any agreements which have as their object or effect the prevention, restriction or other dis‐ tortion of competition within the relevant market shall be prohibited. The Act states that such agreements are invalid, in whole or in part. The Act also forbids the abuse of a dominant position within a relevant market. The terms are very similar to those stipulated for anti-competition agree‐ ments and cartels The Act also deals with control over merger of com‐ panies. As for provisions for agriculture under anti-trust law, the report de‐ scribes that no Polish legal act contains specific exemptions from antitrust law for agriculture. The state has a general, constitutional duty to protect competition and consumers. By force of the Polish constitution, foreign ratified legal acts become a part of the Polish legal system. There‐ fore, European Union regulations regarding the privileged position of agri‐ culture under anti-trust law become applicable in the Polish law. There‐ fore, though the Constitution does not expressly create additional competi‐ tion rules for agriculture, such rules are adopted into the Polish legal sys‐ tem through the European Union treaties which are an integral part of the Polish legal system. This largely means that certain sectors of agriculture 461 enjoy some privileges regarding public aid. Also in Poland, certain gov‐ ernment agencies may be in certain cases legally obliged to purchase goods from agricultural manufacturers. The report also states that certain markets have been exempt from the application of the Competition and Consumer Protection Act, such as the milk market, and the markets of fruits and vegetables and hop. In Poland there is no specific national antitrust law for the agricultural sector in the Polish law. The applicable provi‐ sions may stem from the law of European Union. Application of agricul‐ tural anti-trust law is not entrusted to any specific authority, as it is within the duties of the President of the Competition and Consumer Protection Office. The report also described some important domestic procedures re‐ garding anti-trust law in agricultural context handled by the Competition and Consumer Protection Office, related to potential price rigging o cher‐ ries (2016) and currant (20154) and cartel/division of market in cattle feed market (2017). As for unfair trading practices in the food chain, the report described the act on counteracting the unfair use of contractual advantage in trading agricultural and food products which applies to agreements for the purchase of agricultural or food products concluded between pur‐ chasers of those products and their suppliers if certain volume/monetary conditions are met. The second part of the report tackled the issue of EU anti-trust law. In Poland, agricultural producer organizations are approved in accordance with regulation no. 1308/2013, divided into sectors. One is‐ sue pertained to producer organisations. Investments undertaken by the producer group and implemented through changes must be necessary/ needed to meet the criteria for recognition as a producer organization as referred to in art. 152, art. 153, art. 154, art. 160 of the regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council No 1308/2013 and the ordinance of the Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development dated September 19, 2013. Additionally, producer groups must meet certain criteria regard‐ ing financing, schedule of implementation, eligibility of proposed invest‐ ments and legitimacy of expenses. Production volume must be adjusted to the planned volume in the given document. There are several official gov‐ ernment registers kept. The body responsible for maintaining the register of pre-approved producer groups, approved producer organizations and their associations and transnational producer organizations and their asso‐ ciations is the President of the Agricultural Market Agency. The Agricul‐ tural Market Agency also keeps a register of agricultural producer groups. From September 1, 2017 these registers will be kept by the President of the Agency for Restructuring and Modernization of Agriculture. Such a Niewiadomski / Litwiniuk / Marciniuk 462 register is also available at the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Develop‐ ment. Currently, one can observe the closure of existing agricultural pro‐ ducer groups and the creation of new entities taking their place in accor‐ dance with regulation no. 1308/2013. At the same time, legislative works on regulating the functioning of agricultural cooperatives are carried out in Poland. At present, a draft of such an act is in the Parliament. Another is‐ sue discussed in the report was exemption of agricultural organisations from cartel prohibitions. Recognized trade organizations are excluded from the cartel prohibition in accordance with art. 101 TFEU in connec‐ tion with art. 209 and 210 of the regulation 1308/2013. In Poland, Euro‐ pean regulations apply directly in this regard and are not subject to a sepa‐ rate special regulation at the national level in the agricultural sector. The exclusions specified in regulation 1308/2013 appear to be sufficient for in‐ terbranch organizations. Apart from these exclusions, art. 101 TFEU ap‐ plies directly and does not find significant national exceptions. Additional‐ ly, there is a general statutory regulation on competition and consumer protection, which has been discussed in the earlier part of the report. Next, the report mentioned issues regarding some quantitative ceilings of Regu‐ lation (EU) No 1308/2013. The report stated that only some of the limits are relevant for Polish agriculture, as some – such as the production of olives – is marginal. The report found milk production caps as less impor‐ tant. Poland exceeded them initially but current negotiations of milk caps seem sufficient but it includes a certain level of uncertainty due to un‐ known effects after the abolition of the milk quota system. As for the beef and veal sector, the limits seem to be sufficient. The report found rye and wheat limits too small for Poland and that they should be increased as they have a significant impact on the Polish cereal market. As for the specific time-limited exemptions of cartels in the dairy sector and the opinion on this instrument for market crises, the report states that regulations 558/2016 and 559/2016 containing temporary solutions allowing for in‐ creasing market consolidation are a response to the rather precarious eco‐ nomic situation in this sector, resulting from the abolition of the quota sys‐ tem. Such solutions are only temporary help and cannot ensure a longterm development policy for the milk sector in Europe. Poland is particu‐ larly interested in the development of this sector as one of the leading milk producers. This type of temporal law is not conducive to the planning of investment processes in agriculture. It is important to look at the milk sec‐ tor in the long term and to develop comprehensive principles in effect on this market. Further, the report discussed financing recognized agricultural Poland 463 organizations. Polish legislation currently does not lay down any specific provision with regard to the approval by competent authorities of the ex‐ tension of rules of recognized POs’ agreements to non-members or with regard to the extension of fees to non-members. Recognized PO’s in Poland are relatively week, the process of recognition started in fruit and vegetable sector 10 years ago. The instrument might be very useful in the future and fit for application in practice. Next, the report states that entities composed of the collective and organised activity of agricultural manufac‐ turers and acting for the benefit of its members should be treated equally regardless of their legal form or status. Exclusion from anti-trust laws should apply to recognised manufacturer organisations and other entities who associate farmers for economic purposes, including agricultural coop‐ eratives and manufacturer groups. The report found that the provisions of Article 209 (1) of Regulation no. 1308/2013 are sufficient and should not undergo any modification. The agreements between farmers or asso‐ ciations of farmers must not involve an obligation on the farmers to charge identical prices for their products. Arrangements whereby farmers agree to sell through a co-operative and take whatever price the co-operative realis‐ es in the market should, however, be acceptable. Further clarification in the context of PO’s might be needed. In Poland, the exclusion of competi‐ tion in the third subparagraph of 209(1) of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 is understood, i.e., by all agreements or collaborative arrangements be‐ tween direct competitors in the farming sector which seek to share markets and/or customers. Further clarification in the context of PO’s might be needed. As for the regulation of contractual relations based on articles 148 and 168 of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013), Poland adopted the provi‐ sions. The provisions of the act within scope of the responsibility to estab‐ lish written agreements for all deliveries of agricultural products to the first buyer (agricultural products belonging to the sectors discussed in art. 1 section 2 of Regulation no. 1308/2013, including cereals, sugar, dried fodder, seeds, hop, tobacco, fruits and vegetables, processed fruit and veg‐ etable products, milk and dairy products, beef and veal, pork, lamb and goat’s meat, eggs, poultry meat, bee products, wine, and ethyl alcohol of agricultural origin) – with exception of direct sales – by manufacturers and groups of manufacturers of the said products, manufacturer organisations, or manufacturer organisation associations. There were already laws against unfair competition in Poland, the new law was introduced. How‐ ever, even though access to the tools is unrestricted, they are present in the Polish legal system are not commonly used by trading partners (specifical‐ Niewiadomski / Litwiniuk / Marciniuk 464 ly by providers) to establish equivalent conditions of agreements through‐ out the agreement’s duration. Simultaneously, the providers do not want to risk counterclaim from the chain in the form of the termination of cooper‐ ation in situations when the lawsuit is filed as the agreement binding the parties is still effective; because of this, providers usually wait until the agreement expires to file their claims. As the providers are economically dependent on commercial chains, they usually do not risk losing its agree‐ ments if they are bound by the long-term cooperation with the recipients. The third part referred to some general questions posed by the organisers of the conference. The issue of protecting farmers’ interests in the supply chain was a subject of debate in Poland. The direct incentive were signals regarding the deteriorating standing of food producers compared to other participants of the market. One of the examples in the discussion was that supermarkets may enforce reducing prices on suppliers and also impose additional fees which deteriorates the financial standing of food manufac‐ turers. Another problem is extending payment deadlines which particu‐ larly harms farms which are doing poorly financially. Discussed proposals included setting a maximum payment deadline or allowing the farmers to file anonymous complaints against the chains. Another idea was creating a position of authority – an arbiter office who would deal with disputes be‐ tween recipients and suppliers of goods or imposing the duty of only con‐ cluding agreements in writing which would be beneficial for the farmers. Some experts noticed that since agreements for supply of goods are usual‐ ly concluded several months in advance and imposing the duty to con‐ clude the agreements in writing would allow to better monitor price trends. As a result of the discussion certain legislative solutions have been adopted – described earlier in the report. As for the issue of potential re‐ form of national agricultural competition law or EU agricultural competi‐ tion law, the report was of the opinion that the current state of regulations should be deemed appropriate and any potential changes should be tightly correlated with an evolution of EU law provisions. Referring to the issue of whether EU law needs to be further amended in this respect, two factors should be taken into consideration. First, the need to ensure stable condi‐ tions for agricultural activity whilst maintaining the general principle of competition which is key not only for production growth but also to main‐ tain the appropriate quality. Restrictions on the application of competition rules in agriculture should be only introduced with great caution. At last, external circumstances of the functioning of European agriculture should Poland 465 not be overlooked which is always under a strong pressure of competition via trade relations from non-EU countries. Niewiadomski / Litwiniuk / Marciniuk 466 United Kingdom Rhodri Jones Agri Advisor LLP National Competition Law is found primarily in the Competition Act 1998 (CA 1998) and the Enterprise Act 2002 (EA 2002). Chapter 1 of the CA 1998 deals with Anti Competitive Agreements and Cartels. Chapter 2 prohibits abuse of a dominant market position. The Chapters are modelled upon Articles 101 and 102 of TFEU. Matters which impact inter-state trade will come under EU rules with no such inter-state requirement re‐ quired for the national laws. The EA 2002 deals with matters relating to mergers. All of the provisions in these acts are enforced by the Competi‐ tion and Markets Authority (CMA), who will also investigate markets it believes are not functioning correctly. The CA 1998 contains exclusions in relation to collaborative agree‐ ments between farmers within the UK. The exemption applies to collabo‐ ration agreements between farmers or farmers’ associations concerning the production and sale of agricultural produce and the joint use of facili‐ ties. There are certain conditions including that any such agreement may only be between farmers (e.g. not processors) and any agreement should not involve an obligation on the farmers to charge identical prices for their products. Otherwise there is very little in terms of specific anti-trust law relating to farming at a national level in the UK. Apart from in some specialist crop and veg growing areas of the mar‐ ket, producer organisations and co-operatives are not commonplace in the UK. The marketplace is fragmented and generally farming businesses sell individually. There are farmer owned co-operatives in the dairy industry both large and small in size. Where livestock is in question, beef and lamb are predominantly sold at auction. Some are sold directly to processors who sometimes work on behalf of large retailers. There is no real facility in the UK for farmers to agree a price well in advance of the sale. The general lack of co-operation in the UK leads to a market where producers have very little influence on the conditions of sale and where large retail‐ ers dominate. This leads to relatively low food prices for consumers which, in turn, means that little is done to address the imbalance of power 467 between producers and retailers. The perception that the EU support pay‐ ments are there in order to compensate for such market challenges con‐ tribute to the lack of action and also, perhaps, to a large proportion of pro‐ ducers not seeking opportunities to seek more influence upon their sales. Due to the nature of the UK market, many of the exemption provisions in the EU laws are not relevant in the UK. However, it is worth noting that there is a lack of clarity due to the different ways in which exemptions ap‐ ply to different produce without a clear rationale as to why there are such differences. There is also significant complexity (for example, the forma‐ tion of POs and their legal definition and how similar co-operative ven‐ tures which are not strictly POs are treated) and, given the size of busi‐ nesses generally (in the UK), an over-concern with the negative impact collaborations can have on the market. Collaborations between small busi‐ nesses should be encouraged and supported to ensure food security and sustainability. The Grocery Code Adjudicator is a relatively new position in the UK which seeks to regulate the relationship between large retailers and their suppliers. It is currently considering a consultation as to whether its remit should be extended, which could result in the inclusion of primary produc‐ ers. For farmers in the UK, Brexit is naturally a challenge and, for some, an opportunity. It remains to be seen whether, following exit from the EU, competition law will remain similar to its present form or will change to encourage the collaboration and negotiation power which will undoubted‐ ly be needed by small businesses of all kinds to forge new trading relation‐ ships. Jones 468 B. Commission II – Kommission II Freins et moteurs juridiques nationaux à la compétitivité de l’agricul‐ ture Agricultural competitiveness: Drivers and obstacles in national law Nationale rechtliche treibende Kräfte und Hemmschuhe landwirt‐ schaftlicher Wettbewerbsfähigkeit Rapports nationaux – National Reports – Landesberichte Résumés – Summaries – Zusammenfassungen Germany Prof. Dr. Dr. h. c. Dieter Schweizer Ministerialrat, President of the CEDR Zusammenfassung Mit europäischem und nationalem Recht werden Rahmenbedingungen ge‐ schaffen, unter denen Landwirtschaft betrieben werden darf. Häufig beein‐ flussen diese Regelungen direkt oder indirekt auch die Wettbewerbsfähig‐ keit landwirtschaftlicher Betriebe. Der Begriff Wettbewerbsfähigkeit be‐ zieht sich in vorliegendem Bericht auf die Konditionen der Teilnahme landwirtschaftlicher Betriebe in Deutschland an nationalen, europäischen und internationalen Märkten. Konditionen umfassen u. a. Rahmenbedin‐ gungen sowie ökonomische Aspekte (z. B. Rentabilität, Stabilität und Li‐ quidität) der Produktion privater Güter. Die Bereitstellung öffentlicher Gü‐ ter ist nicht Gegenstand des Berichts. Die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit fördernde Maßnahmen sind beispielsweise Maßnahmen für eine im Vergleich zum Wettbewerber effizientere / kos‐ tengünstigere Produktion, unterstützende Maßnahmen bei ungünstigen Markt- und Produktionsbedingungen oder eine anderweitige Verbesserung der Rahmenbedingungen durch z. B. einkommenswirksame Transfers. Entsprechendes gilt reziprok für die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit mindernde Maßnahmen. Der vorliegende Bericht bewertet wesentliche nationale Regelungen hinsichtlich ihres Einflusses auf die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit landwirtschaft‐ licher Betriebe in Deutschland. Die Beurteilung der Wirkung einer natio‐ nalen Regelung auf die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit erfolgt auf den landwirt‐ schaftlichen Sektor als Ganzes, wobei ggf. je nach Ausgestaltung der Re‐ gelung nach Betriebsgröße, Betriebsform etc. differenziert wird. Dabei wird bewertet, wie die Maßnahme auf die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit von Be‐ trieben relativ zu bestehenden Regelungen in Deutschland bzw. im Ver‐ gleich zum Szenario ohne die jeweilige Maßnahme wirkt. Ob dadurch im Vergleich zu anderen Ländern generell bessere, vergleichbare oder un‐ günstigere Wettbewerbsbedingungen erzielt werden, ist nicht Gegenstand vorliegender Beurteilung 471 Der überwiegende Teil der bestehenden nationalen Regelungen (z. B. rechtliche Bestimmungen zu Steuern, zur Umsetzung der Gemeinsamen Agrarpolitik sowie Förderinstrumente) fördert die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit des landwirtschaftlichen Sektors. Entsprechend dem agrarpolitischen Leit‐ bild der Bundesregierung werden dabei insbesondere kleinere und mittlere Familienbetriebe in ihrer Wettbewerbsfähigkeit gestärkt. Einzelne Rege‐ lungen wie beispielsweise aus dem Bereich Tier- und Umweltschutz, hem‐ men hingegen tendenziell die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit, da der dadurch ent‐ stehende Mehraufwand in der Regel nicht vom Markt vergütet wird. Aller‐ dings wurden diese Reglungen vorrangig zum Erreichen anderer agrar-, umwelt- und sozialpolitischer Ziele als zur Steigerung der Wettbewerbsfä‐ higkeit getroffen. Entsprechend ist die Bewertung der Regelungen allein im Hinblick auf die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit nicht vollständig und abschlie‐ ßend. Insbesondere wurden die möglichen ökonomischen Nachteile, die sich z. B. aus anhaltender Umweltbelastung ergeben können, nicht in die Betrachtung einbezogen. Insgesamt sind Determinanten wie z. B. die Kosten der Produktion und die Effizienz der gesamten Wertschöpfungskette maßgebend für die Wett‐ bewerbsfähigkeit des Sektors. Die bestehenden nationalen Regelungen ha‐ ben hierauf einen nur begrenzten Einfluss. Dennoch kann durch den ge‐ zielten Einsatz von Förderinstrumenten (z. B. Gemeinschaftsaufgabe „Ver‐ besserung der Agrarstruktur und des Küstenschutzes“ - GAK) die Wettbe‐ werbsfähigkeit einzelner Betriebsformen gezielt gestärkt werden.. Schweizer 472 Romania Dr. Victor Marcusohn Université Ecologique de Bucarest Comme ils prévoient l’article 1 de la Loi du fond foncier no.18/1991, tous les terrains, indiffèrent de destination, de titre de propriété ou partie du do‐ maine public ou privée de l’État, constituent le fond foncier de la Rouma‐ nie ». Par « détenteurs des terriens », la loi considère les titulaires des droits de propriété, ainsi que les titulaires d’autres droits réels, mais aussi les possesseurs et les détenteurs précaires. L’objectif principaux de la Loi no.18/1991 est d’assurer la reconstituti‐ on ou la constitution du droit de propriété privée sur les terrains qui étai‐ ent, au moment de la promulgation de la loi, dans le patrimoine des anci‐ ens coopératives agricoles de production. Dans ce sens, des provisions de la loi bénéficient les membres coopéra‐ teurs qui avaient apporter de la terre dans la coopérative agricole de pro‐ duction ou qui avaient été dépossédés par n’importe quel moyen de leurs terres ainsi que, dans les conditions de la loi, leurs successeurs, les mem‐ bres coopérateurs qui avaient apporter de la terre dans la coopérative et d’autres personnes établissent par la loi. Si en ce qui concerne la vente, l’article 1.652 du Code civil établie le principe de la capacité selon lequel « chaque personne peut acheter ou vendre, s’il n’est pas interdit par loi », le législateur a aussi institué des incapacités spéciales de vendre ou d’acheter. Une signification spéciale de ce point de vue a aussi la Loi no.17/2014 qui établies des mesures de régu‐ lation pour la vente des terrains agricoles situés extra-muros. En conformi‐ té avec l’article 4 de la loi, la vente des terrains agricoles situés extra-mu‐ ros se fait en respectant les conditions prévues dans le Code Civil et en respectant le droit de préemption des copropriétaires, des bailleurs, des voisins et de l’Etat roumain, dans cet ordre, dans des conditions de prix égaux. D’autre point de vue, le bail représente une variété du contrat de locati‐ on, qui a comme finalité l’exercice d’une activité agricole. De point de vue des biens qui peuvent être loués, article 1.836 du Code civil établies les suivant biens agricoles : 473 a) les terrains avec une destination agricole, ça veut dire les terrains agri‐ coles productives (les terrains arables, les vignobles, les vergers, les arbres fruitiers, les plantations, les terrains avec des installations agro zootechniques etc.) et aussi les terrains agricoles non-productives qui peuvent être aménagés pour la production agricole. b) les animaux, les constructions, les équipements destinés à l’exploitati‐ on agricole. Ne peuvent pas être donnés en bail les terrains avec une destination fores‐ tière, les terrains inondés, les terrains intra-muros et les terrains avec une destination spéciale. En ce qui concerne le bail, comme prix du contrat, celui-ci peut être établie en argent ou en fruits. De point de vue de la for‐ me, le contrat de bail est un contrat solennel, dont la forme écrite est pré‐ vue à la sanction de la nullité absolue. En conformité avec les dispositions des articles 103-107 du Code fiscal, les revenus des activités agricoles comprissent les revenus obtenus indivi‐ duellement ou en association sans personnalité juridiques par la cultivation des produits agricoles, l’exploitation des plantations viticoles, des arbres fruitiers etc. et l’élevage du bétail et la valorisation des produits d’origine animalière en état naturel. Les revenus obtenus par la valorisation de ces produits, autrement que dans un état naturel, représentés des revenus des activités indépendantes avec des règles différents d’imposition. Le revenu provenant d’une activité agricole est établi à base de norme de revenu. L’impôt sur les revenus des activités agricoles se calculent par l’autorité fiscale en appliquant une cote fixe de 16 % sur le revenu annuel des activités agricoles établie en tenant compte de la norme annuelle de re‐ venu. Conformément au normatifs établies par l’autorité fiscale centrale, pour les personnes physiques qui réalisent des revenus provenant des activités agricoles, la contribution lunaire pour les assurances sociales représentent la valeur annuelle de la norme de revenu rapporté au numéro des mois dont l’activité a eu lieu. Pour les revenus provenant des activités agricoles, silviculture et pisci‐ culture réalisée jusqu’à 1 janvier 2017, la base lunaire de calcul ne peut pas dépasser plus que 5 fois le salaire moyen brut, en vigueur pour le mois dont la contribution a été calculé. La personne physique qui réalise des revenus de l’agriculture sont obli‐ gés a effectués des payements anticipés qui représentent des contributions Marcusohn 474 à l’assurances sociales de santé qui s’établissent par l’autorité fiscale com‐ pétente, par décision fiscale, sur chaque source de revenu, en tenant comp‐ te de la déclaration de revenu estimé/norme de revenu ou déclaration sur le revenu réalisé. Pour cette personne physique, la base de calcul de la contribution a les assurances sociales de santé prévues par décision fiscale sont surlignés chaque mois et le payement se fait trimestriellement, en 4 tranches égales, jusqu’au 25 du dernier mois de chaque trimestre. Initialement, le régime juridique des exploitations agricoles en Rouma‐ nie a été régulé par l’Ordonnance du Gouvernement no.108/2001, acte normatif qui a été abrogé par la Loi no.37/2015 sur la classification des fermes et des exploitations agricoles. Conformément à l’article 1 alinéa 2 de cette loi, la ferme agricole a été définie comme l’unité économique basique pour la production agricole formé du terrain agricole et/ou le bâtiment dans laquelle se trouve les con‐ structions, les espaces de dépôt, outils et équipements agricoles, autres an‐ nexes, animaux et oiseaux et ainsi des outils afférents qui aides au dérou‐ lement des activités agricoles. Le fermier représente la personne physique ou morale, ou un groupe de personnes physiques ou morales qui sont propriétaires ou qu’utilise une ferme agricole dans laquelle accomplissent la production agricole et l’ex‐ ploitation agricole est une forme d’organisation qui comprissent les unités utilisables pour des activités agricoles qui sont gestionnés par un fermier, situé au territoire du même état membre de l’UE. Les fermes et les exploitations agricoles peuvent avoir un pu plusieurs propriétaires et peuvent être détenues en propriété privée ou associative, leur forme juridique état conforme à la provision de la loi. La Loi no.145/2014, qui établissent des mesures de régulation pour le marché des produits du secteur agricole, prévoient le déroulement des ac‐ tivités économiques, de valorisation par les producteurs agricoles, person‐ nes physiques, des produits agricoles personnelles et de l’exercice de com‐ merce avec ces produits. Cet acte normatif prévoit que l’activité économi‐ que du secteur agricole représente l’activité déroulé dans la ferme person‐ nelle par un producteur agricole, personne physique, pour obtenir des pro‐ duits agricoles qui dépassent le nécessaire pour consommation individuel‐ le et qui sont destinés à être vendues sur le marché. La personne physique qui déroule une activité économique dans le sec‐ teur agricole recevra un attestât de producteur, qui atteste cette qualité, avec terme de valabilité un an de la date de l’émission. Dans l’attestât de producteur il y a des informations et des dates sur le nom et prénom du Romania 475 producteur agricole, la dénomination des produits et la surface de terrain exploité, respectivement le numéro des animaux qui sont enregistrés dans le registre agricole organisé par les autorités de l’administration publique locales ou le terrain/la ferme est situé. L’exercice des activités de commerce des produits agricoles obtenues dans la ferme individuelle par les producteurs agricoles personnes physi‐ ques qui détiens l’attestât de producteur agricole se réalisent sur le cahier de commercialisation des produits du secteur agricole. Il est interdit de vendre des produits achetés des tiers à la base du cahier de commercialisa‐ tion. Marcusohn 476 Spain Prof. Dr. Esther Muñiz Espada Université de Valladolid L´objective de ce rapport est souligner les principaux points d´interest sur la situation de l´agriculture en Espagne, pour evidencier le grè et le niveau de competitivité d´agriculture en Espagne. La superficie agricole en Espagne équivaut à environ 25 millions d'hec‐ tares, au deuxième rang dans l'Union européenne après la France. Au prix du marché, la valeur du PIB agricole en 2016 a atteint une valeur de 25.000 millions d'euros, ce qui représente 2,5 % du PIB et 5 % de l'emploi total dans le pays. 5 % des exploitations agricoles ont une taille supérieure à 100 hectares et elles contrôlent le 55 % de l'ensemble de la surface agri‐ cole espagnole. Le modèle d’exploitation agricole est pour l´instant l´ex‐ ploitation familial agraire. Les entreprises multinationales sont celles qui sont en train d’absorber ces petites exploitations familiales. La politique agricole commune de l'UE absorbe près de 40 % du budget communau‐ taire. Dans l'exécution de cette politique communautaire, ont été intégrés depuis des décennies de nombreux règlements et directives de grand im‐ pact économique, social et même l'environnement, avec des conséquences important sur le système juridique espagnol. L'agriculture reste une pro‐ fession essentiellement masculine en Espagne. 80 % des femmes aident dans l´exploitation agricole, mais 50 % ne paient aucune cotisation sociale pour l'exercice de l´activité économique, de cette manière leur contributi‐ on reste invisible. Les femmes ne sont propriétaires que de 20 % des terres agricoles, et 60 % des femmes contrôle une entreprise agricole qui ne rep‐ résente pas plus que 5 hectares et 60 % des femmes entrepreneur agricole a plus de 55 ans. En Espagne, les titulaires des exploitations agricoles sont plus de 70 % d'hommes, et la proportion de femmes occupant des titulaires d'une société agricole 23 % de la surface totale (fons : MAPAMA). L'ensemble du secteur fait l'objet d'un grand nombre de dispositions lé‐ gislatives : alimentaires, environnementales, commerciales, développe‐ ment de la propriété, lois sur la qualité, … réglementé aussi à niveau ré‐ gionale, c´est à dire par les communautés autonomes ; ce qui implique une dispersion législative agricole avec des répercussions très négatives sur le 477 secteur agraire et cela justifie la nécessité d´arriver à l´élaboration du code rural de manière similaire à la France. Donc, la simplification législative est une réforme inachevée pour l’Espagne. Il faut recouper la fonction de la codification, codification du Droit rural et de l´agriculture, á faveur de la sécurité juridique et pour permettre aussi l'intégration interrégionale. Sur le droit foncier il convient de noter un problème important : l´admi‐ nistration a établi des limites excessives sur le foncier. Il existe des restric‐ tions excessives au droit de propriété, qui ont sérieusement érodé les droits des propriétaires. L'évolution des droits fondamentaux dans ces derniers temps n´est pas étrangère aux zones rurales. Les limites qui affectent les droits de propriété sont des restrictions à la liberté de l'entreprise, à la li‐ berté de travail, et sont des restrictions sur la productivité et, en fin de compte, à la richesse nationale. D´une autre part, une plainte constante en Espagne est la perte accélérée d'hectares de terres agricoles ou la consommation de grandes zones agri‐ coles, soit à cause du développement urbain, l'infrastructure, pour le déve‐ loppement des énergies renouvelables, pour les besoins des installations d'industrialisation et collectives ; on peut vérifier que les plus grandes in‐ stallations photovoltaïques occupent la qualité des terres et même celles ir‐ riguées avec de l'argent public. Les problèmes économiques ne peuvent pas faire penser que le problème de la pression urbaine sur l'environne‐ ment rural et agricole a moins d'importance aujourd'hui, parce que précisé‐ ment le zone périurbaine a reçu plus l´invasion, parce que le prix est plus économique. Cela fait déjà longtemps que l´on insiste sur la nécessite de doter le territoire agraire et rural d´une politique spécifique de nivellement reposant sur le principe de solidarité interterritoriale et repenser une nou‐ velle type de relations entre le monde urbain et rural. Les problèmes sur la cohésion territoriale, c´est à dire, les relations entre le monde urbain et le monde agricole et rural doit se repenser pour faire face aux défis souligner pour la FAO et pour remplir aussi les obligations juridiques de l’art. 39 TFUE ou les objectifs de la PAC. Les problèmes de cohésion territoriale ont une influence aussi sur l'ac‐ cès à la propriété foncière dans les deux régimes: de propriété et de bail rural. Pour l´Espagne, le problème de l´organisation de la terre n´est pas seulement un problème économique, c´est un problème d´ organisation du Etat. Le Real Décret Législative 7/2015, de 30 de octobre, texte refondu de la loi de sol et réhabilitation urbaine, ne reflète pas une coherente relati‐ on d'interdépendance entre les zones urbaines et rurales. Muñiz Espada 478 D´une autre part, le problème de l´ accès à la terre n´est pas spéciale‐ ment juridique, mais sur tout économique: en ce moment, le prix de la terre dans chaque région est très cher bien pour accéder à la propriété bien pour accéder au bail rural, parce chaque région peut offrir très peu de ter‐ rain et chaque installation est devenue très chère. La raison est surtout le phénomène de la concentration de la propriété de la terre ; comme nous connaissons très bien, ce processus a commencé en Amérique Latine mais maintenant il a commencé en Europe, en partie répondre au besoin d’ajus‐ tement structurel nécessaire pour le secteur pour l´effet de la globalisation, et cela produit le risque de disparition des exploitations familiales agraires, et le dépeuplement des zones rurales. Maintenant, les unités de production absorbent la partie de la terre que quittent les exploitations qui ferment. Le prix rend difficile l´installation, donc seules les grandes entreprises et les fonds d'investissement peuvent se permettre d'acheter la propriété de ces terres. Mais pour eux cela est seulement un investissement. Tout cela est un affaiblissement du monde rural. Il y a aussi une responsabilité de la PAC sur le prix de la terre. Et pour les baux ruraux il est nécessaire d'aug‐ menter la mobilité du marché immobilier et favoriser la promotion du bail rural, le coût d'acquisition des terres en bail s´est très élevé pour une gran‐ de partie des agriculteurs, en particulier pour les jeunes ou pour la premier installation, donc le bail devrait se faire plus abordable et flexible. Pour favoriser l´accès de la femme au titularité de la exploitation agri‐ cole il faut dire que dans le droit espagnol il n´y a aucune barrière pour l'accès des femmes aux moyens de production ou l'accès à la propriété de l’entreprise agricole. Les instruments juridiques sont suffisants pour don‐ ner aux femmes, sur un pied d'égalité, accès aux moyens de production. La loi elle-même reconnaît qu'il existe des instruments juridiques suffi‐ sants pour que les femmes aient les mêmes droits que les hommes, mais la réalité est que les femmes rurales en Espagne n´ont pas eu recours à ces instruments. Ce qui a été demandé de manière récurrente c´est un statut professionnel spécifique pour le conjoint du chef l´exploitation agricole. La loi 35/2011, de 4 de octobre, sur la titularité partagée des exploitations agraires, a essayer de déterminer quels éléments continuent à être une dif‐ ficulté pour la reconnaissance du travail des femmes ou faire visible le tra‐ vail de la femme dans l'agriculture et d'illustrer des processus, et comment éviter conditionner le développement agricole et rural. La loi n'a pas été d´un grand succès, ni n´a donné d'excellents résultats, en particulier parce que n´a pas été accompagnée par des bénéfices fiscaux. Spain 479 Pour le droit agroalimentaire la loi emblematique est la loi Ley 12/2013, du 2 de août, de moyens pour ameliorer le fonctionement de la chaine agroalimentaire. La loi vise à éliminer le déséquilibre entre les dif‐ férents maillons de la chaîne alimentaire entre agriculteurs et l'industrie de transformation et de vente au détail. Il est prévu un système de contratati‐ on pour réduire les déséquilibres et asymétries dans le pouvoir de négocia‐ tion. Ses objectifs: améliorer la performance, l'équilibre et la structuration de la chaîne alimentaire, renforcer le secteur productif, d'assurer une con‐ currence loyale et effective de la chaîne alimentaire, accroître l'efficacité et la compétitivité dans le secteur alimentaire. La loi fournit un code de bonnes pratiques commerciales, qui n´est applique que d´une manière très légère. En plus, un agenda pour contrôler les pratiques interdites a été or‐ ganisée, avec une régime très strict de sanctions. Un problème majeur que n'a pas été résolu est la question de la médiation comme moyen de résoud‐ re les conflits, il y a un besoin de développement de cet instrument pour permettre la résolution des conflits avant d'avoir recours aux tribunaux. Sur le principe de la protection de l'environnement, la protection des ressources naturelles et le paysage, on peut dire que ce principe est pleine‐ ment développé dans le domaine des exigences de conformité pour la ré‐ ception des paiements directs. Ceci pour éviter l´abandon des terres agri‐ coles et veiller à ce qu'il soit maintenu dans de bonnes conditions agricoles et environnementales. Cependant, l'expérience a montré qu'un certain nombre d'exigences incluses dans le champ d'application de la conditi‐ onnalité ne sont pas suffisamment liées à l'agriculture ou aux terres agri‐ coles, mais concernent plutôt les autorités nationales que les agriculteurs eux-mêmes. La loi 26/2007, du 23 octobre, de responsabilité envirommentale domi‐ ne cet aspect; mais le problème plus urgent est developper de manière complete la Directive sur les hábitats, parce que les propiétées affectées par la Directive n´ont pas reçu la compensation economique correspon‐ dante; bien que les exigences de la condicionalité pour les paiments di‐ rects, encouragent en Espagne le greening de la PAC: la conservation de la biodiversité et la protection enviromentale, mais pour être plus efficace on devrait l´affecter à quelles exploitations qui sont actuellement exemptes. Muñiz Espada 480 C. Commission III – Kommission III Les évolutions récentes et significatives du droit rural Significant current developments in rural law Bedeutende aktuelle Entwicklungen im Recht des ländlichen Raums Rapports nationaux – National Reports – Landesberichte Résumés – Summaries – Zusammenfassungen Argentina Prof. em. María Adriana Victoria Universidad Nacional de Santiago del Estero. Nancy Lydia Malanos Universidad Católica de Rosario Current status of food and food security standards in Argentina In Argentina, agri-food and food safety legal rules do not accompany tech‐ nological advances; usually the technical fact about which they are disci‐ plined is earlier. Even the modern food industry implements the discover‐ ies made by science and puts them on the market, and precisely these are next to the consumers who require that they be legislated. Although not defined in the regulations what is meant by functional foods and novel foods, some of them have been regulated in the Argentine Food Code, such as fortified foods, fortified with vitamins, with protein derivatives, dietetic foods fortified with Proteins, foods fortified with es‐ sential amino acids; fluid milks fortified with Vitamins A or D or A and D; modified food for reduced energy or calorific value; modified foods in their sugar composition; foods low in lactose; modified foods in their pro‐ tein composition; gluten meal or powder, foods modified in their lipid composition, dietetic foods with guaranteed tenure in medium chain triglycerides; foods modified in their mineral composition (low sodium content, dietary salt); foods modified in fiber. Also altered products have been regulated, such as industrial production trans fatty acids. With re‐ spect to enriched foods, probiotics and prebiotics are regulated for the consumption of wheat flour marketed in the domestic market, added with iron, folic acid, thiamine, riboflavin and niacin, to the salt enriched with iodate of potassium. There is a National Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Program. With regard to the use of biotechnology, there is legislation on trans‐ genics, but the Food Code has not included transgenic foods. In relation to the breeding of farm animals, it has been legislated on the use of antibiotics, their impact on antibiotic resistance and public health. 483 Legislation has been passed on Democracy in food and food safety. As a new legislative measure on food safety and food safety, Law No. 27.233 / 15 has declared the health of animals and plants to be of na‐ tional interest. Since 2008 Law No. 26.396, which declares national pre‐ vention and control of eating disorders, has been created the National Pro‐ gram for Healthy Eating and Obesity Prevention. In addition, by the end of April 2016, the Food Guidelines for the Argentine Population were launched, which are a fundamental tool to promote knowledge that con‐ tributes to more equitable and healthy eating and nutrition behaviors by the population. Although we have a lot of regulation on the food and food security is‐ sues, Argentina has a long way to go in order to ensure that the legislation is able to accommodate the modern technical facts. Victoria / Malanos 484 France Christine Lebel Université de Franche-Comté Le foncier agricole La loi n° 2017-348 du 20 mars 2017 complète la loi n° 2014-1170 du 13 octobre 2014 dite loi d’Avenir pour l’Agriculture. Elle porte sur la pré‐ servation des terres agricoles avec l'obligation, pour les sociétés qui font l'acquisition de terres, de constituer des structures dédiées dont l'objet principal est la propriété agricole. La loi nouvelle accorde aux SAFER la possibilité d'acquérir, à l'amiable, les parts de groupements fonciers agri‐ coles ou ruraux au-delà de la limite actuelle de 30 % du capital de ces so‐ ciétés agricoles. L’article L.143-15-1 I du Code rural et de la pêche maritime énonce les personnes visées par l’obligation de rétrocession sont les personnes mora‐ les de droit privé, quelque soit leur forme (commerciale ou civile) ou leur objet (agricole ou non) à l’exception des GFA, GFR, SAFER, GAEC, EARL et des associations dont l’objet est principal la propriété agricole. Les sociétés civiles classiques (SCI,SCEA ouSCEV) sont soumises à l’ob‐ ligation de rétrocession des biens susceptibles d’être préemptés qu’elles ont acquis tout comme les sociétés commerciales ou pour les autres per‐ sonnes morales de droit privé telles que les fondations. L’obligation de rétrocession porte sur tous les biens et droits pour les‐ quels la SAFER peut exercer son droit de préemption, c’est-à-dire de tous les biens et droits énumérés à l’article L.143-1 du Code rural et de la pêche maritime. L’obligation de rétrocession s’applique uniquement lorsque, à la suite de l’acquisition ou de l’apport, la surface totale détenue en propriété par la société bénéficiant de l’apport ou réalisant l’acquisition et la société à laquelle elle rétrocède les biens ou les droits excède le seuil fixé par le schéma directeur régional des exploitations mentionné à l’arti‐ cle L.312-1 du Code rural et de la pêche maritime. Elle s’applique égale‐ ment, suite à l’acquisition ou à l’apport des biens et des droits concernés. Le nouvel article L.312-4 du Code rural et de la pêche maritime précise que les informations figurant au barème de la valeur vénale moyenne des I. 485 terres agricoles constituent un élément d’appréciation du juge pour la fixa‐ tion du prix des terres. Les mesures écologiques La loi n° 2016-1087 du 8 août 2016« biodiversité » pour la reconquête de la biodiversité, de la nature et des paysages modifie l’article L.110-1 du Code de l’environnement. Elle créée la compensation par la demande est conduite sous la responsabilité du débiteur de l'obligation de compensati‐ on, qui peut s'en charger directement ou la déléguer à un opérateur de compensation (C. env., art. L. 163-1, II). Cette loi invente un nouvel ins‐ trument au service de la maîtrise d'usage des terres : l'obligation réelle en‐ vironnementale (C. env., art. L. 132-3). Il s'agit de la possibilité pour le propriétaire d'un immeuble de souscrire conventionnellement envers une collectivité, un établissement public, ou une personne morale de droit pri‐ vé en charge de la protection de l'environnement, une obligation écologi‐ que qui pèsera sur tous les propriétaires successifs du bien. L’exploitant agricole face à l’extérieur La loi n° 2016-1691 du 9 décembre 2016 modifie l'article L. 631-24 à pro‐ pos des critères et des modalités de détermination du prix qui font réfé‐ rence à un ou plusieurs indices publics de coûts de production en agricul‐ ture qui reflètent la diversité des conditions et des systèmes de production et à un ou plusieurs indices publics des prix des produits agricoles ou ali‐ mentaires. La construction du prix des produits agricoles fait actuellement débat et sera l’objet de modifications législatives prochainement. Les contrats doivent faire référence à un ou plusieurs indices publics du prix de vente des principaux produits fabriqués par l'acheteur. L'évolution de ces indices est communiquée sur une base mensuelle par l'acheteur à l'organisation de producteurs ou à l'association d'organisations de pro‐ ducteurs signataire de l'accord-cadre mentionné par cette disposition léga‐ le. La loi prévoit également d'adopter le même type de mécanisme pour fixer les prix dans les conditions générales de vente relatives à des produ‐ its alimentaires comportant un ou plusieurs produits agricoles non trans‐ formés. II. III. Lebel 486 L'objectif du législateur de rendre la fixation des prix plus objective, dans ce secteur, où l’agriculteur subi les conditions des acheteurs. France 487 United States of America Prof. Terence J. Centner University of Georgia Prof. em. Margaret Rosso Grossman University of Illinois As the world’s population increases, and disruptive droughts and floods adversely affect human activities, food production will become increasing‐ ly critical. Technological innovations, particularly genetic technologies, affect food production in the United States and are the focus of recent le‐ gal developments. Federal agencies approved two new types of genetically engineered (GE) food products: a transgenic salmon and Arctic apples. Congress required labels for GE food, preempting state labeling laws. Regulatory agencies have begun to modernize the US regulatory system to take account of innovative genetic technologies that may escape regulation -- or face excessive regulation -- under current rules. Companies that de‐ velop new products through genetic technologies have legally-recognized property rights, which are protected by contract and by criminal law. Both federal and state legislation and administrative agency regulations continue to govern livestock production and the marketing of livestock products. In response to decisions by the WTO Appellate Body, Congress repealed country of origin labeling for some meat products. To address the issue of antibiotic resistance, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) amended its Veterinary Feed Directive rules, which require veterinary au‐ thorization for use of certain antibiotics in animal feed. Marketing claims inform consumers, and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) allows claims that meat products came from animals that did not receive added hormones or beta agonists. New USDA rules for organic animal produc‐ tion address animal welfare concerns, including living conditions for live‐ stock and poultry. On the state level, California requires more space for laying hens and other farm animals, and a law prohibits sale of eggs raised in battery cages. Production of food in the United States raises environmental concerns with international importance. Although research is inconclusive, applica‐ 489 tion of systemic pesticides, along with other stressors, may be related to declining bee populations and the resulting problems with crop pollina‐ tion. The United States has not banned the application of neonicotinoids, but it has withdrawn registration for sulfoxaflor. Globally, the use of glyphosate herbicides has increased dramatically, due in part to cultivation of glyphosate-resistant GE crops. The US Environmental Protection Agen‐ cy, like the European Food Safety Authority, concluded that glyphosate is unlikely to be carcinogenic. Some researchers disagree, and more studies and monitoring are needed. Two important developments will improve the safety of food in the United States. A new FDA regulation amends regulatory criteria that de‐ termine when a substance is generally regarded as safe (GRAS) and thus exempt from regulation as a food additive. The GRAS determination must be supported by scientific evidence, and the GRAS notification procedure, which remains voluntary, will provide scientific data to the FDA for eval‐ uation. In another important development for human health, the FDA has banned the use of partially hydrogenated oils -- industrially produced trans fats -- from food, effective in June 2018. The FDA declared that partially hydrogenated oils are not GRAS for use in human food. The ban does not affect trans fats that occur naturally in dairy products and meat from rumi‐ nants. In the United States, technological innovations, particularly GE tech‐ nologies and the use of herbicides and insecticides, have raised concerns about protection of human health and the environment. Consumers de‐ mand information about their food products and about the welfare of live‐ stock and poultry. In light of scientific, technological, and social develop‐ ments, new statutes and regulations help to ensure the safety of food pro‐ duced for consumers in the US and in other nations. In the United States, as in Europe, agrarian law must continue to respond to the challenges of providing food and fiber and protecting the environment for future genera‐ tions. Centner / Rosso Grossman 490 VII. Rapports Individuel – Individual Reports – Individuelle Berichte La réglementation du contrat de bail rural dans le droit espagnol: frein ou moteur à la compétitivité de l’agriculture ? Prof. Laura Zumaquero Université de Málaga En Espagne les baux ruraux son actuellement réglementés par la Loi 49/2003, du 26 novembre, partiellement modifié en 2005. Cette Loi essaie de promouvoir la figure du bail, comme forme d’accès à la terre al‐ ternative à la propriété, dans un context où le prix d’achat de la terre est monté en flèche. Dans cette ligne de dynamisation du marché de la terre en régimen de bail rural, la Loi de 2003 marque entre ses objectifs priori‐ taires: 1. Améliorer la competitivité du secteur, en augmentant l’efficacité des exploitations; 2. Garantir la continuité des exploitations; 3. Assurer la stabilité aux locataires ruraux, ce qui se repercutera directement sur la mo‐ dernisation des exploitations agraires. Ces objectifs essayent d’atteindre à partir d’une politique de libéralisation du secteur. Nous cherchons à assou‐ plir le régimen de bail rural, ce qui est en lui-même un aspect favorable à la competitivité, en pouvant se qualifier comme une réglementation effi‐ cace et cela pour plusieurs raisons: a. la Loi supprime l’exigence de pro‐ fessionalisme pour exercer l’activité agricole, b. elle élimine les limites quantitatives établis par la réglémentation précedente pour eviter l’accu‐ mulation des terres à la même personne ou entreprise, c. la Loi contient une durée minimum du contrat du bail et elle supprime les prorrogations forcées en établissant un système d’extention tacite pour trois années, d. elle supprime les droits d’acquisition préferentielle, e. elle établit une ré‐ glementation des frais et des améliorations favorables au locataire et elle garantit la stabilité des baux ruraux, avec l’indépendence de la vente de la terre. Dans ce contexte, à peine deux années après l’entrée en vigueur de la Loi de 2003, le législateur décide de reformer de manière substantielle le règlement des baux ruraux, bien que finalement il fait quelques retouches, avec l’objectif de la possibilité de l’augmentation des exploitations agri‐ coles viables. Bien qu’ils sont plusieurs les aspects que nous pouvons identifier comme favorable à la competitivité, il est vrai que la réforme de 2005 rompt avec la politique de libéralisation en viguer dans les dernièrs 493 annés, en introduisant des obstacles innecesaires qui entravent les objetifs marqués. Dans ce sens et de point de vue de la competitivité est plus fa‐ vorable la rédaction originaire que la version reformé de 2005. Bien que la Loi de Baux Ruraux contienne divers points forts pour l’amélioration de la competitivité, ils est remarcable pour son importance: a) La réglementation de la durée des contrats: La Loi établit une durée minimum de 5 années pour le contrats de bail, en sustitution du délai de 3 années, excessivement brève dès point de vue des especialistes. b) Les exigences de la Loi d’être locataire rural: L’extension de la conditi‐ on de locataire à quelque personne, bien que ce n’est pas la finalité du législateur, est très positive, si l’intention est l’accès à l’exploitation d’une plus grand nombre de personnes qui remplacent celles qui ne veut pas continuer avec l’exploitation agricole. c) La réglementation des améliorations en faveur du locataire rural: La Loi reconnnaît un credit en faveur du locataire, si les améliorations augmentent la valeur du fond et ils subsistent à la fin du contrat. Ce droit de remboursement est renforcé par le droit de rétention que la Loi reconnaît au possesseur de bonne foi. Bien que ces aspects montrent une claire tendance legislative vers l’amé‐ lioration de la compétitivité, la majorité des modifications introduites par la Loi constituent un frein. Cette idée peut s’extraire de mannier plus clai‐ re de: a) La réglementation relative à la limitation de l’extension des exploitati‐ ons agraires: La Loi reprévoit une serie des limites quantitatives de la superficie loué pour éviter l’accumulation des grandes surfaces de bail pour une seule locataire rural. b) Les previsions en matière de renovation générationnel: La Loi fait réfe‐ rence aux jeunes agriculteurs seulement sur quelques sujets. Mais estce-que ce critère garantit la continuité des exploitations? Il faudra eva‐ luer si cette personne est la plus adequate pour prendre en charge l’ex‐ ploitation. c) La politique de retour des droits d’acquisition préférentielle: La Loi re‐ vient en faveur de l’agriculteur profesionnel les droit d’acquisition pré‐ férentielle, étant un obstacle à la liberté de circulation, en plus d’être contraire à la flexibilisation qui se réfère à l’Exposé de Motifs de la Loi. Zumaquero 494 Ces sont seulement quelques des aspects qui constituent un frein à la com‐ petitivité et qui exigent une reforme urgente. Indepéndamment de la nec‐ cesité d’améliorer la technique législative, a mon avis, il est indispensable, aux effets d’améliorer la competitivité dans cette matière, d’adopter les suivants mesures de reforme: 1º Supprimer les restrictions d’accès à la terre à l’égard du locataire; 2º Éliminer les limitations aux exploitations agraires; 3º Garantir la continuité des exploitations agraires; 4º Supprimer les droits d’acquisition préférentielle, et dans le cas d’opter pour la limita‐ tion, reformer les critères par rapport à son exercise. Seulement à partir de la combination d’une bonne technique législative et des mesures sufissants qui eliminent les obstacles d’accès à la terre en regimen de location, garatisant la continuité des exploitations agraires et la stabilité aux mains des locataires, nous pourrons atteindre le niveau de competitivité souhaité. La réglementation du contrat de bail rural dans le droit espagnol 495 Significant current developments in rural law Teresa Rodriguez Cachón PhD student of the University of Burgos (Spain) Since the XXVIII European Congress of Agricultural Law, taken place in Potsdam (Germany), from 9th to 13th September 2015, there have been several developments regarding rural law in Spain. In particular, we will focus on the Spanish Code of Good Business Practices in Food Procure‐ ment Contracting (hereinafter, the Code), which is related to two of the proposed topics: agricultural reforms, with a greater focus on farmers; and food democracy. The sources of the Code are of two different types and origins: Euro‐ pean initiatives and Spanish legal obligations. On one hand, the Code is the result of certain European initiatives that encourage food supply chain stakeholders and Member States to tackle unfair trading practices (UTPs) in an appropriate and proportionate manner in order to improve the gener‐ al performance of the sector. To this goal, in July 2014, the European Commission on its "Communication on tackling unfair trading practices (UTPs) in the business-to-business food supply chain" encouraged opera‐ tors in the European food supply chain to participate in voluntary schemes aimed at promoting best commercial practices and emphasized the impor‐ tance of effective and independent enforcement at national level. All stakeholders have acknowledged the need to address UTPs issues not only at national level but also in the European sphere. With this aim, participants of the food supply chain have set up the Supply Chain Initia‐ tive (SCI), a self-regulatory framework launched within the pale of the Commission’s High Level Forum for a Better Functioning Food Supply Chain. The SCI is composed of national authorities and key stakeholder representatives at EU level from the supply and retail sides of the food sector. It has the purpose of promoting fair and sustainable business practices along the food supply chain as a basis for commercial dealings. The work undertaken by the SCI has been an important cornerstone in creating an environment where undertakings deal with each other in a fair and sustainable way. As the SCI does not provide for any other type of sanction apart from being excluded from itself, its final objectives only 497 can be to set up the right mind-sets, negotiation approaches and resolution mechanisms in organisations, thereby encouraging a change of business culture in such a way that it be the participants in the food chain who, in fact, exclude from the traffic those who repeatedly act unfairly. It should be recognized that there are limits to how far a self-regulatory initiative can go in avoiding UTPs or any other unfair practice. Hence, European Commission underlines the importance of supplementing the SCI with national level voluntary schemes, which would definitely in‐ crease and strengthen the effectiveness of the SCI. Spanish legislator has sided with this suggestion by creating the Code. Apart from the mentioned European initiatives, the creation and the general principals of the Code come from explicit national obligations es‐ tablished by the Spanish Law 12/2013, of 2 August, measures to improve the functioning of the food supply chain (LMFCA). Article 15 LMFCA establishes the possibility (but not the obligation) of creating this Code with implementation in Spain. There remains a wide divergence in the way UTPs issues in food supply chains are addressed in the EU. In the case of Spain, a "mixed approach" has been adopted: a voluntary scheme (the Code) is complemented with some regulatory measures consisting of a new public enforcement system creating by the LMFCA. The appropriate understanding of the interactions between voluntary scheme and statutory systems is essential in order to ar‐ ticulate an effective fight against UTPs. The public enforcement system contained in the LMFCA reinforces ac‐ tions of civil nature contained in antitrust norms, mainly the Spanish Un‐ fair Competition Law (Ley 3/1991). The administrative authority in charge of applying LMFCA sanctions is the Information and Food Control Agency (AICA), created by the LMFCA itself as an autonomous body, de‐ pendent of the Spanish Minister of Agriculture and Food, Fishery and En‐ vironment. AICA has distinct public legal personality and full capacity to act as an administrative enforcement authority. This "mixed approach" adopted by Spanish legislator has both advan‐ tages and disadvantages. Among the positive points, stands out the possi‐ bility to fade (or, at least, mitigate) the "fear factor". This "fear factor" is related to any situation when the weaker party in a commercial relation‐ ship (in most cases, an SME) fears that starting a lawsuit may lead the stronger party to terminate the commercial relationship. This can discour‐ age parties that are subject to UTPs from taking legal actions. Rodriguez Cachón 498 Farmers and SME suppliers emphasise that the existence of an adminis‐ trative authority with the power to launch own investigations and to accept confidential complaints on alleged UTPs would be crucial to tackling the issue of the "fear factor". Most of these stakeholders call for the establish‐ ment of an independent enforcement body at national level, because ef‐ fective enforcement would be a key factor in reducing the occurrence of UTPs. And that is exactly what Spain has done by the creation of the AICA, which can undertake ex officio own initiative investigations that do not lead to the disclosure of the identity of the complainant. On the other hand, among the negative points of the "mixed approach" adopted by Spain regarding UTPs issues in food supply chain, it is neces‐ sary to point out the note done by the Spanish National Commission on Markets and Competition (CNMC) in its report on the Preliminary project of the LMFCA. The public enforcement system contained in the LMFCA gives powers to act on private law relations to an administrative authority (the AICA) but the CNMC understands that these relations are already subject to the rules of obligations and contracts, to legislation that regu‐ lates unfair competition and industrial property and to antitrust legislation. Therefore, the CNMC concludes that this public enforcement system should be removed and, on its position, the existing mechanisms (the Code and actions of civil nature contained in antitrust norms executed at the courts of Justice) should be strengthened. Regarding the main elements addressed by Code, two sections stand out. A list of basic principles that shall be governed the food supply chain is set up in the first section. Among them, principle of defence of con‐ sumers, principle of loyalty and principle of sustainability in the food sup‐ ply chain are of the highest importance. The compliance with the Code and resolution of discrepancies are addressed in the eighth section of the Code. In the event of any conflict or discrepancy with regard to the appli‐ cation of the Code to individual companies, the operators undertake to re‐ solve the conflict or discrepancy by mediation system. And subsidiarily, when the previous mediation system conclude without any agreement hav‐ ing been reached, the operators may make use of arbitration systems due to the obligation of bearing in mind the undertaking to minimize the oper‐ ational and management costs of conflict resolution. Although it is too early to assess the overall impact of this new fight against UTPs, until now both Spanish and European voluntary framework against UTPs have had positive effects. Anyway the Commission has ad‐ Significant current developments in rural law 499 mitted the need to continue closely monitoring the situation regarding both the voluntary initiatives and public enforcement systems. Rodriguez Cachón 500 VIII. Liste des Rapports nationaux – List of National Reports – Liste der Landesberichte VIII. Liste des Rapports nationaux – List of National Reports – Liste der Landesberichte Les rapports nationaux suivants ont été présentés au XXIXe Congrès et Colloque Européen de Droit Rural. Ils sont accessibles sur le site Internet du C.E.D.R, cf. www.cedr.org. Country Commission I Commission II Commission III President Rudolf Mögele Norbert Olszak Michael Cardwell General Reporter Paul Richli Christian Busse Luc Bodiguel Ludivine Petetin National Reports Argentina Maria Adriana Victoria/ Nancy Malanos Austria Anton Reinl Belgium Antoine Grégoire Bulgaria Minko Georgiev/ Henrich Meyer-Ger‐ baulet/Christina Yan‐ cheva/Dimitar Grekov/ Dafinka Grozdanova/ Aneta Roycheva Finland Tero Poutala France Catherine Del Cont Denis Guerard/Lionel Manteau Christine Lebel Germany Birgit Buth Dieter Schweizer José Martínez Hungary Zsófia Hornyák/Nóra Ja‐ kab/Zoltán Nagy/István Olajos Italy Luigi Russo Antonio Sciaudone Alessandra Di Lauro Netherlands Eric Janssen J.W.A. (Jeroen) Rheinfeld Poland Adam Niewiadomski/ Przemysław Litwiniuk/ Konrad Marciniuk Teresa Kurowska/Dorota Łobos-Kotowska/Monika Król/Izabela Lipińska/ Ra‐ dosław Pastuszko Małgorzata Korzycka/ Justyna Goździewicz- Biechońska/Anna Ka‐ pała/Katarzyna Leśkie‐ wicz/Aneta Suchoń/ Pa‐ weł Wojciechowski Romania Victor Marcusohn Spain Jose M. De la Cuesta Esther Muñiz Espada Pablo Amat-Llombart 503 Switzerland Jürg Niklaus Beat Röösli UK Rhodri Jones Jeremy Moody Christopher Price USA Terence Centner Individual Copa and Cogeca Mem‐ ber's (François Guerin) Laura Zumaquero (Spain) Teresa Rodriguez Ca‐ chon (Spain) VIII. Liste – List 504

Abstract

The XXIXth European Congress on Agricultural Law, which took place from 20st to 23rd September 2017 in Lille, was organised by the C.E.D.R. (Comité Européen de Droit Rural) in collaboration with the French Association of Agricultural Law (AFDR). The overarching subject of the congress was “agriculture and competition”, with a focus on the application of competition law to the agricultural sector, as well as on national driving forces and legal impediments to agricultural competitive ability. The academic paper was developed in three commissions on the basis of ­national reports. The resulting conclusions and recommendations for the responsible authorities of the European Union, the member states and third countries, as well as to international organisations, were published. This volume documents the work done in the context of the congress, including the general reports and the synthesis report.

Zusammenfassung

Der XXIX. Europäische Agrarrechtskongress, der vom 20. bis 23. September 2017 in Lille stattfand, wurde vom C.E.D.R. (Comité Européen de Droit Rural) in Zusammenarbeit mit der Französischen Vereinigung für Agrarrecht (AFDR) organisiert. Das übergreifende Thema des Kongresses war "Landwirtschaft und Wettbewerb", insbesondere die Anwendung des Wettbewerbsrechts auf den Agrarsektor sowie nationale treibende Kräfte und Hemmschuhe rechtlicher Art für die landwirtschaftliche Wettbewerbsfähigkeit. Die wissenschaftliche Arbeit wurde in drei Kommissionen auf der Grundlage nationaler Berichte geleistet. Entsprechende Schlussfolgerungen und Empfehlungen an die zuständigen Behörden der Europäischen Union, der Mitgliedstaaten und Drittländer sowie an internationale Organisationen wurden veröffentlicht. Dieser Band dokumentiert die Kongressarbeit inklusive der Generalberichte und des Syntheseberichts.

Schlagworte

Landwirtschaftsrecht, Landwirtschaft, Agrarrecht, Wettbewerb, Wettbewerbsrecht Landwirtschaftsrecht, Landwirtschaft, Agrarrecht, Wettbewerb, Wettbewerbsrecht

References

Abstract

The XXIXth European Congress on Agricultural Law, which took place from 20st to 23rd September 2017 in Lille, was organised by the C.E.D.R. (Comité Européen de Droit Rural) in collaboration with the French Association of Agricultural Law (AFDR). The overarching subject of the congress was “agriculture and competition”, with a focus on the application of competition law to the agricultural sector, as well as on national driving forces and legal impediments to agricultural competitive ability. The academic paper was developed in three commissions on the basis of ­national reports. The resulting conclusions and recommendations for the responsible authorities of the European Union, the member states and third countries, as well as to international organisations, were published. This volume documents the work done in the context of the congress, including the general reports and the synthesis report.

Zusammenfassung

Der XXIX. Europäische Agrarrechtskongress, der vom 20. bis 23. September 2017 in Lille stattfand, wurde vom C.E.D.R. (Comité Européen de Droit Rural) in Zusammenarbeit mit der Französischen Vereinigung f