Content

Oliver C. Ruppel, Emmanuel D. Kam Yogo

Environmental law and policy in Cameroon - Towards making Africa the tree of life | Droit et politique de l'environnement au Cameroun - Afin de faire de l'Afrique l'arbre de vie

1. Edition 2018, ISBN print: 978-3-8487-5260-7, ISBN online: 978-3-8452-9436-0, https://doi.org/10.5771/9783845294360

Series: Recht und Verfassung in Afrika - Law and Constitution in Africa, vol. 37

CC-BY-NC-ND

Bibliographic information
Recht und Verfassung in Afrika | 37 Law and Constitution in Africa Environmental law and policy in Cameroon – Towards making Africa the tree of life Droit et politique de l’environnement au Cameroun – Afin de faire de l’Afrique l’arbre de vie Oliver C. Ruppel | Emmanuel D. Kam Yogo [eds./dir.] Nomos [africa] Herausgeber/Editorial Board: Hartmut Hamann, Professor of Law, Freie University Berlin & Hamann Rechtsanwälte, Stuttgart | Ulrich Karpen, Professor of Law, University of Hamburg | Oliver C. Ruppel, Professor of Law, University of Stellenbosch | Hans-Peter Schneider, Professor of Law, University of Hannover Wissenschaftlicher Beirat/Scientific Advisory Council: Laurie Ackermann, Justice (Emeritus), Constitutional Court of South Africa, Johannesburg | Jean-Marie Breton, Professor of Law (Emeritus), Honorary Dean, University of French West Indies and Guyana | Philipp Dann, Professor of Law, Humboldt University Berlin | Gerhard Erasmus, Professor of Law (Emeritus), Associate, Trade Law Centre, Stellenbosch | Norbert Kersting, Professor of Political Sciences, University of Muenster | Salvatore Mancuso, Professor of Law, Chair Centre for Comparative Law in Africa, University of Cape Town | Yvonne Mokgoro, Justice, South African Law Reform and Development Commission, Pretoria | Lourens du Plessis, Professor of Law, Northwest University, Potchefstroom | Werner Scholtz, Professor of Law, University of the Western Cape, Bellville | Nico Steytler, Professor of Law, Int. Association of Centers for Federal Studies, Bellville | Hennie A. Strydom, Professor of Law, University of Johannesburg | Christoph Vedder, Professor of Law, University of Augsburg | Gerhard Werle, Professor of Law, Humboldt University Berlin | Johann van der Westhuizen, Justice, Constitutional Court of South Africa, Johannesburg | Reinhard Zimmermann, Professor of Law, Managing Director of the Max Planck Institute for Comparative and International Private Law, Hamburg Recht und Verfassung in Afrika – Band/Volume 37 Law and Constitution in Africa BUT_Ruppel_5260-7_HC.indd 2 02.08.18 10:41 Oliver C. Ruppel | Emmanuel D. Kam Yogo [eds./dir.] Environmental law and policy in Cameroon – Towards making Africa the tree of life Droit et politique de l’environnement au Cameroun – Afin de faire de l’Afrique l’arbre de vie Nomos BUT_Ruppel_5260-7_HC.indd 3 02.08.18 10:41 The Deutsche Nationalbibliothek lists this publication in the Deutsche Nationalbibliografie; detailed bibliographic data are available on the Internet at http://dnb.d-nb.de ISBN 978-3-8487-5260-7 (Print) 978-3-8452-9436-0 (ePDF) British Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library. ISBN 978-3-8487-5260-7 (Print) 978-3-8452-9436-0 (ePDF) Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Ruppel, Oliver C./Kam Yogo, Emmanuel D. [eds./dir.] Environmental law and policy in Cameroon – Towards making Africa the tree of life Droit et politique de l’environnement au Cameroun – Afin de faire de l’Afrique l’arbre de vie Oliver C. Ruppel/Emmanuel D. Kam Yogo [eds./dir.] 961 p. Includes bibliographic references. ISBN 978-3-8487-5260-7 (Print) 978-3-8452-9436-0 (ePDF) 1st Edition 2018 © Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft, Baden-Baden, Germany 2018. Printed and bound in Germany. This work is subject to copyright. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage or retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publishers. Under § 54 of the German Copyright Law where copies are made for other than private use a fee is payable to “Verwertungs gesellschaft Wort”, Munich. No responsibility for loss caused to any individual or organization acting on or refraining from action as a result of the material in this publication can be accepted by Nomos, Konrad Adenauer Stiftung or the author(s)/editor(s). BUT_Ruppel_5260-7_HC.indd 4 02.08.18 10:41 This publication was produced by / Cette publication a été produite par Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung Climate Policy and Energy Security Programme for Sub-Saharan Africa / Programme sur la Politique Climatique et la Sécurité Énergétique pour l’Afrique Subsaharienne Yaounde, Cameroon / Yaoundé, Cameroun Disclaimer The contents of the articles, including any errors or omissions are solely the responsibility of the authors. Opinions expressed by the different authors, do not necessarily reflect those of the editors or of the Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung. The editors did their best to acknowledge the usage of copyright protected material. In case any copyright violation should be detected, please contact the editors and any such error or omission will be rectified in a reprint or 2nd edition. Avertissement Les contenus des articles, y compris les erreurs ou omissions définitives, relèvent de la seule responsabilité individuelle des auteurs. Les opinions exprimées par les auteurs individuels ne reflètent pas nécessairement celles des éditeurs ou de la Konrad- Adenauer-Stiftung. Les éditeurs ont fait tout leur possible pour reconnaître l’utilisation du matériel protégé par le droit d’auteur. En cas de violation du droit d’auteur, veuillez contacter les éditeurs, et tout sera mis en œuvre pour rectifier les omissions ou les erreurs, lors de la réimpression ou d’une nouvelle édition. BUT_Ruppel_5260-7_HC.indd 5 02.08.18 10:41 7 CONTENTS / CONTENU FOREWORD / AVANT-PROPOS 31 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS / REMERCIEMENTS 35 ABOUT THE AUTHORS / À PROPOS DES AUTEURS 39 ABBREVIATIONS / ABRÉVIATIONS 43 SECTION 1: SETTING THE SCENE / MISE EN SCÈNE 49 CHAPTER 1: CAMEROON IN A NUTSHELL – HUMAN AND NATURAL ENVIRONMENT, HISTORICAL OVERVIEW AND LEGAL SETUP 51 Oliver C. RUPPEL & Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 1 Introduction 51 2 The human environment 51 2.1 Ethnic groups 52 2.2 Religious groups 53 2.3 Regions and official languages 54 3 The natural environment 55 4 Historical overview 58 4.1 German colonial presence 58 4.2 German rule 60 4.3 After the German domination 62 4.4 The Independence process 64 4.5 Cameroon today 65 5 The legal setup 66 6 Concluding remarks 73 SECTION 2: ENVIRONMENTAL LAW – INTRODUCTION AND INTERNATIONAL LEGAL FRAMEWORK / DROIT ENVIRONNEMENTAL – INTRODUCTION ET CADRE JURIDIQUE INTERNATIONAL 75 CHAPTER 2: INTRODUCING ENVIRONMENTAL LAW 77 Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 1 Terminology 77 2 Foundations of environmental protection 79 3 Functions of environmental law 81 4 Historical development of environmental law 82 CONTENTS / CONTENU 8 CHAPITRE 3 : INTRODUCTION AU DROIT INTERNATIONAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 93 Oliver C. RUPPEL & Daniel Armel OWONA MBARGA 1 Introduction 93 2 L’applicabilité du droit international au Cameroun 93 2.1 La ratification régulière des traités et accords internationaux 94 2.2 La publication des traités et accords internationaux 96 2.3 La réciprocité dans l’application des traités et accords internationaux 98 3 Les sources du droit international de l’environnement 99 3.1 Conventions internationales : accords multilatéraux sur l’environnement (AME) 100 3.2 Le droit international coutumier 105 3.3 Les concepts et principes généraux du droit international de l’environnement 106 3.4 Décisions judiciaires et doctrine 111 4 Accords multilatéraux sur l’environnement pertinents pour le Cameroun 111 CHAPTER 4: ENVIRONMENTAL LAW IN THE AFRICAN UNION 119 Oliver C. RUPPEL 1 Introduction 119 2 Institutional structure in the AU 120 3 Environmental issues within the AU’s general legal framework 121 4 Specific environmental conventions 122 4.1 The African Convention on Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, 1968 124 4.2 The Revised (Algiers) Convention on the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, 2003 125 4.3 Bamako Convention on the Ban of the Import into Africa and the Control of Transboundary Movement and Management of Hazardous Wastes within Africa 127 4.4 The Maritime Transport Charters 128 4.5 The African Nuclear Free Zone Treaty (Treaty of Pelindaba) 128 4.6 The Phyto-Sanitary Convention for Africa 129 4.7 The African Union Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa 130 4.8 African Charter on Maritime Security and Safety and Development in Africa (Lomé Charter) 130 CONTENTS / CONTENU 9 5 The African Union’s judicial system and the consideration of environmental rights 131 6 Selected institutions and initiatives particularly relevant for environmental protection 133 6.1 The African Ministerial Conference on the Environment (AMCEN) 133 6.2 Relevant departments within the AU Commission 134 6.3 The Peace and Security Council (PSC) 134 6.4 The New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) 135 CHAPITRE 5 : DROIT ET POLITIQUE DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT AU SEIN DES COMMUNAUTÉS ÉCONOMIQUES RÉGIONALES EN AFRIQUE CENTRALE 138 Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 1 Introduction 138 2 Le leadership de la CEEAC sur les questions environnementales en Afrique centrale 139 2.1 Le cadre institutionnel et normatif de la gestion de l’environnement dans l’espace de CEEAC 139 2.2 L’esquisse d’un cadre politique régional de gestion de l’environnement par la CEEAC 145 3 La prise en compte timide des préoccupations environnementales dans la CEMAC 151 3.1 Les institutions de la CEMAC intervenant dans le domaine de l’environnement 151 3.2 La lutte contre la pollution du milieu marin au sein de la CEMAC 156 3.3 Les règles pharmaceutiques communautaires 158 3.4 Les programmes de la CEMAC en matière de l’environnement 159 4 Conclusion 160 SECTION 3: GENERAL ASPECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL LAW IN CAMEROON / ASPECTS GENERAUX DU DROIT DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT AU CAMEROUN 163 CHAPITRE 6 : LE CAMEROUN ET SON ENVIRONNEMENT 165 Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 1 Introduction 165 2 Les zones écologiques du Cameroun 166 2.1 La zone soudano-sahélienne 166 CONTENTS / CONTENU 10 2.2 La zone de savane 168 2.3 La zone maritime et côtière 169 2.4 La zone de forêts tropicales 170 3 Les instruments politiques de gestion de l’environnement au Cameroun 171 3.1 Le Plan national de gestion de l’environnement 171 3.2 Les programmes, plans d’action et stratégies par secteurs 172 4 Conclusion 180 CHAPITRE 7: LA QUESTION ENVIRONNEMENTALE DANS LE SYSTÈME JURIDIQUE DU CAMEROUN 181 Jean-Marie TCHAKOUA 1 Introduction 181 2 La question environnementale et le double héritage anglais et français 183 2.1 Le système anglo-saxon et le droit applicable dans l’ex-Cameroun occidental 183 2.2 Le système romano-germanique et le droit applicable dans l’ex-Cameroun oriental 186 2.3 L’affaiblissement de l’opposition entre les deux ex-parties du Cameroun 187 3 La question environnementale et l’opposition entre le droit traditionnel et le droit moderne 190 3.1 L’hégémonie du droit moderne face au droit traditionnel 190 3.2 La survie des coutumes 197 CHAPITRE 8 : LE DROIT PÉNAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT AU CAMEROUN 201 Frédéric FOKA TAFFO 1 Introduction 201 2 Les infractions contre la forêt, la faune et la pêche 202 2.1 Les atteintes à la forêt 202 2.2 Les atteintes à la faune 205 2.3 Les atteintes aux ressources halieutiques 207 3 Les infractions de pollution de l’eau, de l’atmosphère et du sol 209 3.1 Les atteintes à l’eau 209 3.2 Les atteintes à l’atmosphère 210 3.3 Les atteintes au sol et au sous-sol 211 4 Les autres infractions au droit à un environnement sain 212 4.1 La gestion des déchets et des substances radioactives 213 CONTENTS / CONTENU 11 4.2 Les atteintes à la santé publique 215 4.3 Les atteintes aux biens culturels 216 5 Conclusion 217 SECTION 4: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN CAMEROON / GESTION ENVIRONNEMENTALE AU CAMEROUN 219 CHAPITRE 9 : LE CADRE INSTITUTIONNEL DE LA GESTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT AU CAMEROUN 221 Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 1 Introduction 221 2 Les institutions centrales de protection de l’environnement 222 2.1 Les départements ministériels 222 2.2 Les structures centrales de coordination et de consultation en matière de gestion de l’environnement 227 3 Les institutions décentralisées et les chambres consulaires 230 3.1 Les institutions de la décentralisation territoriales et les chefferies traditionnelles 230 3.2 Les institutions de la décentralisation technique 235 3.3 Les chambres consulaires et l’assemblée consultative 238 4 Conclusion 240 CHAPTER 10: PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN CAMEROON 242 Christopher F. TAMASANG & Andre Felix Martial TCHOFFO 1 Introduction 242 2 Why principles of environmental law in general and principles of environmental management in particular? 244 2.1 Theoretical foundations of principles of (environmental) law 244 2.2 Sources and role of principles in law and environmental law in particular 245 2.3 Some conceptual clarifications 246 3 Fundamental principles of environmental management under Cameroonian law 246 3.1 Theoretical presentation of the principles 247 3.2 Practical utility and implementation of the principles of environmental management 261 4 Addressing the insufficient consideration of principles of environmental management in the 1996 law 266 CONTENTS / CONTENU 12 4.1 Absence in Cameroonian law of some basic principles of contemporary environmental management 266 4.2 Challenges to the development of principles on environmental management in Cameroon 269 5 Conclusion and way forward 270 5.1 Conclusion 270 5.2 Way forward 271 CHAPTER 11: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT UNDER CAMEROONIAN LAW 274 Christopher F. TAMASANG & Sylvain N. ATANGA 1 Introduction 274 1.1 Conceptual clarification of EIA 275 1.2 The legal bases for EIA in international environmental law 277 1.3 Legal bases for the application of environmental impact assessment in Cameroon 279 2 The procedure and practice of environmental impact assessment in Cameroon 281 2.1 Environmental and social impact assessment (ESIA) 281 2.2 Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) 285 2.3 Environment impact statement (EIS) 286 3 Adjudication mechanisms in environmental impact assessment in Cameroon 287 3.1 Administrative mechanisms 287 3.2 Judicial mechanisms 289 3.3 Alternative dispute resolution mechanisms 291 4 Challenges to the effective implementation of environmental and social impact assessment in Cameroon 292 4.1 Inadequate scientific and baseline data 292 4.2 Incompetent personnel and over-centralisation 292 4.3 Ineffective public participation in ESIA processes 293 4.4 Problem of specialisation of judicial personnel 294 4.5 Inadequate human resources 294 4.6 Corruption within the EIA Processes 294 5 Conclusions and recommendations 294 CONTENTS / CONTENU 13 CHAPITRE 12 : LA RÉGLEMENTATION DES ÉTABLISSEMENTS CLASSÉS AU CAMEROUN ET LA PROTECTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 296 Paule Jessie NANFAH 1 Introduction 296 2 Le contrôle des activités polluantes et dangereuses 299 2.1 Les intérêts protégés 299 2.2 Les activités concernées 301 3 La prévention des risques et la sanction des atteintes à l’environnement 303 3.1 La prévention des risques industriels et environnementaux 303 3.2 La sanction des atteintes à l’environnement 306 4 Conclusion 309 CHAPITRE 13 : DROIT ET POLITIQUE DE GESTION DES CATASTROPHES ET RISQUES AU CAMEROUN 312 Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 1 Introduction 312 2 L’évolution du cadre institutionnel, normatif et politique de la gestion des catastrophes et risques au Cameroun 313 2.1 L’évolution des institutions de gestion des catastrophes et risques 313 2.2 L’évolution des règles juridiques de gestion des catastrophes et risques 319 2.3 L’évolution du cadre politique de gestion des catastrophes et risques 324 3 La coopération internationale et la gestion des risques et catastrophes au Cameroun 326 3.1 La coopération au niveau africain 326 3.2 La coopération au niveau mondial 328 4 Conclusion 331 SECTION 5: LAND, AGRICULTURE AND URBANISATION / LA TERRE, L’AGRICULTURE ET L’URBANISATION 333 CHAPITRE 14 : LE RÉGIME FONCIER ET DOMANIAL AU CAMEROUN 335 Jean-Marie Vianney BENDEGUE 1 La genèse 335 1.1 La période précoloniale 335 CONTENTS / CONTENU 14 1.2 La période coloniale 338 1.3 La période postcoloniale 339 2 La substance des régimes 340 2.1 Les statuts des terrains 340 2.2 Le régime des transactions 341 2.3 Les questions de gouvernance foncière 342 3 Le règlement des litiges 342 3.1 Les recours administratifs 342 3.2 Les recours juridictionnels 345 4 Les reformes et perspectives 348 CHAPITRE 15 : POLITIQUE AGRICOLE ET GOUVERNANCE FONCIÈRE AU CAMEROUN 350 Marie NGO NONGA 1 Introduction 350 2 L’évolution des politiques foncières et agricoles au Cameroun 353 2.1 Généralité sur l’évolution de la politique foncière camerounaise 353 2.2 La mutation de la politique agricole camerounaise 360 3 La problématique de la gouvernance foncière et agricole au Cameroun 365 3.1 La persistance des conflits fonciers 365 3.2 La problématique de la définition d’une gouvernance agricole durable 368 4 Conclusion 370 CHAPITRE 16 : LES RÈGLES D’URBANISATION ET LA PROTECTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT AU CAMEROUN 372 Joseph Magloire NGANG 1 Introduction 372 2 Aménagement urbain et étiologie des problèmes environnementaux 376 2.1 La liaison défectueuse entre l’environnement et les composantes de l’urbanisme 376 2.2 Les problèmes environnementaux inhérents aux faiblesses de l’aménagement urbain 379 3 Urbanisation et résolution des problèmes environnementaux 382 3.1 L’urbanisme réglementaire et la protection de l’environnement 382 3.2 L’urbanisme opérationnel et la gestion des problèmes environnementaux 386 4 Conclusion 391 CONTENTS / CONTENU 15 SECTION 6: WASTE AND POLLUTION / LES DÉCHETS ET LA POLLUTION 395 CHAPITRE 17 : LA GESTION DES DÉCHETS AU CAMEROUN 397 Adele FONI FOUTH KINIE 1 Introduction 397 2 L’encadrement normatif et institutionnel de la gestion des déchets au Cameroun 398 2.1 Les normes en matière de gestion des déchets au Cameroun 398 2.2 Les institutions et les autres acteurs de la gestion des déchets au Cameroun 402 3 Les grandes orientations stratégiques de la gestion des déchets au Cameroun 407 3.1 Les mécanismes de lutte contre la pollution occasionnée par les déchets 407 3.2 Les mécanismes de responsabilité en matière de gestion des déchets au Cameroun 410 4 Les limites inhérentes à la gestion des déchets au Cameroun 413 5 Quelques éléments pour une meilleure gestion des déchets à Yaoundé 414 5.1 Les éléments qui interviennent en amont 415 5.2 Les mesures à prendre en aval 416 6 Conclusion 417 CHAPITRE 18 : LE CONTRÔLE DE LA POLLUTION AU CAMEROUN 418 Jean Marcial BELL & Adele FONI FOUTH KINIE 1 Introduction 418 2 Le phénomène de pollution au Cameroun 419 2.1 La typologie de pollution au Cameroun 419 2.2 Les causes de la pollution au Cameroun 420 2.3 Les conséquences de la pollution au Cameroun 421 3 Les mécanismes de contrôle de la pollution au Cameroun 422 3.1 Les mécanismes sur le plan normatif 422 3.2 Les mécanismes de contrôle sur le plan institutionnel 424 4 Les limites du contrôle de la pollution au Cameroun 427 4.1 Un système d’assainissement précaire 428 4.2 La corruption une réelle limite pour le contrôle de la pollution au Cameroun 429 5 Les perspectives pour l’amélioration du contrôle de la pollution au Cameroun 430 5.1 Le renforcement des capacités professionnelles 430 CONTENTS / CONTENU 16 5.2 La responsabilisation des pollueurs 430 6 Conclusion 431 SECTION 7: FLORA AND FAUNA / LA FAUNE ET LA FLORE 433 CHAPTER 19: A PARADIGM SHIFT IN THE LEGAL PROTECTION OF BIODIVERSITY IN CAMEROON 435 Prudence GALEGA 1 Introduction 435 2 Shifts in internalised global norms 437 3 Innovative shifts in national legal tools 439 3.1 Legal recognition of biodiversity as common national heritage 439 3.2 Policy outcomes for biodiversity protection 440 3.3 Environmental protection 442 3.4 Innovative legal tools for the protection of forest biodiversity 443 3.5 Wildlife protection regime 445 3.6 Legal regime for benefit sharing from biological and genetic resources 446 3.7 The role of customs and traditions 450 3.8 Biosafety and biosecurity 451 3.9 Legal tools for transparency on biodiversity products for trade 452 4 Institutional tools 453 4.1 Institutional reforms of biodiversity focal institution 453 4.2 Institutional reforms within biodiversity dependent sectors (rural development sectors) 454 4.3 Support role of biodiversity relevant institutions 455 4.4 Coordination options 456 4.5 Other major stakeholders 456 4.6 Implementation challenges 457 5 Improving legal effectiveness 457 5.1 Policy options 458 5.2 Practical options 458 5.3 Enforcement options 458 5.4 Funding options 458 6 Conclusion 459 CONTENTS / CONTENU 17 CHAPITRE 20 : L’ENCADREMENT JURIDIQUE D’UN PHENOMÈNE NOUVEAU – LES CONVERSIONS DE FORÊTS EN AFRIQUE CENTRALE 462 Samuel NGUIFFO & Marie-Madeleine BASSALANG 1 Introduction 462 2 Une planification insuffisante de l’espace forestier 464 2.1 Une planification limitée au seul secteur forestier 465 2.2 Une difficulté à incorporer les activités non forestières sur les espaces forestiers 466 3 Un régime de l’attribution des terres forestières à parfaire 467 3.1 Le régime de l’affectation des terres forestières à des usages non forestiers 468 3.2 Le défrichement, enjeu nouveau favorisant les conversions des forêts 471 4 Conclusion 473 CHAPITRE 21 : ELEMENTS D’INTRODUCTION AU DROIT FORESTIER CAMEROUNAIS 476 François Narcisse DJAME 1 Introduction 476 2 Les sources et les acteurs de la mise en œuvre du droit forestier camerounais 478 2.1 Les sources du droit forestier 478 2.2 Les acteurs de la mise en œuvre du droit forestier 483 3 La consistance du domaine forestier national 486 3.1 Le contenu du domaine forestier permanent 487 3.2 Le domaine forestier non permanent 489 4 Les règles de gestion et d’exploitation des ressources forestières 490 4.1 Les règles générales de protection des forêts 490 4.2 La protection des forêts liée à leur exploitation 491 4.3 Les modes d’exploitation du patrimoine forestier 494 4.4 La gestion participative comme moyen de conservation et de protection des forêts 496 5 La répression des infractions à la législation forestière 498 5.1 La nature des infractions 498 5.2 Les sanctions encourues 498 6 Conclusion 500 CONTENTS / CONTENU 18 CHAPITRE 22 : LA PROTECTION DE LA FAUNE EN DROIT CAMEROUNAIS 502 François Narcisse DJAME 1 Introduction 502 2 Le constat de l’existant : l’affirmation de la protection de la faune par le droit positif 504 2.1 Le cadre légal et réglementaire de protection de la faune sauvage 504 2.2 L’action du juge dans la protection de la faune 510 3 Le constat des carences et le nécessaire renforcement des mesures de protection de la faune 512 3.1 La carence des mesures de protection de la faune 512 3.2 Les propositions d’amélioration de la protection de la faune 515 CHAPTER 23: BIOSAFETY LAW AND POLICY IN CAMEROON 518 Augustine B. NJAMNSHI 1 Introduction 518 2 The scope and objectives of the 2003 Biosafety Law 519 3 Basic environmental law principles within the biosafety legal framework 520 3.1 The precautionary principle 520 3.2 The prevention principle 520 4 Institutional framework 521 4.1 The National Competent Administration (NCA) 521 4.2 The National Biosafety Committee 521 5 Procedure for submitting applications 523 5.1 Importation, confined trial, release, placing in the market, transit and or transportation of GMOs 524 5.2 Packaging and labelling of GMO for food 526 5.3 Approval and authorisation 527 5.4 Approval of rDNA pharma products 527 5.5 Conditions to ban activities related to GMOs 528 5.6 Request to revise the decision to ban activities related to GMOs 529 5.7 Socio economic considerations 529 5.8 Transparency, public participation and awareness and right to information 530 5.9 Confidentiality and commercial information 530 6 GMO related liability general environmental liability 531 7 Offences, penalties and settlements 532 8 Concluding remarks 533 CONTENTS / CONTENU 19 SECTION 8: WATER AND FISHERIES / L’EAU ET LA PÊCHE 535 CHAPITRE 24 : LA PROTECTION DES EAUX CÔTIÈRES AU CAMEROUN 537 Marie NGO NONGA 1 Introduction 537 2 L’existence d’un cadre législatif et politique concernant les eaux côtières 539 2.1 Les textes généraux de protection des eaux côtières au Cameroun 539 2.2 Les textes et programmes spécifiques à la zone côtière 542 3 Les organes en charge de la protection des eaux côtières au Cameroun 548 3.1 Les organes à compétences générales 548 3.2 Les organismes spécifiques de protection des eaux côtières 551 4 Conclusion 556 CHAPITRE 25 : L’ENCADREMENT JURIDIQUE DES ACTIVITÉS DE PÊCHE AU CAMEROUN 558 Georges Francis MBACK TINA 1 Introduction 558 2 Les dispositifs régulateurs de l’exploitation durable des ressources halieutiques 559 2.1 Les dispositifs normatifs du secteur halieutique 559 2.2 Les institutions de gestion durable des ressources halieutiques au Cameroun 565 3 La mise en œuvre du dispositif régulateur des ressources halieutiques 569 3.1 Les programmes de gestion durable 569 3.2 Une gestion durable perfectible 572 SECTION 9: MINING AND ENERGY / L’EXPLOITATION MINIÈRE ET L’ÉNERGIE 577 CHAPITRE 26 : LE DROIT MINIER CAMEROUNAIS 579 Michel NYOTH HIOL 1 Introduction 579 2 Le cadre juridique d’exercice de l’activité minière au Cameroun 580 CONTENTS / CONTENU 20 2.1 Une diversification des substances relevant de l’exploitation minière au Cameroun 580 2.2 L’obligation d’obtenir un titre administratif 582 2.3 Les modalités de délivrance du titre minier 585 3 Les régimes juridiques d’exploitation des ressources minières et la gestion du contentieux 587 3.1 Une diversification des régimes juridiques d’exploitation des ressources minières 588 3.2 La gestion du contentieux minier 589 4 Conclusion 595 CHAPITRE 27 : LES COMPENSATIONS ENVIRONNEMENTALES FACE AU DÉVELOPPEMENT DE L’INDUSTRIE EXTRACTIVE AU CAMEROUN 597 Edwige JOUNDA 1 Introduction 597 2 Les compensations environnementales : un outil de réparation de l’impact des industries extractives sur l’environnement 600 2.1 Un échec observé dans le cadre du projet pipeline Tchad-Cameroun 600 2.2 Les mesures compensatoires prévues dans le cadre du projet de fer de Mbalam 601 3 Les compensations environnementales sont un outil perfectible 603 4 La compensation de la biodiversité dans la législation camerounaise : un cadre limité 604 4.1 Du fait du manque d’espace 606 4.2 Manque de moyens financiers des investisseurs 607 4.3 Les risques sociaux 607 5 Conclusion 608 CHAPITRE 28 : LE DROIT CAMEROUNAIS DE L’ÉNERGIE 610 Michel NYOTH HIOL 1 Introduction 610 2 Le régime juridique d’accès à l’exploitation énergétique 611 2.1 L’identification des conditions d’accès à l’exploitation énergétique 611 2.2 Les conditions liées au régime d’exploitation énergique 614 2.3 La prééminence du régime de concession 614 3 L’unicité des règles juridiques aménageant la gestion du contentieux 620 3.1 L’identification des poches de conflits 620 CONTENTS / CONTENU 21 3.2 Le maintien des procédés de droit commun de résolution des litiges 623 4 Conclusion 625 CHAPTER 29: THE STATE OF ELECTRICITY PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION IN CAMEROON 627 Durando NDONGSOK & Oliver C. RUPPEL 1 Introduction 627 2 The energy mix of Cameroon 628 3 Access to electricity and the electricity mix of Cameroon 628 4 The untapped electricity potential of Cameroon 629 5 Institutional set up to facilitate access to electricity 630 6 Country orientation towards electricity access 631 7 Existing legal framework 632 8 Making energy available and affordable to the majority of Cameroonians 633 9 Investment 634 10 Cameroon as energy exporter to neighbouring countries 635 11 The time for standalone solar systems 635 CHAPITRE 30 : LES ÉNERGIES RENOUVELABLES DANS LE CHAMP POLITIQUE ET LEGAL DE L’ÉNERGIE AU CAMEROUN 637 Robert MBIAKE, M.J. Carolle ATONTSA epse NDEMÉFO & Jean Marcial BELL 1 Introduction 637 2 Politique énergétique 637 2.1 Énergies polluantes 638 2.2 Énergies propres 638 3 Présentation du Cameroun 640 3.1 Position géographique du Cameroun 640 3.2 Potentiels en énergies renouvelables 641 4 La quintessence d’une politique sur les énergies renouvelables 649 4.1 Les énergies renouvelables dans la vision d’émergence à l’horizon 2035 649 4.2 Les énergies renouvelables dans le Document de stratégie pour la croissance et l’emploie 650 4.3 L’articulation des énergies renouvelables dans les politiques sectorielles 650 5 Le cadre d’implémentation de la politique des énergies renouvelables 652 5.1 Le cadre juridique 653 5.2 Le cadre institutionnel 657 CONTENTS / CONTENU 22 5.3 Les entraves à l’essor du cadre légal des énergies renouvelables au Cameroun et les solutions envisageables 661 6 Conclusion 664 SECTION 10: CLIMATE CHANGE / CHANGEMENT CLIMATIQUE 667 CHAPTER 31: ASPECTS OF INTERNATIONAL CLIMATE CHANGE LAW AND POLICY FROM AN AFRICAN PERSPECTIVE 669 Oliver C. RUPPEL 1 Introduction 669 2 Why is Africa particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change? 670 3 The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 673 3.1 The IPCC’s main findings for Africa 674 3.2 Impacts of climate change in Africa 676 3.3 Future risks 677 4 Opportunities for effective action to reduce the risks associated to climate change 679 5 International legal mechanisms to address climate change 679 6 The UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and its protocols 680 7 Africa in the international climate negotiations 684 CHAPITRE 32 : SITUATION DES CHANGEMENTS CLIMATIQUES AU CAMEROUN – LES ÉLÉMENTS SCIENTIFIQUES, INCIDENCES, ADAPTATION ET VULNERABILITÉ 687 Joseph Armathé AMOUGOU 1 Introduction 687 2 Quelques traits caractéristiques des zones agro écologiques du Cameroun 688 3 Évolution de la pluviométrie dans les cinq ZAEs du Cameroun 688 3.1 Évolution de la pluviométrie à Maroua dans la zone Soudano-sahélienne 688 3.2 Évolution de la pluviométrie à Ngaoundéré en la zone de hautes savanes guinéennes du Cameroun 690 3.3 Évolution de la pluviométrie à Yaoundé en la zone de forêt à pluviométrie bimodale 691 3.4 Évolution de la pluviométrie à Bafoussam dans la zone des hautes terres du Cameroun de 1960 à 2010 693 CONTENTS / CONTENU 23 3.5 Évolution de la pluviométrie à Douala en la zone côtière et littorale du Cameroun 694 4 Détection des périodes anormalement sèches ou anormalement humides et typologie des précipitations dans les cinq zones agro écologiques 696 4.1 Périodes anormalement sèches ou anormalement humides 696 4.2 Typologie des régimes pluviométriques dans les cinq zones agro écologiques du Cameroun 697 5 Les émissions des GES au Cameroun 701 6 Vulnérabilité et impacts des changements climatiques dans les secteurs de développement au Cameroun 704 7 Les actions du Cameroun pour lutter contre les changements climatiques 706 7.1 Actions menées dans le domaine de l’atténuation des GES au Cameroun 706 7.2 Actions prévues dans le domaine de l’adaptation au Cameroun 709 8 Conclusion 710 CHAPITRE 33 : LE CADRE JURIDIQUE DU CHANGEMENT CLIMATIQUE AU CAMEROUN 713 Joseph Armathé AMOUGOU, Patrick Mbomba FORGHAB & Oliver C. RUPPEL 1 Introduction 713 2 Les dispositifs politique, juridique et institutionnel au niveau international 714 3 Les dispositifs politique, juridique et institutionnel au niveau africain 716 4 Les dispositifs politique, juridique et institutionnel au niveau régional de l’Afrique centrale 717 5 Le cadre politique de la lutte contre les changements climatiques au Cameroun 719 5.1 Les communications nationales sur les changements climatiques 719 5.2 Le Plan national d’adaptation aux changements climatiques (PNACC) 720 5.3 La stratégie nationale REDD+ 720 5.4 La Contribution prévue déterminée au niveau national (CPDN) 721 5.5 Le Cadre national pour les services climatiques (CNSC) 721 CONTENTS / CONTENU 24 5.6 Le Ministère de l’environnement protection de la nature et développement durable (MINEPDED) via l’Observatoire national sur les changements climatiques (ONACC) 722 5.7 Le cadre juridique de collecte et de gestion de l’information météorologique et climatologique 723 5.8 Le cadre juridique large de la lutte contre le changement climatique 724 5.9 La législation nationale en lien aux changements climatiques du Cameroun 727 5.10 Les engagements au titre de la fourniture de l’information climatique 727 5.11 Les engagements au titre de la réduction des émissions de GES 728 5.12 Les engagements au titre de l’adaptation au changement climatique 728 5.13 Les engagements au titre de la coopération internationale et nationale sur les changements climatiques 728 5.14 Les engagements au titre du financement de la lutte contre le changement climatique 729 5.15 Les engagements au titre de l’amélioration de la gouvernance climatique nationale 729 CHAPITRE 34 : DROIT DES RESSOURCES NATURELLES ET EFFICACITÉ CLIMATIQUE AU CAMEROUN 731 Samuel NGUIFFO 1 Introduction 731 2 Un droit peu sensible aux impératifs climatiques 733 2.1 Le régime de la gestion des ressources naturelles est globalement favorable aux émissions de gaz à effet de serre 733 2.2 Le régime de la propriété des forêts par les personnes privées encourage les émissions de gaz à effet de serre 739 3 Pistes pour une réforme climato-compatible du droit des ressources naturelles 742 3.1 Réformer le régime de la propriété des espaces 742 3.2 Imposer des règles nouvelles de gestion des espaces et des ressources 744 4 Conclusion 747 CONTENTS / CONTENU 25 CHAPITRE 35 : JUSTICE CLIMATIQUE AU CAMEROUN 750 Paul Guy HYOMENI 1 Introduction 750 2 La justice climatique : un concept en pleine évolution à l’échelle mondiale 750 3 Le Cameroun et la justice climatique 755 3.1 Responsabilités en matière d’émission des GES 756 3.2 Dispositif national en matière de justice climatique 756 4 Conclusion et recommandations 764 SECTION 11: TRADE AND THE ENVIRONMENT / COMMERCE ET ENVIRONNEMENT 769 CHAPTER 36: INTERNATIONAL TRADE, ENVIRONMENT AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 771 Oliver C. RUPPEL 1 Introducing the international trade, environment and development debate 771 1.1 The trade perspective 771 1.2 The environmental perspective 772 1.3 The development perspective 772 1.4 Sustainable development: the answer to the dilemma? 772 1.5 The role of trade for sustainable development and the reduction of poverty in Africa 775 2 The WTO and the North-South Divide 778 3 The WTO and the environment 781 4 The Committee on Trade and Environment 783 5 The 2001 Doha Declaration and the environment 785 6 WTO Agreements and their environmentally relevant provisions 786 6.1 The General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) 786 6.2 The General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) 787 6.3 The Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) 788 6.4 The Agreement on Sanitary and Phyto-sanitary Measures (SPS) 788 6.5 The Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) 789 6.6 The Agreement on Subsidies and Countervailing Measures (SCM) 790 6.7 The Agreement on Agriculture 790 6.8 The Environmental Goods Agreement (EGA) 790 CONTENTS / CONTENU 26 7 The WTO’s Dispute Settlement Body (DSB) 791 8 Selected environmental case references 793 8.1 United States – Canadian Tuna (1982) 793 8.2 Canada – Salmon and Herring (1988) 793 8.3 United States – Tuna (Mexico) (1991, not adopted) 794 8.4 United States – Gasoline (1996) 795 8.5 Chile – Swordfish (WTO/ITLOS, 2000) 795 8.6 United States – Shrimp: Initial Phase (1998) 797 8.7 United States – Shrimp: Implementation Phase (2001) 797 8.8 Brazil – Measures Affecting Imports of Re-treaded Tyres (2007) 799 8.9 China – Measures related to the exportation of various raw materials 800 8.10 China – Measures related to the exportation of rare earths, Tungsten and Molybdenum 802 9 Multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs) 803 10 Cameroon’s global and regional trade ties 805 11 Concluding remarks 809 CHAPITRE 37 : DROIT ET POLITIQUE DU COMMERCE AU CAMEROUN ET PROTECTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 814 Emma Marie Solange NGONDJE SONGUE 1 Introduction 814 2 Législations régissant les activités commerciales à incidence environnementale 816 2.1 Présentation des politiques de protection de l’environnement en matière commerciale 816 2.2 Le conflit entre activité commerciale et protection de l’environnement 826 3 Règlement des conflits nés de la prise en compte de la protection de l’environnement en matière commerciale 830 3.1 Étude critique du système de règlement des conflits portant sur la protection de l’environnement en matière commerciale 830 3.2 Recommandations relativement à la protection de l’environnement dans le domaine commercial 834 4 Conclusion 835 CONTENTS / CONTENU 27 SECTION 12: HUMAN RIGHTS, JUSTICE AND THE ENVIRONMENT / DROITS DE L’HOMME, JUSTICE ET L’ENVIRONNEMENT 837 CHAPITRE 38 : ENVIRONNEMENT ET DROITS DE L’HOMME AU CAMEROUN 839 Frédéric FOKA TAFFO 1 Introduction 839 2 Le cadre juridique du droit à un environnement sain 840 2.1 La garantie au plan national du droit à un environnement sain 840 2.2 La protection internationale du droit à un environnement sain 841 2.3 Les exigences internationales de l’État au titre du droit à un environnement sain 843 2.4 Les titulaires et débiteurs du droit à un environnement sain 843 2.5 Le devoir de mener une étude d’impact préalable 845 3 Droit à un environnement sain et indivisibilité des droits de l’homme 847 3.1 Le droit à la santé 847 3.2 Le droit aux loisirs et aux espaces verts 848 3.3 Les autres droits économiques et sociaux 849 3.4 Le droit à la vie et au respect de la dignité humaine 851 3.5 Le droit à l’information et le droit à la participation 852 3.6 Le droit de recours et à la réparation 854 4 Environnement et protection spécifique des populations autochtones 855 4.1 Droit de propriété sur les terres 856 4.2 Droit à une protection spécifique et droits d’usage 858 4.3 Droits culturels 860 5 Conclusion 861 CHAPTER 39: CONSERVATION OF BUFFER ZONES, HUMAN RIGHTS AND THE ENVIRONMENT UNDER CAMEROONIAN LAW 863 Christopher F. TAMASANG & Kaspa K. NYONGKAA 1 Introduction 863 2 The conception of conservation buffer zones 869 2.1 The evolution of the buffer zone paradigm 871 2.2 The establishment of conservation buffer zones: legal and administrative procedures in Cameroon 874 2.3 Approaches to the management of buffer zones 877 CONTENTS / CONTENU 28 3 The conceptualisation of conservation buffer zones in environmental legal frameworks 879 3.1 Scrutiny of international policies and legal framework 879 3.2 National policies and buffer zones management 883 4 Benefits of conservation buffer zones 885 4.1 Buffer zones: a new approach to conservation 886 4.2 A kinder, gentler conservation approach 886 4.3 Participatory integrated conservation and development projects 887 5 Challenges of buffer zone management and impacts on the enjoyment of human rights 888 5.1 The challenge of articulating customary land right 888 5.2 Overwhelming State power versus local community(ies) rights 889 6 Concluding remarks and moving forward 890 CHAPITRE 40 : LES LITIGES ENVIRONNEMENTAUX DEVANT LES JURIDICTIONS CAMEROUNAISES 894 Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO & Eric KOUA 1 Introduction 894 2 Le contentieux de l’environnement devant le juge administratif 894 2.1 Le sursis à exécution 895 2.2 Le recours pour excès de pouvoir 895 3 Les litiges relatifs à l’environnement devant le juge judiciaire camerounais 898 3.1 Les matières récurrentes 899 3.2 Les protagonistes au procès en matière environnementale devant le juge judiciaire 901 4 Conclusion 910 SECTION 13: CUSTOMARY LAW AND THE ENVIRONMENT / LE DROIT COUTUMIER ET L’ENVIRONNEMENT 911 CHAPTER 41: THE SIGNIFICANCE OF CUSTOMARY LAW FOR ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION IN CAMEROON 913 Andreas KAHLER 1 Introduction 913 2 Customary law in Cameroon 914 3 Revival of customary law? 921 CONTENTS / CONTENU 29 4 Customary law and the environment 922 4.1 Environmental law and customary rules 923 4.2 Environmental aspects of customary law: taking communities’ rights serious 925 5 Outlook 930 CHAPTER 42: REDD+ IMPLEMENTATION IN CAMEROON’S ENVIRONMENTAL LAW: THE ROLE OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES AND LOCAL COMMUNITIES 934 Christopher F. TAMASANG & Gideon NGWOME FOSOH 1 Introduction and background 934 2 The legal framework for IPLCs’ participation in REDD+ implementation in Cameroon: opportunities and challenges 937 2.1 International legal framework for IPLCs’ participation in REDD+ implementation 938 2.2 Opportunities and challenges for IPLCs’ participation in REDD+ impleme ntation under domestic law: experiences from Cameroon 941 2.3 Access to information, decision-making and participation 951 3 Enhancing the participation of IPLCs in REDD+ activities 953 4 Activities and levels of IPLCs’ participation in REDD+ implementation 954 5 Enabling institutional and governance environment for IPLCs’ participation 955 6 Conclusions and recommendations 955 6.1 Conclusions 955 6.2 Recommendations 956 31 FOREWORD It is with great pleasure that I write a foreword to the first edition of Environmental Law and Policy in Cameroon – Towards Making Africa the Tree of Life. I commend the legal and transdisciplinary depth of the work and its expected positive impact it is to enfold on our beautiful country, Cameroon. This impressive book offers a multifaceted insight into environmental law and policy in Cameroon. It does this by taking stock of existing legal frameworks and Cameroon’s environmental commitment at both the local, national, regional, continental and international levels. It is highly commendable that the editorial team and the authors of this book have eloquently managed to give an overview of sectoral and cross-sectoral legislation and policies relating to environmental concerns. The publication puts environmental law into a broader context of current and future societal needs, economic and social developments. The focus of the publication is on Cameroon. It is, however, notable that the book also puts a strong emphasis on international law and the multi-faceted African legal structure and its particularities, making the publication also highly relevant to Cameroon’s neighbours in Central and West Africa. I have noticed with great respect, that the publication is fully adaptive to Cameroon’s bilingual language policy as it equally accommodates English and French chapters. The bilingual language policy in Cameroon is founded by the Constitution and the government strongly encourages bilingual publications such as this one, which equally fosters both our official languages. In light of the above, I wish to cordially thank Professor Oliver Ruppel of the Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung and all who have contributed to the first edition of this book. The publication is another successful example of German-Cameroonian development cooperation. It will be a valuable source of information and guidance for lawyers, judges, policymakers, students and all those members of the public interested in environmental law and policy in Cameroon. H.E. Hélé Pierre Minister of the Environment, Nature Protection and Sustainable Development of Cameroon Yaoundé, June 2018 33 AVANT-PROPOS C’est avec grand plaisir que j’écris cet avant-propos de cette première édition de Droit et Politique de l’Environnement au Cameroun – Afin de faire de l’Afrique l’arbre de vie. Je salue la profondeur juridique et transdisciplinaire du travail et son impact positif attendu sur notre beau pays, le Cameroun. Cet impressionnant ouvrage offre une vision multifacette du droit et de la politique de l’environnement au Cameroun. Il fait le bilan des cadres juridiques existants et de l’engagement du Cameroun aux niveaux local, national, régional, continental et international dans le domaine de l’environnement. Il est hautement louable que l’équipe éditoriale et les auteurs de ce livre aient réussi à donner un aperçu éloquent de la législation et des politiques sectorielles et intersectorielles relatives aux préoccupations environnementales. Cette publication place le droit de l’environnement dans un contexte plus large de besoins sociétaux actuels et futurs, puis de développements économiques et sociaux. Cette publication est centrée sur le Cameroun, mais il convient de noter qu’elle met également fortement l’accent sur le droit international et la structure juridique africaine aux multiples facettes et ses particularités, la rendant ainsi très pertinente pour les États voisins du Cameroun en Afrique centrale et de l’Ouest. J’ai noté avec beaucoup de respect que cette publication s’adapte pleinement à la politique linguistique bilingue du Cameroun, car elle intègre aisément des chapitres en anglais et en français. La politique linguistique bilingue au Cameroun est fondée sur la Constitution et le gouvernement encourage fortement des publications bilingues comme celle-ci, qui favorisent équitablement nos deux langues officielles. À la lumière de ce qui précède, je remercie cordialement le Professeur Oliver Ruppel de la Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung et tous ceux qui ont contribué à la première édition de ce livre. Cette publication est un autre exemple de réussite de la coopération au développement entre l’Allemagne et le Cameroun. Ce sera une source précieuse d’informations et d’inspirations pour les avocats, les juges, les décideurs, les étudiants et tous le public intéressé par le droit et la politique de l’environnement au Cameroun. S.E. Hélé Pierre Ministre de l’Environnement, de la Protection de la Nature et du Développement Durable du Cameroun Yaoundé, Juin 2018 35 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS A multi-authored publication such as this one is an enormous team effort. Therefore, our special thanks go to all the distinguished contributors. We are very grateful to the Climate Policy and Energy Security Programme for Sub-Saharan Africa (CLESAP) of the Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung (KAS) which not only made this publication possible through financial means but also provided a platform for discussion and dialogue for those active in the field of environmental law and policy throughout the process of developing the concept for and the realisation of this substantive publication. The objectives of the KAS to promote peace, freedom and justice through civic education at the national, regional and international level and to increase development cooperation have truly been put into practice with this work. Moreover, we would like to also thank the staff-members of the KAS Yaoundé office for their support. It goes to Ms. Maureen Ngale, Ms. Marie-Stella Tchuente and Ms. Carole Teuntchou. Last but not least, we would like to express our sincere gratitude to Dr. Katharina Ruppel-Schlichting who pro bono has accompanied this publication since the very beginnings of its creation in 2016. Without her legal expertise, her valuable experience and her energetic support with regard to both, contents and technical issues, the completion of this book – within the limited time frame available – would certainly not have been possible. The Editors Yaoundé, June 2018 37 REMERCIEMENTS Une publication avec plusieurs auteurs comme celle-ci est un énorme travail d’équipe. Par conséquent, nos remerciements distingués vont à tous les contributeurs. Nous sommes très reconnaissants au Programme sur la Politique Climatique et la Sécurité Energétique pour l’Afrique Subsaharienne (CLESAP) de la Konrad- Adenauer-Stiftung (KAS), qui a non seulement rendu cette publication possible par des moyens financiers mais qui a aussi facilité une plate-forme de discussion et de dialogue entre les parties prenantes dans le domaine du Droit et de la Politique de l’Environnement tout au long du processus de développement du concept et de la réalisation de cette publication substantielle. Les objectifs de la KAS de promouvoir la paix, la liberté et la justice à travers l’éducation civique aux niveaux national, régional et international et aussi d’intensifier la coopération au développement ont vraiment été mis en pratique avec ce travail. De plus, nous voudrions également remercier le personnel du bureau de KAS Yaoundé pour leur soutien. Ces remerciements s’adressent à Mme Maureen Ngale, à Mme Marie-Stella Tchuente et à Mme Carole Teuntchou. Enfin, nous tenons à exprimer notre sincère gratitude à Dr. Katharina Ruppel- Schlichting qui a bénévolement accompagné ce projet depuis son lancement en 2016. Sans son expertise juridique, son expérience précieuse et son soutien énergique en ce qui concerne à la fois le contenu et les problèmes techniques, la finalisation de ce livre – dans le délai limité accordé – n’aurait certainement pas été possible. Les Editeurs Yaoundé, Juin 2018 39 ABOUT THE AUTHORS / À PROPOS DES AUTEURS Prof. Dr. Joseph Armathé AMOUGOU est le Directeur de l’Observatoire national sur les changements climatiques (ONACC) de la République du Cameroun. Sylvain N. ATANGA is a Ph.D Candidate and Graduate Teaching Assistant in the Faculty of Laws and Political Science at the University of Yaoundé II, Cameroon. Dr. Marie Jeanne Carolle ATONTSA epse NDEMEFO est enseignant-chercheur et était le point focal changement climatique près le Réseau des parlementaires panafricains sur les changements climatiques de 2012 à 2017. Marie-Madeleine BASSALANG est juriste et consultante en gestion de l’environnement. Dr. Jean Marcial BELL est le Directeur de la formation à l’Agence pour la professionnalisation des universites, institutions et structures (APPUIS), Yaoundé, Cameroun. Ancien Directeur du Centre d’excellence pour la gouvernance des industries extractives en Afriqie francophone (CEGIEAF), Université catholique de l’Afrique centrale (UCAC), Yaoundé, Cameroun. Dr. Jean-Marie Vianney BENDEGUE est Inspecteur Général au Ministère des Domaines, du Cadastre et des Affaires Foncières du Cameroun. Dr. François Narcisse DJAME est Chargé de cours au département de droit public à l’Université de Douala. Dr. Frédéric FOKA TAFFO est consultant et enseignant-chercheur en droit international, Directeur exécutif du Centre de recherche A PRIORI, un centre de recherche spécialisé en droits de l’homme, environnement et sécurité humaine et en entrepreneuriat, management des projets et innovation basé à Yaoundé, Cameroun. Adele FONI FOUTH KINIE est enseignante associée à l’ Université catholique d’Afrique centrale (UCAC) et consultante à l’Agence pour la professionnalisation des universites, institutions et structures (APPUIS). Patrick Mbomba FORGHAB is the Deputy Director of the National Observatory on Climate Change and national designated entity on Climate Technology Centre Network for Cameroon. ABOUT THE AUTHORS / À PROPOS DES AUTEURS 40 Justice Prudence GALEGA is a legal expert and Secretary General of the Ministry of Environment, Protection of Nature and Sustainable Development. She is the National Focal Point for Cameroon for the Convention on Biological Diversity. Paul Guy HYOMENI titulaire master 2 en droits de l’homme et État de droit, Université de Yaoundé II. Edwige JOUNDA est juriste, diplômée en gestion de l’environnement de l’Université Senghor de l’Alexandrie. Andreas KAHLER holds an M.A. degree in social sciences from the Free University Berlin and is a technical adviser and freelance consultant with focus on governance and sustainable development cooperation in Africa. Since 2012 he has especially worked in all regions of Cameroon. Prof. Dr. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO est Maître de conférences en droit public à l’Université de Douala et professeur associé à la Faculté de droit de l’Université Laval au Canada et à l’École nationale d’administration et de magistrature (ENAM) au Cameroun. Il est un des Review Editors du sixième Rapport mondial sur l’environnement (GEO6) à ONU environnement (ancien PNUE) et Consultant en droit et politique de l’environnement auprès de plusieurs institutions internationales. Eric KOUA est Magistrat en service à la Cour d’appel de Bafoussam, Cameroun. Dr. Georges Francis MBACK TINA est Moniteur au Département de droit public et science politique de l’Université de Ngaoundéré, Cameroun. Il s’intéresse particulièrement aux enjeux environnementaux et à la gestion des ressources naturelles. Dr. Robert MBIAKE is Co-ordinator of the Pluri-disciplinary Research team on Climate Change and former Head Master of Research and Information at CE- PAMOQ (Centre de physique atomique moléculaire et optique quantique) at the University of Douala, Cameroon. Paule Jessie NANFAH est diplomate et poursuit ses recherches en droit international de l’environnement. Durando NDONGSOK is an expert in climate finance and low emission development strategies. He has experience in several African countries and is Co-founder and Managing Director of S2 Services, Douala, Cameroun. Dr. Joseph Magloire NGANG est Chargé de cours en droit public à l’Université de Yaoundé II, Cameroun. ABOUT THE AUTHORS / À PROPOS DES AUTEURS 41 Emma Marie Solange NGONDJE SONGUE est Assistante au département de droit public à la Faculté des sciences juridiques et politiques à l’Université de Douala, Cameroun. Dr. Marie NGO NONGA est Chargée de cours au Département de droit privé à l’Université de Yaoundé II, Cameroun. Samuel NGUIFFO est juriste et dirige le Centre pour l’environnement et le developpement (CED), une organisation active en l’Afrique centrale. Gideon NGWOME FOSOH is a Graduate Teaching Assistant and a Ph.D Candidate in the Faculty of Laws and Political Science, University of Yaoundé II, Cameroon. Augustine B. NJAMNSHI is the Executive Secretary of the Bioresources Development and Conservation Program - Cameroon (BDCP-C) and Chair of the Cameroon Climate Change Working Group. His areas of expertise include environmental law and governance, climate justice and environmental politics. Kaspa K. NYONGKAA is a Graduate Teaching Assistant and a Ph.D Candidate in the Faculty of Laws and Political Science, University of Yaoundé II, Cameroon. Dr. Michel NYOTH HIOL est consultant international sur l’exploitation des ressources naturelles en Afrique centrale. Il est également enseignant en freelance dans les cycles de Masters professionels au Departement de droit des affaires à l’Université de Douala, Cameroun. Daniel Armel OWONA MBARGA est Master en droits de l’homme et action humanitaire à l’Université catholique d’Afrique centrale (UCAC), Yaoundé, Cameroun. Prof. Dr. Oliver C. RUPPEL is the Founding Director of the Climate Policy and Energy Security Programme for sub-Saharan Africa (CLESAP), Konrad-Adenauer- Stiftung, Yaounde, Cameroon. Ordinarily, he is a Professor of public, commercial and international law at Stellenbosch University, South Africa, where he also serves as the Director of the Development and Rule of Law Programme (DROP). He is a Distinguished Fellow at the Fraunhofer Center for International Management and Knowledge Economy (IMW), Leipzig, Germany; and Professor Extraordinaire at the University of Central Africa (UCAC), Yaounde, Cameroon; Strathmore Law School, Nairobi, Kenya; and the European Faculty of Law, Nova University, Slovenia. Dr. Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING is an attorney and freelance legal consultant for international law and policy. ABOUT THE AUTHORS / À PROPOS DES AUTEURS 42 Prof. Dr. Christopher F. TAMASANG holds a Ph.D in environmental law and is Associate Professor of Law, Faculty of Laws and Political Science at the University of Yaoundé II, Cameroon, Vice-Dean in charge of research and cooperation, coordination of research programs in english law, Coordinating Lead Author and co-editor of a book on the national assessment of biodiversity and ecosystem servies; senior international legal consultant for United Nations’ organisations and other international institutions. Prof. Dr. Jean-Marie TCHAKOUA est Agrégé des Facultés de droit et Professeur titulaire à l’Université de Yaoundé II, Cameroun. Andre Felix Martial TCHOFFO is a Graduate Teaching Assistant and a Ph.D Candidate in the Faculty of Laws and Political Science, University of Yaoundé II, Cameroon. He is also a Lead Author of a book on the national assessment of biodiversity and ecosystem services. 43 ABBREVIATIONS / ABRÉVIATIONS ADIE Agence intergouvernementale pour le développement de l’information environnementale AEC African Economic Community AFLEG Africa Forest Law Enforcement and Governance AMCEN African Ministerial Conference on the Environment ANAFOR Agence nationale de développement des forêts ANOR Agence des normes et de la qualité ANRP Agence nationale de radio protection APA Stratégie nationale sur l’accès aux ressources génétiques et le partage juste et équitable des avantages découlant de leur utilisation AU African Union BAD Banque africaine de développement BCSAP Brigade de contrôle et de surveillance des activités de pêche BDEAC Development Bank of Central African States CAPEF Chambre d’agriculture, des pêches, de l’élevage et des forêts du Cameroun CAPP Central African Power Pool CBD Convention on Biological Diversity CDB Convention sur la diversite biologique CCIMA Chambre de commerce, d’industrie, des mines et de l’artisanat CCM Climate change mitigation CCNUCC Convention cadre des Nations unies sur le changement climatique CDM Clean Development Mechanism CDPM Caisse de développement de la pêche maritime CEBEVIRHA Commission économique du bétail, de la viande et des ressources halieutiques CEC Certificate of environmental conformity CEEAC Communauté économique des États de l’Afrique centrale CEFDHAC Conférence sur les écosystèmes des forêts denses et humides d’Afrique centrale CEMAC Communauté économique et monétaire de l’Afrique centrale CER Communautés économiques régionales CERECOMA Centre spécialisé de recherche sur les ecosystèmes marins CF Community forestry CHG Community hunting ground CHM Clearing-House Mechanism ABBREVIATIONS / ABRÉVIATIONS 44 CICOS Commission internationale du Bassin Congo-Oubangui-Sangha CIESPAC Centre inter-État d’enseignement supérieur en santé publique d’Afrique centrale CIJ Cour internationale de justice CITES Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora CMAE Conseil des ministres africains de l’environnement CMPO Comité ministériel de pilotage et d’orientation CMS Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals CMSC Cadre mondial pour les services climatiques CN-MDP Comité national pour le mécanisme de développement propre CNPC Conseil national de protection civile CNSP Corps national des sapeurs-pompiers CNUED Conférence des Nations unies sur l’environnement et le développement COBAC Central African Banking Commission COMIFAC Commission des forêts d’Afrique centrale COREP Commission de pêche du golfe de Guinée CPAC Comité d’homologation des pesticides d’Afrique centrale CPAC Comité inter-État des pesticides d’Afrique centrale CPF Comités paysans forêts CPSP Comité de pilotage et de suivi des pipelines CRE Conseil régional de l’eau CRGRE Centre régional de coordination et de gestion des ressources en eau CTS Comité technique de suivi DERME Direction des énergies renouvelables et de la maitrise des énergies DFNP Domaine forestier non permanent DFP Domaine forestier permanent DMN Direction de la météorologie nationale DPA Direction des pêches et de l’aquaculture DSCE Document de stratégie pour la croissance et l’emploi DSDSR Document de strategie du developpement du secteur rural DSRP Document de stratégie de réduction de la pauvreté ECCAS Economic community of central African states EIA Environmental impacts assessment EIES Études d’impact environnemental EIF Enhanced integrated framework EIS Environmental impact statement EMP Environmental management plan ESIA Environmental and social impact assessment ABBREVIATIONS / ABRÉVIATIONS 45 ESMP Environmental and social management plan FAO Organisation des Nations unies pour l’agriculture et l’alimentation FCPF Forest Carbon Partnership Facility FEDEV Foundation for Environment and Development FEM Fonds pour l’environnement mondial FEVAC Fonds pour l’économie verte en Afrique centrale FMU Forest management unit GFC Green Climate Fund GICAM Groupement inter-patronal du Cameroun GIEC Groupe d’experts intergouvernemental sur l’évolution du climat GIEC Groupe intergouvernemental sur l’evolution du climat GIZ Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit GMOs Genetically modified organisms GRFA Genetic resources for food and agriculture HYSACAM Société hygiène et salubrité du Cameroun ICDP Integrated conservation and development projects ICJ International Court of Justice ICSID International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes IEL International environmental law IPLCs Indigenous peoples and local communities depending on the forest IPP Independent power producer ITLOS International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea ITTA International Tropical Timber Agreement MAETUR Mission d’aménagement des terrains urbains et ruraux MAGZI Mission d’aménagement et de gestion des zones industrielles MDP Mécanisme de développement propre MEA Multilateral environmental agreement MIDEPECAM Mission de développement de la pêche au Cameroun MIGA Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency MINCOMERCE Ministry of Commerce MINDAF Ministère des domaines et des affaires foncières MINEE Ministry of Water Resources and Energy MINEF Ministère de l’environnement et des forêts MINEPDED Ministère de l’environnement, de la protection de la nature et du developpement durable MINEPIA Ministère de l’élevage, des pêches et des industries animales MINESUP Ministry of Higher Education MINFOF Ministère des forêts et de la faune MINHDU Ministère de l’habitat et du développement urbain MINIMDIT Ministère de l’industrie, des mines, et du développement technologique ABBREVIATIONS / ABRÉVIATIONS 46 MINPROFF Ministry of Women’s Empowerment and the Family MINRESI Ministry of Scientific Research and Innovation NCA National Competent Authority NEMP II National Environmental Management Plan as revised NEPAD Nouveau partenariat pour le développement de l’Afrique NFAP National Forestry Action Programme NGO Non-governmental organisation NPFE Non-permanent forest estate OAB Organisation africaine du bois OAPI African Intellectual Property Organization OAU Organization of African Unity OCEAC Organisation de coordination pour la lutte contre les endémies en Afrique centrale OCFSA Organisation pour la conservation de la faune sauvage en Afrique OCHA Office de coordination des affaires humanitaires ODD Objectifs pour le développement durable OGM Organismes génétiquement modifiés OHADA Organisation pour l’harmonisation en Afrique du droit des affaires OIE Office internationale des épizooties OIPC Organisation internationale de la protection civile OMC Organisation mondiale du commerce OMD Objectifs du millénaire pour le développement OMM Organisation mondiale de la météorologie OMS Organisation mondiale de la santé OMT Organisation mondiale du tourisme ONACC Observatoire national sur les changements climatiques ONUDI Organisation des Nations unies pour le développement industriel PACEBCo Programme d’appui à la conservation des ecosystèmes du Bassin du Congo PADEVAC Programme d’appui au développement de l’économie verte en Afrique centrale PAE NEPAD Plan d’actions environnementales du NEPAD PANERP Poverty Reduction Energy Plan PANGIRE Plan d’action nationale de gestion integree des ressources en eau PANGIRE Plan national de gestion intégrée des ressources en eau PARGIRE-AC Plan d’action régional de la gestion intégrée des ressources en eau de l’Afrique centrale PDSE Electricity Sector Development Plan PDSE 2030 Plan de développement du secteur electrique du Cameroun à l’horizon 2030 PEAC Pool énergétique de l’Afrique centrale ABBREVIATIONS / ABRÉVIATIONS 47 PES Payment for environmental services PFE Permanent forest estate PMEDP Programme pour des moyens d’existence durables dans la pêche PNACC Plan national d’adaptation aux changements climatiques PNERP Plan national énergie pour de réduction de la pauvreté PNGE Plan national de gestion de l’environnement PNLDAH Plan national de lutte contre les déversements accidentels d’hydrocarbures PNUD Programme des Nations unies pour le développement PNUE Programme des Nations unies pour l’environnement PPAs power purchase agreements PRASAC Pôle régional de recherche appliquée des savanes d’Afrique centrale PSFE Programme sectoriel forêt et environnement RAPAC Réseau des aires protégées d’Afrique centrale RCD Revue Camerounaise de Droit REACEV Réseau des entreprises d’Afrique centrale sur l’économie verte ReCTrad Central African Network of Traditional Rulers for the Conservation of Biodiversity and the Sustainable Management of Forest Ecosystems within the Congo Basin REFADD Réseau des femmes africaines pour le développement durable REJEFAC Réseau des jeunes pour les forêts d’Afrique centrale REPALEAC Réseau des populations autochtones et locales d’Afrique centrale RNIE Réseaux nationaux d’information environnementale ROSECEVAC Réseau des organisations de la société civile de l’économie verte d’Afrique centrale SDGs Sustainable Development Goals SEA Strategic environmental and social assessment SEVAC Système de l’économie verte en Afrique centrale SFI Société financière internationale SNGDES Stratégie nationale sur la gestion durable des eaux et des sols SNH Société nationale d’hydrocarbures SONATREL Société nationale de transport de l’énergie ST-EP Initiative Sustainable Tourism - Eliminating Poverty TJB Tonneaux de jauge brute UA Union africaine UDEAC Union douanière et économique de l’Afrique centrale UEAC Central African Economic Union UFA Unité forestière d’aménagement UICN Union internationale pour la conservation de la nature UMAC Central African Monetary Union ABBREVIATIONS / ABRÉVIATIONS 48 UNCLOS United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea UNGA United Nations General Assembly UNOCA Bureau régional des Nations unies pour l’Afrique centrale VPA Voluntary partnership agreement WTO World Trade Organization ZAEs Zones agro ecologiques ZEE Zone économique exclusive SECTION 1 SETTING THE SCENE MISE EN SCÈNE 51 CHAPTER 1: CAMEROON IN A NUTSHELL – HUMAN AND NATURAL ENVIRONMENT, HISTORICAL OVERVIEW AND LEGAL SETUP Oliver C. RUPPEL & Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 1 Introduction The following passages are meant to serve as an introduction for the reader who may not be familiar with Cameroon, its human and natural environment, as well as the history and the legal setup of the country. As is already indicated by the title “Cameroon in a nutshell”, this chapter most obviously does not claim to be conclusive in any sense. 2 The human environment According to the world population review, Cameroon is a culturally diverse coastal country in Africa, which lies on the western side of Africa on the Eastern Atlantic Ocean. Cameroon is bordered by Chad, Nigeria, the Central African Republic, Gabon, Equatorial Guinea, and the Republic of the Congo. The 2018 population is estimated at 24.68 million.1 This makes Cameroon the 54th most populous country in the world. The country is sparsely populated, however, with just 40 people per square kilometre, which ranks 167th in the world. The urbanisation rate is currently 3.3%; 58% of the country is urbanised and that percentage continues to grow annually. Yaoundé is Cameroon’s capital. It was founded in the latter part of the 19th century by German traders during the ivory industry’s peak. Yaoundé’s population is approximately 2.5 million, which makes it the second-largest city in the country after Douala, which has more than 3 million residents. Douala is said to be the 27th most expensive city on earth, and the most expensive African city.2 ____________________ 1 Cf. http://worldpopulationreview.com/countries/cameroon-population/, accessed 16 April 2018. 2 (ibid.). Oliver C. RUPPEL & Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 52 2.1 Ethnic groups Cameroon is an ethnically diverse country with about 250 groups. Some of the groups are interrelated while others have been assimilated into other groups through years of interaction. These ethnic groups mainly fall under the Bantu, Semitic, and Nilotic language groups. Cameroon’s ethnic community are known to coexist in peace, and no particular group holds any political influence over the affairs of the country. The groups contribute to the country’s cultural diversity.3 The Bamileke is a semi-Bantu community in Cameroon with origins from Egypt. The Bamileke occupy the northwest and western highlands of Cameroon. The ethnic group is composed of other related tribes with whom they share a common ancestry forming the largest group at 38% of the total population. The tribes include Bamum, Tikar and other people of the Western highlands. Languages spoken by the Bamileke include variants of Ghomala, Fe’fe, Yemba, Medumba, and Kwa. Traditionally, their system of government was patriarchal and hereditary. Being a dynamic and entrepreneurial community, the Bamileke can be found in almost all parts of Cameroon and some parts of the world. Since they are a Bantu community, their primary activities revolve around agriculture, an activity which is mainly handled by women. The Beti-Pahuin are a Bantu ethnic community occupying the southern rainforest regions of Cameroon. The Beti-Pahuin share a common origin with the Fang, Njem, Bulu and Baka among others. Though their origins are unclear, it is believed that the Beti-Pahuin people migrated from Sudan. In Cameroon, the group was displaced severally from their locations by the Jihad and Fula who were forcing communities to convert to Islam. During these movements, some of the groups that interacted with the Beti-Pahuin were assimilated. Others, such as the Maka, resisted assimilation and fled south and east. The Beti-Pahuin served as middlemen during the European trade. The Germans exploited them for slave labour, road construction and as sexual prisoners leading to a series of conflict. Due to their involvement in cocoa farming, the Beti-Pahuin have a strong economic influence. As the first inhabitants of the Cameroonian forest, the so-called Pygmies or authentic indigenous inhabitants today constitute a relatively marginalised minority – both socially, economically and politically. The different groups are constituted of the Baka in the East and South regions, the Bakola in the Ocean region, the Bagyeli in the Southwest of Cameroon and the Bedzam in the Central areas of the country. Some of these ethnic minorities are underrepresented in political, administrative and decision-making structures. Pygmy communities have traditionally lived in the forests, conducting hunter-gatherer lifestyles in harmony with their forest environment. ____________________ 3 Sawe (2017). CAMEROON IN A NUTSHELL 53 Many have historically had little interaction with wider society and had a selfsufficient, subsistence livelihood. These communities have, however, been deeply affected by the logging industry and other natural resource and economic development projects in the areas that they traditionally inhabit.4 The Duala (or Douala) are a Bantu coastal Cameroonian ethnic group who are highly educated due to long-term contact with the Europeans. The Duala share a common origin with people such as the Ewodi, Isubu, Batanga, Bakoko, and the Bassa forming 12% of the total population. The primary language spoken is Duala. The Duala trace their origin to Gabon or Congo after which they moved to their present locations. The Duala were mainly traders and cultivators, which have remained part of their economic activities to the present day. Their success in trade declined significantly during the German rule after which they prospered again during the French rule. Most of the Duala are Christians. Kirdi is a group of people occupying northwestern Cameroon. The name Kirdi means pagan and was used to refer to a group of people who refused to join the Islamic faith. The group makes up 18% of the total population. Among the members of Kirdi are Bata, Fata, Mada, Mara, and Toupori. The Kirdi speak Chadic and Adamawa languages. The Fulani are a nomadic tribe in Cameroon which forms about 14% of the total population. The Fulani are Muslims who speak Pulaar language. The Fulani had a religious and cultural dominance over the local people forcing most of them to convert to Islam while others fled from their homes. Their culture is highly influenced by Islamic practices.5 2.2 Religious groups Cameroon is home to many different religious groups. A large part of the population in the country is affiliated with a certain religious community. The Constitution allows the freedom of conscience and religious worship making Cameroon a religiontolerant country. However, for a religious group (apart from African traditional religions) to be legally functional, it has to be registered by the state after meeting the basic requirements such a having a considerable congregation. In Cameroon, Christianity is the most practiced religion followed by Islam.6 About 69.5% of the population of Cameroon are Christians (Protestants, Roman Catholics or other groups). Like in many African countries, the establishment and development of Christianity were introduced to the country by the Christian missionaries. The missionaries arrived in Cameroon during the early nineteenth century dur- ____________________ 4 UN (2014). 5 (ibid.). 6 Sawe (2017). Oliver C. RUPPEL & Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 54 ing which they established missions, schools, health and other facilities to benefit local communities. The first Catholic priests, from the German Pallotine mission, were sent into Cameroon in 1890.7 They returned independent Cameroon in 1964. Today, members of the Roman Catholic Church make up about 39.2% of the total population making it the largest Christian group in Cameroon. Protestants make up the second largest Christian group in Cameroon with about 28.1% of the population. Protestant churches were the first to be established in Cameroon with the first missionaries arriving in the early nineteenth century. After Christianity, Islam is the second most practiced religion in Cameroon with about 19.5% of the population being Muslims. The religion was introduced by the Fulani as they migrated from Nigeria and Mali. The Fulani used force to convert the local people to Islam leading to conflicts with the local people. The Muslims organised themselves into groups called Lamidats which were headed by a very powerful leader called Lamido. While some of the people converted to Islam and Christianity, a section of the Cameroonian people, mainly in rural areas, still retained their indigenous religious practices. These people make up about 4.3% of the population. Some of the traditional religions have adopted some practices of Muslims and Christians merging them with their own. Some of their practices include rituals, animal sacrifices, and ancestor and spirit worship. Other religious groups in the country include atheists or agnostics at 4.6%, and other religions such as Hinduism at 2.1%. All these religious groups impact on the cultural and national practices of the country. For instance, most religious holidays are made into national holidays while the practices of the religions dictate and influence cultural practices such as food, dress, and moral conduct.8 2.3 Regions and official languages The Constitution divides Cameroon into 10 regions, each headed by a presidentially appointed governor. The three northernmost regions are the Far North (Extrême Nord), North (Nord), and Adamawa (Adamaoua). Directly south of them are the Centre (Centre) and East (Est). The South Province (Sud) lies on the Gulf of Guinea and the southern border. Cameroon’s western region is split into four smaller regions: The Littoral (Littoral) and Southwest (Sud-Ouest) regions are on the coast, and the Northwest (Nord-Ouest) and West (Ouest) regions are in the western grassfields. The Northwest and Southwest were once part of British Cameroons; the other ____________________ 7 Skolaster (1924). 8 For the religious beliefs in Cameroon, see Sawe (2017). CAMEROON IN A NUTSHELL 55 regions were in French Cameroun. The Anglophone Cameroonians are the people of various cultural backgrounds who hail from the English-speaking regions of Cameroon (Northwest and Southwest regions). These regions were formerly known as British Southern Cameroons, being part of the League of Nations mandate and United Nations Trust Territories. Almost 250 languages are spoken in Cameroon.9 However, French and English are the both official languages in Cameroon, which are spoken by 70% and 30% of the population respectively. According to Article 1 (3) of the Cameroonian Constitution, the official languages of the Republic of Cameroon shall be English and French, both languages having the same status. The State shall guarantee the promotion of bilingualism throughout the country. It shall endeavour to protect and promote national languages.10 3 The natural environment The natural environment of Cameroon can be described as ‘Africa on a small scale’ as it accommodates all the major climatic conditions and vegetation features of the continent. Located between West and East Africa and stretching from the Gulf of Guinea to Lake Chad, Cameroon presents specificities in terms of its relief, climate, wildlife and vegetation. Cameroon’s 400 km coastline is propitious and holds key attractions of which are picturesque bays, natural and sandy beaches, islands, mangroves and waterfalls dropping directly into the ocean. Cameroon has seven national parks including the Waza Park in the Far North Region which is home to animals that are a reflection of African wildlife (elephants, lions, giraffes, black rhinoceros, panthers, buffalos, antelopes, hippopotamus, hyenas, gorillas, hartebeest, cheetahs, etc.).11 Cameroons physical geography is varied, with forests, mountains, large waterfalls, savannahs and deserts, falling into four regions. At the border of the northern Sahel region lies Lake Chad and the Chad basin; further south the land forms a sloping plain, rising to the Mandara Mountains. The central region extends from the Benue (Bénoué) river to the Sanaga river, with a plateau in the north. This region includes the Adamaoua plateau which separates the agricultural south from the pastoral north. In the west, the land is mountainous, with a double chain of volcanic peaks, rising to a height of 4,095 metres at Mount Cameroon. This is the highest and wettest peak in western Africa. The fourth region, to the south, extends from the Sanaga river to the ____________________ 9 Kouega (2007). 10 Cf. Law No. 96/06 of 18 January 1996 to amend the Constitution of 2 June 1972. 11 See also https://www.prc.cm/en/cameroon/useful-information, accessed 16 April 2018. Oliver C. RUPPEL & Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 56 southern border, comprising a coastal plain and forested plateau. There is a complicated system of drainage. Several rivers flow westwards: The Benue river which rises in the Mandara Mountains and later joins the River Niger, and the Sanaga and Nyong rivers, which flow into the Gulf of Guinea. The Dja and Sangha drain into the Congo Basin. The Logone and Chari rivers flow north into Lake Chad.12 Cameroon’s climatic conditions and agro-ecological zones are conducive to animal health and suitable for raising livestock. Cameroon’s sea coast extends for almost 360 km. The mouths of large rivers constitute privileged zones for fishing, particularly for shrimp, small coastal pelagic fish and demersal species (bass and pike, etc.). Cameroon’s forests cover around 20 million hectares, making them the second largest in Africa, with an identified potential of 300 marketable timber species, of which around 60 are currently exploited, with three forming around 60% of the total timber exportation from the country. The area designed for commercial logging covers a little more than seven million hectares, while community forests represent about two million whereas so-called council forests cover 1.8 million hectares.13 10% of the Congo Basin forest is found in Cameroon, covering 41.3% of the national territory.14 Cameroon is a regional center for trade in goods and services. Cameroon’s economy has many assets: favorable conditions for farming, plentiful water resources and rainfall, forests, oil, etc. Agriculture, (including subsistence farming, breeding livestock, hunting, fishing and logging) play a key role. Large quantities of raw materials are exported mainly cocoa, cotton, crude oil, timber and coffee. Other products traded include bananas, natural rubber, palm oil, pineapples etc.15 Like energy as a whole, access to electricity in Cameroon is at the lowest compared with other countries of the world.16 Cameroon has a wealth of minerals e.g. nickel-cobalt, gold, diamonds, limestone and marble. Cameroon’s subsoil has abundant reserves of bauxite and iron-ore. It has vast and rich farm land, abundant raw materials and plentiful water resources.17 All of these resources constitute the backbone of the Cameroonian economy as well as the life support system for most Cameroonian people, especially in the marginalised rural communities. Many of these resources are traded commercially while others are still used traditionally.18 ____________________ 12 See http://thecommonwealth.org/our-member-countries/cameroon, accessed 2 April 2018. 13 Cf. MINFOF & WRI (2017). 14 African Development Bank Group (2015). 15 See also https://www.prc.cm/en/cameroon/useful-information, accessed 24 March 2018. 16 With further references see Ndongsok & Ruppel (2017). 17 See for more details https://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/tpr_e/s285-00_e.pdf, accessed 7 April 2018. 18 Ageh (2017:507). CAMEROON IN A NUTSHELL 57 The wealth in natural resources already had implications during Cameroon’s colonial history. The exploitation of natural resources began during this time, which is why it should also be briefly discussed. Certainly, environmental protection did not play a primary role during the colonial era. Interestingly, however, a German imperial decree of 4 April 1900 exists, in which the German governor in Cameroon was authorised – for the purpose of protecting the forest – that persons involved in illegal logging (which was in violation of existing regulations) could be ordered to reforest the deforested areas.19 The United Nations Statistics Division in its Environment Statistics Country Snapshot Cameroon provides a good overview of relevant data about the environment for comparative purposes. The country snapshot of Cameroon, inter alia, reflects the following data: Table 1: Environment statistics snapshot Cameroon20 Land and Agriculture Year Total area (km2) 475,650 2015 Agricultural land (km2) 97,500 2015 Arable land (% of agric. land) 64 2015 Permanent crops (% of agric. land) 16 2015 Permanent pasture and meadows (% of agric. land) 21 2015 Change in agricultural land area since 1990 (%) 6 2015 Forest area (km2) 188,169 2015 Change in forest since 1990 (%) -23 2015 Population Population (1000) 23,344 2015 Population growth rate from previous year (%) 3 2015 Air and climate Emissions of: CO2 (million tonnes) 6 2014 CO2 per capita (tonnes) 0 2014 GHG (million tonnes CO2 eq.) 166 1994 GHG per capita (tonnes CO2 eq.) 12 1994 Ozone depleting CFCs (ODP tonnes) 0 2013 Biodiversity Proportion of terrestrial marine areas protected (%) 11 2014 ____________________ 19 Reichsanz. Nr. 108 vom 5. Mai 1900, Kol. Bl. S. 365; Ruppel (1912). 20 Available at https://unstats.un.org/unsd/envstats/snapshots/, accessed 18 May 2018. Oliver C. RUPPEL & Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 58 Number of threatened species 774 2016 Fish catch (tonnes) 239,000 2015 Change in fish catchfrom previous year (%) 8 2015 Energy Total energy supply (PJ) 326 2015 Energy supply per capita (GJ) 14 2015 Energy use intensity (MJ per USD constant 2011 PPP GDP)) 5 2014 Renewable electricity production (%) 75 2015 4 Historical overview Portuguese sailors were the first Europeans to reach what is Cameroon today. Because there were so many shrimps (Portuguese: camarões) found there, today’s river Wouri was called Rio de Camarões. This is where the name Cameroon comes from. Around 1520, there was a proliferation of goods trade between the Europeans and the local tribes, especially the Douala. Preferred commodities were ivory, palm oil and slaves. Initially, the Portuguese were the main supplier of slaves to the new world. Towards the seventeenth century, Portuguese monopoly over the trade was broken by the Dutch.21 Slave traders from France, Britain and Brandenburg then joined the Dutch and Portuguese in the trade along the Cameroon coast where they were exchanged for European goods. 22 The slave trade officially ended in 1840, when the Douala signed a treaty with the British government. Around this time began the mission of Cameroon. In the mid-19th century, the first researchers arrived in Central Africa. 4.1 German colonial presence The German explorer to Africa, Heinrich Barth traveled the Sahara and the north of Cameroon in 1851, while the military doctor Gustav Nachtigal was one of the first to explore the region around Lake Chad. Since 1862, German traders were active in neighboring Gabon, including the Hamburg based trading house Woermann. In 1868, Woermann established the first German trading post in Douala. The southern coastal ____________________ 21 Ngoh (1996:40). 22 (ibid.). CAMEROON IN A NUTSHELL 59 tribes developed a fear that the interior ethnic groups would start trading directly with the Europeans, thus undercutting their powerful intermediary status. To avoid this, the Douala-centered chiefs sought a British protectorate that would cement their power; yet, British delays in sending an envoy to meet with the chiefs ‘forced’ the African leaders to turn to Germany instead. 23 On 12 July 1884, Johannes Voss and Edward Schmidt, the latter two representing respectively the German firms Jantzen and Thormählen and Woermann met with King Akwa and King Bell and their subordinates in Douala and signed the German- Douala treaty.24 According to the terms of the treaty, the Douala kings and their subordinates ceded their rights of sovereignty, legislation, and administration over their people and land. Although the treaty was not signed directly by German officials but merely by private German business representatives the German government recognised it as binding on the state and used it to proclaim sovereignty over the territory soon expanding into the hinterland.25 Before 1884, Germany was not so much interested in the acquisition of overseas territories. This changed in the wake of the Berlin Conference, which took place from 1884 to 1885. Now Germany became more actively involved in the scrambling and partition of Africa. The territories which were finally annexed by Germany included Cameroon, Tanganyika, Togoland and German South West Africa (Namibia).26 Cameroon belonged to the first German colonies, over which the German Reich took over the ‘protection rule’ in 1884. The German-Douala treaty was one of the 95 treaties that the Germans signed with various ethnic groups in Kamerun between 1884 and 1916 with indigenous kings or traditional chiefs.27 The Berlin Conference (also called the Berlin West Africa Conference) aimed to shape a basis for a legally regulated occupation of Africa.28 European powers negotiated and formalised claims to territory in Africa. It marked the climax of the European competition for the scramble for Africa. During the 1870s and early 1880s, European nations such as Great Britain, France, and Germany began looking to Africa for natural resources for their growing industrial sectors as well as a potential market for the goods these factories produced. As a result, these governments sought to safeguard their commercial interests in Africa and began sending scouts to the continent to secure treaties from indigenous peoples or their supposed representatives. The Berlin Conference did not initiate European colonisation of Africa, but it did legiti- ____________________ 23 (ibid.). 24 (ibid.:62). 25 Ames et al. (2005:100). 26 Ngoh (1996:58). 27 (ibid.:67). 28 Ames et al. (2005:97). Oliver C. RUPPEL & Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 60 mate and formalise the process. In addition, it sparked new interest in Africa. Following the close of the conference, European powers expanded their claims in Africa such that by 1900, European states had claimed nearly 90% of African territories.29 This European scramble for Africa radically also changed the power structures in Cameroon. In 1884, the German Chancellor Otto von Bismarck appointed the researcher and consul general in Tunis, Dr. Gustav Nachtigal to Imperial Commissioner for the West Coast of Africa. Nachtigal was commissioned to place the areas of interest for German trade under German protectorate. In 1884, Germany assumed sovereignty of the territory and, in exchange, conferred special trade privileges upon the chiefs of Douala and Bamiléké.30 Nachtigal proclaimed German patronage over Cameroon on 14 July 1884 and hoisted the German flag. In 1889, the officers Hans Tappenbeck and Richard Kund founded the research station Yaoundé, from which emerged the now state capital of Cameroon. Matters related to these territories were initially administrated in the Political Department of the German Foreign Office until in April 1890, a Colonial Department was established. In contrast to the other departments, it was directly responsible to the Chancellor. This special regulation followed from the constitutional status of the colonial protected areas. A compromise ended the initial discussion as to whether those areas should be treated national or foreign under state law. Although the colonies were not considered foreign territory they were not included in Article 1 of the Reich Constitution, which defined the territory of the Reich. Consequently, the colonial subjects did not receive the German nationality and the laws applicable to the German Reich did not automatically come into force for the colonies. In 1907, the Colonial Department of the Foreign Office became the Reichskolonialamt. 4.2 German rule The German administration in Cameroon was established by the German colonial constitution of 1886-1888. At the head of the colonial administration in Cameroon was the Governor. Formally subject to the authority in Berlin, he had extensive executive, judicial and legislative powers. The Governor received instructions from the Kaiser and the German Chancellor. The courts were under the Governor who was also the highest paid judge in the territory although the Imperial Chancellor also examined appeals by criminals against sentences of the Governor. Although the Governor was authorised to issue decrees for general administration, taxes and tariffs, these decrees were approved by the Imperial Chancellor. It was difficult to carry out effective ____________________ 29 Gates & Kwame (2010). 30 See http://www.cameroonconstitution.com/about/history/, accessed 10 April 2018. CAMEROON IN A NUTSHELL 61 administration because of the vastness of the territory and because of the lack of a good means of communication. The Governor therefore delegated some of his powers to local administrators for effective administration. The governorship was in the early years of German domination was situated in Douala, but was relocated to Buea in 1901, due to the prevailing strenuous climatic and health conditions in Douala.31 On 3 July 1885, Julius Baron Soden arrived in Cameroon. He was the first German Governor and ruled from 1885 to 1891. Soden advocated a gradual rather than a rapid military expansion inland. During Soden’s tenure of office, the German flag was hoisted at Buea. Other stations were opened in Barombi, Bali and Yaoundé. It was also during this period that the Germans acquired Victoria (today Limbe) from the British. The Germans consolidated their position on the coast of Cameroon during his reign. Von Soden created the Schiedsgericht (forerunner of the mixed court) to replace the outworn Court of Equity which was created by the British. In 1891, Eugen von Zimmerer succeeded von Soden who resigned because of poor health.32 The administration of von Zimmerer lasted from 1891 to 1895.33 It was under the Governorship of von Zimmerer that the exploration of the hinterland of Cameroon and the establishment of stations was carried on in earnest. A large part of the hinterland was opened to German trade and administration. Von Zimmerer did much to protect the interest of German traders in Cameroon. The Bakweri, Bassa and Bulu uprisings were subdued during his reign.34 Jesko von Puttkamer was the longest serving German Colonial Governor in Cameroon, he ruled from 1895 to 1907. Puttkamer encouraged penetration into northern Cameroon and sanctioned brutal military campaigns to conquer inland ‘countries’.35 He contributed greatly to the opening of plantations on a large scale and created the Gesellschaft Süd Kamerun, which established a German monopoly in rubber and ivory trade in southeastern Cameroon. The Gesellschaft Nordwest Kamerun, which was established in 1899 succeeded in monopolising commerce in the northwestern grasslands.36 The Gesellschaft Süd Kamerun was able to obtain, sovereign rights over a concession of about 7,200,000 ha, lying between 120 degrees east longitude, latitude 40 north, and the south and south-east boundaries of the territory. Within this vast area, the Gesellschaft Süd Kamerun had an exclusive right of occupation on the vacant lands in accordance with the relevant imperial decree of 15 June 1896, as well as an equally exclusive right to purchase lands from with the natives.37 ____________________ 31 Ngoh (1996:72). 32 (ibid.). 33 (ibid.). 34 (ibid.). 35 (ibid.). 36 (ibid.). 37 Etoga Eily (1971:182). Oliver C. RUPPEL & Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 62 On the initiative of Governor Jesko von Puttkamer, the seat of government of Douala was moved to Buea. The governor’s palace (so-called Puttkamerschlösschen) is still an impressive monument of German colonial past in Cameroon, located at the scenic foot slopes of Mount Cameroon. In those days, the soil of Mount Cameroon was presented as one of the best and richest tropical soils; this soil offered, among other guarantees, the advantage of not being exposed to drought; the humid and hot climate with almost assured rains provided conditions for a natural greenhouse, while the different altitude belts of this gigantic structure offered a favorable environment for the cultivation of different crops. In a little while, the slopes of Mount Cameroon were to be covered with plantations of a remarkable variety. The European farmers had succeeded in taking advantage of the crops which grew there naturally, and whose immense potential was hardly exploited by the natives.38 Theodor Seitz, who was the fourth German Governor to Cameroon, ruled for three years from 1907 to 1910.39 Otto Gleim ruled Cameroon from 1910 to 1912. One of the greatest problems Gleim faced was the Douala land problem. In 1910, the local administration decided to transfer the local population from Douala town to a different location. This was intended to improve on the health situation of Europeans who were living in the town and also to prevent speculation on land from the natives. Gleim did not support this measure and supported the local inhabitants in objecting it. Karl Ebermaier was the sixth and last German Governor to rule Cameroon from 1912 to 1916.40 4.3 After the German domination The German domination over Cameroon did not endure very long. In 1914, the First World War broke out. The poorly equipped German Schutztruppe was able to stay in Cameroon for another two years. In 1916, their last garrison capitulated to the British colonial army. After the First World War and the defeat of Germany, Cameroonian territories fell to the League of Nations in 1919, according to the Treaty of Versailles. Article 22 of the Treaty of Versailles proclaims as follows: To those colonies and territories which as a consequence of the late war have ceased to be under the sovereignty of the States which formerly governed them and which are inhabited by peoples not yet able to stand by themselves under the strenuous conditions of the modern world, there should be applied the principle that the well-being and development of such peoples form a sacred trust of civilisation and that securities for the performance of this trust ____________________ 38 Eily Etoga (1971:163). 39 Ngoh (1996:72). 40 (ibid.:74). CAMEROON IN A NUTSHELL 63 should be embodied in this Covenant. The best method of giving practical effect to this principle is that the tutelage of such peoples should be entrusted to advanced nations who by reason of their resources, their experience or their geographical position can best undertake this responsibility, and who are willing to accept it, and that this tutelage should be exercised by them as Mandatories on behalf of the League. The character of the mandate must differ according to the stage of the development of the people, the geographical situation of the territory, its economic conditions, and other similar circumstances. Certain communities formerly belonging to the Turkish Empire have reached a stage of development where their existence as independent nations can be provisionally recognised subject to the rendering of administrative advice and assistance by a Mandatory until such time as they are able to stand alone. The wishes of these communities must be a principal consideration in the selection of the Mandatory. Other peoples, especially those of Central Africa, are at such a stage that the Mandatory must be responsible for the administration of the territory under conditions which will guarantee freedom of conscience and religion, subject only to the maintenance of public order and morals, the prohibition of abuses such as the slave trade, the arms traffic, and the liquor traffic, and the prevention of the establishment of fortifications or military and naval bases and of military training of the natives for other than police purposes and the defence of territory, and will also secure equal opportunities for the trade and commerce of other Members of the League. There are territories, such as South-West Africa and certain of the South Pacific Islands, which, owing to the sparseness of their population, or their small size, or their remoteness from the centres of civilisation, or their geographical contiguity to the territory of the Mandatory, and other circumstances, can be best administered under the laws of the Mandatory as integral portions of its territory, subject to the safeguards above mentioned in the interests of the indigenous population. In every case of mandate, the Mandatory shall render to the Council an annual report in reference to the territory committed to its charge. The degree of authority, control, or administration to be exercised by the Mandatory shall, if not previously agreed upon by the Members of the League, be explicitly defined in each case by the Council. A permanent Commission shall be constituted to receive and examine the annual reports of the Mandatories and to advise the Council on all matters relating to the observance of the mandates. According to Article 118 of the Treaty of Versailles Germany had to renounce its rights over the Cameroonian territories: In territory outside her European frontiers as fixed by the present Treaty, Germany renounces all rights, titles and privileges whatever in or over territory which belonged to her or to her allies, and all rights, titles and privileges whatever their origin which she held as against the Allied and Associated Powers. Germany hereby undertakes to recognise and to conform to the measures which may be taken now or in the future by the Principal Allied and Associated Powers, in agreement where necessary with third Powers, in order to carry the above stipulation into effect. In particular, Germany declared in more general terms, regarding its Colonies in Article 119 of the Treaty of Versailles that: Germany renounces in favour of the Principal Allied and Associated Powers all her rights and titles over her oversea possessions. The Milner-Simon Declaration of 1919 confirmed the division of former German Kamerun between French and British administration. The two zones were established Oliver C. RUPPEL & Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 64 as “class B” mandates by the League of Nations in 1922. The British part of Kamerun became part of Nigeria, administered from Lagos, and the French part became the protectorate of Cameroun. Class B mandates required that the colonial power send an annual report to the League of Nations, but they were not very restrictive. In practice, French and British Cameroon were administered as colonies. The narrow strip of land forming the British Cameroons was divided in two parts: the territories of the north became part of the Nigerian provinces of Bornu and Yola, while the south (present-day English-speaking Cameroon) became the Cameroons province, with its capital at Buea. When the League of Nations was dissolved in 1946, the mandates became trust territories of the United Nations. Nigeria and Cameroon both gained independence in 1960. Since the 1940s, political parties in French Cameroon and in Nigeria had been demanding reunification of the two territories.41 4.4 The Independence process In 1961, a referendum was organised in English-speaking Cameroon: the northern population voted to join Nigeria while the southern population voted to join the French-speaking Republic of Cameroon, which became the Federal Republic of Cameroon.42 It becomes apparent, that the role of the international community, especially in the genesis of the Republic of Cameroon played a prominent role.43 Following the historic vote by English speaking southern Cameroonians in the UN-sponsored plebiscite of 11 February 1961 to accede to independence by joining the already French-speaking independent Republic of Cameroon arose the need for a constitution governing the organisation and functioning of the union. It was for this purpose that the equally historic constitutional conference was convened in Foumban in July that same year. There, the leaders of the Southern Cameroons and the Republic of Cameroon came up with the Federal Constitution enacted on 1 September 1961.44 In 1972 and especially in 1984, the Constitution was further revised, which led to the establishment of the Unitary Republic of Cameroon and twelve years later, to the birth of the Republic of Cameroon.45 In that process, the federal system was abolished and the line of succession to the presidency redefined. The contemporary institutional and political organization of the Republic of Cameroon derives its legitimacy ____________________ 41 With further references see Dupraz (2015). 42 See https://www.prc.cm/en/the-president/constitutional-function, accessed 10 April 2018. 43 Nfobin & Nchotu Nchang épse Minang (2014:255). 44 Nfobin Ngwa (2017:538). 45 See Olinga (2006). CAMEROON IN A NUTSHELL 65 and basis from Law No. 96/06 of 18 January 1996 on the revision of the Constitution of June 1972. In the Preamble of the Constitution, the Cameroonian people, proud of its linguistic and cultural diversity, solemnly proclaimed that it constitutes a single and one Nation, engaged in a common destiny. It affirms “its firm will to build the Cameroon fatherland on the ideological base of brotherhood, justice and progress”. The preamble also proclaims the adhesion of the Republic of Cameroon to fundamental universally recognised democratic principles, the principle African unity and to that formulated by the United Nations Charter. Cameroon’s people affirm their attachment to fundamental liberties inscribed in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the UN Charter, the African Charter for Human and Peoples Rights and all international conventions related to it, and dully ratified.46 4.5 Cameroon today Today, Cameroon is a developing country where the economic conditions of the majority of the people are not so different from many other African countries. Such conditions include over 70% of the population are trapped below the poverty line, transmissible diseases are rife, the costs of education are fast rising and becoming unaffordable, health infrastructure is rudimentary and outdated, medical facilities are beleaguered with numerous resource problems which in turn affects access to quality healthcare. There is an increase in the tide of corruption perpetrated by top administrative political actors and the realisation of economic and social rights is selective and influenced by factors such as political attitudes and choices made by the communities in question.47 Despite economic and political crises, a steadily growing population, high levels of corruption, crusted governmental structures with a president who has led the country since 1982, Cameroon has been considered in recent decades as a haven of peace in Central Africa. Cameroon has never been a country that lacked opportunities. It has all the right prospects. But the challenge it faces is to create an enabling environment to encourage Cameroonians and foreign investors to invest.48 The country is not only divided between domestic politics but also surrounded by violent conflicts ____________________ 46 Cf. with further references https://www.prc.cm/en/cameroon/constitution, accessed 9 April 2018. 47 Agbor (2017:177). 48 See Douglas (2017); Cameroon is ranked 166 out of 190 countries in the World Bank’s Ease of doing business index. The economy is one of Africa’s more difficult markets to operate in, ranking particularly poorly in areas such as registering property, paying taxes and trading across borders. Oliver C. RUPPEL & Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 66 and humanitarian crises (for example in the Lake Chad region). Missed reforms, local, national and cross-border conflicts are putting increasing pressure on Cameroon, which was long regarded as an anchor of stability in the Central African region. Cameroon is experiencing restless times. Three themes are at the center of the current political challenges in the country: Refugees from the Central African Republic crossing the Cameroonian border in the east; the old Anglo-Francophone conflict which has rekindled in the form of protests in the English-speaking regions; and an army which is deployed in the north of the country to counter the threat of Boko Haram’s terrorists.49 5 The legal setup In the pre-colonial Cameroonian society, there existed diverse unwritten indigenous laws and usages which applied in varying degrees to the different ethnic groups. The only exception was in the north where the Foulbe tribes, who originally invaded the territory from North Africa in the early nineteenth century, had introduced islamic laws in some areas. Despite the differences in the structures, content and institutions which applied these indigenous and islamic laws or traditional laws as they are referred to today, there were many similarities. A German attempt to ascertain and codify the different traditional laws was frustrated by the outbreak of the First World War, but the results from the six tribes that were studied showed that there were substantial similarities in basic concepts and practices.50 In the discussions and resolutions of the Berlin Conference, the forces and institutions that were supposed to realise this transformation were named: religion, science, philanthropic movements, commerce, and administration. These have all been subject of research, yet there was another force that is implicit in the conference’s resolutions and aims: the law.51 The introduction of colonial jurisdiction as a means of control and domination and specifically as a means of education and domestication of the natives, intended to force them into the new dynamics of colonial society and make them useful in the exploitation and transformation of their country. Since the German constitution contained no provision for governing colonies, the Reichstag was tasked in 1885 to adopt a Colonial Constitution (Kolonialverfassung). The Reichstag accepted the bill, after a difficult debate, on 10 April 1886. Traders and colonial lobbyists in the German Colonial Society (Deutsche Kolonialgesellschaft) had influenced this Colonial ____________________ 49 Ruppel & Stell (2017). 50 See Fombad (2007). 51 See Ames et al. (2005:97). CAMEROON IN A NUTSHELL 67 Constitution. They hoped to exclude the Reichstag from control over the colonies, and therefore sought to place the greatest power possible in the hands of the Kaiser. The first article of the Colonial Constitution did indeed concentrate authority in the Kaiser, who had the power to issue decrees on almost all matters concerning the protectorates. The chancellor was given limited powers, most of which were actually delegated to him by the Kaiser. The budget for administering the colonies had to be submitted to the Reichstag, however, and this was the only opening for that representative body to discuss the German government’s actions in the colonies.52 The colonial law concerning the legal relations of the German protected areas (Schutzgebiete), was the Schutzgebietsgesetz of 17 April 1886, modified by the Schutzgebietsgesetz of 10 September 1900. Paragraph 1 of the Schutzgebietsgesetz states that all executive and legislative matters were to be decided by the Kaiser in the name of the Reich. The statute delegated all powers to the German Emperor, making him the Schutzherr, Lord Protector, of the colonies.53 The legal system in Cameroon subordinated the African and European population to different laws and different courts. The decision of legal cases over the African population was – especially in criminal matters – placed under colonial authority. In addition, African authorities (kings) were authorised by the colonial administration. The colonial law provisions were published in the Reichsgesetzblatt in the Central Journal for the German Reich or Reichsanzeiger and from 1890 in the German Colonial Journal (Deutsches Kolonialblatt). In addition, several collections, some of them continuous, brought together the legal provisions of the various German colonies. For Cameroon, the relevant colonial law provisions were collected in 1912 and published (Landesgesetzgebung für das Schutzgebiet Kamerun).54 After the end of the First World War and the division of former German Kamerun between the French and the British administration German law was no longer applicable as the incoming powers introduced their own set of legal traditions upon their arrival.55 The legal system as well as the sources of law applicable in the country have been significantly shaped by the dual English-French colonial legal heritage that has given rise to its dual legal system in the country. It consists of two distinct and often conflicting legal systems, the English common law and the French civil law operating in some sort of tenuous coexistence. Cameroon’s legal system consists of a large number of heterogeneous, not always organically interconnected elements. The Cameroonian legal system can therefore – at least to a certain extent – be described as bi-jural in which French law applies in the eight French speaking regions; ____________________ 52 (ibid.:101). 53 Cf. with further references Hartmann (2007:54). 54 Ruppel (1912). 55 Tchakoua (2014:19). Oliver C. RUPPEL & Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 68 English law substantially applies in the two English speaking regions, although most of the uniform laws that are now being introduced are essentially based on French legal concepts.56 Moreover, and especially after Cameroonian Independence, it becomes apparent that the influence of the French law tradition also had strong impacts in the English speaking regions. Both the British and the French recognised and enforced customary law. However, not every custom or usage was recognised and enforced as customary law. For example, in Anglophone Cameroon, Section 27 (1) of the Southern Cameroons High Court Law, 1955, provided for the recognition and enforcement of only customary law which is not repugnant to natural justice, equity and good conscience or incompatible either directly or by implication, with any existing law. Generally, today in Cameroon, customary law has limited application. It only applies to certain persons and governs only a few matters. It applies only to persons traditionally subject to it, effectively meaning the rural population and even then, only if they desire that this law should regulate their relationship. The only exception to this is in the northern part of the country, where sharia law and sharia courts still play a large part in regulating the lives of rural people. Traditional leadership still plays an important role in Cameroon today. According to Presidential Decree No. 77/245 of 15 July 1977 on the Organisation of Traditional Chiefdoms, as stipulated in Article 2 thereof, are organised on a territorial basis and classified into three categories: 1st degree, 2nd degree and 3rd degree chiefdoms. Article 3 states that 1st degree chiefdoms have a territorial influence which doesn’t exceed a division and which covers at least two 2nd degree chiefdoms. This article goes on to state that 2nd degree chiefdoms cover at least two 3rd degree chiefdoms with a territorial influence not exceeding a sub-division. 3rd degree chiefdoms are villages or districts. Article 4 states that traditional rulers can be classified as 1st or 2nd degree chiefs, depending on the population and economy under their responsibility. In Article 7, it is stated that 1st degree chiefdoms are created by Prime Ministerial Orders, 2nd degree chiefdoms by the Ministry of Territorial Administration and 3rd degree chiefdoms by the Senior Divisional Officer. However, Articles 31-32 states that certain urban agglomerations can be grouped by the Ministry of Territorial Administration into zones and districts which are headed by sub chiefs. Articles 8-18 state that traditional chiefs are chosen from culturally designated families and in case of the vacancy of this post, the competent administrative authority is responsible for the designation of a replacement in conformity with traditions and in consultation with the traditional elders. Traditional chiefs are forbidden from holding public office except by authorization. Articles 19-21 state that the role of the traditional chief is to ____________________ 56 Fombad (2007). CAMEROON IN A NUTSHELL 69 assist administrative authorities in doing the following: transmitting and executing orders from administrative authorities; maintaining public order; ensuring economic, social and cultural development; collecting taxes and other fees for the State, as well as any other duties conferred by the administration. In Articles 22-24 of this decree it is stated that 1st and 2nd degree chiefs receive a fixed taxable allowance and other benefits depending on the population under their responsibility. These clauses were modified by Decree No. 2013/332 of 13 September 2013, which states that chiefs will receive a monthly non-taxable allowance categorized as follows: 200,000 FCFA for 1st degree chiefs, 100,000 FCFA for 2nd degree chiefs and 50,000 FCFA for 3rd degree chiefs. These allowances cannot, however, be cumulated with parliamentary, civil service and public administration benefits. Since Independence and the reunification of the former British Southern Cameroons and the French Cameroun, the country can be said to have had at least three different Constitutions and numerous constitutional amendments. What can be considered to be the first Constitution was in reality the Constitution under which French Cameroun became independent on 1 January 1960. The second Constitution was in reality simply an amendment of the 1960 Constitution of the French Cameroun in 1961, when the British and French administered parts of the country were reunited and was styled as the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Cameroon, which ushered in a highly centralised federal system. On 2 June 1972, after a referendum, a new unitary Constitution was adopted and the name of the country was changed to the United Republic of Cameroon. In 1984, the appellation ‘United Republic’ was replaced with ‘Republic’. What is currently in force is this 1972 Constitution, which was substantially amended in 1996. Although not explicitly so-stated, the Cameroonian Constitution is treated as the supreme law of the land.57 The Constitution takes precedence over all other national legal instruments. Below the Constitution (in descending order of importance) come laws, ordinances, decrees, orders, decisions, instructions, and circulars. International treaties and agreements are ratified by the President. Those whose ratification requires legislation are submitted for (legislative) approval by Parliament. Immediately after they are published, duly signed and ratified, international treaties and agreements override national legal instruments, provided that each agreement or treaty is implemented by all the parties. The 1996 Constitution of the Republic of Cameroon is clear on the reception of international law in Cameroon as well as the status of such laws in relation to other municipal pieces legislation. On the applicability and supremacy of treaties and international agreements in Cameroon’s legal system, the Constitution provides as fol- ____________________ 57 (ibid.). Oliver C. RUPPEL & Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 70 lows: Duly approved or ratified treaties and international agreements shall, following their publication, override national laws, provided the other party implements the said treaty or agreement (Article 46, Constitution of Cameroon). Article 45 of the Constitution, in effect, makes treaties and international agreements not just applicable but also acquire a supreme status over national laws. The supremacy enjoyed by treaties and international agreements is inferred from the phrase override national laws. Therefore, all ratified treaties and international agreements automatically become law in Cameroon, and do enjoy a supreme status over domestic legislation.58 The courts in the country can be divided into two main categories viz, courts with ordinary jurisdiction and courts with special jurisdiction. The former, have powers to hear all matters, such as, civil, criminal and labour disputes. Safe for the Supreme Court which has jurisdiction over the whole national territory,59 the ordinary courts are highly decentralised. Within this category, there are two types. The first are courts which have original jurisdiction in the sense that they have the power to hear matters at first instance. These consist of traditional (law) courts, which operate at village or tribal level; magistrates’ courts, which operate at sub-divisional level, although they usually cover several subdivisions, and high courts, which operate at divisional level, but they also often cover several divisions. The second consists of courts with appellate jurisdiction. While the High Court has limited appellate jurisdiction, the main appellate courts are the Court of Appeals which are located in the headquarters of each of the ten regions. The Supreme Court sometimes operates as an ‘appellate’ court, in the sense that it can quash, on an application to it, a judicial decision which it considers to have mistakenly interpreted the law. It does not decide the matter itself, but usually instructs a lower court of similar standing to the one from which the matter came to do so. Nevertheless, the Supreme Court has exclusive jurisdiction over all administrative, institutional and constitutional disputes in the country. Since it is usually saddled with a heavy backlog of administrative and institutional disputes, and has generally been slow and inefficient, a party who ‘appeals’ a matter from the Court of Appeal to it usually does so more to delay and frustrate the other party than to achieve anything else. Courts with special jurisdiction deal with either specified matters provided for by law, or a particular class of persons. In 1996, the twelfth amendment of the Constitution, inter alia made provisions for an autonomous constitutional justice organ, the so-called Constitutional Council.60 Only recently, that is twenty-two years later, the members and president of the con- ____________________ 58 Agbor (2017:185). 59 According to Article 38 (1) the Supreme Court shall be the highest court of the State in legal and administrative matters as well as in the appraisal of accounts. 60 See Articles 46 to 52 of the 1996 Constitution of the Republic of Cameroon. CAMEROON IN A NUTSHELL 71 stitutional council were finally announced through Decrees No. 2018/105 and No. 2018/106 on 7 February 2018.61 Article 46 of the Cameroonian Constitution of 1996 states that, “the Constitutional Council shall have jurisdiction in matters pertaining to the Constitution. It shall rule on the constitutionality of laws. It shall be the organ regulating the functioning of the institutions”.62 Further, according to Article 47, the Constitutional Council gives the final ruling on the following: • the constitutionality of laws, treaties and international agreements; • the constitutionality of the standing orders of the National Assembly and the Senate prior to their implementation; • conflict of powers between State institutions; between the State and the Regions, and between the Regions; • ensures the regularity of presidential elections, parliamentary elections and referendum operations. It shall proclaim the results thereof; and • provides advice in matters falling under its jurisdiction. It is this Council that receives the resignation of the President of the Republic, declares the position vacant and opens the interim period before elections. The council is also responsible for judging the eligibility of parliamentarians and senators. Article 48 stipulates that, the Constitutional Council watches over the regularity of presidential and parliamentary elections as well as referendum operations. The Constitutional Council also proclaims the results of these various elections. In this light, the Constitutional Council serves as a constitutional judiciary organ, an institutional regulator, an electoral committee as well as an adviser on constitutional matters. The duties of the members of the Constitutional Council are incompatible with those of members of Government, of members of Parliament, of the Supreme Court, economic and social council, civil servants, military and private individuals whose integrity and neutrality affects the job. Councilors are supposed to be politically neutral and should not have partisan or syndicate affiliations.63 According to Article 12 of the Law of 21 April 2004, the Constitutional Council sits only if it is seized on matters within its jurisdiction. This is done through a letter which should state the facts and legal backing motivating the request. Each query is overseen by a designated Councilor who after research and investigations should produce a report and propose related decisions to the other Councilors for closed doors deliberation (except in cases concerning elections and referendums) and voting. The quorum for decision taking is nine members and decisions are based on majority votes. In case of parity, the vote of the session chair is preponderant except ____________________ 61 Enyegue (undated). 62 Gras (2018). 63 Olinga (2006). Oliver C. RUPPEL & Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 72 when it comes to confirming the vacancy of the Presidency of the Republic, in such a case the majority vote of two-thirds of the Councilors is sufficient. In cases of election contestation, the Constitutional Council can be seized by any candidate, political party or any government agent directly linked to the election. For referendums, the constitutionality of laws as well as treaties, queries can be made by the Presidents of the Republic, Senate, Assembly and also two-third of the members of the Senate and Assembly. In cases where the vacancy of the position of Head of State needs to be confirmed, the request is made by the President of the National Assembly after consultation with the bureau. The Constitutional Council should arrive at decisions within a limit of 15 days except in cases where the query is made by the President of the Republic. In this case, the deadline is eight days. Decisions should clearly make reference to the legal texts, the facts of the request and the basis on which it was arrived at. It should also contain the names of the Councilors who sieged and be published in the official news outlets. Besides the Constitutional Council, the amended Constitution also provided for the creation of a set of Administrative and Audit Courts decentralised along the lines of the ordinary courts. The courts within the country operate within a unified but decentralised court structure at the summit of which is a single Supreme Court for the whole country that operates more like the French Cour de Cassation rather than an English Court of Appeal. The highest court within each of the regions is the Appeal Court. Unlike legislation, the role of judicial precedent as a source of law in Cameroon depends on whether one is in the English speaking Anglophone or French speaking Francophone regions of the country. The English legal system on which the law applied in the Anglophone regions is based treats judicial precedent differently from the way the French civil law on which the law applied in the Francophone regions is based. The English law doctrine of binding precedent or stare decisis under which judicial precedent is a major source of law was received in the Anglophone regions as part of the general reception of English law. For the two Anglophone regions, the doctrine of binding precedent operates in the sense that the precedents laid down within each region constitute binding authority within that region. However, judicial precedent as a binding source of law in the English provinces plays but a rather limited role because of the ‘regionalised’ system. Although appeals may be taken from the Court of Appeal to the Supreme Court, these are not usually handled as appeals in the strict sense of the word and the decisions taken by the Supreme Court are at best only of persuasive authority. To this extent, whilst judicial precedents remain an important source of law in the Anglophone regions, because of the way the courts are structured and actually operate, it may not be as significant as it should have been. Generally, the attitude towards judicial precedent in Francophone Cameroon is different. Judiciary precedent is not regarded as a primary source of law. However, CAMEROON IN A NUTSHELL 73 precedents, especially of the superior courts, although not strictly binding, are of highly persuasive value in the Francophone courts.64 6 Concluding remarks As mentioned at the outset, this chapter aimed to provide an introductory basic overview of Cameroon, aspects of its human and natural environment, its history and the legal setup of the country. The chapter raises no claim to completeness and will be complemented by a vast variety of topics to be discussed in the following chapters. References African Development Bank Group, 2015, Cameroon, joint 2015-2020 country strategy paper and country portfolio performance review (CPPR) report, Abidjan, African Development Bank, https://www.afdb.org/fileadmin/uploads/afdb/Documents/Project-and-Operations/Cameroon_- _Joint_2015-2020_Country_Strategy_Paper_and_Country_Portfolio_Performance_Review_ report_–_06_2015.pdf, accessed 4 April 2018. Agbor, AA, 2017, Shifting the matrix from legal passivity to a new domestic legal order: towards the justiciability of economic, social and cultural rights in Cameroon, 25 (2) African Journal of International and Comparative Law, 176-198. Ageh, AP, 2017, Ethical dilemma with respect to CBD regulations in genetic modification of biological resources in Cameroon, 25 (4) African Journal of International and Comparative Law, 507-518. Ames, E, M Klotz & L Wildenthal, 2005, Germany’s colonial pasts, Lincoln and London, University of Nebraska Press. Douglas, K, 2017, Understanding Cameroon’s untapped business opportunities, https://www.howwemadeitinafrica.com/understanding-cameroons-untapped-businessopportunities/, accessed 20 March 2018. Dupraz, Y, 2015, French and British colonial legacies in education: a natural experiment in Cameroon, at http://Www.Parisschoolofeconomics.Eu/IMG/Pdf/, accessed 3 April 2018. Enyegue, M, undated, Le Cameroun a-t-il besoin d’un conseil constitutionnel ? Cameroon- Camer.be at http://camer.be/39851/30:27/le-cameroun-a-t-il-besoin-dun-conseil-constitutionnelg-cameroon.html, accessed 10 April 2018. Etoga Eily, F, 1971, Sur les chemin du développement: Essai d’histoire des faits économiques au Cameroun, Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania State University. Fombad, CM, 2007, Researching Cameroonian law, at http://www.nyulawglobal.org/globalex/ Cameroon.html, accessed 23 March 2018. ____________________ 64 Fombad (2007). Oliver C. RUPPEL & Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 74 Gates, HL & Kwame AA, 2010, Encyclopaedia of Africa, Oxford, Oxford Press, at http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195337709.001.0001/acref- 9780195337709-e-0467, accessed 10 April 2018. Gras, R, 2018, Paul Biya nomme les membres du Conseil Constitutionelle, Jeune Afrique, at http://www.jeuneafrique.com/528921/politique/cameroun-paul-biya-nomme-les-membres-duconseil-constitutionnel/, accessed 10 April 2018. Hartmann, W, 2007, Making South West Africa German? Attempting imperial, juridical, colonial, conjugal and moral order, 2 Journal of Namibian Studies, 51-84. Kouega, JP, 2007, The language situation in Cameroon, 8 (1) Current Issues in Language Planning, 3-94. MINOF / Ministère des forêts et de la faune & WRI / World Resources Institute, 2017, Domaine forestier du Cameroun, Yaoundé, MINFOF & WRI. Ndongsok, D & Ruppel, OC, 2017, Country report: state of electricity production and distribution in Cameroon, Berlin, Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung e.V., European and International Cooperation Department. Nfobin Ngwa, EH, 2017, The Francophone / Anglophone split over Article 47 of the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Cameroon: An abiding malaise with an explosive charge, 25 (4) African Journal of International and Comparative Law, 538-560. Nfobin, EH & Nchotu Nchang épse Minang, V, 2014, The Cameroon ‘Anglophone Question’ in international law, 22 (2) African Journal of International and Comparative Law, 234-257. Ngoh, VJ, 1996, History of Cameroon since 1800, Limbe, Presprint, Presbyterian Printing Press. Olinga, A, 2006, La Constitution de la Republique du Cameroun, Yaoundé, Les Presses de l’Université Catholique d’Afrique Centrale. Ruppel, J, 1912, Die Landesgesetzgebung für das Schutzgebiet Kamerun. Sammlung der in Kamerun zur Zeit geltenden völkerrechtlichen Verträge, Gesetze, Verordnungen und Dienstvorschriften mit Anmerkungen und Registern, Berlin, E.S. Mittler. Ruppel, OC & M Stell, 2017 (unpublished, on file with the authors), Länderbericht: Kamerun, die ehemalig deutsche Kolonie: Stabilitätsanker Zentralafrikas in politisch unruhigen Gewässern?, Berlin, Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung e.V., European and International Cooperation Department. Sawe, BE, 2017, Ethnic groups of Cameroon, in Worldatlas, at https://www.worldatlas.com/ articles/ethnic-groups-of-cameroon.html, accessed 16 April 2018. Skolaster, H, 1924, Die Pallottiner in Kamerun. 25 Jahre Missionsarbeit 1890 – 1916, herausgegeben 2014 von Hannappel, N, Reihe Bischof Heinrich Vieter – Leben und Vermächtnis des Glaubensboten Kameruns, Band 2, Friedberg, Pallotti. Tchakoua, JM, 2014, Introduction générale au droit Camerounais, Yaoundé, Presses de l’UNAC. UN / United Nations, 2014, Report of the Independent Expert on minority issues, Rita Izsák, Addendum, Mission to Cameroon (2 to 11 September 2013), United Nations General Assembly, Human Rights Council on the promotion and protection of all human rights, civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights, including the right to development (A/HRC/25/56/Add), at http://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/HRC/RegularSessions/Session25/Pages/ListReports.aspx, accessed 16 April 2018. SECTION 2 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW – INTRODUCTION AND INTERNATIONAL LEGAL FRAMEWORK DROIT ENVIRONNEMENTAL – INTRODUCTION ET CADRE JURIDIQUE INTERNATIONAL 77 CHAPTER 2: INTRODUCING ENVIRONMENTAL LAW1 Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 1 Terminology At the outset, it is important to explain the term environmental law, as there is more than one valid definition. This is obvious in the light of the fact that environmental law is a highly complex subject. The Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary broadly defines environment as “the conditions, circumstances, etc. affecting a person’s life”2. This definition can serve as a good starting point for our analysis and definition of the term environment. Academics from various disciplines, including humanists, natural scientists and economists have made various attempts to shed light on this issue, and thus definitions vary. The etymological origin of the term environment is to be found in an ancient French word, environner, which means to encircle. This implicates the existence of a centre in which someone or something is situated observing the circumstances, objects, or conditions by which he, she or it is surrounded. Based on this etymological origin, it is reasonable – though not necessarily correct – for the term environment to often be used synonymously with other terms such as nature, ecology or habitat. A commonly-used definition is that environment is the complex of physical, chemical, and biotic factors (like climate, soil and living things) that act upon an organism or an ecological community and ultimately determine its form and survival and “the aggregate of social and cultural conditions that influence the life of an individual or community.”3 Academics and decision-making bodies have dealt with the notion ‘environment’ in the process of drafting documents, academic papers, statutes or other legal texts, as well as judicial decisions. Most approaches describe the term very widely, whilst others are more specific, as shown by the examples below. ____________________ 1 This chapter is a partially revised and updated version of Ruppel-Schlichting (2016). 2 Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary (1995). 3 Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary (2004). Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 78 The Declaration of the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment, which was discussed and decided at the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment in Stockholm in 1972, is considered to be one of the basic legal foundations of international environmental protection. Part I proclaims that “the protection of the human environment is a major issue which affects the well-being of peoples and economic development throughout the world”. While the declaration lacks a definition of the term itself, it is more precise in specifying what natural resources are: The natural resources of the earth, including the air, water, land, flora and fauna and especially representative samples of natural ecosystems, must be safeguarded for the benefit of present and future generations through careful planning or management as appropriate. The encompassing nature of the term has also been emphasised by the International Court of Justice in its advisory opinion on the Legality of the Threat or Use of Nuclear Weapons:4 The environment is not an abstraction, but represents the living space, the quality of life, and the very health of human beings, including generations unborn. By way of summary it can be stated that the term environment denotes the entire range of living and non-living factors that influence life on earth, and their interactions. Everything living, humans, animals, plants and micro-organisms are thus part of our environment, as well as non-living resources such as air, water, land, in addition to historical, cultural, social and aesthetic components; this includes the built environment. In a very broad sense, environmental law can generally be described as the body of rules which contain elements to control the human impact on the environment. However, given that all human activities, as well as all natural events have a direct or indirect impact on the environment, environmental protection virtually forms part and should be integrated into all areas of law and policy. Thus, environmental law cannot be seen as a distinct domain of law but rather as an assortment of legal norms, contained in a number of conventional fields of law or an5 ensemble of norms, statutes, treaties and administrative regulations to ensure or to facilitate the rational management of natural resources and human intervention in the management of such resources for sustainable development. In more detail, environmental law can thus be defined as the group of norms, rules, procedures and institutional arrangements found in civil and common law, statutes and implementing regulations, case law, treaties and soft law instruments, which deal ____________________ 4 Advisory Opinion, ICJ Rep. 1996, 241, para. 29. 5 Okidi (1988:130). INTRODUCING ENVIRONMENTAL LAW 79 with or relate to protection, management and utilisation of the environment and natural resources for sustainable development and/or intergenerational equity.6 Whatever the scope of environmental law, it cannot be disputed that an interdisciplinary and holistic approach is needed in order to adequately address environmental threats and concerns from a legal perspective. Disciplines that are relevant for the area of environmental law include the natural, physical and social sciences, history, ethics, and economics. 2 Foundations of environmental protection Although environmental law is considered to be a relatively new area of law, one must go far back in the world’s history when tracing the foundations of environmental protection. As stated above, environmental law is of interdisciplinary nature, and as such, it is anchored in various fields and disciplines: religion, philosophy, ethics, science, economics, national and international law. All world religions contain rules and principles regarding the conservation of the environment.7 In the Judeo-Christian religious tradition, one basic conceptual foundation of environmental protection in terms of human guardianship for the earth and its resources can be found in the Old Testament:8 God blessed them, and God said to them, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the earth and subdue it; and have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the air and over every living thing that moves upon the earth.” Christian environmental commitment has been stressed for example by former Pope Benedict XVI and his predecessor, John Paul II:9 ____________________ 6 See also Sands & Peel (2012:13) for a detailed discussion. 7 For a detailed description see Kiss & Shelton (2004:9ff.). 8 Gen.1:28. 9 Message of His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI for the celebration of the World Day of Peace 1 January 2008 see http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/benedict_xvi/messages/peace/documents/ hf_ben-xvi_mes_20071208_xli-world-day-peace_en.html, accessed 15 January 2018; in his message for the celebration of the World Day of Peace 1 January 1990, His Holiness Pope John Paul II stated the following: “Faced with the widespread destruction of the environment, people everywhere are coming to understand that we cannot continue to use the goods of the earth as we have in the past. The public in general as well as political leaders are concerned about this problem, and experts from a wide range of disciplines are studying its causes. Moreover, a new ecological awareness is beginning to emerge which, rather than being downplayed, ought to be encouraged to develop into concrete programmes and initiatives.” see http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/messages/peace/documents/hf_jp-ii_mes_19 891208_xxiii-world-day-for-peace_en.html, accessed 24 January 2018. Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 80 The family needs a home, a fit environment in which to develop its proper relationships. For the human family, this home is the earth, the environment that God the Creator has given us to inhabit with creativity and responsibility. We need to care for the environment: it has been entrusted to men and women to be protected and cultivated with responsible freedom, with the good of all as a constant guiding criterion. Human beings, obviously, are of supreme worth vis- à-vis creation as a whole. Respecting the environment does not mean considering material or animal nature more important than man. Rather, it means not selfishly considering nature to be at the complete disposal of our own interests, for future generations also have the right to reap its benefits and to exhibit towards nature the same responsible freedom that we claim for ourselves. In June 2015, Pope Francis, with his second encyclical called Laudato si10 released an environmental compass, focusing among others on climate change as a common concern and lamenting pollution, waste and the throwaway culture, a lack of clean water, loss of biodiversity, and an overall decline in human life and a breakdown of society. Principles of environmental protection can also be found in the Islamic tradition:11 The right to utilise and harness natural resources, which God has granted man, necessarily involves an obligation on man’s part to conserve them both quantitatively and qualitatively. God has created all the sources of life for man and all resources of nature that he requires, so that he may realise objectives such as contemplation and worship, inhabitation and construction, sustainable utilisation, and enjoyment and appreciation of beauty. It follows that man has no right to cause the degradation of the environment and distort its intrinsic suitability for human life and settlement. Nor has he the right to exploit or use natural resources unwisely in such a way as to spoil the food bases and other sources of subsistence for living beings, or expose them to destruction and defilement. The religious belief systems of indigenous peoples contain concepts of environmental protection to a wide extent as well, as natural resources are basic to their existence. Thus, the relationship with the land is a foundation for their beliefs, customs, tradition and culture.12 Semi-detached from religious concepts and traditions are the concepts of equity and justice, which are of rather philosophical or ethical nature. Three kinds of relationships can be listed in this context: Inter-generational equity, dealing with the relationships among existing persons; intra-generational equity, governing the relationships between present and future generations; and inter-species equity, covering the relationships between humans and other species. These concepts have been laid ____________________ 10 See Encyclical Letter Laudato Si’ of The Holy Father Francis on care for our common home, at http://w2.vatican.va/content/francesco/en/encyclicals/documents/papa-francesco_201505 24_enciclica-laudato-si.html, accessed 15 January 2018. 11 Bagader et al. (1994) Section one: A general introduction to Islam’s attitude toward the universe, natural resources, and the relation between man and nature. 12 Hinz & Ruppel (2008:6). INTRODUCING ENVIRONMENTAL LAW 81 down in many environmental legal texts13 and form basic principles for environmental jurisprudence on international14 and national15 level. Science, especially biology, chemistry and physics, has been and remains one of the most important foundations in the history and the development of environmental law, as it uses science to predict and regulate the consequences of human behaviour on natural phenomena. On the other hand, environmental law must be developed in a manner that is flexible enough to respond to scientific uncertainty, possible irreversibility and the dynamics of a constantly evolving environment.16 Last, but not least, environmental law also rests on the world’s economic system and its challenge to environmental protection17 as economic growth – at least in its early stages – more often than not brings about environmental degradation.18 Measures for environmental protection are expensive and therefore increase the costs of goods and services; this in turn has an impact on the free trade in goods and services, and might influence the issue of competitive advantage. This, the economic North-South divide19, and the fact that natural resources are exhaustible, tie the need for environmental protection and economic development together. This can be addressed through environmental law mechanisms. 3 Functions of environmental law During the past decades, environmental concerns have been high on the legal agenda, with good reason. Mankind is part of nature and life depends on the uninterrupted functioning of natural systems as this ensures the supply of energy and nutrients. Humans are directly dependent on the ecosystems and natural resources. The dependence of people on ecosystems is often more apparent in rural communities where lives are directly affected by the availability of resources such as water, food, ____________________ 13 See for example Principle 1 of the Declaration of the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment (Stockholm Declaration); Preamble to the Convention on Biological Diversity; Section 3 (2) of the Environmental Management Act No. 7 of 2007. 14 E.g. Maritime Delimitation in the Area between Greenland and Jan Mayden Denmark v Norway ICJ 14 June 1993 separate opinion by Weeramantry available at http://www.icjcij.org/docket/index.php?p1=3&k=e0&case=78&code=gjm&p3=4, accessed 4 November 2010. 15 E.g. Oposa and others v Factoran and another G.R.NO: 101083 Supreme Court of the Philippines. Summary at http://www.unescap.org/drpad/vc/document/compendium/ph1.htm, accessed 4 November 2010. See also Gatmaytan (2003). 16 Kiss & Shelton (2004:14). 17 (ibid.:15). 18 Hypothesis advanced by Simon Kuznet in his Environmental Kuznet’s Curve. Kuznet (1955 and 1956). For a critical discussion see Yandle et al. (2002). 19 Beyerlin (2006). Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 82 medicinal plants and fire wood. Further, ecosystems provide cultural, aesthetic, spiritual and intellectual stimulation. Every form of life is unique and merits respect, regardless of its worth to man. Humans can, however, alter nature and exhaust natural resources by action or its consequences and must therefore fully recognise the urgency of maintaining the stability and quality of nature and of conserving natural resources. Thus, environmental concerns have become subject to multiple law-making processes. But why is law needed to conserve our environment? Given that environmental degradation is largely caused by human intervention, the public authority responsible for preventing such negative effects will act by developing legal rules in order to have at hand binding norms. The obligatory character of environmental law and enforcement mechanisms are designed to prevent acts detrimental to the environment. Not only does environmental law establish rules and regulations, it also provides for other forms of intervention such as management tools, incentives and disincentives. However, binding rules are not the only element in environmental law; other, nonbinding principles such as declarations or plans might just as well be appropriate to enhance environmental protection. Thus, environmental law is an essential remedy to pollution and to the depletion of the world’s natural resources. International law is needed because most environmental challenges cross boundaries in their scope.20 From a legal perspective, environmental protection can be achieved by international treaties and declarations, through national constitutions, and environmental policies determining the objectives and strategies which should be used in order to ensure the respect of environmental values, and further, through statutory legal instruments to reach the objectives fixed by the environmental policy. The main function of environmental law is thus to safeguard and protect non-renewable resources for future generations. Further to this, renewable resources have to be managed in such a way that continuous supply is ensured and resource depletion is avoided, e.g. deforestation, which can also trigger climate change and desertification. Habitats upon which various species of animal life depend for survival have to be protected in order to retain the food chain. Also the essential character of natural treasures has to be preserved for future generations.21 4 Historical development of environmental law Although much has been written, especially with regard to the historical development of international environmental law, the following paragraphs will complementarily ____________________ 20 Kiss & Shelton (2004:3). 21 Sands (2003:252); Kidd (2008:13). INTRODUCING ENVIRONMENTAL LAW 83 provide a short overview on how international environmental has developed.22 Writing, however, from a Cameroonian perspective, the African context will also be addressed. International environmental law has only come into its own during the second half of the 20th century, although some international environmental legislative measures had already been taken earlier. The 1902 Paris Convention to Protect Birds Useful to Agriculture granted protection to certain birds by prohibiting their killing or destruction of their nests, eggs or breeding places, except for scientific research or repopulation purposes. The 1933 London Convention Relative to the Preservation of Fauna and Flora in their Natural State applied to Africa – then largely colonised. It did not, however, cover the metropolitan areas of the colonial powers.23 The Convention provided for the creation of national parks, included measures regulating the export of hunting trophies, banned certain methods of hunting and provided for measures to be taken to protect animals and plants perceived to be useful to man or of special scientific interest. On the North American continent, the 1940 Washington Convention on Nature Protection and Wildlife Preservation in the Western Hemisphere provided for the establishment of national parks and reserves, the protection of wild plants and animals, and for cooperation between governments in the field of research.24 Following these precursors of present-day environmental law concepts, the founding of the United Nations and its specialised agencies in 1945 marks a milestone in the development of international environmental law. In the 1950s, states increasingly entered into water-related agreements. Such boundary water agreements, including provisions on the problem of water pollution and efforts to combat marine pollution, were addressed by the 1954 London Convention for the Prevention of the Pollution of the Sea by Oil.25 In 1956, the first United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS I) was held at Geneva, Switzerland. Four treaties were concluded as a result in 1958: the Convention on the Territorial Sea and Contiguous Zone,26 the Convention on the Continental Shelf,27 the ____________________ 22 For an extensive overview of the history of international environmental law see, for example, Kiss & Shelton (2004:25), Sands & Peel (2012:16) and Sands (2003:25). 23 This convention was replaced by the 1968 African Convention on the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. 24 Legal instruments predating the establishment of the United Nations are the 1909 Agreement Respecting Boundary Waters between the United States and Canada or the 1921 Geneva Convention Concerning the Use of White Lead in Painting. Cf. Sands (2003:25) and Kiss & Shelton (2004:25). 25 Amended in 1962 and 1969 and replaced in 1972 by the International Convention for the Prevention of the Pollution of the Sea by Oil. 26 Entry into force: 10 September 1964. 27 Entry into force: 10 June 1964. Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 84 Convention on the High Seas,28 and the Convention on Fishing and Conservation of Living Resources of the High Seas.29 The four Conventions on the Law of the Sea aimed at achieving international cooperation to solve the problems related to the conservation of the living resources of the high seas. Among others, it prohibited ocean pollution by oil, pipelines and by radioactive waste; further, damage to the marine environment caused by drilling operations on the continental shelf was also addressed. The 1959 Antarctic Treaty outlawed all nuclear activity on the sixth continent and envisaged the adoption of measures to protect animals and plants. The present ecological era is considered to have started at the end of the 1960s, when it became apparent that the world’s resources were not limitless and something needed to be done to prohibit industrial and developing nations from destroying the world’s water, air, biological and mineral resources. Public opinion increasingly demanded action to protect the quantity and quality of the environment.30 New technologies, especially the development and deployment of nuclear technology led to further environmental legislation such as the 1963 Moscow Treaty Banning Nuclear Weapons in the Atmosphere, Outer Space and Underwater. It was adopted to obtain an agreement on general and complete disarmament under strict international control and in accordance with the objectives of the United Nations. It is noteworthy, that even before the United Nations officially took up the protection of the environment with its Stockholm conference in 1972, it was at regional level, where environmental law history was written as early as 1968. On the European level, the Council of Europe adopted the first environmental texts.31 But more remarkably, the heads of states and governments of the Organisation of African Unity in 1968 signed a comprehensive document on environmental protection, namely the African Convention on the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. This was remarkable in that such a document was signed despite the common view in the region that environmental degradation was primarily a problem of industrial pollution in the northern hemisphere. Within the United Nations, which strongly shaped the evolution of international environmental law, several conferences and the results thereof are of particular relevance. In 1972, the General Assembly convened a Conference on the Human Environment in Stockholm. This environmental conference was the first of its kind and it was attended by about 6,000 participants, delegations from 113 states, representatives of every major intergovernmental organisation, 700 observers sent by 400 ____________________ 28 Entry into force: 30 September 1962. 29 Entry into force: 20 March 1966. 30 Kiss & Shelton (2004:27). 31 The Declaration on Air Pollution Control; the European Water Charter; and the European Agreement on the Restricting of the Use of Certain Detergents in Washing and Cleaning Products. See Kiss & Shelton (2004:27). INTRODUCING ENVIRONMENTAL LAW 85 NGOs and 1,500 journalists.32 The two-week conference resulted in several documents, which remain basic foundations of today’s international environmental law: The Declaration on the Human Environment included 26 principles that greatly shaped future international environmental law. In its basic statements, the 1972 Stockholm Declaration on Human Environment recognises that the natural elements and man-made things are essential to human well-being and to the full enjoyment of human rights including the right to life. The protection of the environment is viewed as a major issue for economic development. It furthermore recognises that the natural growth of the world’s population continuously poses problems for preserving the environment and that human ability to improve the environment is complemented by social progress and the evolution of production, science and technology. The Action Plan for Human Environment, also a result of the 1972 Stockholm conference, is made up of 109 resolutions for action with three major themes: a global environmental assessment programme;33 environmental management activities;34 and supporting measures focused on information and public education, and on the education of environmental specialists. One further important outcome of the 1972 Stockholm Conference was the recommendation for a central organisation charged with environmental matters, today’s United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). Subsequent to the Stockholm Conference, a multitude of environmental conventions were adopted.35 The 1971 Ramsar Convention on Conservation of Wetlands of International Importance was adopted to stem the progressive encroachment on and subsequent loss of wetlands, while recognising the fundamental ecological functions of wetlands, including their economic, cultural, scientific and recreational value. The 1972 UNESCO Convention on the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage, adopted in Paris, established a system to protect cultural and natural heritage of outstanding universal value. In 1972 the UN Conference on the Law of the Sea produced the Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) adopted in 1982 after ten years of work. UNCLOS encompasses, inter alia, the issue of marine environmental protection. In 1973 the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES) was adopted in Washington to protect certain endangered species from over-exploitation by means of a system of import-export permits. The 1979 Bonn Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Ani- ____________________ 32 See http://www.unep.org/Documents.multilingual/Default.asp?DocumentID=97&articleID=15 19&l=en, accessed 4 November 2010. Also see Kiss & Shelton (2004:28). 33 Establishing ‘Earthwatch’ a mechanism for evaluation and review, research and monitoring and information exchange. 34 Containing provisions concerning pollution (dumping of toxic and dangerous substances; elaboration of norms limiting noise; control of contaminations in food); protection of the marine environment; and protection of wildlife and natural spaces. 35 For a collection of international environmental treaties see UNEP (2005). Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 86 mals protects those species that migrate across national boundaries. The 1982 United Nations World Charter for Nature was not endorsed as a binding legal instrument, but it continues to have a strong influence on environmental law. This charter proclaims that mankind itself is part of nature, that civilisation is rooted in nature and that every form of life is unique and therefore merits respect, regardless of its worth to man. In its principles it sets forth that nature shall be respected; population levels of all wild forms, wild and domesticated shall be at least sufficient for their survival; special protection shall be afforded to the unique areas of the globe (land and sea); and that ecosystems, organisms and other natural resources shall be managed to achieve and maintain their optimum sustainable productivity and continuity. Emerging new environmental challenges, such as long-range air pollution and the depletion of the ozone layer resulted in the adoption of the 1985 Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer and the 1987 Montreal Protocol, creating an international system to reduce emissions of ozone-depleting substances. The Chernobyl Disaster of 198636 led to the Vienna Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident and the Vienna Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency of the same year. In 1987, Our Common Future, also known as the Brundtland Report, was drafted by a special UN Commission.37 This report stated that individual states, and the international community at large, had come to recognise sustainable development as the single most important paradigm to maintain and improve the quality of human life. The newly-coined term, sustainable development, meant that natural resources, renewable or non-renewable, and the environment must be used in such a manner that may equitably yield the greatest benefit to present generations while maintaining its potential to meet the needs and aspirations of future generations. Sustainable development includes the maintenance and improvement of the capacity of the environment to produce renewable resources and the natural capacity for regeneration of such resources. This concept was taken up by the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development held in Rio in 1992. It was the next big conference after Stockholm 1972, and hosted 10,000 participants, 172 states, 1,400 NGOs and 9,000 ____________________ 36 On April 26, 1986, the fourth reactor of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant exploded. After the explosion, graphite fires broke out due to the high temperatures of the reactor. All permanent residents of Chernobyl and the zone of alienation were evacuated because radiation levels in the area had become unsafe. The nuclear meltdown produced a radioactive cloud that floated over neighbouring nations. Two hundred and thirty-seven people suffered from acute radiation sickness, of which thirty-one died within the first three months. An international assessment of the health effects of the Chernobyl accident is contained in a series of reports by the United Nations Scientific Committee of the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). The radioactive contamination of aquatic systems as well as the degradation of flora and fauna became major issues in the immediate aftermath of the accident. 37 World Commission on Environment and Development (1987). INTRODUCING ENVIRONMENTAL LAW 87 journalists.38 Two legally binding instruments resulted from the Rio Conference, namely the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UN- FCCC) and the 1992 Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). The UNFCCC was drafted prior to the Rio Conference, adopted in New York, and then opened for signature at the Rio Conference. It regulates levels of greenhouse gas concentration in the atmosphere, so as to avoid climate change on a level that would impede sustainable economic development or compromise initiatives in food production, while the CBD aims at conserving biological diversity, promoting the sustainable use of its components, and encouraging equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the utilisation of genetic resources. Other texts resulting from the Rio Conference were the Non-Legally Binding Authoritative Statement of Principles for a Global Consensus on the Management, Conservation and Sustainable Development of all Types of Forests; the Declaration on Environment and Development (Rio Declaration) as well as Agenda 21. The Rio Declaration, a soft law mechanism, reaffirms the Stockholm Declaration and provides 27 principles guiding environment and development, the core concepts being sustainable development and integrating development and environmental protection. Concepts contained in the Rio Declaration include inter-generational equity; prevention; environmental impact assessment; the polluter pays and precautionary principles; public rights such as participation and access to justice; and the special status of indigenous peoples. Agenda 21, which is a Programme of Action and, like the Rio Declaration, a soft law and thus a non-binding document, was drafted to serve as a guide for the implementation of the treaties agreed to at the summit and the principles of sustainable development. Agenda 21 also established the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development (CSD) and the Global Environment Facility (GEF). Agenda 21 remains of particular importance for international environmental law and consists of 40 Chapters with 115 specific topics. Agenda 21 is sub-divided in four main parts: conservation and resource management (e.g. atmosphere, forest, water, waste, chemical substances); socio-economic dimensions (e.g. habitats, health, demography, consumption and production patterns); strengthening the role of NGOs and other social groups; and measures of implementation (funding, institutions). Sector-specific Chapters on the atmosphere (9); biodiversity and biotechnology (15); oceans (17); freshwater resources (18); toxic chemicals (19); and waste (20ff) form part of Agenda 21. After the Rio Conference, virtually every multilateral agreement included environmental protection, be it of particularly environmental, economic, or human rights ____________________ 38 Kiss & Shelton (2004:33). Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 88 or humanitarian law nature.39 An emerging issue in international environmental law after the Rio Conference was a new weapons system which called for the 1993 Paris Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and their Destruction. New technologies such as biotechnology and the handling of living modified organisms (LMOs) in the laboratory resulted in the adoption of the 2000 Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety to the CBD, drafted to ensure an adequate level of protection in the field of safe transfer, handling and use of LMOs that may have adverse effects on the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity, taking into account risks to human health, and specifically focusing on trans-boundary movements. Ten years after the Rio Conference, the next big UN Conference of environmental relevance was the Johannesburg World Summit on Sustainable Development held in 2002. Although this summit was considered to be less successful in environmental terms by environmentalists and environmental lawyers, it emphasised the interrelation between combating poverty and improving the environment. The Declaration on Sustainable Development, which emerged from the summit, focuses on development and poverty eradication and recognises three components of sustainable development: economic development, social development, and environmental protection. The Johannesburg Summit was followed by a further World Summit of the United Nations General Assembly in 2005, which reaffirmed the commitment to achieve the goal of sustainable development through implementation of Agenda 21 and the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation. The 2005 World Summit Outcome, adopted by the UN General Assembly, specifically envisages promoting a recycling economy to tackle climate change, to promote clean energy, to fight hunger, and to provide access to clean drinking water and basic sanitation. Undoubtedly, the UN has played a vital role in the development of environmental law. However, it must also be emphasised, that environmental law has gradually developed on the regional, sub-regional and of course on the national levels as well. Seen from a Cameroonian perspective, international environmental law within the African Union and the Economic Community of Central African States (ECCAS) is of particular importance. As early as 1968, the Organisation of African Unity (OAU), which later became the African Union (AU), signed a comprehensive document on environmental protection, namely the African Convention on the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources to enhance environmental protection; foster the conservation and sustainable use of natural resources; and to harmonise and coordinate policies in these fields. The 1968 Convention was revised in 2003 to improve institutional structures to facilitate effective implementation and mechanisms to encourage ____________________ 39 (ibid.). INTRODUCING ENVIRONMENTAL LAW 89 compliance and enforcement, but the revised convention is yet to come into force.40 One further piece of AU legislation of environmental relevance is the African Nuclear Free Zone Treaty, which was adopted in 1995 and entered into force on 15 July 2009 to establish an African nuclear-weapon-free zone, thereby, inter alia, keeping Africa free of environmental pollution from radioactive waste. Within the ECCAS legal framework, environmental concerns are of increasing importance and have a place in the legal setting of the regional institution within the Treaty Establishing the ECCAS (Article 51) and its various Protocols (e.g. the Protocol on Cooperation in Natural resources between member states of the ECCAS). The evolution of international (and national) environmental law was not restricted to the drafting of legal treaties, agreements or similar documents. Jurisprudence also played and continues to play a significant role in the process of developing environmental law standards and contributed to the protection of the environment. One early landmark decision in this regard was a case involving the United States and Canada in 1941, namely the Trail Smelter Arbitration (with involvement of the Governments of Canada and the United States).41 The arbitration affirmed that no state has the right to use its territory or permit it to be used to cause serious damage by emissions to the territory of another state or to the property of persons found there. Jurisprudence of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) also contributed to environmental protection. The Corfu Channel case42 (UK v Albania), decided by the ICJ in 1949, did not specifically deal with environmental matters but addressed general principles of state responsibility also applicable to environmental matters. In 1996, the ICJ issued two advisory opinions relating to the use of nuclear weapons, one requested by the General Assembly of the United Nations,43 the other by the World Health Organisation44. The latter dealt directly with environmental concerns as the question in the request was formulated as follows: ____________________ 40 As of January 2017, 42 states have signed the Convention, sixteen member states have deposited their instrument of ratification. The revised Convention came into force on 23 July 2016, 30 days after the 15th country (Burkina Faso) had deposited its ratification instrument. Cameroon has not yet signed the Convention. 41 Trail Smelter Arbitration (1938/1941) 3 RIAA 1905 Arbitral Tribunal: US and Canada. 42 ICJ Corfu Channel (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland v Albania) judgment available at http://www.icj-cij.org/, accessed 5 November 2010. 43 ICJ Legality of the Threat or Use of Nuclear Weapons; Request for Advisory Opinion by the General Assembly of the United Nation, 8 July 1996, at http://www.icj-cij.org/ docket/index.php?p1=3&p2=4&k=e1&case=95&code=unan&p3=4, accessed 5 November 2010. 44 ICJ Legality of the Use by a State of Nuclear Weapons in Armed Conflict; Request for Advisory Opinion by the World Health Organisation, 8 July 1996, at http://www.icj-cij.org/ docket/index.php?p1=3&p2=4&k=e1&p3=4&case=93; last accessed 5 November 2010. Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 90 In view of the health and environmental effects, would the use of nuclear weapons by a State in war or other armed conflict be a breach of its obligations under international law including the WHO Constitution? The court in its advisory opinion denied the request by the WHO because the legality of the use of nuclear weapons “does not relate to a question which arises within the scope of activities of that organisation”. The court held that although negative effects on human health and the environment may result from the use of nuclear weapons, the WHO needs to undertake measures irrespective of the legality of their use. The request by the United Nations General Assembly was, however, accepted and with regard to environmental concerns the court recognised that45 the environment is under daily threat and that the use of nuclear weapons could constitute a catastrophe for the environment. The Court also recognises that the environment is not an abstraction but represents the living space, the quality of life and the very health of human beings, including generations unborn. The existence of the general obligation of States to ensure that activities within their jurisdiction and control respect the environment of other States or of areas beyond national control is now part of the corpus of international law relating to the environment. And further the court stated that46 while the existing international law relating to the protection and safeguarding of the environment does not specifically prohibit the use of nuclear weapons, it indicates important environmental factors that are properly to be taken into account in the context of the implementation of the principles and rules of the law applicable in armed conflict. One further case of particular importance decided by the ICJ was the case concerning the Gabcíkovo-Nagymaros Project.47 This case raised a multitude of environmentally related legal issues, such as the concept of sustainable development, the principle of continuing environmental impact assessment and the handling of erga omnes obligations in inter partes judicial procedure. ____________________ 45 ICJ Legality of the Threat or Use of Nuclear Weapons; Request for Advisory Opinion by the General Assembly of the United Nation, 8 July 1996, 21 para. 29, at http://www.icjcij.org/docket/index.php?p1=3&p2=4&k=e1&case=95&code=unan&p3=4, last accessed 5 November 2010. For a discussion of the ICJ’s advisory opinion and of the question whether or not the use of nuclear weapons during international armed conflict would violate existing norms of public international law relating to the protection and safeguarding the environment see Koppe (2008). 46 ICJ Legality of the Threat or Use of Nuclear Weapons; Request for Advisory Opinion by the General Assembly of the United Nation, 8 July 1996, 21 para. 33, at http://www.icjcij.org/docket/index.php?p1=3&p2=4&k=e1&case=95&code=unan&p3=4, accessed 5 November 2010. 47 ICJ Gabčíkovo-Nagymaros Project (Hungary v Slovakia), 25 September 1997, at http://www.icj-cij.org/docket/index.php?p1=3&p2=3&k=8d&case=92&code=hs&p3=4, accessed 5 November 2010. INTRODUCING ENVIRONMENTAL LAW 91 But not only the jurisdiction of the ICJ contributed to the development of environmental law and to the protection of the environment. Other international and national judicial bodies had to deal with environmental concerns as well. The Dispute Settlement Body of the WTO, for example, was frequently confronted to resolve issues regarding environmental protection.48 Environmental protection was also a burning issue in the Ogoni case, a case which was heard in national courts of Nigeria49 and the United States,50 as well as by the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights51 and which was also subject to a United Nations Special Rapporteur’s Report on Nigeria,52 which accused Nigeria and Shell of abusing human rights and failing to protect the environment in oilproducing regions, and called for an investigation of Shell. Subject to judicial review in this case was the fact that, since Shell began drilling for oil in Ogoniland in the Niger Delta in 1958, the people of Ogoniland have had pipelines built across their farmlands and in front of their homes, have suffered constant oil leaks from these very pipelines, and have been forced to live with the constant flaring of gas fires. This environmental assault has drenched land with oil, killed masses of fish and other aquatic life, and introduced devastating acid rain to the land of the Ogoni, a people dependent upon farming and fishing. The poisoning of the land and water has had devastating economic and health consequences. Summarising, it can be stated that the history of modern environmental law originated in the second half of the past century and is strongly influenced and developed by international and national political action and legislative measures, as well as by international and national jurisprudence. ____________________ 48 See for example the following cases: Panel Report, United States – Import Prohibition of Certain Shrimp and Shrimp Products WT/DS58/R and Corr.1, adopted 6 November 1998, modified by Appellate Body Report, WT/DS58/AB/R, DSR 1998:VII, 2821; Panel Report, European Communities – Measures Affecting Asbestos and Asbestos-Containing Products, WT/DS135/R and Add.1, adopted 5 April 2001, modified by Appellate Body Report, WT/DS135/AB/R, DSR 2001:VIII, 3305; Panel Report, Brazil – Measures Affecting Imports of Retreaded Tyres, WT/DS332/R, adopted 17 December 2007, as modified by Appellate Body Report, WT/DS332/AB/R. 49 Judgment delivered by the Nigerian High Court on 14 November 2005. 50 Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum; United States Court of Appeals for The Second Circuit, Docket Nos. 06-4800-cv, 06-4876-cv. http://www.ca2.uscourts.gov/decisions, last accessed 5 November 2010. For a comment on this decision see Ikari (2010). 51 Communication 155/96. The Social and Economic Rights Action Center and the Center for Economic and Social Rights v. Nigeria, at http://www.achpr.org/english/_info/decision_ article_24.html, accessed 5 November 2010. 52 Released 15 April 1998. The report condemned Shell for using a “well-armed security force which is intermittently employed against protesters.” The report was unusual both because of its frankness and its focus on Shell, instead of only on member countries. Katharina RUPPEL-SCHLICHTING 92 References Bagader, AA, AT El-Chirazi El-Sabbagh, M As-Sayyid Al-Glayand & MY Izzi-Deen Samarrai in collaboration with O Abd-ar-Rahman Llewellyn, 1994, Environmental protection in Islam, 2nd edition, Gland, IUCN/International Union for the Conservation of Nature & MEPA/the Meteorological Protection Administration of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, at http://cmsdata.iucn.org/downloads/environemental_protection_in_islam.pdf; accessed 1 March 2017. Beyerlin, U, 2006, Bridging the North-South divide in international environmental law, 66 Zeitschrift für ausländisches öffentliches Recht und Völkerrecht (ZaöRV), 259. Gatmaytan, DB, 2003, The illusion of intergenerational equity: Oposa v. Factoran as pyrrhic victory, 15 Georgetown International Environmental Law Review, 457. Hinz, MO & OC Ruppel, 2008, Legal protection of biodiversity in Namibia, in: Hinz, MO & OC Ruppel (eds), 2008, Biodiversity and the ancestors: Challenges to customary and environmental law, case studies from Namibia, Windhoek, Namibia Scientific Society, 3-62. Ikari, B, 2010, U.S. Appeals Court dismisses Ogoni lawsuit against Shell – no corporate liability, means more corporate killings, genocide and instability, Sahara Reporters, 22 September 2010, at http://www.saharareporters.com/article/us-appeals-court-dismisses-ogoni-lawsuit-againstshellno-corporate-liability-means-more-cor, accessed 5 November 2010. Kidd, M, 2008, Environmental law, Cape Town, Juta. Kiss, A & D Shelton, 2004, International environmental law, New York, Transnational Publishers. Koppe, E, 2008, The use of nuclear weapons and the protection of the environment during international armed conflict, Oxford, Hart Publishing. Kuznets, S, 1955, Economic growth and income inequality, 45 (1) American Economic Review, 1. Kuznets, S, 1956, Quantitative aspects of the economic growth of nations, 5 Economic Development and Cultural Change, 1. Ruppel-Schlichting, K, 2016, Introducing environmental law, in: Ruppel, OC & K Ruppel- Schlichting, Environmental law and policy in Namibia, Windhoek, Hanns-Seidel-Foundation, 9-21. Sands, P & J Peel, 2012, Principles of international environmental law, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. Sands, P, 2003, Principles of international environmental law, 2nd edition, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. UNEP / United Nations Environment Programme, 2005, Register of international treaties and other agreements in the field of the environment, Nairobi, UNEP. World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987, Our common future. Report transmitted to the General Assembly as an Annex to document A/42/427 - Development and International Cooperation: Environment, at http://www.un-documents.net/wced-ocf.htm, accessed 2 March 2017. Yandle, B, M Vijayaraghavan & M Bhattarai, 2002, The environmental Kuznets Curve – a primer, 2 (1) PERC/Property Environment and Research Centre Study, 1. 93 CHAPITRE 3 : INTRODUCTION AU DROIT INTERNATIONAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT1 Oliver C. RUPPEL & Daniel Armel OWONA MBARGA 1 Introduction Le présent chapitre traite de plusieurs aspects du droit international de l’environnement en mettant l’accent sur la manière dont ils sont reliés à la situation du Cameroun. Il convient de reconnaître d’emblée que de nombreux juristes de renommée internationale2 ont écrit sur le sujet, surtout en matière de sources du droit international. Cependant, afin de donner un aperçu aussi complet que possible de ce domaine juridique, sans toutefois déborder le cadre de cette publication, nous résumons dans ce chapitre les caractéristiques les plus fondamentales du droit international de l’environnement. 2 L’applicabilité du droit international au Cameroun Parler de l’applicabilité du droit international à un État revient à s’interroger sur les modalités d’application des règles d’origine externe3 dans un ordre juridique interne. En effet, l’application de ces normes dans un État est assujettie à la mise en œuvre de divers mécanismes consacrés par la constitution qui établit leurs conditions d’internalisation. Avant toute présentation des mécanismes sus-évoqués, il sied de rappeler que l’application du droit international dans un État peut s’effectuer selon deux systèmes, en l’occurrence le monisme et le dualisme. Le premier affirme une unité juridique entre le droit international et le droit interne dont les règles seraient hiérarchisées en fonction d’un principe,4 tandis que le second considère que ces ordres juridiques sont ____________________ 1 Ce chapitre est partiellement basé sur Ruppel (2016). 2 Cf. par exemple Sands & Peel (2018) ; Kiss & Shelton (2004) ; Dugard (2011). 3 Pour reprendre l’expression d’Ondoua qui l’utilise pour désigner tant le droit international que le droit communautaire. Cf. Ondoua (2014:295). 4 Pellet (2006:827). Oliver C. RUPPEL & Daniel Armel OWONA MBARGA 94 indépendants l’un de l’autre en ce qui concerne leurs sources, leur objet et leurs destinataires.5 Dans le premier cas, nous pouvons avoir un monisme avec primauté du droit international sur le droit interne.6 La nature de la règle internationale reste intacte dans un système postulant une homogénéité entre les sources du droit international et du droit national. Dans le second cas par contre, une hétérogénéité des systèmes juridiques international et national est prônée, justifiant ainsi la nécessité d’une réception du droit international dans le droit interne. Par ce mécanisme, les règles du droit international mutent pour devenir de simples normes de droit national.7 Au Cameroun, le constituant a opté pour un monisme avec primauté du droit international. En effet, l’article 45 de la loi constitutionnelle du 18 janvier 1996 établit que les traités et accords internationaux régulièrement approuvés ou ratifiés ont, dès leur publication, une autorité supérieure à celle des lois, sous réserve pour chaque accord ou traité, de son application par l’autre partie. L’on peut ainsi voir dans cet article la valeur infra constitutionnelle et supra-législative des traités et accords internationaux dans l’ordre juridique camerounais. Il ressort donc de cet article que les modalités d’insertion du droit international dans l’ordre juridique interne camerounais sont une ratification régulière des traités et accords internationaux, leur publication, et une réciprocité dans leur application. 2.1 La ratification régulière des traités et accords internationaux La ratification peut se définir comme l’acte par lequel l’organe compétent d’un État confirme la signature apposée sur un traité par un plénipotentiaire et marque ainsi le consentement définitif de l’État à être lié par ce traité.8 Au Cameroun, c’est le Président de la République qui dispose de cette prérogative. En effet, l’article 43 de la loi constitutionnelle du 18 janvier 1996 lui accorde la compétence exclusive de négociation et de ratification des traités et accords internationaux. Cet article institue donc la prééminence des pouvoirs du Président de la République dans l’exercice des fonctions diplomatiques de l’État. D’aucuns ont, pour cette raison, affirmé que le chef de ____________________ 5 Metou (2009:132, note 10). 6 Le monisme avec primauté du droit international est le système qui prévaut dans les États ayant opté pour le monisme. Ce choix est d’ailleurs appuyé par la jurisprudence internationale. En effet, le Tribunal arbitral mixte franco-mexicain a affirmé, dans sa sentence du 19 octobre 1928, qu’« il est incontestable et incontesté que le droit international est supérieur au droit interne ». Cf. Georges Pinson (France) v. United Mexican States, (1928:393), décision n° 1, 1928 Recueil de sentences arbitrales, Volume V. 7 Mouelle Kombi (1996:137). 8 Cornu (2011:842). INTRODUCTION AU DROIT INTERNATIONAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 95 l’État « reste le seul initiateur et conducteur de la politique et des relations internationales ».9 Toutefois, il faut noter que l’exercice de ce pouvoir peut s’effectuer avec l’intervention de certains acteurs, notamment le Parlement, le Conseil constitutionnel et le Peuple. Relativement au Parlement, la ratification par le chef de l’État doit au préalable faire l’objet d’une approbation en forme législative lorsque le traité ou l’accord international en question concerne l’une des matières qui ressort du domaine de la loi énuméré à l’article 26 de la Constitution.10 Cependant, cette condition ne peut être considérée que comme une norme d’habilitation du fait de son caractère plus formel que substantiel.11 De plus, cette idée est confortée par le fait que la Constitution n’institue pas une juridiction chargée de contrôler le respect de cette formalité. Pour ce qui est du Conseil constitutionnel, il faut tout d’abord préciser qu’il est mis en place depuis 2018. Il ne peut être saisi que par voie d’action par des autorités habilitées, en l’occurrence le Président de la République, le Président du Sénat, le Président de l’Assemblée nationale, un tiers des membres de l’une des deux chambres parlementaires, et les Présidents des exécutifs régionaux lorsque les intérêts de leur région sont en cause.12 Au regard de la loi constitutionnelle du 18 janvier 1996, lorsque le Conseil constitutionnel déclare qu’un traité ou un accord international comporte une clause contraire à la Constitution, sa ratification ou son approbation en forme législative ne peut intervenir qu’après une révision de la Constitution.13 C’est dire que le contrôle de constitutionnalité des conventions est un contrôle préventif,14 mais surtout non systématique pour reprendre l’expression d’Olinga.15 Cependant, ce contrôle n’a encore, à notre connaissance, jamais été effectué. Cela constitue un risque pour la garantie de la primauté de la Constitution dans l’ordre juridique camerounais, car le caractère non systématique de la saisine du Conseil constitutionnel peut contribuer à l’insertion dans l’ordre juridique camerounais de conventions internationales contraires à la Constitution.16 Ainsi, une saisine obligatoire du Conseil constitutionnel serait indiquée pour une meilleure protection de la Constitution.17 Par ailleurs, il serait égale- ____________________ 9 Tcheuwa (1999:93). 10 Voir article 43, loi constitutionnelle n° 96/06 du 18 janvier 1996 portant révision de la Constitution. 11 Ondoua (2014:299). 12 Voir article 47 (2), loi constitutionnelle n° 96/06 du 18 janvier 1996 portant révision de la Constitution. 13 Voir article 44, loi constitutionnelle n° 96/06 du 18 janvier 1996 portant révision de la Constitution. 14 Atangana-Malongue (2014:314). 15 Olinga (2005:5). 16 Atangana-Malongue (2014:314). 17 (ibid.). Oliver C. RUPPEL & Daniel Armel OWONA MBARGA 96 ment opportun d’attribuer à tout plaideur la qualité pour saisir le Conseil constitutionnel que ce soit par voie d’action18 ou par voie d’exception19 afin que la saisine de cette juridiction ne soit pas conditionnée par la configuration politique des institutions. En effet, un Parlement dans lequel les députés de l’opposition politique n’atteignent pas, par exemple, le tiers requis pour la saisine du Conseil constitutionnel ne saisira jamais cette juridiction. Par ailleurs, il serait difficile d’imaginer le parti politique majoritaire au Parlement saisir la juridiction constitutionnelle sauf fronde massive en son sein. Enfin, en ce qui concerne le Peuple, le Chef de l’État peut, après consultation des Présidents du Conseil constitutionnel, de l’Assemblée nationale et du Sénat, soumettre au référendum des projets de loi tendant à la ratification des accords ou traités internationaux présentant, par leurs conséquences, une importance particulière.20 Cependant, une telle consultation n’a encore jamais été réalisée, ce qui conduit pour certains à une « …désuétude du référendum en matière de ratification des instruments conventionnels ».21 Ainsi, la ratification est une étape primordiale à l’application du droit international au Cameroun. Dès lors qu’elle a été effectuée, il faut publier ce consentement à être lié par les dispositions du traité ou de l’accord international ratifié afin qu’il soit connu de tous. 2.2 La publication des traités et accords internationaux En droit camerounais, la publication est un acte assuré par le Président de la République ou les autorités subordonnées consistant à porter un texte à la connaissance de ses destinataires, les sujets de droit.22 Elle s’effectue selon une procédure comprenant une solution de principe à laquelle des aménagements ont été apportés. ____________________ 18 La saisine par voie d’action permettrait à tout plaideur de saisir directement le Conseil constitutionnel comme le ferait les autorités habilitées que nous avons énumérées. L’article 122 de la Constitution béninoise par exemple consacre cette modalité : « Tout citoyen peut saisir la Cour constitutionnelle sur la constitutionnalité des lois, soit directement, soit par procédure de l’exception d’inconstitutionnalité invoquée dans une affaire qui le concerne devant une juridiction.… ». 19 La saisine par voie d’exception consiste à soulever une exception d’inconstitutionnalité au cours d’un procès devant une juridiction autre que le Conseil constitutionnel. Dans ce cas, cette juridiction sursoit à statuer sur le litige en attendant la décision du juge constitutionnel. C’est par exemple le cas en Côte d’Ivoire où l’article 96 de la Constitution dispose que tout plaideur peut soulever l’exception d’inconstitutionnalité d’une loi devant toute juridiction. 20 Voir article 36 (2), loi constitutionnelle n° 96/06 du 18 janvier 1996 portant révision de la Constitution. 21 Moulle Kombi (2003:23). 22 Tchakoua (2008:113-114). INTRODUCTION AU DROIT INTERNATIONAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 97 En principe la publication d’un texte s’effectue par le biais de son insertion matérielle au Journal officiel publié en anglais et en français et exécutoire à Yaoundé le jour même de sa publication.23 Cependant, en raison de l’impossibilité d’assurer la parution quotidienne du Journal officiel, cette solution de principe ne peut pas toujours être respectée.24 Pour pallier à cette difficulté, le texte est publié, sur décision du Président de la République, suivant la procédure d’urgence.25 Selon l’article 4 de l’ordonnance n° 72/11 du 26 août 1972 relative à la publication des lois, des ordonnances, décrets et actes réglementaires, cette procédure consiste en la communication du texte à la population par tous moyens, notamment par la radio aux heures de grande écoute ou dans des émissions spécialisées. Mais par la suite, le texte sera publié au Journal officiel. C’est à ces modalités qu’obéit également la publication des traités et accords internationaux. En effet, le décret de ratification signé par le chef de l’État témoigne de ce que la convention est ratifiée et implique sa publication par insertion au Journal officiel.26 Mais dans le cas des normes communautaires qui sont d’applicabilité directe, ce sont les traités eux-mêmes qui organisent les modalités de leur entrée en vigueur. Par exemple, le Traité créant l’Organisation pour l’harmonisation en Afrique du droit des affaires dispose en son article 9 que les actes uniformes entrent en vigueur 90 jours après leur adoption, sauf modalités particulières d’entrée en vigueur prévue par l’acte uniforme lui-même. Ils sont opposables trente jours francs après leur publication au Journal officiel de l’Organisation.27 La question de la publication est très importante dans la mesure où une incompréhension de sa procédure peut amener un juge à rendre de mauvaises décisions. C’est ce qui a été le cas dans l’affaire Liman Saïbou du 27 février 2006 devant le Tribunal de grande instance du Mfoundi dans laquelle le juge avait confirmé la vente d’un immeuble, bien commun d’un couple, effectuée par le mari sans l’autorisation de son épouse au motif que la Convention sur l’élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination à l’égard des femmes28 n’avait pas été publiée conformément à l’article 45 de la loi constitutionnelle du 18 janvier 1996.29 Pourtant, cette convention avait été ratifiée le 15 juillet 198830 et publiée au Journal officiel du 15 août 1988.31 Non seulement le décret de ratification valait déclaration officielle de l’applicabilité de ladite convention, mais encore, cette convention avait fait l’objet d’une insertion au Journal ____________________ 23 (ibid.:113). 24 (ibid). 25 (ibid). 26 Mouelle Kombi (1996:141). 27 Tchakoua (2008:115). 28 Adoptée le 18 décembre 1979 et entrée en vigueur le 3 septembre 1981. 29 Atangana-Malongue (2014:327). 30 Décret n° 88-993 du 15 juillet 1988. 31 Atangana-Malongue (2014:327). Oliver C. RUPPEL & Daniel Armel OWONA MBARGA 98 officiel. Nous ne pouvons donc que partager le point de vue de Atangana-Malongue qui déplore le fort nationalisme juridique des juridictions de fonds qui rechignent encore à appliquer le droit international.32 Mais une lueur d’espoir subsiste tout de même de voir diminuer la réticence des juges du fond au regard des décisions de la Cour suprême, notamment la jurisprudence Michel Zouhair33 confirmée dans l’affaire Dame Veuve Yamsi c/ Dame Gomdjim.34 2.3 La réciprocité dans l’application des traités et accords internationaux Par réciprocité il faut entendre le fait que la plupart des traités établissent des droits et obligations d’application réciproque qui ne doivent être respectés et exécutés par une partie qu’autant qu’ils le sont par l’autre.35 Ainsi, dans le cas où l’une des parties ne respectait pas ses obligations, l’autre ne serait pas tenue de les respecter. Seulement cette obligation n’est véritablement pertinente que dans le cadre de conventions bilatérales et devient inopérante en matière de droits de l’homme. En effet, les conventions relatives aux droits de l’homme mettent à la charge des États parties des obligations dont le respect s’impose non à titre de contrepartie des droits consentis par les autres États signataires, mais à raison des engagements pris à l’égard des bénéficiaires,36 en l’occurrence les individus. De ce fait, les normes internationales relatives aux droits de l’homme contenues dans les conventions internationales ratifiées par le Cameroun ne sont pas assujetties à l’obligation de réciprocité. C’est par exemple le cas des normes internationales de protection de l’environnement telles que les principes de prévention et de précaution consacrés dans la Déclaration de Rio de 1992. Au terme de cette analyse, l’on constate que la loi constitutionnelle du 18 janvier 1996 ne fait pas référence à d’autres sources du droit international qu’aux conventions. Le Cameroun s’inscrit alors dans la même lancée que bon nombre d’États afri- ____________________ 32 (ibid.:329). 33 Dans cette affaire, la Cour suprême a établi qu’en cas de conflit entre une convention internationale et une norme interne contraire, la seconde est écartée du champ de contentieux de l’espèce. Cf. Cour suprême, 15 juillet 2010, arrêt n° 21/Civ, affaire Michel Zouhair Fadoul contre Omaïs Kassim Sélecta SARL. 34 Dans cette affaire la Cour suprême a cassé l’arrêt attaqué dont la motivation était fondée sur l’article 1241 du Code civil, au motif qu’il était discriminatoire à l’égard des femmes et contrevenait donc à la Convention sur l’élimination de toutes les discriminations à l’égard des femmes. En appliquant cet arrêt, les juges d’appel avaient violé les engagements internationaux du Cameroun souscrits par la ratification de cette convention. Cour suprême, ordonnance n° 498 du 5 novembre 2013, affaire Dame Veuve Yamsi c/ Dame Gomdjim, inédit. 35 Guinchard & Debard (2015:866). 36 Boukongou (2009-2010:5-6). INTRODUCTION AU DROIT INTERNATIONAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 99 cains d’expression française dont les constitutions ont consacré des articles non au droit international en général, mais davantage au droit international conventionnel.37 Les autres sources du droit international telles que la coutume internationale ne sont pas citées, pourtant elles n’en sont pas moins des sources invocables devant un juge. Seulement, la constitution n’ayant pas précisé leurs modalités d’application, il est difficile d’y faire appel. Metou dit d’ailleurs à ce propos que « C’est certainement pour cette raison que le moyen fondé sur les normes coutumières internationales est moins fréquent devant les juridictions nationales ».38 3 Les sources du droit international de l’environnement Les sources du droit international de l’environnement font partie des sources du droit international en général. Le régime juridique international doit par conséquent être consulté pour retracer les sources du droit international de l’environnement. Le droit international, comme le droit national, comprend différents types de droit, à savoir le droit dur et le droit mou. Le droit dur désigne les dispositions ou accords de nature obligatoire, et par conséquent contraignants à l’égard de ceux auxquels ils s’appliquent. Le droit mou est par contre constitué de textes à caractère non impératif tels que les Déclarations résultant des Conférences de Rio et de Stockholm. Il a une grande influence en droit international en ce que son acceptation et son observation produisent le droit international coutumier. Le principal problème consiste à déterminer à quel moment le droit mou devient un tel droit, c’est-à-dire un droit dur. Nous examinerons cette situation plus loin. Le droit international de l’environnement comprend autant le droit dur que le droit mou. Les sources du droit international en général sont énumérées à l’article 38 du Statut de la Cour internationale de justice (CIJ) qui constitue l’organe judiciaire principal des Nations unies: 1. La Cour, dont la mission est de régler conformément au droit international les différends qui lui sont soumis, applique : a. les conventions internationales, soit générales, soit spéciales, établissant des règles expressément reconnues par les États en litige ; b. la coutume internationale comme preuve d’une pratique générale acceptée comme étant que droit ; c. les principes généraux de droit reconnus par les nations civilisées ; d. sous réserve de la disposition de l’article 59, les décisions judiciaires et la doctrine des publicistes les plus qualifiés des différentes nations, comme moyen auxiliaire de détermination des règles de droit.… ____________________ 37 Foumena (2014:327). 38 Metou (2009:148). Oliver C. RUPPEL & Daniel Armel OWONA MBARGA 100 Étant donné que l’article 38 du Statut de la CIJ a été rédigé pour la première fois en 1920, les présentes dispositions ne reflètent plus aujourd’hui toutes les sources du droit international. Il convient dès lors de tenir compte de l’évolution des sources du droit qui s’ajoutent aux sources déjà reconnues à l’article 38.39 Toutefois, nous développerons uniquement dans les paragraphes qui suivent les quatre catégories de sources du droit international décrites à l’article 38 en soulignant leur incidence sur les préoccupations liées à l’environnement. 3.1 Conventions internationales : accords multilatéraux sur l’environnement (AME) Les conventions internationales ou traités visés à l’article 38 de la CIJ sont définis par l’article 2.1 (a) de la Convention de Vienne sur le droit des traités (1969) comme des accords internationaux « conclus par écrit entre États et régis par le droit international, qu’ils soient consignés dans un instrument unique ou dans deux ou plusieurs instruments connexes, et quelle que soit leur dénomination particulière ». Les Traités internationaux sur l’environnement ou Accords multilatéraux sur l’Environnement (AME), ainsi communément dénommés, régissent les relations en matière d’environnement entre États. Même si, en général, le premier objectif de tout AME est de protéger et de conserver l’environnement, il reste que les AME sont aussi bénéfiques sur le plan économique, politique ou administratif. C’est ainsi qu’ils peuvent protéger la santé publique, améliorer la gouvernance, autonomiser le public pour qu’il puisse s’impliquer dans les actions environnementales, accroître la solidarité, renforcer le respect politique international et améliorer l’assistance et le réseautage techniques et financiers.40 En règle générale, les AME demeurent par nature contraignants et en conséquence doivent être distingués des instruments internationaux non contraignants (droit mou) qui ne disposent d’aucun caractère exécutoire, mais servent plutôt de directives. Le caractère contraignant des AME provient du principe du pacta sunt servanda, qui a été réaffirmé à l’article 26 de la Convention de Vienne sur le droit des traités. Même si le droit international se focalise principalement sur les obligations entre États, il dispose d’un potentiel d’influence au niveau national en matière de droit environnemental. Dans certains cas, les parties à de tels accords sont des organisations ____________________ 39 Cette liste de sources peut être complétée par d’autres sources du droit international telles que les obligations erga omnes et ius cogens. L’estoppel et l’acquiescement peuvent s’ajouter à la liste des sources du droit international ainsi que les actes juridiques unilatéraux. Voir Dugard (2005:27). 40 UNEP (2006:44f.). INTRODUCTION AU DROIT INTERNATIONAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 101 gouvernementales ou non-gouvernementales, au lieu des États ou en sus de ces derniers. 3.1.1 Comment est-ce que les AME sont établis Les traités internationaux sont établis suivant un processus à plusieurs étapes.41 Généralement, une organisation internationale telle que les Nations unies, l’Union africaine ou le Conseil européen élabore un projet de texte. À l’étape suivante, le projet de texte est négocié par les parties prenantes, à savoir les délégations nationales, y compris les autorités gouvernementales, les hommes de sciences et les représentants des ONG. La phase de négociation se clôture par l’adoption d’un texte convenu qui sera par la suite signé par les plénipotentiaires. Certains traités sont signés après la session de clôture des négociations à une période déterminée. Après celle-ci, les États non contractants peuvent adhérer ou accéder au traité. La ratification qui se fait au niveau national dans les formes prévues par le droit national est l’étape qui suit la signature. Les dispositions du droit national prévoient habituellement qu’un traité soit ratifié par le chef de l’État après approbation du parlement ou l’acceptation de l’exécutif. Le procédé par lequel un AME devient applicable en vertu du droit national dépend des dispositions constitutionnelles du pays concerné. Ce procédé peut suivre une approche moniste ou dualiste, comme expliqué plus haut dans ce chapitre.42 Le processus de ratification est dans la plupart des cas conclu par le dépôt de l’instrument de ratification43, approbation ou autre communication, au secrétariat de l’organisation internationale et le traité entre ensuite en vigueur à une date déterminée par le traité lui-même, la plupart du temps après le dépôt d’un certain nombre d’instruments de ratification ou après un délai déterminé. 3.1.2 Portée générale des AME Le droit international de l’environnement peut être établi au niveau mondial et comporter des règles applicables, sinon à l’ensemble, du moins à la quasi-totalité de la communauté internationale.44 Au niveau régional, le droit international crée un cadre ____________________ 41 Cf. Sands (2003:128) ; Dugard (2005:408). 42 Pour une discussion plus détaillée sur la relation entre le droit international et le droit municipal, voir Dugard (2005:47). 43 Il s’agit généralement d’un document délivré par l’État concerné indiquant que le traité a été ratifié. 44 Les AME bénéficient d’une adhésion effective du monde entier et comprennent la Convention sur la biodiversité (CBD) et son protocole, le Protocole de Carthagène sur la biosécurité Oliver C. RUPPEL & Daniel Armel OWONA MBARGA 102 juridique pour des régions particulières, par exemple le droit européen de l’environnement (dont les directives de la Communauté européenne) ou de manière similaire au sein de l’Union africaine.45 La dimension régionale ou continentale peut évidemment être aussi subdivisée en blocs plus petits tels que le cadre juridique de la Communauté économique et monétaire de l’Afrique centrale (CEMAC), souvent appelé niveau sous régional. Les accords bilatéraux sur l’environnement sont des traités conclus la plupart du temps entre deux États qui partagent les mêmes ressources naturelles, par exemple des rivières, des lacs ou des parcs. Comme nous l’avons souligné, la large portée du droit international de l’environnement s’explique en partie par la couverture géographique des accords internationaux. Une autre raison de cette portée est la grande variété des secteurs couverts par ce domaine juridique tels que l’eau, le sol, la biodiversité, l’air et le climat, pour ne citer que ceux-là. Ainsi, le nombre d’accords internationaux se rapportant directement ou indirectement à l’environnement se trouve extraordinairement élevé46 et aucun autre domaine juridique n’a généré autant de conventions sur un sujet aussi précis que le droit international de l’environnement au cours des dernières décennies. 3.1.3 Structure type des AME De nombreux AME ont des caractéristiques communes, utilisent les mêmes techniques juridiques et ont souvent des structures similaires.47 Comme d’autres traités internationaux, les AME sont généralement présentés de la manière suivante : le préambule, qui peut être utile dans l’interprétation des traités, explique les motivations ____________________ (2000), la Convention de Ramsar sur les zones humides d’importance internationale (1971) et la Convention de Washington sur le commerce international des espèces de faune et de flore sauvages menacées d’extinction de 1973 (CITES), entre autres. 45 L’AME le plus pertinent pour Afrique est la Convention africaine sur la conservation de la nature et des ressources naturelles. Concernant certains aspects de la mise en œuvre de la législation de l’UA au niveau national, voir Dinokopila (2015:479). 46 Kiss & Shelton (2004:41) parle de plus de mille. Le Registre des traités internationaux et autres accords dans le domaine de l’environnement d’UNEP (2005) contient 272 accords environnementaux, sans compter les accords et traités bilatéraux axés sur d’autres questions, mais qui établissent des obligations dans le domaine de l’environnement, comme les accords du GATT/OMC ou des accords régionaux de libre-échange. Le site web des accords internationaux sur l’environnement énumère sur ce domaine 1309 accords multilatéraux, 2294 accord bilatéraux, 250 autres accords (non multilatéraux, non bilatéraux), 215 instruments non contraignants (non-accords), 241 instruments bilatéraux non contraignants (non-accords) ainsi que 100 autres instruments environnementaux (non multilatéraux, non bilatéraux) non contraignants (non-accords), voir http://iea.uoregon.edu/page.php?query=home-contents.php, visité le 15 février 2018. 47 Cf. Kiss (2004:42). INTRODUCTION AU DROIT INTERNATIONAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 103 des parties contractantes, mais ne contient en son sein aucune disposition contraignante. La partie principale de l’AME comprend les règles de fond qui définissent les obligations des parties, les modalités d’application, les dispositions institutionnelles (comme celles créant les organes du traité tels que la Conférence des parties) et les dispositions finales relatives à la durée du traité. De nombreux AME comportent des Annexes contenant des réglementations spécifiques relatives aux détails techniques tels que des listes de substances ou d’activités, des normes en matière de pollution, des listes d’espèces protégées, etc. 3.1.4 Respect et application des AME Le respect et l’application des AME48 sont, comme dans d’autres domaines juridiques, essentiels pour que les AME ne restent pas lettre morte. Le respect, c’est-à-dire la conformité par les parties contractantes aux obligations engendrées par l’AME, est assuré par différents moyens juridiques. Les mesures visant à l’observation des AME peuvent être adoptées par les États ou par les secrétariats et conférences des parties à chaque AME spécifique. Ce dernier contient généralement des dispositions relatives au respect ou non des termes de l’Accord.49 L’organe compétent de l’AME50 peut, lorsqu’il est autorisé, passer régulièrement en revue la mise en œuvre globale des obligations découlant de cet instrument juridique et les difficultés rencontrées. Les parties ont l’obligation d’appliquer les AME en adoptant et en promulguant des lois, des règlements, des politiques et d’autres mesures et initiatives à l’effet de respecter leurs engagements. Les organisations internationales ont ainsi élaboré des directives générales sur le respect et l’application des AME.51 Le respect de ces der- ____________________ 48 Pour une discussion plus détaillée sur le respect et l’application des AME, voir UNEP (2006). 49 Voir par exemple l’article 34 du Protocole de Carthagène sur la biosécurité, l’article XII de la Convention sur le commerce international des espèces de faune et de flore sauvages menacées d’extinction (CITES), ou l’article 18 du Protocole de Kyoto à la CCNUCC relative la Décision 27/CMP.1 sur les Procédures et mécanismes relatifs au respect du Protocole de Kyoto, disponible à http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/2005/cmp1/eng/08a03.pdf#page=92, consulté le 15 février 2018. 50 Tel que la Conférence des parties, avec le secrétariat, établi conformément aux articles 23-25 de la Convention sur la biodiversité. 51 En 2002, le PNUE a adopté les Lignes directrices sur le respect et l’application des Accords multilatéraux sur l’environnement ; d’autres Lignes directrices pertinentes comprennent les Lignes directrices 1999 des Caraïbes pour l’application des AME ; les Principes directeurs 2002 pour la réforme des autorités chargée de la mise à exécution des normes environnementales dans les pays en transition de l’Europe orientale, du Caucase et de l’Asie centrale (EO- CAC) élaborés par les États membres de l’EOCAC et l’Organisation de coopération et de développement économique (OCDE) ; ou les Lignes directrices 2003 pour le renforcement du Oliver C. RUPPEL & Daniel Armel OWONA MBARGA 104 niers est renforcé, entre autres, par des plans nationaux de mise en œuvre, dont le suivi et l’évaluation des améliorations en matière d’environnement, le rapport et la vérification, la création des comités dotés d’une expertise appropriée, l’inclusion aux AME des dispositions et mécanismes d’examen du respect de mise en conformité.52 L’efficacité des AME doit être réexaminée. À cet égard, le suivi pourrait constituer une mesure appropriée de renforcement du respect des dispositions. Il comprend la collecte des données, l’élaboration des rapports, l’obligation pour les parties de présenter des rapports réguliers et à temps sur le respect des AME en utilisant une présentation commune appropriée, la vérification des données et des informations techniques afin d’aider à déterminer si la partie se conforme aux AME. Les États parties peuvent être tenus de présenter des rapports sur les progrès accomplis et sur des mesures qu’ils auront adoptées à l’effet de donner suite aux droits reconnus dans les AME. L’article 26 de la Convention sur la biodiversité (CBD) constitue un exemple de disposition instituant cette revue applicable au titre de l’AME. Les parties sont par conséquent invitées à produire des rapports à la Conférence des parties (COP) sur des mesures prises pour appliquer la convention et leur efficacité dans la réalisation des objectifs de la convention. Un des problèmes majeurs concernant les rapports nationaux régis par les accords internationaux en général est la question de la nonsoumission dans les délais. Parmi les raisons invoquées, on peut citer l’insuffisance des ressources humaines, techniques et financières. En prenant encore comme exemple la CBD, force est de constater qu’au 14 février 2018, 190 sur 196 États parties à la CBD avaient soumis le cinquième rapport national.53 Le Cameroun a soumis tous ses cinq rapports nationaux au titre de la CBD. Les dispositions relatives au règlement des différends complètent les dispositions visant le respect d’un accord. Plusieurs formes de mécanismes de règlement des différends, dont les bons offices, la médiation, la conciliation, les commissions d’établissement des faits, les groupes spéciaux de règlement des différends, l’arbitrage et d’autres formes de mécanismes juridiques possibles sont disponibles en fonction des dispositions spécifiques contenues dans l’AME applicable. L’organe judiciaire principal des Nations unies est un organe compétent pour connaître certains différends en matière d’environnement. Les autres instances judiciaires environnementales comprennent le Tribunal international du droit de la mer ou la Cour internationale d’arbitrage et de conciliation sur l’environnement. ____________________ respect et de l’application des Accords Multilatéraux sur l’Environnement (AME) dans la Région CEE (Commission économique des Nations unies pour l’Europe). 52 Cf. les Lignes directrices 2002 du PNUE sur le Respect et l’application des accords multilatéraux sur l’environnement. 53 Voir https://www.cbd.int/reports/default.shtml, consulté le 18 février 2018. INTRODUCTION AU DROIT INTERNATIONAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 105 Alors que le respect est généralement relatif au contexte international, l’application se réfère au contexte national. Celle-ci peut donc être définie comme l’ensemble des procédures et actions employées par l’État, ses autorités et ses agences compétentes pour veiller à ce que les organisations ou les personnes qui ne se conforment pas à la législation sur l’environnement soient amenées à s’y conformer ou remises à la conformité et/ou soient punis suite à une procédure civile, administrative ou pénale.54 L’application de la loi est essentielle pour assurer les avantages des AME, protéger l’environnement, la santé et la sécurité publiques, décourager les violations de la loi et encourager l’amélioration de la performance.55 L’application comprend un ensemble de mesures qui peuvent être mises en œuvre, comme l’adoption des lois et règlements, le contrôle des résultats et diverses activités et étapes que l’État peut entreprendre sur le territoire national afin de garantir la mise en œuvre d’un AME. En outre, de bons programmes de mise en œuvre renforcent la crédibilité des efforts de protection de l’environnement et du système juridique qui les soutient tout en assurant l’équité à l’égard de ceux qui se conforment volontairement aux exigences environnementales.56 Afin de parvenir à une application efficace, il convient entre autres de prévoir des mesures de lutte contre les infractions aux lois et règlements nationaux d’application des accords multilatéraux sur l’environnement (violation de la législation environnementale) ou en cas de violations multiples des lois et règlements nationaux sur l’environnement, que l’État prévoit sa propre responsabilité pénale en conformité avec ses lois et règlements (crimes environnementaux). 3.2 Le droit international coutumier Le droit international coutumier est constitué de normes et de règles que les pays suivent traditionnellement et qui lient tous les États du monde.57 Il n’est cependant pas évident de déterminer à quel moment un principe devient un droit coutumier et par conséquent contraignant. Cette situation a entraîné des différends entre États. Deux critères se sont cependant cristallisés en matière de conditions requises pour qu’une règle devienne un droit international coutumier.58 Le prérequis du premier ____________________ 54 UNEP (2006:294). 55 (ibid.:289). 56 (ibid.:33). 57 Sands (2003:143f.). 58 Ces critères qui sont également appliqués par des juridictions nationales, ont été développés par la jurisprudence internationale, entre autres dans les cas suivants : Cas d’asile Rapports 1950 de la CIJ 266 ; Cas du Plateau Continental de la mer du Nord (Allemagne de l’Ouest c/ Oliver C. RUPPEL & Daniel Armel OWONA MBARGA 106 critère est qu’une pratique soit établie, usus, c’est-à-dire un usage constant et uniforme ou une acceptation généralisée de la règle. Le second critère est l’acceptation qu’une obligation soit contraignante (opinio juris sive necessitatis).59 De nombreuses règles de droit international coutumier concernant particulièrement le domaine du droit de l’environnement ont été élaborées.60 Le principe selon lequel aucun État ne peut utiliser ou permettre d’utiliser son territoire de manière à causer un préjudice au territoire d’un autre État est devenu par exemple un principe de droit international coutumier. Ce principe remonte à l’arbitrage de la Fonderie de Trail en 194161 et a été repris par la Déclaration de Stockholm, répété dans la Déclaration de Rio et réaffirmé dans l’Affaire des armes nucléaires.62 L’obligation d’informer sans délai les autres États concernant des situations d’urgence environnementale et les préjudices environnementaux auxquels un ou plusieurs autres États seraient exposés est énoncée dans les Principes relatifs aux ressources partagées de 1978 rédigés par le PNUE. Cette obligation se trouve également à l’article 192 de la Convention des Nations unies sur le droit de la mer de 1982. Ce devoir a été négligé par le gouvernement de l’Union Soviétique dans le cas de la catastrophe de Tchernobyl en 1986. La conséquence est l’adoption en 1986 de la Convention sur la notification rapide d’un accident nucléaire qui, en son article 2, impose explicitement une obligation aux États de notifier les États qui sont ou pourraient être affectés par un accident nucléaire. 3.3 Les concepts et principes généraux du droit international de l’environnement Un large éventail de principes généraux guide le droit et la politique sur des questions relatives à l’environnement, aux niveaux national et international. La plupart de ces principes comportent de nombreux chevauchements. Tous établissent le cadre fondamental en matière de protection de l’environnement. ____________________ Les Pays-Bas et le Danemark) Rapports 1969 de la CIJ 3 ; Cas du Nicaragua (Nicaragua c/ États-Unis) Rapports 1986 de la CIJ 14. 59 Pour une discussion plus détaillée voir Sands (2003:143) ou Dugard (2005:29). 60 Pour plus de détails voir Sands (2003:147) et Kiss (2004:49). 61 Arbitrage de la fonderie de Trail (1938/1941) 3 RIAA 1905 Tribunal arbitral : États-Unis c/ Canada. 62 Avis consultatif, CIJ Rep. 1996, 226 ss. et paragraphe 64 ss. INTRODUCTION AU DROIT INTERNATIONAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 107 Aperçu des concepts et principes généraux du droit de l’environnement • Souveraineté des États • Coopération • Préservation et protection de l’environnement • Précaution • Prévention • Principe pollueur-payeur • Information et assistance en situation d’urgence environnementale • Information et consultation dans des relations transfrontalières • Droits de la personne : information, participation et accès à la justice • Accès et partage des avantages en matière de ressources naturelles • Bonne gouvernance • Développement durable, intégration et interdépendance • Equité intergénérationnelle et infra-générationnelle • Responsabilité des dommages transfrontaliers • Transparence, participation du public, accès à l’information et recours • Préoccupation commune à l’humanité • Droits des générations futures • Héritage commun de l’humanité • Responsabilités communes mais différenciées Plusieurs concepts établissent le fondement du droit international de l’environnement. La protection des droits des générations futures peut être appréhendée comme un des moteurs essentiels de protection de l’environnement. Aussi, le droit international de l’environnement et de nombreuses conventions internationales expriment-ils l’obligation de protéger l’environnement pour les générations présentes et futures. Le plus important des concepts qui encadrent le droit de l’environnement, particulièrement pour les pays en développement, est probablement le concept de développement durable. Il a été défini dans le Rapport de la Commission mondiale pour l’environnement et le développement de 1987 comme « un développement qui rencontre les besoins du présent sans compromettre ceux des générations futures. »63 Le développement durable est ainsi composé d’une grande variété d’aspects interreliés, parmi lesquels le développement économique et social et la protection de l’environnement.64 Le concept de développement durable est étroitement lié au concept de préoccupation commune à l’humanité. La protection de la préoccupation ____________________ 63 Commission mondiale sur l’environnement et le développement (1987). 64 Pour une analyse détaillée, voir Voigt (2009). Oliver C. RUPPEL & Daniel Armel OWONA MBARGA 108 commune à l’humanité peut entraîner l’imposition des obligations aux États et le soutien ou la limitation des droits et libertés individuelles. La préoccupation commune à l’humanité se matérialise dans le concept d’héritage commun de l’humanité avec l’idée sous-jacente que la préoccupation générale de l’humanité doit être sauvegardée par des régimes juridiques spéciaux appliqués à des domaines et sites spécifiques tels que l’Antarctique ou des sites qui peuvent être considérés comme des parties essentielles de l’héritage culturel de l’humanité. Un des plus vieux principes du droit international général est celui de la souveraineté des États. Le principe énonce que l’État dispose d’une compétence exclusive sur son territoire, qu’il constitue la seule autorité qui peut adopter des règles juridiques contraignantes pour son territoire ; il est dépositaire du pouvoir exécutif (administration, police) et ses tribunaux sont ceux qui sont compétents pour connaître des litiges.65 Le principe de la souveraineté des États est confronté à des défis, particulièrement en ce qui concerne les questions environnementales, comme la pollution de la mer, des rivières, des lacs et de l’air ainsi que la migration transfrontalière des espèces, qui ne respectent pas la compétence territoriale nationale. Il est par conséquent indispensable que les traités et le droit international coutumier imposent des limites à la souveraineté des États. Dans le Rapport dénommé Sutherland,66 la souveraineté est présentée comme l’un des « concepts les plus utilisés et aussi les plus mal utilisés dans les domaines des affaires internationales et du droit international. » L’acceptation dans la quasi-totalité des traités implique le transfert d’une partie du pouvoir décisionnel des États vers certaines institutions internationales. En général, les raisons pour lesquelles les pays acceptent ces traités sont qu’ils réalisent que les avantages d’une action concertée que renforce le traité sont meilleurs par rapport à la situation qui prévaudrait en d’autres circonstances.67 Il devient dès lors indéniable que des unités étatiques, bien que distinctes et bénéficiant d’un territoire, ne disposent plus du contrôle exclusif sur le processus de gouvernance de leur société. Dans ce contexte, la gouvernance se conceptualise à plusieurs niveaux,68 étant donné que le pouvoir s’est largement dispersé sur un éventail d’institutions et d’acteurs. L’obligation internationale générale de coopérer avec les autres dans la résolution des problèmes concernant la communauté internationale est essentielle pour une conservation entière et mondiale de l’environnement.69 Ce principe général est contenu et développé dans de nombreux AME. C’est ainsi que l’article 5 de la Convention sur la biodiversité (CBD) souligne l’importance de ce principe. La coopération est essen- ____________________ 65 Sands (2003:235). 66 Sutherland et al. (2005). 67 (ibid.). 68 Cf. Winter (2006). 69 Sands (2003:249). INTRODUCTION AU DROIT INTERNATIONAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 109 tielle pour rationaliser l’utilisation des ressources partagées, éradiquer la pauvreté comme prérequis au développement durable, renforcer les capacités par le transfert de connaissances, d’informations et de technologies. Cette coopération permet également de garantir le financement et l’assistance technique. Le principe général de prévention peut être considéré comme l’intention la plus importante du droit de l’environnement. Le principe de prévention exige que des mesures soient prises à un stade précoce et, si possible, avant que les dommages ne se produisent. Les mécanismes juridiques visant à la satisfaction des conditions du principe de prévention comprennent l’évaluation des dommages environnementaux (étude d’impact), l’octroi des licences ou autorisations, l’adoption des normes nationales et internationales ou des stratégies et des politiques préventives. Comme le principe de prévention, le principe de précaution a pour but d’éviter les dommages environnementaux. Cependant, il doit être appliqué lorsque les conséquences de la non-action peuvent être particulièrement graves ou irréversibles. L’approche précautionneuse vise à fournir des orientations en matière d’élaboration et d’application du droit de l’environnement en cas d’incertitude scientifique. Elle a été formulée dans le Principe 15 de la Déclaration de Rio sur l’environnement et le développement comme suit :70 Pour protéger l’environnement, des mesures de précaution doivent être largement appliquées par les États selon leurs capacités. En cas de risque de dommages graves ou irréversibles, l’absence de certitude scientifique absolue ne doit pas servir de prétexte pour remettre à plus tard l’adoption de mesures effectives visant à prévenir la dégradation de l’environnement. Un autre principe important qui cadre davantage avec l’économie et qui a trouvé sa place dans bon nombre d’AME et de législations nationales est le principe pollueur payeur dont le but est d’imposer à la personne responsable de la pollution les coûts relatifs aux dommages environnementaux. Le principe pollueur-payeur constitue un moyen d’imputation des frais des mesures de prévention et de contrôle de la pollution afin d’encourager l’utilisation rationnelle des ressources naturelles limitées. Le principe de responsabilités communes mais différenciées tel qu’établi dans le principe 7 de la Déclaration de Rio se reflète dans différents accords sur l’environnement, par exemple la Convention des Nations unies sur le changement climatique (article 3(1)). Le principe de responsabilités communes mais différenciées est composée de la commune responsabilité des États en matière de protection de l’environnement et de la reconnaissance de la différence dans la contribution des États à la dégradation de l’environnement ainsi que de la différence dans les capacités de remédiation à cette dégradation. Ces différentes responsabilités se traduisent par des obligations différenciées pour les États. ____________________ 70 (ibid.:267). Oliver C. RUPPEL & Daniel Armel OWONA MBARGA 110 Aux niveaux international et national, les besoins spécifiques des communautés autochtones en matière d’accès aux avantages découlant des ressources naturelles dont elles dépendent pour leur subsistance sont de plus en plus reconnus. Leur participation autant dans la prise de décision que dans la gestion est d’une haute importance pour la protection des écosystèmes en raison de leurs connaissances traditionnelles et de leur prise de conscience. Le principe d’accès aux ressources et le partage des avantages a été relevé dans le principe 22 de la Déclaration de Rio : Les populations et communautés autochtones et les autres collectivités locales ont un rôle vital à jouer dans la gestion de l’environnement et le développement en raison de leurs connaissances du milieu et de leurs pratiques traditionnelles. Les États ont l’obligation de reconnaître leur identité, leur culture et leurs intérêts ; ils doivent en conséquence leur accorder tout l’appui nécessaire et leur permettre de participer efficacement à la réalisation d’un développement durable. L’illustration de ce principe se trouve également à l’article 8 (j) de la Convention sur la biodiversité, qui impose aux États l’obligation du respect, de la préservation et de l’entretien des connaissances, des innovations et des pratiques des peuples indigènes et des collectivités locales. Il impose également d’encourager le partage équitable des avantages qui découlent de l’utilisation des connaissances, des innovations et des pratiques indigènes. La transparence et l’accès à l’information sont tous deux requis pour assurer l’effectivité de la participation du public et le développement durable. La participation du public dans un contexte de développement durable requiert, entre autres, la possibilité de recueillir et d’exprimer les opinions et celle de chercher, recevoir et répandre les idées. Elle exige aussi un droit d’accès, à temps, à l’ensemble des informations rapportées par les gouvernements et les entreprises sur les politiques économiques et sociales en matière d’utilisation durable des ressources naturelles et de protection de l’environnement. Cette participation doit se faire sans imposer de charges financières indues aux demandeurs d’informations tout en assurant une protection adéquate de la vie privée et de la confidentialité des affaires. La réalisation des études d’impact, avec une large participation du public en termes d’accès à l’information et le droit de présenter des observations sur les déclarations en matière d’environnement et d’impact, constitue l’un des mécanismes juridiques permettant de garantir les droits des populations. Le principe 10 de la Déclaration de Rio se réfère aux droits du public comme suit : La meilleure façon de traiter les questions d’environnement est d’assurer la participation de tous les citoyens concernés, au niveau qui convient. Au niveau national, chaque individu doit avoir dûment accès aux informations relatives à l’environnement que détiennent les autorités publiques, y compris aux informations relatives aux substances et activités dangereuses dans leurs collectivités, et avoir la possibilité de participer aux processus de prise de décision. Les États doivent faciliter et encourager la sensibilisation et la participation du public en mettant les informations à la disposition de celui-ci. Un accès effectif à des actions judiciaires et administratives, notamment des réparations et des recours, doit être assuré. INTRODUCTION AU DROIT INTERNATIONAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 111 3.4 Décisions judiciaires et doctrine Le droit international de l’environnement intègre également les avis des cours et tribunaux internationaux. Bien qu’il y ait peu de cours et tribunaux de ce genre et que leur autorité soit limitée, leurs décisions ont beaucoup de poids auprès des commentateurs juridiques et une grande influence sur le développement du droit international de l’environnement. Ces juridictions sont : la Cour internationale de justice (CIJ), le Tribunal international du droit de la mer, l’Organe de règlement des différends (ORD) de l’Organisation mondiale du commerce (OMC) ainsi que les tribunaux régionaux. La doctrine des publicistes les mieux qualifiés constitue une autre source du droit international de l’environnement. La doctrine joue également un rôle dans la jurisprudence des organes judiciaires internationaux. L’affaire Essai nucléaire71 et celle de Projet Gabčíkovo-Nagymaros72 ont été sans nul doute influencées entre autres par la doctrine. 4 Accords multilatéraux sur l’environnement pertinents pour le Cameroun73 Le Cameroun est un État partie à de nombreux AMEs, ce qui confirme son engagement considérable dans le domaine de l’environnement. Chaque adhésion à un AME apporte des avantages et des obligations pour le Cameroun. En dehors des avantages immédiats que confère une protection environnementale performante, il existe également des effets à long terme. Tel est le cas des problèmes de santé publique liés à l’environnement et ayant une incidence sur le développement qui, en effet, sont traités internationalement et de façon proactive.74 De nombreux AMEs améliorent la gouvernance environnementale et promeuvent de manière générale la transparence, ____________________ 71 Légalité de la CIJ en matière de menace et d’utilisation des armes nucléaires ; demande d’avis consultatif de l’Assemblée Générales des Nations unies, le 8 Juillet 1996. Un autre exemple est l’affaire de la délimitation maritime dans la zone située entre Groenland et Jan Mayen Danemark c/ Norvège CIJ le 14 juin 1993, opinion individuelle de Weeramantry. 72 CIJ Projet Gabčíkovo-Nagymaros (Hungrie/Slovaquie), le 25 septembre 1997. 73 Les informations contenues dans cette section sont tirées du site ecolex qui est un service d’information sur le droit de l’environnement géré conjointement par l’Organisation des Nations unies pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture, l’Union internationale pour la conservation de la nature et le Programme des Nations unies pour l’environnement. Rassemblant les fonds documentaires de ces organismes, il constitue une source d’informations parmi les plus complètes en matière de droit de l’environnement. Seules les informations sur le Protocole de Carthagène relatif à la biosécurité ont été tirées d’un autre site, en l’occurrence celui de la Convention sur la diversité biologique. Cf https://www.ecolex.org/fr/ ; http://bch.cbd.int/ protocol/parties/, consultés le 13 mars 2017. 74 UNEP (2006:44). Oliver C. RUPPEL & Daniel Armel OWONA MBARGA 112 la prise de décision participative, la résolution des conflits et ont une influence positive directe en termes de processus de démocratisation dans n’importe quel contexte de pays en développement. Dans certains cas, il est avantageux d’adhérer à un AME afin d’obtenir l’assistance financière pour faire face aux problèmes environnementaux. Plus important encore, les AMEs peuvent également faciliter l’assistance technique, par exemple à travers le transfert des connaissances et des technologies. Il existe aussi des obligations. L’application des AMEs requiert une bonne dose de ressources humaines, techniques et financières. Afin qu’un AME ait un impact sur le terrain, il est essentiel d’adopter et d’appliquer des mesures législatives et administratives et de renforcer les capacités en matière de mise en œuvre et d’exécution forcée aux niveaux local et national. Le tableau suivant dresse la liste des traités internationaux et des instruments afférents dans le domaine de l’environnement dont le Cameroun est partie. Il donne également un aperçu des obligations du Cameroun en vertu du droit international de l’environnement. Tableau 1 : Cameroun et les AMEs Informations spécifiques sur les Conventions Informations relatives à la participation du Cameroun Conventions Lieu d’adoption Date d’adoption Entrée en vigueur Type 75 Date Entrée en vigueur Convention-cadre des Nations unies sur les changements climatiques New York, États-Unis d’Amérique 09.05.1992 21.03.1994 R 19.10.1994 17.01.1995 Protocole de Kyoto Kyoto, Japon 11.12.1997 16.02.2005 R 28.08.2002 16.02.2005 Convention sur la diversité biologique Rio de Janeiro, Brésil 05.06.1992 29.12.1993 R 19.10.1994 17.01.1995 Convention de Vienne pour la protection de la couche d’ozone Vienne, Autriche 22.03.1985 22.09.1988 R 30.08.1989 28.11.1989 Protocole de Montréal relatif aux substances qui appauvrissent la couche d’ozone Montréal, Canada 16.09.1987 01.01.1989 R 30.08.1989 28.11.1989 Convention sur le commerce international des espèces de faune et de flore sauvages menacées d’extinction Washington D.C., États- Unis d’Amérique 03.03.1973 01.07.1975 A 05.06.1981 03.09.19981 ____________________ 75 Ratification (R), Adhésion (A). INTRODUCTION AU DROIT INTERNATIONAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 113 Informations spécifiques sur les Conventions Informations relatives à la participation du Cameroun Conventions Lieu d’adoption Date d’adoption Entrée en vigueur Type 75 Date Entrée en vigueur Convention de Bâle sur le contrôle des mouvements transfrontières des déchets dangereux et de leur élimination Bâle, Suisse 22.03.1989 05.05.1992 A 09.02.2001 10.05.2001 Protocole de Carthagène sur les risques biotechnologiques Montréal, Canada 29.01.2000 11.09.2003 R 20.02.2003 21.03.2003 Convention des Nations unies sur la lutte contre la désertification Paris, France 17.06.1994 26.12.1996 R 29.05.1997 27.08.1997 Convention des Nations unies sur le droit de la mer Montego Bay, Jamaïque 10.12.1982 16.11.1994 R 19.11.1985 16.11.1994 Accord relatif à l’application de la partie XI de la Convention des Nations unies sur le droit de la mer New York, États-Unis d’Amérique 28.06.1994 28.07.1996 R 28.08.2002 27.09.2002 Convention internationale sur la protection des végétaux Rome, Italie 06.12.1951 03.04.1952 A 05.04.2006 05.04.2006 Convention de Bamako sur l’interdiction d’importer en Afrique des déchets dangereux et sur le contrôle des mouvements transfrontières Bamako, Mali 30.01.1991 22.04.1998 R 21.12.1995 22.04.1998 Convention relative aux zones humides d’importance internationale particulièrement comme habitats des oiseaux d’eau Ramsar, Iran 02.02.1971 21.12.1975 A 20.03.2006 20.07.2006 Oliver C. RUPPEL & Daniel Armel OWONA MBARGA 114 Informations spécifiques sur les Conventions Informations relatives à la participation du Cameroun Conventions Lieu d’adoption Date d’adoption Entrée en vigueur Type 75 Date Entrée en vigueur Protocole en vue d’amender la Convention relative aux zones humides d’importance internationale particulièrement comme habitats des oiseaux d’eau Paris, France 03.12.1982 01.02.1986 A 20.03.2006 20.07.2006 Convention de Stockholm sur les polluants organiques persistants Stockholm, Suède 22.05.2001 17.05.2004 R 19.05.2009 17.08.2009 Convention sur la protection physique des matières nucléaires Vienne, Autriche 26.10.1979 08.02.1987 A 29.07.2004 29.07.2004 Convention internationale pour la prévention par les navires (MAR- POL) telle que modifiée par le Protocole de 1978 Londres, Royaume-Uni de Grande- Bretagne et d’Irlande du Nord 17.02.1978 02.10.1983 A 18.09.2009 18.12.2009 Protocole portant amendement à la Convention internationale sur la responsabilité civile pour des dommages dus à la pollution par les hydrocarbures Londres, Royaume- Uni de Grande- Bretagne et d’Irlande du Nord 27.11.1992 30.05.1996 A 15.10.2001 15.10.2002 Convention sur l’interdiction de la mise au point, de la fabrication, du stockage et de l’emploi des armes chimiques et sur leur destruction Paris, France 03.09.1992 29.04.1997 R 16.09.1996 29.04.1997 Convention-cadre de l’OMS pour la lutte antitabac Genève, Suisse 21.05.2003 27.02.2005 R 03.02.2006 04.05.2006 Étant donné qu’une présentation succincte de tous les instruments internationaux contenus dans le tableau ci-dessus nous amènerait à dépasser les limitations rédactionnelles établies pour cet article, nous ne nous appesantirons que sur les plus importants. INTRODUCTION AU DROIT INTERNATIONAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 115 La Convention internationale sur la protection des végétaux de 1951 est née du constat des États de la nécessité d’une coopération internationale en matière de lutte contre les organismes nuisibles aux végétaux et aux produits végétaux, en vue de prévenir leur dissémination internationale. C’est dans cette optique que les États parties à cette convention s’engagent à prendre des mesures législatives, techniques et réglementaires telles que la mise en place d’une organisation nationale officielle de la protection des végétaux,76 ou encore la délivrance de certificats phytosanitaires conformes au modèle contenu dans la convention.77 La Convention internationale sur la responsabilité civile pour des dommages dus à la pollution par les hydrocarbures de 1969 établit des règles et procédures uniformes à l’échelle internationale sur les questions de responsabilité en cas de dommages de pollution78 survenus sur le territoire ou dans la zone économique exclusive d’un État contractant.79 Ceci est fait dans l’optique de garantir une réparation équitable.80 La Convention relative aux zones humides d’importance internationale particulièrement comme habitats des oiseaux d’eau de 1971 vise à enrayer les empiétements progressifs sur les zones humides ainsi que leur perte.81 En effet, au regard de leur importance écologique fondamentale en tant que régulateur des régimes des eaux et en tant qu’habitats d’une faune et d’une flore caractéristiques, les zones humides constituent une ressource d’une grande valeur dont la perte serait irréparable.82 Afin de les protéger, les États parties doivent recenser les zones humides appropriées sur leur territoire et établir une liste des zones d’importance internationale.83 Par ailleurs, les parties contractantes devront élaborer et appliquer leurs plans d’aménagement de façon à favoriser la conservation des zones humides inscrites sur la liste et, autant que possible, leur exploitation rationnelle.84 La Convention sur le commerce international des espèces de faune et de flore sauvages menacées d’extinction de 1973 a pour objectif de protéger certaines espèces de faune et de flore contre une surexploitation par suite du commerce international.85 Pour ce faire, elle catégorise les différentes espèces dans trois annexes selon des critères déterminés. L’annexe I comprend toutes les espèces menacées ____________________ 76 Article IV (1). 77 Article V (2) (b). 78 Préambule. 79 Article II. 80 Préambule. 81 Préambule. 82 Préambule. 83 Article 2. 84 Article 3. 85 Préambule. Oliver C. RUPPEL & Daniel Armel OWONA MBARGA 116 d’extinction qui sont ou pourraient être affectées par le commerce.86 L’annexe II quant à elle comprend des espèces susceptibles de devenir des espèces menacées d’extinction et certaines espèces qui doivent faire l’objet de réglementation afin de rendre efficace le contrôle du commerce des spécimens qu’elle contient.87 Enfin, l’annexe III contient toutes les espèces qu’une Partie déclare soumises, dans les limites de sa compétence, à une réglementation ayant pour but d’empêcher ou de restreindre leur exploitation et nécessitant la coopération des autres Parties pour le contrôle du commerce.88 En outre, cette convention impose diverses obligations aux États parties telles que l’établissement de sanctions pénales à l’égard de contrevenants à ses dispositions.89 La Convention des Nations unies sur le droit de la mer de 1982 établit un nouveau cadre juridique international des mers et des océans au regard des faits nouveaux intervenus depuis les conférences des Nations unies sur le droit de la mer de 1958 et 1960.90 En ce qui concerne l’environnement, elle traite de questions telles que la pollution par les navires. En effet, entre autres obligations, ces derniers doivent se conformer aux règlements, procédures et pratiques internationaux généralement acceptés visant à prévenir, réduire et maîtriser la pollution par les navires dans l’exercice de leur droit de passage.91 La Convention de Vienne pour la protection de la couche d’ozone de 1985 oblige ses États parties à prendre des mesures dans le but de protéger la santé humaine et l’environnement contre les effets néfastes des activités humaines qui modifient ou sont susceptibles de modifier la couche d’ozone.92 Ces mesures peuvent être législatives ou administratives.93 Elles peuvent également consister en une coopération entre les parties au moyen d’observations systématiques.94 La Convention-cadre des Nations unies sur les changements climatiques de 1992 a pour objectif de stabiliser les concentrations de gaz à effet de serre dans l’atmosphère à un niveau qui empêche toute perturbation anthropique dangereuse du système climatique.95 Pour ce faire, les États parties doivent, entre autres obligations, établir et publier des inventaires nationaux à jour, des émissions anthropiques par leurs sources qui seront transmis à la Conférence des parties.96 ____________________ 86 Article II (1). 87 Article II (2). 88 Article II (3). 89 Article VIII (1) (a). 90 Préambule. 91 Article 39 (2) (b). 92 Article 2 (1). 93 Article 2 (2) (b) 94 Article 2 (2) (a). 95 Article 2. 96 Article 4. INTRODUCTION AU DROIT INTERNATIONAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 117 Enfin, la Convention de Bamako sur l’interdiction d’importer en Afrique des déchets dangereux et sur le contrôle des mouvements transfrontières de 1991. Elle constitue un instrument régional phare de la protection de l’environnement. Elle organise le contrôle des mouvements des déchets dangereux entre plusieurs États et oblige également ses parties à sanctionner tout trafic illicite de ces déchets. Son article 9 (2), par exemple, contraint les États à adopter une législation nationale appropriée pour imposer des sanctions pénales à toute personne qui planifie ou effectue ces importations illicites ou y collabore. Bibliographie indicative Atangana-Malongue, T, 2014, Le juge camerounais et le droit international, dans : Atangana Amougou, JL (ed.), Le Cameroun et le droit international, Paris, Pedone, 309-334. Boukongou, JD, 2009-2010, Droit international des droits de l’homme, Manuel de cours, inédit. Cornu, G (ed.), 2011, Vocabulaire juridique, Paris, QUADRIGE/PUF. Dinokopila, B, 2015, The implementation of African Union law in South Africa, in : de Wet, E, H Hestermeyer, R Wolfrum (eds), 2015, The implementation of international law in Germany and South Africa, Pretoria, Pretoria University Law Press, 468-495. Dugard, J, 2011, International law, a South African perspective, Cape Town, Juta. Dugard, J, 2005, International law, a South African perspective, Cape Town, Juta. Foumena, GT, 2014, Le juge administratif camerounais face aux normes d’origine internationale: le cas des conventions, dans : Atangana, JL (ed.), Le Cameroun et le droit international, Paris, Pedone, 335-348. Guinchard, S & T Debard (eds), 2015, Lexique des termes juridiques 2015-2016, Paris, Dalloz. Kiss, A & D Shelton, 2004, International environmental law, New York, Transnational Publishers. Metou, BM, 2009, Le moyen de droit international devant les juridictions internes en Afrique : Quelques exemples d’Afrique noire francophone, 22 (1) Revue québécoise de droit international, 129-165. Mouelle Kombi, N, 1996, La loi constitutionnelle camerounaise du 18 janvier 1996 et le droit international, dans : Melone, S et al., La réforme constitutionnelle du 18 janvier 1996 au Cameroun. Aspects juridiques et politiques, Yaoundé, Fondation Friedrich Ebert, 126-144. Moulle Kombi, N, 2003, Les dispositions relatives aux conventions internationales dans les nouvelles Constitutions des États d’Afrique francophone, 57 (1) RJPIC, 5-38. Olinga, AD, 2005, Réflexions sur le droit international, la hiérarchie des normes et l’office du juge au Cameroun, dans : Olinga, AD (ed.), Le droit international devant le juge camerounais : bilan et perspectives, Actes de la journée d’étude du 18 juin 2004 à l’École Nationale de l’Administration et de la Magistrature (ENAM), (63) Juridis Périodique, Édition spéciale. Ondoua, A, 2014, Le droit international dans la constitution camerounaise, dans : Atangana Amougou JL (ed.), Le Cameroun et le droit international, Paris, Pedone, 295-307. Pellet, A, 2006, Vous avez dit « Monisme » ? Quelques banalités de bon sens sur l’impossibilité du prétendu monisme constitutionnel à la française, dans : De Béchillon, D et al. (eds), L’architecture du droit : Mélanges en l’honneur de Michel Troper, Paris, Economica, 827-857. Oliver C. RUPPEL & Daniel Armel OWONA MBARGA 118 Ruppel, OC, 2016, Introduction to international environmental law, in : Ruppel, OC & K Ruppel- Schlichting (eds), Environmental law and policy in Namibia – towards making Africa the tree of life, Windhoek, Hanns-Seidel-Foundation, 55-64. Sands, P, 2003, Principles of international environmental law, 2nd edition, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. Sands, P, & J Peel, 2018, Principles of international environmental law, 4th edition, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. Sutherland P, J Bhagwati, K Botchwey, N FitzGerald, K Hamada, JH Jackson, C Lafer, T de Montbrial, 2005, The future of the WTO: addressing institutional challenges in the new millennium, Geneva, WTO Consultative Board, at http://www.wto.org/english/thewto_e/10anniv_e/future_ wto_e.htm; consulté 21 février 2018. Tchakoua, JM, 2008, Introduction générale au droit camerounais, Yaoundé, Presses de l’UCAC. Tcheuwa, JC, 1999, Quelques aspects du droit international à travers la nouvelle Constitution camerounaise du 18 janvier 1996, 53 (1) RJPIC, 85-102. UNEP / United Nations Environment Programme, 2005, Selected texts of legal instruments in international environmental law, Nairobi, UNEP. UNEP / United Nations Environment Programme, 2006, Manual on compliance with and enforcement of multilateral environmental agreements, Nairobi, UNEP Division of Environmental Conventions. Voigt, C, 2009, Sustainable development as a principle of international law, Leiden, Martinus Nijhoff Publishers. Winter, G, (ed.), 2006, Multilevel governance of global environmental change: perspectives from science, sociology, and the law, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. 119 CHAPTER 4: ENVIRONMENTAL LAW IN THE AFRICAN UNION1 Oliver C. RUPPEL 1 Introduction The historical foundations of the African Union (AU) originated in the Union of African States, an early confederation that was established in the 1960s. The Organisation of African Unity (OAU) was established on 25 May 1963. On 9 September 1999, the heads of state and governments of the OAU issued the Sirte Declaration,2 calling for the establishment of an African Union. The Declaration was followed by summits in Lomé in 2000, when the Constitutive Act of the African Union was adopted, and in Lusaka in 2001, when the Plan for the Implementation of the African Union was adopted. During the same period, the initiative for the establishment of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) was also established. The AU was launched in Durban on 9 July 2002 by the then South African President, Thabo Mbeki,3 at the first session of the Assembly of the African Union. The Union’s administrative centre is in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia and the working languages are Arabic, English, French, Portuguese, and Swahili. The African Union has 54 member states with Morocco being the only African State that is not a member. Geographically, the African Union covers an area of 29,757,900 km² and the United Nations Population Division estimated a population total of 1,256,000,000 for 2017.4 Given the African continent’s bounty of natural resources, the protection and conservation of the environment must be an overarching aim within the AU; this is reflected in the African Union’s legal framework. ____________________ 1 This chapter is a revised and updated version of Ruppel (2016). 2 Named after Sirte, in Libya. 3 Thabo Mbeki was the African Union’s first President. 4 UN (2017). Oliver C. RUPPEL 120 2 Institutional structure in the AU The Assembly is the supreme organ of the Union, and is composed of Heads of State and Government or their duly accredited representatives. The Assembly determines common policies. The Executive Council, composed of ministers or authorities designated by the governments of members states, is responsible to the Assembly and coordinates and makes decisions on common policies. Together, a Chairperson, the Deputy Chairperson, eight Commissioners and staff members form the Commission. Each Commissioner is responsible for one portfolio (peace and security; political affairs; infrastructure and energy; social affairs; human resources, science and technology; trade and industry; rural economy and agriculture; and economic affairs). The Commission is comparable to a secretariat and plays a central role in the day-to-day management of the AU. The Commission inter alia represents the African Union and defends its interests; elaborates draft common positions of the African Union; prepares strategic plans and studies for the consideration of the Executive Council; elaborates, promotes, coordinates and harmonises the programmes and policies of the Union with those of the regional economic communities (RECs); and ensures the mainstreaming of gender in all programmes and activities of the African Union. The Executive Council is assisted by the Permanent Representatives Committee and the following Specialised Technical Committees, which assist the Executive Council in substantive matters: The Committee on Rural Economy and Agricultural Matters; the Committee on Monetary and Financial Affairs; the Committee on Trade, Customs and Immigration Matters; the Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, Energy, Natural Resources and Environment; the Committee on Transport, Communications and Tourism; the Committee on Health, Labour and Social Affairs; and the Committee on Education, Culture and Human Resources. The Pan-African Parliament implements policies, while the Economic, Social and Cultural Council is an advisory organ composed of different social and professional groups of the Member States. The Peace and Security Council makes decisions on prevention, management and resolution of conflicts. The financial institutions of the AU will consist of the African Central Bank, the African Monetary Fund, and the African Investment Bank. The African Court of Justice and Human Rights will ensure compliance with the law as outlined below. ENVIRONMENTAL LAW IN THE AFRICAN UNION (AU) 121 Figure 1: Structure of the African Union5 3 Environmental issues within the AU’s general legal framework The Constitutive Act of the African Union, which was adopted in Lomé, Togo in 2000, provides in Article 13 that the Executive Council coordinates and takes decisions on policies in areas of common interest to the member states. This includes, foreign trade; energy, industry and mineral resources; food, agricultural and animal resources; livestock production and forestry; water resources and irrigation; and the environment and its protection. The African Economic Community, the African Union’s economic institution was established in 1991 by the Abuja Treaty Establishing the African Economic Community. Cameroon signed this treaty in 1991. It contains specific provisions regarding environmental protection and the control of hazardous wastes. The Treaty contains broad economic objectives, which touch on the environment, firstly by the general objective of promoting economic, social and cultural development and the integration of African economies in order to increase economic self-reliance and to promote ____________________ 5 Chart compiled by C Luedemann based on Ouazghari (2007:5). Oliver C. RUPPEL 122 an indigenous and self-sustained development; and secondly, through the specific objective of ensuring the harmonisation and coordination of environmental protection policies, among the States Parties. The Treaty makes provision for several specialised technical committees, including a Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, Natural Resources and Environment. Each of these committees has the mandate to prepare projects and programmes in its sphere of duty, and of ensuring supervision and implementation of these. Chapter VIII contains provisions with regard to food and agriculture, and provides for cooperation among member states in the development of rivers and lake basins, and the development and protection of marine and fisheries resources, and plant and animal protection. States Parties are required to ensure the development within their borders of certain basic industries that are identified as conducive to collective selfreliance and to modernisation, and to ensure proper application of science and technology to a number of sectors that, according to Article 51, include energy and the conservation of the environment. States have the obligation to coordinate and harmonise their policies and programmes in the field of energy and natural resources, and to promote new and renewable forms of energy and, in line with Article 58, to promote a healthy environment, and, to this end, to adopt national, regional and continental policies, strategies and programmes and establish appropriate industries for environmental development and protection. The Treaty requires member states to take appropriate measures to ban the importation and dumping of hazardous wastes in their territories, and to cooperate among themselves in the trans-boundary movement, management and processing of such wastes, where these emanate from a member state. The African Charter for Human and Peoples’ Rights has progressively taken up the issue of environmental protection by explicitly incorporating a human right to environment, a third generation human right.6 Article 24 of the African Charter for Human and Peoples’ Rights reads, “[a]ll peoples shall have the right to a general satisfactory environment favourable to their development”. 4 Specific environmental conventions7 The following table provides an overvies of environmental conventions at AU level and Cameroon’s involvement. ____________________ 6 See Glazewski (2000:17); Ruppel (2008). For a detailed discussion on the right to environment under the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights see also Mekouar (2001). 7 Table compiled by the author based on information from http://www.au.int/en/treaties, accessed 24 January 2015. ENVIRONMENTAL LAW IN THE AFRICAN UNION (AU) 123 Table 1: Important African environmental conventions Treaty / Agreement Particularities Cameroonian Participation Treaty / Agreement Date of Adoption Date Entry into Force Date of Last Signature / Deposit Date of Signature Date of Ratification / Accession Date Deposited Phyto-Sanitary Convention for Africa 13.09.1967 06.10.1992 02.10.2016 - 11.04.1987 08.06.1987 African Convention on the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources 15.09.1968 16.06.1969 24.01.2013 15.09.1968 18.07.1977 29.09.1978 Bamako Convention on the Ban of the Import into Africa and the Control of Transboundary Movement and Management of Hazardous Wastes within Africa 01.01.1991 22.04.1998 07.03.2017 01.03.1991 11.07.1994 21.12.1995 African Maritime Transport Charter 11.06.1994 - 27.01.2012 - - - The African Nuclear- Weapon-Free Zone Treaty (Pelindaba Treaty) 11.04.1996 15.07.2009 22.02.2017 11.04.1996 11.06.2009 28.09.2010 African Convention on the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (Revised Version) 01.07.2003 23.07.2016 07.03.2017 - - - African Union Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa 23.10.2009 06.12.2012 24.05.2017 - 06.04.2015 24.05.2017 Oliver C. RUPPEL 124 Treaty / Agreement Particularities Cameroonian Participation Treaty / Agreement Date of Adoption Date Entry into Force Date of Last Signature / Deposit Date of Signature Date of Ratification / Accession Date Deposited Revised African Maritime Transport Charter 26.07.2010 - 04.07.2017 - - - African Charter on Maritime Security and Safety and Development in Africa (Lomé Charter) 15.10.2016 - 30.01.2017 24.01.2017 - - 4.1 The African Convention on Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, 1968 The 1968 African Convention on the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (also referred to as the African Nature Convention or the Algiers Convention), and the forerunner to the 2003 Revised Algiers Convention, which is outlined in the next paragraph, is arguably one of the centrepieces of the AU’s environmental texts. This regional African Convention was originally adopted in Algiers in 1968 under the auspices of the Organisation of African Unity (OAU) and came into force in 1969. As such it was the successor to the 1900 Convention for the Preservation of Wild Animals, Birds and Fish in Africa, which was later superseded by the 1933 Convention Relative to the Preservation of Fauna and Flora in their Natural State (the London Convention). The need for a treaty to address nature conservation had already been expressed in the Arusha Manifesto of 1961.8 Hence, in 1963, the African Charter for the Protection and the Conservation of Nature was adopted, followed soon after by the Algiers Convention. The objectives of the 1968 Convention encouraged individual and joint action for the conservation, utilisation and development of soil, water, flora and fauna for the present and future welfare of mankind, from an economic, nutritional, scientific, educational, cultural and aesthetic point of view. To this end, states undertake to adopt the measures necessary to ensure conservation, utilisation and development of soil, water, floral and faunal resources in accordance with scientific principles and with due regard to the best interests of the people (Article II); to take effective measures to ____________________ 8 IUCN (2006:4). ENVIRONMENTAL LAW IN THE AFRICAN UNION (AU) 125 conserve and improve the soil and to control erosion and land use (Article IV); and to establish policies to conserve, utilise and develop water resources, prevent pollution and control water use (Article V). Furthermore, the Convention imposes on states the obligation to protect flora and ensure its best utilisation, the management of forests and control of burning, land clearance and overgrazing (Article VI); and to conserve faunal resources and use them wisely, manage populations and habitats, control hunting, capture and fishing, and prohibit the use of poisons, explosives and automatic weapons in hunting (Article VII). States are required to tightly control traffic in trophies, to prevent trade in illegally killed and obtained trophies and to establish and maintain conservation areas (Article X). A list of protected species that enjoy full total protection, and a list of species that may be taken only with authorisation is part of the Convention. 4.2 The Revised (Algiers) Convention on the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, 2003 The Algiers Convention was revised in 2003 (Maputo) to take into account recent developments on the African environment and natural resources scenes, while bringing the Convention to the level and standard of current multilateral environmental agreements.9 The revised Convention, which was adopted by the African Union in Mozambique in July 2003,10 was described as “the most modern and comprehensive of all agreements concerning natural resources”.11 As of January 2018, 4212 of the 54 member states have signed the Convention, and 16 member states13 have deposited their instrument of ratification. The revised Convention thus still has to come in force, which will be 30 days after 15 countries have ____________________ 9 Decision of the Revised 1968 African Convention (Algiers Convention) on the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, Doc. EX/CL/50(III), Assembly/AU/Dec. 9(II). 10 At the second ordinary session of the African Union Assembly held in Maputo, Mozambique in July 2003. 11 Kiss & Shelton (2007:183). 12 The Convention has been signed by Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Cote d’Ivoire, Comoros, the DRC, Congo, Djibouti, Democratic Republic of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Guinea, Kenya, Libya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Mali, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Niger, Rwanda, São Tomé and Príncipe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, South Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. 13 i.e. Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Chad, Cote d’Ivoir, Comoros, Congo, Ghana, Libya, Lesotho, Liberia, Mali, Niger, Rwanda and South Africa, see http://www.africaunion.org/root/au/Documents/Treaties/List/Revised%20Convention%20on% 20Nature%20and%20Natural%20Resources.pdf, accessed 25 January 2018. Oliver C. RUPPEL 126 deposited their ratification instruments. Cameroon, being a signatory to the 1968 Convention, has not signed the revised Convention. The revised Convention follows a comprehensive and general approach to environmental protection. It defines natural resources, addresses economic and social development goals, and stresses the necessity to work closely together towards the implementation of global and regional instruments supporting the goals of the Rio Declaration and Agenda 21.14 The Preamble sets the tone by providing that its “objectives would be better achieved by amending the 1968 Algiers Convention by expanding elements related to sustainable development”. In this vein, Article 4 on fundamental obligation, states: The Parties shall adopt and implement all measures necessary to achieve the objectives of this Convention, in particular through preventive measures and the application of the precautionary principle, and with due regard to ethical and traditional values as well as scientific knowledge in interest of present and future generations. The main objective of the Convention is to enhance environmental protection, to foster the conservation and sustainable use of natural resources, and to harmonise and coordinate policies in these fields with a view to achieving ecologically rational, economically sound and socially acceptable development policies and programmes. In realising these objectives, the Parties should be guided by the principles of a right to a satisfactory environment and the right to development – the so-called thirdgeneration human rights.15 Parties are required to adopt and implement all measures necessary to achieve the objectives of the Convention, in particular through preventive measures and the application of the precautionary principle, and with due regard to ethical and traditional value as well as scientific knowledge in the interest of present and future generations (Article IV). The provisions of the Convention address the following areas:16 Land and soil (Article VI), water (Article VII), vegetation cover (Article VIII), species and genetic diversity (Article IX), protected species (Article X), trade in specimens and products thereof (Article XI), conservation areas (Article XII), process and activities affecting the environment and natural resources (Article XIII), sustainable development and natural resources (Article XIV), military and hostile activities (Article XV), procedural rights (Article XVI), traditional rights of local communities and indigenous knowledge (Article XVII), research (Article XVIII), development and transfer of technology (Article XIX), capacity building, education and training (Article XX), national authorities (Article XXI), cooperation (Article XXII), compliance (Article XXIII), liability (Article XXIV), and exceptions (Article XXV). ____________________ 14 IUCN (2006:5). 15 (ibid.:6). 16 For a discussion on each of these areas see IUCN (2006:8). ENVIRONMENTAL LAW IN THE AFRICAN UNION (AU) 127 The Conference of the Parties and the Secretariat are established by Articles XXVI and XXVII respectively. Article XXXIV relates to the relationship with the 1968 Algiers Convention and provides that for Parties that are bound by the revised Convention, only this Convention is to apply. The relationship between parties to the original Convention and parties to this Convention is to be governed by the provisions of the original Convention (Article XXXIV). It has to be noted that unlike its predecessor, the 2003 Convention excludes reservations, which reflects the necessity for the parties to apply common solutions to common problems. If the parties had the right to make reservations, differing obligations would jeopardise the attainment of the Convention’s objectives.17 Disputes regarding the interpretation and application of the Convention are primarily subject to alternative dispute resolution otherwise the African Court of Justice has jurisdiction. 4.3 Bamako Convention on the Ban of the Import into Africa and the Control of Transboundary Movement and Management of Hazardous Wastes within Africa The Convention was adopted in Bamako, Mali on 30 January 1991 and entered into force on 22 April 1998. As of January 2018, it had 35 signatories, of which 27 including Cameroon had ratified the Convention. The Convention creates a framework of obligations to strictly regulate the transboundary movement of hazardous wastes to and within Africa. The Bamako Convention in Article 3 categorises hazardous wastes and enumerates general obligations of state parties in respect of the enforcement of a ban on hazardous waste import, and on the dumping of hazardous wastes at sea and internal waters in respect of waste generation, and the adoption of precautionary measures. States are furthermore required to establish monitoring and regulatory authorities to report and act on transboundary movement of hazardous wastes. A Secretariat to serve a Conference of the Parties is established. A list of categories of wastes which are hazardous waste and a list of hazardous characteristics are annexed to the Bamako Convention as well as annexes on disposal operations; information to be provided on notification; information to be provided on the movement document; and on arbitration. Included as part of the 2003 Convention are three Annexes: on the Definition of Threatened Species; on Conservation Areas; and on Prohibited Means of Taking. ____________________ 17 IUCN (2006:7). Oliver C. RUPPEL 128 4.4 The Maritime Transport Charters Considering the importance of cooperation among African countries in the maritime transport sector and in order to find appropriate solutions to the problems impeding the development this sector, the Charter was adopted in 1994 but has not come into force as of yet.18 Cameroon has not signed the Charter. In 2010, the Revised African Maritime Transport Charter has been adopted. This Charter has so far been signed by 19 and ratified by nine member states, not by Cameroon. Ratification by 15 states is required for the Charter to come into force. The revised African Maritime Transport Charter, in contrast to its predecessor, puts a strong emphasis on the protection of the marine environment. The Charter recognises the interdependence between economic development and a sustainable policy for the protection and preservation of the marine environment. One of the objectives of the Charter is to develop and promote mutual assistance and cooperation between states parties in the area of maritime safety, security and protection of the marine environment. Article 28 provides that parties are to seek intensify their efforts to ensure the protection and preservation of the marine environment and to promote measures aimed at preventing and combating pollution incidents arising from marine transport. Furthermore, parties “commit themselves to the creation of a sustainable compensation regime to cover marine incidents of pollution of the sea that are not covered by existing international compensation regimes.” 4.5 The African Nuclear Free Zone Treaty (Treaty of Pelindaba) The Treaty, to which Cameroon became a signatory in 1996, entered into force in July 2009.19 The Treaty establishes the African nuclear-weapon-free zone, thereby achieving, inter alia, the promotion of regional cooperation for the development and practical application of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes in the interest of sustainable social and economic development of the African continent, and keeping Africa free of environmental pollution by radioactive wastes and other radioactive matter. Each party has the obligation to renounce nuclear explosive devices, prohibit in its territory the stationing of any nuclear explosive device, and prohibit testing of nuclear explosive devices. Any capability for the manufacture of nuclear explosive devices has to be declared and parties undertake to dismantle and destroy any nuclear explo- ____________________ 18 As of January 2018, 13 States have ratified the charter, while ratification of two-thirds of the member States is required for the Charter to come into force. 19 http://www.au.int/en/sites/default/files/pelindaba%20Treaty.pdf, accessed 25 January 2018. ENVIRONMENTAL LAW IN THE AFRICAN UNION (AU) 129 sive device, destroy facilities for the manufacture of nuclear explosive devices or where possible to convert them to peaceful uses. Furthermore, the measures contained in the Bamako Convention on the Ban of the Import into Africa and Control of Trans-boundary Movement and Management of Hazardous Wastes within Africa have to be implemented according to Article 7 in so far as it is relevant to radioactive waste and not to take any action to assist or encourage the dumping of radioactive wastes and other radioactive matter anywhere within the African nuclear-weaponfree zone. The use of nuclear science and technology for economic and social development is to be promoted, including cooperation under the African Regional Cooperation Agreement for Research, Training and Development Related to Nuclear Science and Technology. Each party undertakes not to take, or assist, or encourage any action aimed at an armed attack by conventional or other means against nuclear installations in the African nuclear weapon-free zone. The Treaty of Pelindaba establishes the African Commission on Nuclear Energy for the purpose of ensuring compliance with their undertakings under the Treaty. Annual reports have to be submitted by the parties to the Commission and a Conference of the Parties is to be convened. The Treaty has four Annexes, including a map of the African-nuclear free zone; and Annexes on Safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency and on the African Commission on Nuclear Energy; and an Annex on the complaints procedure and settlement of disputes. 4.6 The Phyto-Sanitary Convention for Africa The Phyto-Sanitary Convention for Africa was adopted in Kinshasa, DRC, on 13 September 1967. The Convention does not contain any provision relating to its entry into force. However, as of September 2015, 10 member states have deposited their instruments of ratification. The aim of this Convention is to control and eliminate plant diseases in Africa and prevent the introduction of new diseases. To this end, parties undertake to control import of plants and to take measures of quarantine, certification or inspection in respect of living organisms, plants, plant material, seeds, soil, compost and packing material. Cameroon is a party to this Convention. Oliver C. RUPPEL 130 4.7 The African Union Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa The African Union Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa (hereafter the Kampala Convention)20 was adopted on 23 October 2009 in Kampala. So far, the Kampala Convention has 40 signatories. Twenty-seven countries have so far ratified the Kampala Convention and it has entered into force on 6 December 2012. Cameroon ratified the Convention in 2015. The Convention is the first regional legal instrument in the world containing legal obligations for states with regard to the protection and assistance of internally displaced persons. It applies to displacement caused by a wide range of causes including conflict and human rights violations but also to natural or man-made disasters and has thus an environmental component. Member states commit themselves to establish early warning systems and adopt disaster preparedness and management measures to prevent displacement caused by natural disaster. The Convention provides standards for the protection of internally displaced people from arbitrary displacement, protection of internally displaced people while they are displaced and durable solutions to their displacement. 4.8 African Charter on Maritime Security and Safety and Development in Africa (Lomé Charter) The African Charter on Maritime Security and Safety and Development in Africa has been adopted in Lomé, Togo in October 2016. As of January 2018, it has 34 signatories, including Cameroon, whereas only Togo has ratified the Charter so far. The Charter will come into force after it has been ratified by 15 member states. One main focus of the Charter is the prevention of transnational crime such as terrorism, piracy, smuggling of migrants, trafficking in drugs and persons, etc. at sea. Besides, many of the objectives laid down in the Charter’s Article 2 are relevant for environmental protection. It states that the protection of the environment in general and the marine environment in particular are objectives of the charter, just as the promotion of a flourishing and sustainable Blue/Ocean Economy, which refers to the sustainable economic development of the oceans. Communities living next to the sears are to be sensitised for sustainable development of African coastline and biodiversity. En- ____________________ 20 Text available online at http://www.au.int/en/sites/default/files/AFRICAN_UNION_ CONVENTION_FOR_THE_PROTECTION_AND_ASSISTANCE_OF_INTERNALLY_ DISPLACED_PERSONS_IN_AFRICA_(KAMPALA_CONVENTION).pdf, accessed 24 January 2018. ENVIRONMENTAL LAW IN THE AFRICAN UNION (AU) 131 hanced cooperation in various fields of the maritime domain is one of the tools envisaged by the Charter to realise its objectives. The Charter covers many areas of relevance for environmental protection, including illegal fishing; prevention of pollution at sea; sustainable exploitation of marine resources. State parties are encouraged to explore and exploit their maritime resources sustainably and to implement fisheries and aquaculture policies for the preservation of marine resources. 5 The African Union’s judicial system and the consideration of environmental rights Environmental agreements under the umbrella of the AU each have their own provision on how disputes are to be settled. Alternative dispute resolution plays an important role in this regard as it is the favourable mechanism, as e.g. provided for in the African Convention for Nature Conservation. The judicial system in the AU has subject to continuous development and several amendments in recent years.21 In 1998, the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights (ACHPR) has been established by the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights on the Establishment of an African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights, which came into force in 2004. The ACHPR is situated in Arusha, United Republic of Tanzania and has received cases since June 2008. In 2003, the African Court of Justice as ultimate organ of jurisdiction in the African Union was established by the Protocol of the Court of Justice of the African Union, which entered into force in February 2009. However, the Protocol on the Statute of the African Court of Justice and Human Rights adopted in 2008 during the African Union Summit of Heads of State and Government in Sharm El Sheikh, Arab Republic of Egypt provides for the 1998 and the 2003 Protocols to be replaced and the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights and the Court of Justice of the African Union to be merged into a single Court to become what is now known as the ‘African Court of Justice and Human Rights’. However, the 2008 Protocol on the merger of the courts has so far only been ratified by six22 states and ratification by 15 states is required for the Protocol to come into force. Once operational, the merged court will have two sections, a General Affairs Section and a Human Rights Section, both composed of eight Judges. The court will have jurisdiction over all disputes and ap- ____________________ 21 For more details on the creation of judicial structures in the AU see Franceschi (2014:141). 22 As of 24 January 2018, the Protocol has been ratified by Benin, Burkina Faso, Congo, Liberia, Libya, and Mali. See http://www.au.int/en/sites/default/files/Protocol%20on%20Statute% 20of%20the%20African%20Court%20of%20Justice%20and%20HR_0.pdf, accessed 24 January 2018. Oliver C. RUPPEL 132 plications referred to it, which inter alia relate to the interpretation and application of the AU Constitutive Act or the interpretation, application or validity of Union Treaties, as well as human rights violations. In June 2014, a Protocol on Amendments to the Protocol on the Statute of the African Court of Justice and Human Rights23 has been adopted to extend the jurisdiction of the African Court of Justice and Human Rights to cover individual criminal liability for serious crimes committed in violation of international law – making the African Court the first regional court with criminal jurisdiction over genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity once the Protocol comes into operation upon ratification of 15 member states.24 At the same time, the Protocol gives immunity to sitting Heads of State and Government, and to other senior officials based on their function, before the African Court, which has been subject to criticism as no other international tribunal that provides individual criminal liability for serious crimes allows such immunity.25 The African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights (hereafter African Commission) is a quasi-judicial body established by the 1981 African (Banjul) Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights (hereafter African Charter) and is responsible for monitoring compliance with the African Charter. The African Charter is a human rights treaty that already proclaims environmental rights in broadly qualitative terms. It protects the right of peoples both to the ‘best attainable state of physical and mental health’ (Article 16) and to a ‘general satisfactory environment favourable to their development’ (Article 24). Article 24 of the African Charter establishes a binding human-rights-based approach to environmental protection, linking the right to environment to the right to development.26 One famous case related to some environmental issues heard by the African Commission was the Ogoni case. The African Commission held, inter alia, that Article 24 of the African Charter imposed an obligation on the state to take reasonable measures to “prevent pollution and ecological degradation, to promote conservation, and to secure ecologically sustainable development and use of natural resources”.27 The Ogoni case is considered to be a landmark decision with regard to the effective protection of economic, social and cultural rights in Africa, particularly the protection of the right of peoples to a satisfactory environment. ____________________ 23 Available at http://www.au.int/en/content/protocol-amendments-protocol-statute-african-court -justice-and-human-rights, accessed 16 September 2015. 24 While this Protocol has received ten signatures so far, no state has ratified it. 25 See HRW (2014); Du Plessis (2012). 26 Van der Linde & Louw (2003). 27 The Social and Economic Rights Action Center (SERAC) & the Center for Economic and Social Rights (CESR) v. Nigeria. ENVIRONMENTAL LAW IN THE AFRICAN UNION (AU) 133 The recognition of a right to a satisfactory environment by the African Charter and progressive jurisprudence by the African Commission emphasise the issue of environmental protection from a human rights perspective and underline the linkage between climate change and human rights, in a modern holistic approach to one of the most burning issues of today.28 The impacts of climate change on human rights have been explicitly recognised by the African Commission. In its AU Resolution 153 the African Commission called on the Assembly of Heads of State and Government to take all necessary measures to ensure that the African Commission is included in the African Union’s negotiating team on climate change.29 In the same communication it decided to carry out a study on the impact of climate change on human rights in Africa.30 6 Selected institutions and initiatives particularly relevant for environmental protection 6.1 The African Ministerial Conference on the Environment (AMCEN) The African Ministerial Conference on the Environment (AMCEN) has a strong regional and sub-regional focus. AMCEN thus builds on the potential that regional economic communities (RECs) have to integrate adaptation measures into regional policies and socio-economic development.31 AMCEN is a permanent forum where African ministers of the environment discuss matters of relevance to the environment of the continent. It was established in 1985 when African ministers met in Egypt and adopted the Cairo Programme for African cooperation. The Conference is convened every second year. In the 2010 Bamako Declaration on the Environment for Sustainable Development, at the thirteenth session of the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment, the Conference’s contribution in providing political guidance and leadership on environmental management to Africa since its creation in 1985 in Cairo was appreciated. AMCEN was established to provide advocacy for environmental protection in Africa; to ensure that basic human needs are met adequately and in a sustainable manner; to ensure that social and economic development is realised at all levels; and to ensure that agricultural activities and practices meet the food security needs of the region. ____________________ 28 Ruppel (2010). 29 ACHPR/Res. 153 (XLV09). 30 See http://www.achpr.org/english/resolutions/resolution153_en.htm, accessed 14 February 2012. 31 Scholtz (2010), AMCEN (2011). Oliver C. RUPPEL 134 6.2 Relevant departments within the AU Commission Several departments within the AU Commission play an important role when it comes to issues related to environmental protection. The most relevant one is probably the Department of Rural Economy and Agriculture and the Department of Infrastructure and Energy. One of the objectives for establishing the Department of Rural Economy and Agriculture was to promote sustainable development and sound environmental and natural resources management while ensuring food and nutrition security. Located within the Department of Rural Economy and Agriculture are the Division of Agriculture and Food Security and the Division of Environment, Climate Change, Water and Land Management among others. The mission of the Department of Rural Economy and Agriculture is to32 develop and promote the implementation of policies and strategies aimed at strengthening African agriculture and sound environmental management; by working with AU Member States, RECs, African Citizens, Institutions and other Stakeholders. With a view to foster the African agenda on agricultural growth and transformation and sound environmental Management, the Department of Rural Economy and Agriculture has launched its second Strategic and Operational Plan (2014-2017)33 in January 2014, spanning multiple sectors such as environment in general, agriculture, water, fisheries and aquaculture, land, climate change and many more. Other departments that can be involved with issues pertaining to environmental protection include the Departments of Political Affairs; Infrastructure and Energy; Human Resources, Science and Technology; Trade and Industry; and Peace and Security. 6.3 The Peace and Security Council (PSC) Article 3 of the AU Constitutive Act contains the objectives of the AU, including, among other things, the promotion of sustainable development, international cooperation, continental integration, and the promotion of scientific and technological research to advance development of the continent. In the Protocol relating to the Establishment of the Peace and Security Council (PSC) of the African Union, member states committed themselves to various guiding principles (Article 4), including early responses to contain crises situations, the recognition of the interdependence between ____________________ 32 See www.rea.au.int, accessed 16 September 2015. 33 Available at http://rea.au.int/en/sites/default/files/DREA%202014-2017%20Strategic%20and %20Operational-%20%20Plan.pdf, accessed 16 September 2015. ENVIRONMENTAL LAW IN THE AFRICAN UNION (AU) 135 socio-economic development and the security of peoples and states. Moreover, in Article 6 of the AU Constitutive Act, the functions of the PSC are outlined as, among others, the promotion of peace, security and stability in Africa; early warning and preventive diplomacy; peace-making; humanitarian action and disaster management. All of the aforementioned provisions provide a clear mandate for addressing environmental problems, especially when it comes to natural or man-made disasters. 6.4 The New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) The New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) was adopted in 2001 in Lusaka, Zambia by African Heads of State and the Government of the OAU in 2001 and was ratified by the AU in 2002. Its overall aim is to promote partnership and cooperation between Africa and the developed world and it envisages the economic and social revival of Africa. Its founding document states:34 This New Partnership for Africa’s Development is a pledge by African leaders, based on a common vision and a firm and shared conviction, that they have a pressing duty to eradicate poverty and to place their countries, both individually and collectively, on a path of sustainable growth and development, and at the same time to participate actively in the world economy and body politic. The Programme is anchored on the determination of Africans to extricate themselves and the continent from the malaise of underdevelopment and exclusion in a globalising world. NEPAD includes an environmental component, in that:35 It has been recognised that a healthy and productive environment is a prerequisite for the New Partnership for Africa’s Development, that the range of issues necessary to nurture this environmental base is vast and complex, and that a systematic combination of initiatives is necessary to develop a coherent environmental programme. NEPAD recognises that the region’s environmental base must be nurtured, while promoting the sustainable use of its natural resources. To this end, the environmental initiative targets eight sub-themes for priority intervention: • combating desertification; • wetland conservation; • invasive alien species control; • coastal management; • global warming; ____________________ 34 NEPAD founding document available at http://www.nepad.org/resource/new-partnershipafricas-development, accessed 25 January 2018. 35 Preamble to Chapter 8 of the NEPAD documentation, titled The Environmental Initiative; see generally Van der Linde (2002). Oliver C. RUPPEL 136 • cross-border conservation areas; • environmental governance; and • financing. A process aimed at a specific NEPAD Environment Action Plan commenced early in the NEPAD initiative, and a framework for the action plan was endorsed by the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment (AMCEN) in 2002 by the AU in the same year. The Environment Action Plan is underpinned by the notion of sustainable development in that it takes account of economic growth, income distribution, poverty eradication, social equity and better governance. References AMCEN / African Ministerial Conference on the Environment, 2011, Addressing climate change challenges in Africa, a practical guide towards sustainable development, at http://www.africaadapt.net/media/resources/778/guidebook_CLimateChange.pdf, accessed 24 January 2018. Du Plessis, M, 2012, Implications of the AU decision to give the African court jurisdiction over international crimes, Institute for Security Studies Paper No. 235, at https://www.issafrica.org/uploads/Paper235-AfricaCourt.pdf, accessed 16 September 2015. Franceschi, LG, 2014, The African human rights judicial system, Newcastle upon Tyne, Cambridge Scholars Publishing. Glazewski, J, 2000, Environmental law in South Africa, 2nd edition, Durban, Butterworths. HRW / Human Rights Watch, 2014, Statement regarding immunity for sitting officials before the expanded African Court of Justice and Human Rights, at https://www.hrw.org/ news/2014/11/13/statement-regarding-immunity-sitting-officials-expanded-african-court-justiceand, accessed 17 September 2015. IUCN / The World Conservation Union, 2006, An introduction to the African Convention on the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, 2nd edition, Gland, IUCN. Kiss, A & D Shelton, 2007, Guide to international environmental law, Leiden, Martinus Nijhoff Publishers. Mekouar, MA, 2001, Le droit a l’environnement dans la Charte africaine des droits de l’homme et des peuples, FAO Legal Papers Online No. 16, at http://www.fao.org/3/a-bb049f.pdf, accessed 13 November 2010. Ouazghari, KL, 2007, Grund zur Hoffnung? Die Afrikanische Union und der Darfur-Konflikt, HSFK-Report 14/2007. Ruppel, OC, 2008, Third-generation human rights and the protection of the environment in Namibia, in: Horn, N & A Bösl (eds), Human rights and the rule of law in Namibia, Windhoek, Macmillan Education, 101-120, at http://www.kas.de/upload/auslandshomepages/namibia/Human Rights/ruppel1.pdf, accessed 24 January 2018. Ruppel, OC, 2010, Environmental Rights and Justice in Namibia, in: Bösl, A, N Horn & A du Pisani (eds), Constitutional democracy in Namibia. A critical analysis after two decades, Windhoek, Macmillan Education, 323-360. ENVIRONMENTAL LAW IN THE AFRICAN UNION (AU) 137 Ruppel, OC, 2016, Environmental law in the African Union, in: Ruppel, OC & K Ruppel- Schlichting, Environmental law and policy in Namibia, 3rd edition, Windhoek, Hanns-Seidel- Foundation, 71-84. Scholtz, W, 2010, The promotion of regional environmental security and Africa’s common position on climate change, 10 African Human Rights Law Journal, 1-25. UN / United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division, 2017, World population prospects: the 2017 revision, New York, United Nations. Van der Linde, M, 2002, African responses to environmental protection, 35 CILSA 99. Van der Linde, M & L Louw, 2003, Considering the interpretation and implementation of Article 24 of the African Charter on Human and Peoples Rights in light of the SERAC Communication, 3 (1) African Human Rights Law Journal, 167-187. 138 CHAPITRE 5 : DROIT ET POLITIQUE DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT AU SEIN DES COMMUNAUTÉS ÉCONOMIQUES RÉGIONALES EN AFRIQUE CENTRALE Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 1 Introduction L’Afrique centrale abrite le bassin du Congo, le deuxième massif forestier le plus vaste du monde après l’Amazonie. En dehors de ses forêts, l’Afrique centrale regorge d’importantes ressources naturelles dont une diversité de ressources minières, des ressources halieutiques et fauniques. Le processus d’intégration régionale en Afrique centrale s’inscrit dans l’élan du régionalisme qui gagne le monde1 et est marqué par la cohabitation2 de deux communautés économiques régionales : la Communauté économique des États de l’Afrique centrale (CEEAC) et la Communauté économique et monétaire de l’Afrique centrale (CEMAC). La CEEAC est créée en 1988 par 11 États d’Afrique centrale3 pour promouvoir le « développement économique et social dans le but d’améliorer le niveau de vie de leurs peuples ».4 Organisation de coopération économique s’inscrivant dans le processus d’intégration panafricaine, la CEEAC a étendu ses compétences sur plusieurs domaines comme la paix et la sécurité, ainsi que l’environnement. La CEMAC a été créée en 1994 par six États5 et a pour principale mission de réaliser l’intégration de ses membres en s’appuyant sur les acquis du passé générés par l’Union douanière et économique de l’Afrique centrale (UDEAC) et la coopération monétaire. La CEMAC apparaît comme l’une des plus petites communautés économiques en Afrique. La CEEAC et la CEMAC ont, chacune, une dimension environnementale dans leurs processus respectifs d’intégration avec une tendance pour la première à prendre ____________________ 1 Crawford et al. (2010). 2 Kam Yogo (2016:3). 3 Il s’agit de l’Angola, du Burundi, du Cameroun, de la RCA, du Congo, du Gabon, de la Guinée équatoriale, du Rwanda, de Sao Tomé-et-Principe, de la R.D. Congo et du Tchad. 4 Préambule du Traité constitutif de la CEEAC. 5 Il s’agit du Cameroun, de la RCA, du Congo, du Gabon, de la Guinée équatoriale et du Tchad. COMMUNAUTÉS ÉCONOMIQUES RÉGIONALES ET L’ENVIRONNEMENT 139 le leadership dans ce domaine, alors que la dernière en ferait une question moins prioritaire par rapport aux préoccupations économiques. 2 Le leadership de la CEEAC sur les questions environnementales en Afrique centrale En 2007 lors du 13e sommet des chefs d’État et de gouvernement de la CEEAC, trois axes prioritaires avaient été identifiés : la paix et sécurité déjà évoquées, les infrastructures de communication, puis l’environnement et gestion des ressources naturelles. Cette communauté a été désignée comme l’organisation sous régionale chargée d’implémenter les politiques environnementales régionales, notamment l’initiative environnementale du Nouveau partenariat pour le développement de l’Afrique (NEPAD) sur toute l’étendue de l’Afrique centrale. De plus, elle doit exécuter les décisions du Conseil des ministres africains de l’environnement (CMAE) au niveau de l’Afrique centrale. La protection de l’environnement dans la CEEAC s’opère à travers un cadre normatif et institutionnel et un cadre politique. 2.1 Le cadre institutionnel et normatif de la gestion de l’environnement dans l’espace de CEEAC La CEEAC a un cadre institutionnel et normatif de plus en plus dense et varié. Ceci résulte de la diversification de ses missions dans le domaine de l’environnement où de nombreuses institutions et textes juridiques régionaux ont été générés. 2.1.1 Les institutions de gestion de l’environnement au sein de la CEEAC Parmi ces institutions se trouvent des organismes spécialisés de la CEEAC et une direction du secrétariat exécutif. 2.1.1.1 La direction de l’agriculture et de l’environnement du secrétariat exécutif de la CEEAC La problématique de la préservation de l’environnement et de la gestion des ressources naturelles relève de la compétence du secrétariat exécutif qui est l’organe d’opérationnalisation des politiques sous régionales de l’espace CEEAC. Le secrétariat exécutif comprend une direction de l’agriculture et de l’environnement. C’est au Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 140 sein de cette dernière qu’est logé le service de l’environnement et des ressources naturelles qui fonctionne avec les quatre composantes que sont : la valorisation de la biodiversité et économie de l’environnement, l’économie forestière et gestion durable des forêts, les écosystèmes marins et ressources halieutiques, la gestion des risques et catastrophes naturelles. La mission assignée à ces quatre composantes est la mise en œuvre de la politique sous régionale en matière d’environnement et de gestion des ressources naturelles adoptée par les chefs d’État des dix États membres. 2.1.1.2 Les organismes spécialisés de la CEEAC dans le domaine de l’environnement La CEEAC est dotée d’organismes spécialisés qui sont créés en fonction des missions qui lui ont été assignées dans le domaine de l’environnement. On peut notamment répertorier plusieurs dont les plus importants sont : la Commission des forêts d’Afrique centrale (COMIFAC), le Pool énergétique de l’Afrique centrale (PEAC) et la Commission de pêche du golfe de Guinée (COREP). 2.1.1.2.1 La Commission des forêts d’Afrique centrale Le traité relatif à la conservation et à la gestion durable des écosystèmes forestiers d’Afrique centrale et instituant la Commission des forêts d’Afrique centrale (COMI- FAC)6 a été signé le 5 février 2005 par dix pays.7 Selon ce traité, cette Commission est chargée de « l’orientation, de l’harmonisation et du suivi des politiques forestières et environnementales en Afrique centrale ».8 À ce titre, elle doit : • favoriser les actions visant à la participation des populations rurales et des opérateurs économiques dans la gestion durable des écosystèmes forestiers d’Afrique centrale ; • favoriser la coopération, la mise en place d’un réseau entre les organisations nationales et internationales impliquées dans la gestion de l’écosystème ; • assurer la coordination et l’harmonisation des politiques forestières et environnementales des États membres ; ____________________ 6 Voir l’article 5 dudit traité. 7 Il s’agit du Burundi, du Cameroun, de la RCA, du Congo, du Gabon, de la Guinée équatoriale, du Rwanda, de Sao Tomé-et-Principe, de la R.D. Congo et du Tchad. 8 Voir l’article 5 § 2 dudit traité. COMMUNAUTÉS ÉCONOMIQUES RÉGIONALES ET L’ENVIRONNEMENT 141 • initier des actions en vue de la lutte contre le braconnage et l’exploitation non durable des ressources forestières ; • encourager la création des aires protégées en Afrique centrale ; et • faciliter le développement de la fiscalité forestière. Pour y parvenir, elle a été organisée comme la plupart des organisations internationales de coopération, à savoir : le Sommet des Chefs d’État et de gouvernement, le Conseil des ministres (les organes politiques), le Secrétariat exécutif (l’organe administratif et technique). Aux termes de l’article 18 de ce traité, la Commission peut conclure des accords de coopération avec d’autres organisations universelles ou sous régionales dans l’accomplissement de ses missions. Il s’agit notamment de : • l’Organisation pour la conservation de la faune sauvage en Afrique (OCFSA), pour la biodiversité et la lutte anti-braconnage transfrontalière ; • la Conférence sur les écosystèmes des forêts denses et humides d’Afrique centrale (CEFDHAC) dont les organes sont : le forum sous régional, le comité de pilotage sous régional, l’agence de facilitation sous régionale et les fora nationaux. À côté de ces organes, il existe de nombreux réseaux : le Réseau des jeunes pour les forêts d’Afrique centrale (REJEFAC), le Réseau des populations autochtones et locales d’Afrique centrale (REPALEAC),9 le Réseau des femmes africaines pour le développement durable (REFADD). • le Réseau des aires protégées d’Afrique centrale (RAPAC) qui a pour mission « de mettre en œuvre les dispositions du Plan de convergence de la COMIFAC relatives à la création et à la gestion des aires protégées transfrontalières ».10 Son objectif global est « de promouvoir le développement des actions de conservation et de valorisation de la biodiversité de la sousrégion d’Afrique centrale, à travers l’aménagement et la gestion efficace des aires protégées ».11 Le RAPAC est une association sous régionale à vocation environnementale, à caractère technique, scientifique et à but non lucratif.12 L’activité du RAPAC porte sur trois thèmes : la biodiversité en Afrique centrale, l’éducation environnementale et la lutte contre le braconnage.13 • l’Agence intergouvernementale pour le développement de l’information environnementale (ADIE) dont les statuts ont été signés à Douala, le 4 septembre 2008. C’est un organisme spécialisé de la CEEAC. Placée sous l’autorité du Conseil des ministres en charge de l’environnement de la Com- ____________________ 9 Kam Yogo (2015:12). 10 Voir le préambule des statuts du RAPAC. 11 Voir l’article 3 des statuts du RAPAC. 12 Voir l’article 1er des statuts du RAPAC. 13 Mankoto Mambaelele & Agnangoye (2016). Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 142 munauté, l’Agence est chargée de collecter, traiter, diffuser, archiver, développer des bases de données et échanger des informations environnementales à des fins de développement durable, d’appuyer les initiatives visant à améliorer la gestion de l’information environnementale des divers écosystèmes d’Afrique Centrale ; renforcer les capacités des Réseaux nationaux d’information environnementale (RNIE). Les organes de l’ADIE sont : le Conseil d’administration, le secrétariat exécutif, les coordinations nationales, les réseaux nationaux d’information environnementale. • l’Organisation africaine du bois (OAB) dont la coopération avec la COMI- FAC concerne les questions d’économie forestière, de certification et de commerce des produits forestiers. 2.1.1.2.2 Le Pool énergétique de l’Afrique centrale (PEAC) Le Pool énergétique de l’Afrique centrale (PEAC) est créé le 12 avril 2003 et, par décision des chefs d’État et de gouvernement, il est érigé par la suite en un organisme spécialisé de la CEEAC.14 Le PEAC est structuré ainsi qu’il suit : d’abord, les organes de direction (le conseil des ministres de l’énergie, le comité exécutif, le comité de direction, le secrétariat permanent), ensuite les organes consultatifs (comité des experts, l’organe de régulation et l’organe de conciliation), puis les organes techniques (sous-comité planification, sous-comité exploitation, sous-comité environnement), enfin le centre de coordination. 2.1.1.2.3 La Commission de pêches du golfe de Guinée (COREP) La COREP a été créée le 21 juin 1984.15 Depuis 2007 cette commission est devenue un organisme spécialisé de la CEEAC.16 Elle a pour mission d’harmoniser les politiques et législations des États membres, préserver et protéger l’écosystème aquatique, y compris marin et des eaux douces. La structure de la COREP comporte les organes suivants : le conseil des ministres, le comité technique, le sous-comité scientifique, le secrétariat exécutif. ____________________ 14 Voir l’accord intergouvernemental du 11 avril 2003 sur la création du PEAC. 15 Voir la convention signée à Libreville au Gabon le 21 juin 1984. 16 L’érection de la COREP en une institution spécialisée de la CEEAC est intervenue par décision n° 9/CEEAC/CCEG /XIII/07 prise par la Conférence des Chefs d’État et de gouvernement de la CEEAC au cours de la 13e session ordinaire tenue à Brazzaville au Congo le 30 octobre 2007. COMMUNAUTÉS ÉCONOMIQUES RÉGIONALES ET L’ENVIRONNEMENT 143 2.1.2 Le cadre normatif de la CEEAC en matière de protection de l’environnement Ce cadre normatif comprend le traité instituant la CEEAC et certains protocoles, ainsi que d’autres actes juridiques sectoriels. 2.1.2.1 Le traité instituant la CEEAC et ses protocoles Signé en 1983, le traité instituant la CEEAC comporte des dispositions relatives à la protection de l’environnement. C’est dire que la protection de l’environnement est une préoccupation non négligeable dans l’ordre juridique de cette organisation. Comme nous l’avons relevé plus haut, l’environnement et les ressources naturelles figurent parmi les axes prioritaires de la Communauté depuis le sommet des chefs d’État et de gouvernement de 2007. Le traité constitutif prédisposait cette organisation à s’occuper de l’environnement. Ainsi, l’article 4 du traité évoque la préservation de l’environnement parmi les objectifs. Dans le cadre de la construction d’un marché commun, il est nécessaire que l’espace susceptible de former ledit marché soit débarrassé de toute entrave (tarifaire et non) et soit ouvert à la libre circulation des personnes et des biens. C’est ainsi que l’alinéa b de l’article 4 préconise comme objectif pour la Communauté « l’abolition, entre les États membres, des restrictions et autres entraves au commerce ». Dans la même lancée, l’alinéa f du même article assigne comme objectif à l’organisation sous régionale « l’harmonisation des politiques nationales en vue de la promotion des activités communautaires… ». Des domaines variés sont ciblés à l’instar de l’industrie, les ressources naturelles, les transports, etc. En procédant à l’harmonisation des politiques, la Communauté met en cohérence les différentes législations et politiques pour une saine concurrence. Cette mise en cohérence est aussi valable pour les législations et politiques environnementales. Le mécanisme d’harmonisation n’est pas encore très développé17 au sein de la CEEAC. Le traité énonce que les États membres conviennent de coopérer pour « la satisfaction des besoins alimentaires des populations et le renforcement de la sécurité alimentaire, notamment par l’amélioration quantitative et qualitative de la production vivrière ».18 En effet, assurer la sécurité alimentaire requiert le relèvement de la qualité des produits. Or la qualité n’est possible que si la production respecte les conditions environnementales. Dans le cadre de la production agricole par exemple, l’usage des pesticides non con- ____________________ 17 Il faut néanmoins noter que la COMIFAC enregistre quelques succès en matière d’harmonisation des politiques forestières. 18 Article 43 (1) du traité CEEAC. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 144 formes à la législation internationale peut entraîner des conséquences importantes sur la santé humaine et animale, et sur la flore. La culture des organismes génétiquement modifiés (OGM) peut constituer un risque pour la biodiversité qui fait l’objet de protection. Par ailleurs le chapitre XI sur la coopération en matière d’énergie et des ressources naturelles prescrit que les États membres puissent promouvoir les énergies renouvelables».19 Ensuite la protection de l’environnement est envisagée dans les protocoles au traité de la CEEAC. Ces protocoles portent pour l’essentiel sur les questions sectorielles. Le protocole XIV relatif à la coopération dans le domaine des ressources naturelles entre les États membres de la Communauté économique des États de l’Afrique centrale porte également sur la préservation de l’environnement. Ce protocole exige que les États membres s’engagent à « élaborer une politique commune en vue de la prévention de la dégradation de l’environnement et de l’exploitation effrénée des ressources naturelles ».20 Le comité de l’énergie et des ressources naturelles est créé, en vertu de l’article 26 du traité, pour l’application de ce protocole. Par ailleurs, le protocole IX relatif à la coopération dans le domaine du développement agricole entre les États membres de la Communauté économique des États de l’Afrique centrale, fondé sur les articles 4 et 43 du traité constitutif de la CEEAC, intègre également les dispositions relatives à la protection de l’environnement. Ce protocole envisage la coopération entre les États membres dans des secteurs divers de l’agriculture : les ressources forestières, la pêche et la mise en valeur des fleuves et lacs ainsi que la chasse. Pour le cas spécifique de la chasse, ce protocole précise que les États membres s’engagent à « prendre des mesures propres à assurer la conservation et la valorisation de la faune sauvage ainsi que l’organisation de la lutte antibraconnage ».21 Enfin, le protocole XII renforce en réalité les dispositions du traité CEEAC selon lesquelles les États membres conviennent « d’assurer une application appropriée de la science et de la technologie au développement de l’agriculture, des transports … ainsi que la préservation de l’environnement ».22 En somme, le développement scientifique et technologique doit prendre en considération les exigences environnementales. ____________________ 19 Article 54 (1) du traité CEEAC. 20 Article 2 (f) dudit protocole. 21 Article 9 (b) du protocole IX. 22 Article 51 (b) du traité de la CEEAC. COMMUNAUTÉS ÉCONOMIQUES RÉGIONALES ET L’ENVIRONNEMENT 145 2.1.2.2 Le Code du marché de l’électricité Par décision n° 15/CEEAC/CCEG/XIV/09 du 24 octobre 2009 à Kinshasa, la Conférence des chefs d’État et de gouvernement de la CEEAC a décidé d’adopter le Code du marché régional de l’électricité en Afrique centrale. Cette décision assigne au PEAC de « veiller à la mise en pratique »23 de ce code. En fait, la production, le transport, le transit et la distribution de l’électricité peuvent avoir un impact environnemental, y compris sur la santé et sécurité humaine, la flore, faune, sol, l’eau, le climat et le paysage. C’est sans doute la raison pour laquelle le code du marché de l’électricité de l’Afrique centrale accorde une place importante aux dispositions environnementales. Le code a pour objet de définir et régir les règles communes concernant la production, le transport, le transit et la distribution de l’électricité en Afrique centrale.24 Pour s’assurer que ces activités n’auront pas d’impact négatif sur l’environnement, le code énonce qu’il « détermine les règles de protection de l’environnement et des intérêts des consommateurs ».25 Par ailleurs, le code permet aux États d’imposer aux entreprises du secteur de l’électricité « des obligations… qui peuvent porter sur la sécurité… ainsi que la protection de l’environnement y compris l’efficacité énergétique et la protection du climat ».26 À cet effet, ces États doivent s’assurer que les entreprises d’électricité soient exploitées conformément aux principes de ce code du marché.27 Ils peuvent enfin prendre des mesures nécessaires pour atteindre les objectifs en matière de cohésion économique et sociale et de protection de l’environnement.28 Enfin, obligation est faite aux États membres d’informer le PEAC des mesures prises dans le cadre de la mise en œuvre du code pour remplir leurs obligations de service universel et de service public de protection de l’environnement.29 2.2 L’esquisse d’un cadre politique régional de gestion de l’environnement par la CEEAC Le cadre politique régional de gestion de l’environnement est dense et riche. Il couvre de nombreux secteurs de l’environnement. La gestion de l’environnement au ____________________ 23 Article 2 de la décision n° 15/CEEAC/CCEG/XIV/09 du 24 octobre 2009. 24 Voir article 2 du code du marché de l’électricité. 25 L’article 2 alinéa d) du code du marché de l’électricité. 26 Voir l’article 4 (2) de ce code. 27 Voir l’article 4 (1) de ce code. 28 Voir l’article 4 (6) de ce code. 29 Voir l’article 4 (8) de ce code. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 146 sein de la CEEAC fait l’objet d’un cadre d’une politique générale. Ce cadre général est complété par des politiques et programmes sectoriels. 2.2.1 La politique générale de gestion de l’environnement au sein de la CEEAC La sous-région Afrique centrale se positionne comme une actrice importante dans la protection de l’environnement. Cela s’explique pour au moins deux raisons : d’abord parce qu’elle est victime de ces dysfonctionnements de l’environnement ; ensuite parce qu’elle dispose d’un massif forestier important dans l’équilibre de l’écosystème terrestre. Conscients de cet enjeu, les États de cette sous-région étant regroupés au sein de Communauté économique des États de l’Afrique centrale ont marqué leur intention de préserver l’environnement. À cet effet, la Communauté a adopté, en vertu des articles 4, 43 et 54 de son traité constitutif, une politique générale en matière d’environnement et de gestion des ressources naturelles en mars 2007. Cette politique fait ressortir les objectifs et des orientations de coopération entre les États membres. Les objectifs de la politique régionale de l’environnement et de la gestion des ressources naturelles sont au nombre de cinq. D’abord, l’harmonisation des politiques et stratégies de gestion durable de l’environnement et des ressources naturelles au niveau de la région Afrique centrale. Ensuite, la coopération avec les organisations régionales et internationales sur l’environnement de la région. À titre d’exemple, dans le nouveau cadre de coopération entre la CEEAC et le Bureau régional des Nations Unies pour l’Afrique centrale (UNOCA) signé le 15 juin 2016, la lutte contre le braconnage figure au rang des priorités. Par ailleurs, la CEEAC et la Banque africaine de développement (BAD) entretiennent une coopération dense en matière de protection de l’environnement. Dans ce cadre, on peut relever la coopération financière dans le cadre de la mise en œuvre du Programme d’appui à la conservation des ecosystèmes du Bassin du Congo (PACEBCo) en vue de la préservation de la diversité biologique en Afrique centrale, le projet d’information satellitaire et météorologique pour la réduction des risques de catastrophes naturelles en Afrique centrale. Puis, développer les capacités humaines et institutionnelles. C’est ce qui ressort de l’article 59 sur les ressources humaines du traité de la CEEAC. En outre, adopter une approche concertée et convergente des thèmes environnementaux majeurs dans la région. Enfin, suivre la mise en œuvre des conventions internationales. L’orientation de coopération est définie en 12 axes stratégiques majeurs, assortis des actions à mener et des résultats attendus. Ces axes correspondent aux thématiques d’intervention prioritaire de la région Afrique centrale dans le cadre du plan d’actions environnementales du NEPAD (PAE NEPAD). Ces axes sont : • axe d’orientation stratégique 1 : lutte contre la dégradation des sols, la sécheresse et la désertification ; COMMUNAUTÉS ÉCONOMIQUES RÉGIONALES ET L’ENVIRONNEMENT 147 • axe d’orientation stratégique 2 : conservation et gestion durable des zones humides et des ressources en eaux douces d’Afrique centrale ; • axe d’orientation stratégique 3 : prévention et contrôle des espèces allogènes envahissantes ; • axe d’orientation stratégique 4 : conservation et gestion durable des ressources forestières d’Afrique centrale ; • axe d’orientation stratégique 5 : lutte contre les changements climatiques en Afrique centrale ; • axe d’orientation stratégique 6 : conservation et gestion durable des ressources naturelles transfrontalières d’Afrique centrale ; • axe d’orientation stratégique 7 : renforcement des capacités pour la mise en œuvre des conventions internationales ; • axe d’orientation stratégique 8 : population, santé et environnement ; • axe d’orientation stratégique 9 : commerce et environnement ; • axe d’orientation stratégique 10 : le transfert des technologies environnementales durables ; • axe d’orientation stratégique 11 : évaluation et alerte rapide pour la gestion des catastrophes naturelles ou provoquées ; et • axe d’orientation stratégique 12 : la banque des données environnementales en Afrique centrale. Les États conviennent de mettre en place un système d’information environnementale, élaborer une banque des données sur les organisations et institutions nationales ou internationales, élaborer une banque des données sur les ressources forestières, et environnementales, ainsi que sur les aires protégées d’Afrique centrale.30 À côté de cette politique générale, il existe les politiques régionales sectorielles. 2.2.2 Les politiques et plans régionaux sectoriels Plusieurs politiques régionales sectorielles sont à recenser au sein de la CEEAC. Elles portent sur des secteurs divers comme l’eau ou la conservation des écosystèmes. ____________________ 30 Il a été plus question de recenser les différents axes d’orientation stratégiques assortis de quelles actions prévues pour leur mise en œuvre. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 148 2.2.2.1 La politique de l’eau La politique régionale de l’eau, basée sur les principes de la gestion intégrée des ressources en eau, a été élaborée en octobre 2009. Elle vise la réduction de la pauvreté et la croissance économique dans l’espace de la Communauté. Les actions mises en œuvre pour atteindre cet objectif doivent respecter les autres fonctions de l’eau, notamment ses fonctions environnementales. Cette politique définit des objectifs spécifiques parmi lesquels la nécessité de gérer durablement les écosystèmes aquatiques. Elle définit également des priorités parmi lesquelles, la satisfaction des besoins environnementaux (notamment les débits minimaux pour la durabilité des écosystèmes aquatiques et des zones humides). Quant au cadre institutionnel régional de mise en œuvre de la politique régionale de l’eau de la CEEAC, il a été approuvé à Kinshasa le 24 octobre 2009. L’on dénombre les organes décisionnels et les organes consultatifs. Les organes de décision sont : le Comité ministériel de pilotage et d’orientation (CMPO),31 le Comité technique de Suivi (CTS),32 le Centre régional de coordination et de gestion des ressources en eau (CRGRE). Sur le plan administratif et fonctionnel, le centre fait partie intégrante des structures du Secrétariat général de la CEEAC. Mais dans le cadre de la mise en œuvre de la politique de l’eau, il est sous l’égide du CMPO. Le Centre a pour fonction de coordonner la mise en œuvre de la politique régionale de l’eau. Les organes consultatifs sont : le Conseil régional de l’eau (CRE). Il regroupe des acteurs étatiques et non étatiques de la région pour des consultations relatives à la politique régionale de l’eau et les Conseils ou Comités nationaux de l’eau qui jouent le même rôle et ont la même configuration que le Conseil régional au niveau national. Le Plan d’action régional de la gestion intégrée des ressources en eau de l’Afrique centrale (PARGIRE-AC) a été validé le 14 juin 2014 par le Conseil des ministres en charge de l’eau de la Communauté économique des États de l’Afrique centrale. C’est un instrument de facilitation de la mise en œuvre de la politique régionale de l’eau adoptée le 24 octobre 2009. La mise en œuvre de ce plan est confiée à l’Unité de démarrage pour la gestion intégrée des ressources en eau du Secrétariat général de la CEEAC avec l’appui de la BAD, de la facilité africaine de l’eau et du NEPAD. Ainsi, la composante 1 du plan concerne l’appui à l’amélioration des connaissances et de la gestion durable des ressources en eau et porte sur deux actions : ____________________ 31 Il est composé des ministres en charge de l’eau des États membres de la Communauté. Il donne les orientations de la politique de l’eau. 32 Il est composé d’experts qui proviennent de divers milieux : des ministères en charge de l’eau, des organisations sous régionales de gestion de l’eau, représentants de la société civile, des organisations spécialisées de la CEEAC, des principaux donateurs. Ce Comité a pour fonction d’assister techniquement le CMPO. COMMUNAUTÉS ÉCONOMIQUES RÉGIONALES ET L’ENVIRONNEMENT 149 d’abord, la préservation des écosystèmes et des ressources naturelles, ensuite l’appui à la mise en place de systèmes d’information communs pour le suivi efficace des ressources. Les actions contenues dans le PARGIRE-AC sont regroupées en six programmes, parmi lesquels le programme visant la préservation de la ressource et l’amélioration de l’accès à l’eau potable ainsi que l’assainissement en milieu urbain. Ce programme prévoit des actions relatives à la préservation de l’environnement telles que la promotion de la gestion des zones humides et des mangroves, l’appui à la sauvegarde des écosystèmes côtiers et lacustres, l’appui à l’assainissement en milieux urbain, périurbain et semi-urbain. Un autre programme envisage l’appui au développement et la promotion des énergies renouvelables, l’élaboration d’un programme de promotion de l’industrie du tourisme écologique et des loisirs. Dans le cadre de la mise en œuvre de la politique de l’eau, le Cameroun a entamé le processus d’élaboration du Plan national de gestion intégrée des ressources en eau (PANGIRE)33. 2.2.2.2 Le système de l’économie verte en Afrique centrale Le système de l’économie verte en Afrique centrale (SEVAC) est élaboré en vue de promouvoir une approche innovante visant à concilier la protection de l’environnement, notamment la lutte contre les changements climatiques et le développement économique.34 Adoptée lors d’une conférence des ministres des forêts, de l’environnement, des ressources naturelles et du développement durable de la CEEAC, la vision du SEVAC porte sur la volonté des États membres à faire de l’économie verte un secteur clé du développement économique des États de l’Afrique centrale. Le système a pour mission de coordonner et faciliter la mise en œuvre du Programme d’appui au développement de l’économie verte en Afrique centrale (PADE- VAC) et les programmes sectoriels visant à contribuer au développement économique des États. Il vise à développer un cadre politique, institutionnel, financier, opérationnel et promotionnel favorable au développement de l’économie verte en Afrique centrale. Après l’adoption par la conférence des ministres de la déclaration sur le développement et la promotion de l’économie verte en Afrique centrale, une stratégie sous régionale en matière de développement de l’économie verte et des structures ont été ____________________ 33 Voir Cameroon Tribune du 21 février 2017. 34 Voir http://www.ceeac-eccas.org/index.php/en/actualite/dipem/41-conference-des-ministresde-la-ceeac-sur-le-fonds-pour-l-economie-verte-en-afrique-centrale-et-la-transformationstructurelle-de-l-economie-des-ressources-naturelles, consulté le 10 mars 2017. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 150 mises sur pied telles que : le Réseau des entreprises d’Afrique centrale sur l’économie verte (REACEV), le Réseau des organisations de la société civile de l’économie verte d’Afrique centrale (ROSECEVAC), le Fonds pour l’économie verte en Afrique centrale (FEVAC),35 le réseau des éco-juristes, le réseau des parlementaires de l’économie verte, les programmes sectoriels (programme de développement de l’écotourisme, de l’économie des zones humides, de l’éco-agri business), et le forum sur le green business. 2.2.2.3 Programme d’appui à la conservation des écosystèmes du bassin du Congo Le Programme d’appui à la conservation des écosystèmes du bassin du Congo (PA- CEBCo) a effectivement été lancé en 2010 à Kinshasa.36 L’idée de ce programme germe en 2005 au cours du lancement du plan de convergence de la COMIFAC. À cette occasion en effet, la BAD s’était engagée à accompagner la COMIFAC dans la mise en œuvre de ce plan de convergence. Le PACEBCo intègre les enjeux écologiques, sociaux et économiques et contribue à la mise en œuvre des axes 3, 4, 6 et 7 du Plan de Convergence. Le PACEBCo couvre quatre composantes : d’abord le renforcement des capacités des institutions du traité de la COMIFAC, ensuite la gestion durable de la biodiversité et adaptation aux changements climatiques (élaboration et/ou actualisation des plans d’aménagement et de gestion des ressources naturelles (PAGRN), réalisation des plans d’aménagement des aires protégées, développement d’une réponse appropriée à la vulnérabilité liée aux changements climatiques dans les paysages du bassin du Congo, développement et mise en œuvre des projets pilotes REDD et d’adaptation au changement climatique), puis la promotion durable du bien-être des populations, enfin la gestion et la coordination du programme. Le PACEBCo couvre six paysages : le tri-national de la Sangha (Cameroun, RCA, Congo), Virunga (RDC, Rwanda), Maringa-Lopori-Wamba (RDC), Maiko-Tayna- Kahuzi-Biega (RDC), Monte Alen-Monts de Cristal (Gabon, Guinée équatoriale) et le lac Tumba (RDC, Congo). ____________________ 35 Le FEVAC vise à financer, entre autres, les programmes sectoriels pour le développement de l’économie verte en Afrique centrale. Parmi ceux-ci figurent le programme de développement de l’économie de l’hydroélectricité, le programme de développement de l’économie solaire, le programme de développement de l’économie de reboisement, le programme de développement de l’économie de bois, le programme de développement de l’économie des déchets et de l’assainissement et le programme de développement de l’écotourisme. Ce Fonds a été créé par les chefs d’État et de gouvernement de la CEEAC à travers le projet de décision n° 27/CEEAC/CCEG/XVI/15 du 25 mai 2015. 36 Voir http://www.pacebco-ceeac.org, consulté le 10 mars 2016. COMMUNAUTÉS ÉCONOMIQUES RÉGIONALES ET L’ENVIRONNEMENT 151 3 La prise en compte timide des préoccupations environnementales dans la CEMAC Lors de sa création en 1994, la CEMAC avait une orientation purement économique. Mais, la prise en main de certaines anciennes institutions issues de l’UDEAC et la création de nouvelles institutions ont permis un début de prise en compte de l’environnement au sein de la CEMAC. 3.1 Les institutions de la CEMAC intervenant dans le domaine de l’environnement Il s’agit notamment de l’ Organisation de coordination pour la lutte contre les endémies en Afrique centrale (OCEAC), la Commission internationale du Bassin Congo- Oubangui-Sangha (CICOS), la Commission économique du bétail de viande et des ressources halieutiques (CEBEVIRHA) et le Comité inter-État des pesticides d’Afrique centrale (CPAC). 3.1.1 L’Organisation de coordination et de coopération pour la lutte contre les grandes endémies en Afrique centrale (OCEAC) L’OCEAC a été créée en 1963 à Yaoundé par la volonté des ministres de la Santé du Cameroun, du Congo, du Gabon, de la RCA et du Tchad. Il s’agit donc d’une institution consacrée aux questions de santé publique de la sous-région Afrique centrale. Jusqu’en 1965, l’OCEAC porte le nom de l’OCCGEAC.37 Depuis 1983, l’institution sous régionale de santé publique a révisé ses statuts. Les missions de l’OCEAC ont donc été reformulées et consistent en l’institution d’un pôle scientifique régional pour le développement de la santé publique, la participation à la formation des personnels de santé publique dans les États membres, la fourniture d’une expertise de santé publique, et à susciter l’intérêt des partenaires privés et publics. Étant donné que plusieurs maladies proviennent des pollutions que subit l’environnement, l’OCEAC a pris conscience de la protection de celui-ci. Au regard de cette réalité, l’OCEAC a également orienté sa stratégie vers la prévention en essayant d’éliminer dès la souche, les vecteurs de nombreuses maladies. Les actions d’éradication d’une épidémie peuvent également constituer un facteur de pollution ____________________ 37 Voir http://www.oceac.org, consulté le 10 mars 2017. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 152 susceptible d’aboutir à d’autres maladies. Par exemple, les déchets du matériel de vaccination contre une épidémie peuvent polluer l’environnement. Dans le cadre de ses interventions sur la sécurité sanitaire, l’OCEAC est chargée : • de l’élaboration, du suivi et de l’application des normes sanitaires régionales de production, de conservation, de transport et de consommation des aliments, des médicaments, des liquides biologiques et des eaux, etc. ; • de l’évaluation des risques environnementaux sur la santé ; • de l’élaboration des mesures d’hygiène et leur application ; et • de la promotion de l’assainissement du milieu. Quant à sa mission de participation à la formation des personnels de santé publique dans les États membres, l’OCEAC a créé en 1981 le Centre inter-État d’enseignement supérieur en santé publique d’Afrique centrale (CIESPAC) basé à Brazzaville au Congo. Ce Centre a intégré un master en santé publique dans son offre de formation. Ce master comprend les options suivantes : Hygiène et santé, puis santé et environnement. C’est dire que l’OCEAC est résolument engagée à la protection de l’environnement. 3.1.2 La Commission internationale du bassin Congo-Oubangui-Sangha (CICOS) La création de cette institution est le fruit d’un travail mené par les experts de la CEMAC et ceux de la République Démocratique du Congo (RDC), avec le concours technique de la Commission économique pour l’Afrique et de la Commission du Rhin entre 1998 et 1999. Ce travail a abouti à la signature de l’Accord instituant un régime fluvial uniforme le 6 novembre 199938 et à la création de la CICOS, une organisation sous régionale dont la mission est de promouvoir la navigation intérieure. Cette mission a été élargie à la gestion intégrée de ressources en eau par l’additif à l’accord signé le 22 février 2007. La CICOS comprend un organe de décision (le comité des ministres), un organe consultatif (le comité de direction), un organe d’exécution (le secrétariat général). Le secrétariat général comprend quatre directions, parmi lesquelles il y a la direction de l’environnement, de la prévention des pollutions et des risques. Les normes adoptées dans le cadre de la CICOS sont favorables à la protection de l’environnement. Le titre IV de l’additif à l’accord signé le 22 février 2007 porte sur la protection et la préservation de l’environnement. Ce titre porte essentiellement sur ____________________ 38 Cet accord a été signé par la République du Cameroun, la République du Congo, la République Centrafricaine et la République Démocratique du Congo qui n’est pas membre de la CEMAC. COMMUNAUTÉS ÉCONOMIQUES RÉGIONALES ET L’ENVIRONNEMENT 153 les missions de la CICOS en matière de protection des écosystèmes riverains du fleuve et ses affluents contre tout type de pollution et contre les éventuelles modifications de l’écosystème,39 sur la planification de l’aménagement et de la gestion des eaux,40 et sur des modalités de réparation des dommages causés à l’environnement.41 À ce niveau, il est question pour la Commission d’appliquer les principes bien connus de droit international de l’environnement : le principe pollueur-payeur et celui de l’utilisateur-payeur. À cet effet, certains outils économiques ont été envisagés : des taxes et redevances par les États à l’encontre des pollueurs et utilisateurs de l’eau à des fins économiques. La CICOS a par ailleurs adopté des règles dérivées et conventionnelles. Ainsi, le Conseil des ministres de la CEMAC a adopté le code de la navigation intérieure CEMAC/RDC du 17 décembre 199942. Le titre VII de ce code est intitulé « des dispositions relatives à l’environnement » et est constitué de deux chapitres dont le premier est consacré aux définitions et le second à la protection des eaux et élimination des déchets provenant des bâtiments.43 Dans ce dernier chapitre, les États contractants énoncent des interdictions à l’endroit du capitaine et tout membre d’équipage de déverser des substances usées et polluantes dans l’eau. De plus, un accord de coopération entre la CICOS et le Global Water Partnership Afrique centrale dans le but de « faciliter et de promouvoir la coopération entre les parties contractantes dans le but de renforcer le développement de programmes communs d’intervention pour la mise en valeur de la gestion intégrée des ressources en eau ».44 Ces programmes communs comme l’indique l’article 2, portent également sur la préservation de l’environnement. Enfin, il existe un règlement commun relatif au contrat de transport des marchandises par voie d’eau intérieure dans l’espace CICOS45 qui dispose que le transporteur ou toute partie exécutante peut refuser de recevoir ou de charger les marchandises et peut prendre toute autre mesure raisonnable, notamment les décharger, détruire ou les neutraliser, si celles-ci présentent ou risquent, selon toute vraisemblance raisonnable, de présenter un danger réel pour les personnes les biens ou l’environnement pendant la durée de sa responsabilité.46 ____________________ 39 Voir l’article 14. 40 Voir l’article 15. 41 Voir l’article 16. 42 Voir le règlement n° 14/99/CEMAC/036/CM/03 du 17 décembre 1999. 43 Voir les articles 125 à 130 du code de la navigation intérieure CEMAC/RDC. 44 Voir l’article 1 de cet accord. 45 Ce règlement commun a été adopté par décision n° 07/CICOS/CM/08 du Conseil des ministres de la CICOS du 7 mars 2011 à Brazzaville (Congo). 46 Voir l’article 17 de ce règlement. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 154 Les textes fondamentaux de la CICOS lui ont assigné des objectifs en matière de protection de l’environnement tels que : garantir la gestion durable des voies navigables et harmoniser la réglementation en matière de transport pour la sécurité de la navigation et la promotion de l’environnement. La CICOS dispose d’un schéma directeur d’aménagement et de gestion des eaux. Il s’agit d’un vaste programme de mesures à mettre en œuvre au cours de la période 2016-2020. Ainsi, trois mesures sont envisagées dans le cadre de la protection de l’environnement : il s’agit de la sensibilisation pour une meilleure gouvernance, du système d’information pour la gestion et de l’évaluation pour une infrastructure environnementale adéquate. 3.1.3 La Commission économique du bétail, de la viande et des ressources halieutiques (CEBEVIRHA) La Commission économique du bétail, de la viande et des ressources halieutiques (CEBEVIRHA) a été créée le 18 décembre 198747. La terrible sécheresse qui a sévi en 1973-1974 a motivé les acteurs de la CEMAC à créer cette commission pour contribuer à l’alimentation de la population. Elle est a priori une organisation de coopération. La quête de développement durable a amené les autorités de la CEMAC à intégrer la protection de l’environnement dans les missions de la CEBEVIRHA. Ainsi, cette Commission a pour mission, d’abord de contribuer au développement durable, harmonieux et équilibré des secteurs de l’élevage et des industries animales, ensuite d’assurer le contrôle sur les lieux de conditionnement des troupeaux et des poissons. Les objectifs de la CEBEVIRHA sont d’appuyer le développement quantitatif et qualitatif des secteurs de l’élevage, de la pêche et de l’aquaculture et d’assurer la surveillance et le contrôle de la pêche dans les eaux territoriales des États membres de la CEMAC. Dans cette optique, la CEBEVIRHA lutte contre l’exploitation abusive des ressources halieutiques biotique48. À ce propos, elle a conclu un accord de coopération avec la COREP, mais également avec d’autres partenaires. Ces accords sont conclus dans le domaine de compétence de la CEBEVIRHA et intègrent des dispositions sur la protection de l’environnement. Il s’agit entre autres de :49 ____________________ 47 Voir http://www.cemac.int/service/cebevirha-commission-economique-du-b%C3%A9tail-dela-viande-et-des-ressources-halieutiques, consulté le 10 mars 2017. 48 Mevono Mvogo (2015:82). 49 Pour ce qui est des différents accords, voir http://www.cemac.int/service/cebevirhacommission-economique-du-b%C3%A9tail-de-la-viande-et-des-ressources-halieutiques, consulté le 11 mars 2017. COMMUNAUTÉS ÉCONOMIQUES RÉGIONALES ET L’ENVIRONNEMENT 155 • l’accord de coopération entre la CEBERVIRHA et la COREP, visant à assister les États membres en vue de protéger et de mettre en valeur, de façon durable, les ressources halieutiques. À travers cette coopération, ces deux institutions sous régionaux collaborent pour garantir la sécurité alimentaire aux populations de la sous-région ; • l’accord de coopération entre la CEBEVIRHA et l’Union internationale pour la conservation de la nature (UICN). Dans le cadre de cette coopération, l’UICN a lancé en 2010 le projet « Élevage comme moyen de subsistance », lequel repose sur le renforcement des stratégies d’adaptation aux changements climatiques à travers la gestion améliorée au niveau de l’interface bétail-faune sauvage-environnement ; • l’accord de coopération a également été conclu entre la CEBVIRHA et l’Office internationale des épizooties (OIE). D’après l’article 2 de cet accord, l’OIE assiste la commission sur plusieurs volets dont l’établissement de normes dans les échanges intra et extracommunautaires des animaux, et des produits halieutiques ; et • l’accord de coopération entre la CEBEVIRHA et la COMIFAC dans le cadre du Programme d’actions sous régionales de lutte contre la dégradation des terres et la désertification en Afrique centrale. Du fait de sa mission de sécurité alimentaire, la CEBEVIRHA est interpellée par ce programme dans la mesure où l’aspect ‘élevage’ pour lequel elle agit ne peut être optimal que si les éleveurs ont la garantie que le pâturage est disponible. Pour cela, la lutte contre la désertification est une préoccupation de Commission du bétail. 3.1.4 Le Comité inter-États des pesticides d’Afrique centrale (CPAC) Le CPAC est créé par la CEMAC en 200750 comme cela avait été prévu par le règlement n° 09/06/UEAC/114/CM/15 du 10 mars 2006 portant réglementation commune des pesticides en zone CEMAC. Plusieurs textes internationaux ont influencé l’action des autorités communautaires en ce sens. Il s’agit de : • la convention de Stockholm sur les polluants organiques persistants. Elle a pour but de protéger la santé humaine et l’environnement des produits chimiques qui demeurent intacts dans l’environnement pendant de longues périodes et s’accumulent dans les tissus adipeux des êtres humains et de la faune ; et ____________________ 50 Règlement n° 011/07/UEAC/114/CM/05 du 11 mars 2007. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 156 • la convention de Bâle du 22 mars 1989 sur le contrôle des mouvements transfrontières des déchets dangereux et leur élimination. Le CPAC applique le règlement portant harmonisation des pesticides et son règlement d’application. Il ressort de ces textes que le Comité est chargé :51 • de définir les méthodes de contrôle, la composition, la qualité et l’évaluation des produits à l’égard de l’homme, des animaux et de l’environnement ; et • d’assister les comités nationaux dans l’élimination des pesticides périmés. L’acte additionel n° 07/CEMAC/CCE/11 du 25 juillet 2012 a érigé le CPAC en institution spécialisée de la CEMAC. Et le règlemen n° 09/12//UEAC/CPAC/CM/23 di 22 juillet 2012 a organisé le fonctionnement du CPAC. En conférant cette mission au Comité, les instances dirigeantes de la CEMAC ont mesuré l’ampleur des menaces de pollution que les pesticides font peser sur l’environnement. Il revient dès lors à l’institution en charge de l’homologation des pesticides d’être un acteur de premier plan dans la prévention des pollutions qui pourrait provenir des pesticides. D’où l’assistance des comités nationaux dans la destruction des pesticides périmés. En plus, en délivrant les autorisations provisoires de vente, le Comité s’appuie aussi sur des considérations environnementales. 3.2 La lutte contre la pollution du milieu marin au sein de la CEMAC Le code communautaire de la marine marchande est divisé en livres. Le livre IV de ce code porte sur la pollution marine. Ce livre s’applique aux cas de pollution marine qui pourraient survenir dans l’espace maritime des États membres de la CEMAC. Ce livre prévoit la lutte contre la pollution marine autour de trois articulations majeures : l’énumération des potentiels cas de pollution, les actions préconisées en cas de violation et l’action en responsabilité en cas de pollution. Ce code intervient en application de nombreux instruments internationaux de protection de l’espace maritime contre les pollutions.52 Les dispositions de ce code ne s’appliquent pas lorsque les jets et rejets des substances polluantes sont effectués pour la sécurité du navire ou pour sauver des vies humaines en mer, ou lorsqu’ils résultent d’une avarie de l’équipement du navire dont le capitaine peut justifier avoir pris les précautions nécessaires, lorsque les liquides ou mélanges contenant de telles substances sont déversés pour lutter contre une pollution, pour ce qui est des filets en fibres synthétiques, et lorsque l’abandon est dû à la perte accidentelle. ____________________ 51 Voir article 3 du règlement n° 11/07/UEAC/114/CM/15, portant création, composition et fonctionnement du CPAC. 52 Il s’agit par exemple de la convention de Montego Bay. COMMUNAUTÉS ÉCONOMIQUES RÉGIONALES ET L’ENVIRONNEMENT 157 Dans le cadre de ce code, il est interdit aux navires de procéder aux rejets d’hydrocarbures ou de mélanges d’hydrocarbures dans les eaux maritimes.53 Par ailleurs, obligation est faite à tout navire d’avoir un plan d’urgence contre la pollution par les hydrocarbures et les autres substances polluantes établi conformément aux dispositions adoptées par l’Organisation maritime internationale.54 L’article 319 du code admet que les interdictions de jets et de rejets ne s’appliquent pas en cas d’avarie lorsque le capitaine a justifié qu’il a fait preuve de précaution. Cela est également valable en cas de perte accidentelle des filets en fibre synthétique ou de matériaux utilisés pour les réparer. En matière de prévention de la pollution par les immersions de déchets à partir des navires, l’article 339 énonce que les immersions de déchets dans des zones définies doivent être autorisées par arrêtés des ministres compétents en matière de défense nationale, des télécommunications et des ressources faunistiques et touristiques. Les dispositions du code prévoient une procédure de délivrance de permis d’immersion de déchets.55 L’article 338 prévoit une procédure de permis spécifique pour les déchets ou autres matières énumérées dans l’annexe II de la Convention LDC 72 (Convention de Londres de 1972 sur la prévention de pollution par l’immersion de déchets à partir de navires). Une procédure de permis général est également prévue pour les déchets ou autres matières énumérées dans les annexes I et II de la Convention LDC 72. L’article 40 désigne les autorités maritimes et celles chargées de l’environnement pour délivrer ce permis après étude d’impact sur le site d’immersion proposé. Un certificat international de conformité antisalissure est délivré (et renouvelé lors de carénage de la coque) aux navires de jauge brute égale ou supérieure à 400 battant pavillon des États membres et effectuant des voyages internationaux, pour prévenir la pollution par les peintures de coques des navires. Selon le code de la marine marchande, en cas de pollution, le propriétaire, l’armateur ou l’exploitant du navire peuvent être mis en demeure afin de prendre toutes les dispositions nécessaires pour faire face au danger. Si les mesures prises ne produisent pas le résultat escompté, l’autorité maritime peut prendre des mesures nécessaires aux frais, risques et périls de l’armateur, du propriétaire ou de l’exploitant. Par ailleurs, tout propriétaire d’un navire transportant d’hydrocarbures en vrac est responsable des dommages causés par la pollution engendrée par cette cargaison,56 de même que des dommages de pollution provoqués par des hydrocarbures provenant des soutes de ce navire.57 Enfin toute autre personne que le propriétaire peut ____________________ 53 Voir les articles 325, 326, 330, 333, 334, 335 du code communautaire de la marine marchande. 54 Voir l’article 329 de ce code. 55 Les articles 338 et 340 du code. 56 Voir l’article 359 de ce code. 57 Voir l’article 368 du code. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 158 voir sa responsabilité engagée si elle a concouru à la réalisation des dommages de pollution par omission, par témérité ou intentionnellement. En outre, le propriétaire d’un navire battant pavillon d’un État membre transportant plus de 2,000 tonnes d’hydrocarbures est tenu de souscrire à une police d’assurance en responsabilité civile.58 La réparation des dommages causés peut être exigée contre le propriétaire, l’assureur ou la personne dont émane la garantie financière. La responsabilité du propriétaire ne peut être écartée s’il est admis que les dommages proviennent d’un acte ou omission qu’il a commis personnellement soit avec l’intention de causer le dommage, soit témérairement en sachant qu’un tel dommage en résulterait probablement59. Les victimes de dommages de pollution d’hydrocarbures causés par un accident de mer qui n’ont pas pu obtenir entière réparation au titre du code, peuvent formuler une demande d’indemnisation auprès du Fonds international d’indemnisation des dommages de pollution par les hydrocarbures. 3.3 Les règles pharmaceutiques communautaires La politique pharmaceutique communautaire est conçue par l’OCEAC en collaboration avec la commission de la CEMAC. Rédigée en coopération avec l’Union européenne et l’Organisation mondiale de santé, cette politique est censée engendrer le cadre juridique et institutionnel, les ressources humaines, l’assurance qualité et l’accessibilité. Il est vrai que la qualité par exemple porte essentiellement sur le produit, mais il n’en demeure pas moins vrai que cet objectif est fondé sur certains aspects extérieurs comme l’environnement. En effet, un médicament serait de bonne qualité s’il est conforme aux normes établies. Ces normes devraient intégrer celles relatives à la lutte contre la pollution. C’est par exemple le cas de nombreux emballages servant au conditionnement de ces médicaments. Ces emballages devraient être écologiques c’est-à-dire, entre autres biodégradables ou recyclables. Par ailleurs, le règlement n° 05/13/UEAC/OCEAC/CM/SE/2 du 10 juin 2013, portant référentiel d’harmonisation des procédures d’homologation des médicaments à usage humain dans l’espace CEMAC prévoit par exemple les bonnes pratiques de fabrication des médicaments qui sont un facteur de l’assurance de la qualité. Ces bonnes pratiques garantissent que les produits sont fabriqués et contrôlés de façon ____________________ 58 Voir l’article 363 et suivant du code. 59 Voir l’article 362 du code. COMMUNAUTÉS ÉCONOMIQUES RÉGIONALES ET L’ENVIRONNEMENT 159 cohérente et selon les normes de qualité.60 En outre, ce règlement prévoit une déclaration sur l’évaluation environnementale61 au rang des renseignements administratifs pour le dossier de demande d’homologation d’un médicament à usage humain dans un pays de la CEMAC. Il pourrait s’agir d’une présentation des risques que le produit en cours d’homologation pourrait présenter pour l’environnement. Enfin, ce règlement exige que les précautions particulières d’élimination des produits non utilisés ou des déchets de ces produits soient prises.62 3.4 Les programmes de la CEMAC en matière de l’environnement Premièrement le Pôle régional de recherche appliquée des savanes d’Afrique centrale (PRASAC) créé en 1997 est devenu en 2008, le pôle régional de recherche appliquée des systèmes agricoles d’Afrique centrale.63 La gestion des ressources naturelles s’est positionnée comme un objectif de ce programme. En effet, la zone d’intervention du PRASAC est considérée comme exposée aux effets néfastes des changements climatiques, les ressources en eau étant de plus en plus rares, et l’assèchement du lac Tchad étant plus persistant. Il n’est d’ailleurs pas rare que des conflits naissent entre éleveurs et agriculteurs pour l’usage du peu d’eau disponible. En plus, le pâturage devient rare à cause de la sécheresse et la désertification qui avancent à grands pas. De plus, la dégradation des sols entraîne des baisses des potentialités de récoltes. Le PRASAC qui a un rôle de sécurité alimentaire ne pouvait donc prétendre remplir ses fonctions sans intégrer la protection de l’environnement dans ses missions. Ceci d’autant plus que les actions de production agricole sont aussi constitutives de dégradation de l’environnement. Ainsi, le programme agricole a commencé à intégrer la protection de l’environnement dans ses missions et activités. À titre d’exemple, de nombreux projets ayant un lien plus ou moins étroit avec la protection de l’environnement existent, notamment : • le projet d’appui à la recherche régionale pour le développement durable des savanes d’Afrique centrale ; et • le « projet Manioc » qui porte sur la production durable du manioc en Afrique centrale. Il est financé par la Commission de l’Union européenne. De plus, il est prévu une évaluation des impacts environnementaux liés aux pesticides et aux engrais dans le programme thématique pour la sécurité alimentaire. ____________________ 60 Voir l’article 3 de ce règlement. 61 Voir l’article 20 de ce règlement. 62 Voir l’article 41 de ce règlement. 63 Voir http://www.prasac-cemac.org/index.php/paysmembres/tchad, consulté le 11 mars 2017. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 160 Deuxièmement le système qualité en Afrique centrale qui vise à instaurer un système de normes communautaires en conformité avec les standards internationaux. Dans le cadre de l’atelier de validation de l’étude et plan d’action sur le système qualité, il en ressort cinq projets, dont celui sur la sécurité sanitaire des produits alimentaires en Afrique centrale. Protéger l’environnement peut être un moyen de sécurisation sanitaire des aliments. En effet, en observant les dispositions environnementales relatives à l’usage des pesticides, cela pourrait épargner les produits alimentaires des cas de pollution. Par ailleurs, le plan d’action du système qualité de la CEMAC comprend cinq axes d’intervention, dont le renforcement des services nationaux d’inspection de la qualité en matière de sécurité sanitaire, phytosanitaire et zoo sanitaire. Le système qualité CEMAC porte également sur les infrastructures. Il s’agit du Programme infrastructure et qualité de l’Afrique centrale. 4 Conclusion Au regard de tout ce qui précède, il est juste de conclure que la protection de l’environnement figure bel et bien dans les agendas des deux communautés économiques régionales de l’Afrique centrale que sont la CEEAC et la CEMAC. Certes la CEEAC, à partir même de son texte fondateur, avait déjà une prédisposition à développer des règles communautaires de protection de l’environnement appuyées par une politique régionale en la matière, contrairement à la CEMAC qui n’a fait qu’insérer les soucis environnementaux dans ses activités de manière progressive. Il est encourageant de constater qu’une synergie sous régionale pour la protection de l’environnement est envisagée entre les deux communautés régionales comme le témoigne l’accord COMIFAC-CEMAC et l’accord la CEBERVIRHA et la COREP. Le processus visant à jumeler la CEMAC et la CEEAC devra sûrement permettre, sous réserve de son aboutissement, l’éclosion du droit et de la politique communautaire de l’environnement en Afrique centrale. Bibliographie indicative Crawford, JA, R Fiorentino & C Toqueboeuf, 2009, The landscape of regional trade agreements and the WTO surveillance, in : Baldwin, R & P Low (eds), 2009, Multilaterilizing regionalism: challenges for the global trading system, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. Kam Yogo, E, 2015, Le principe de participation du public à la gestiondes forêts dans le bassin du Congo: forces et faiblesses, dans : Lofts, K, S Duych & S Jodoin, Public participation and climate governance, Montréal, Working Paper Series CISDL. Kam Yogo, E, 2016, Le processus d’intégration régionale en Afrique centrale : état des lieux et défis, Bonn/Praia, WAI-ZEI Paper. COMMUNAUTÉS ÉCONOMIQUES RÉGIONALES ET L’ENVIRONNEMENT 161 Mankoto Mambaelele, S & JP Agnangoye, 2016, Le Réseau des aires protégées d’Afrique centrale (RAPAC) et la dynamique de conservation de la biodiversité dans le bassin du Congo, Présentation à la réunion du partenariat pour les forêts du bassin du Congo, http://pfbccbfp.org/tl_files/archive/evenements/paris2006/reunion230606/rapac.pdf, consulté le 30 janvier 2018. Mevono Mvogo, D, 2015, La protection de l’environnement dans le processus d’intégration de la Communauté économique et monétaire de l’Afrique centrale (CEMAC), Mémoire de master 2, Université de Douala. SECTION 3 GENERAL ASPECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL LAW IN CAMEROON ASPECTS GENERAUX DU DROIT DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT AU CAMEROUN 165 CHAPITRE 6 : LE CAMEROUN ET SON ENVIRONNEMENT Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 1 Introduction Souvent considéré comme l’Afrique en miniature, le Cameroun comprend un environnement qui, à quelques exceptions près, peut être considéré comme une synthèse de l’environnement du continent africain avec des zones côtière, forestière, montagneuse, maritime et sahélienne. Le Cameroun est situé pleinement au milieu de l’Afrique, fait partie du bassin du Congo et du golfe de Guinée. Il s’étend du Lac Tchad en zone sahélienne à l’océan atlantique1 en passant par les monts Mandara, divers types de savanes, les hauts plateaux et divers types de forêts. Le Cameroun comprend environ 20 millions d’habitants2 qui se répartissent de manière inégale entre plusieurs ethnies ayant des pratiques coutumières diversifiées vis-à-vis de l’environnement. Alors que certaines coutumes se caractérisent par des pratiques de chasse, d’autres insistent sur des pratiques d’élevage ou d’agriculture et même, dans des cas rares, sur la pratique de la pêche. C’est après la conférence des Nations unies sur l’environnement et le développement tenue à Rio de Janeiro en 1992 que le Cameroun inaugure véritablement une politique environnementale systématique qui se traduit sur le plan institutionnel par la création d’un ministère chargé particulièrement des questions environnementales3 en 1992, suivie de l’élaboration du Plan national de gestion de l’environnement (PNGE). Cette politique s’est traduite sur le plan normatif par l’adoption de la toute première loi-cadre sur la gestion de l’environnement4 en 1996. Cette loi précise que la politique nationale de l’environnement est définie par le Président de la Répu- ____________________ 1 Le Cameroun est ouvert à l’océan atlantique sur une distance de près de 402 km. 2 Selon le Bureau central des recensements et des études de la population (Bucrep), l’effectif de la population du Cameroun au 1er janvier 2010 était de 19,406,100 habitants. Le taux d’accroissement annuel dépasse 2.5%. 3 Voir le décret n° 92/265 du 29 décembre 1992 portant organisation du ministère de l’environnement et des forêts. 4 Il s’agit de la loi n° 96/12 du 5 août 1996 portant loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement. Emmanuel KAM YOGO 166 blique.5 Ceci va dans le même sens que la constitution qui dispose que le Président de la République définit la politique de la nation.6 La loi-cadre sur l’environnement définit celui-ci comme « l’ensemble des éléments naturels ou artificiels et des équilibres biogéochimiques auxquels ils participent, ainsi que des facteurs économiques, sociaux et culturels qui favorisent l’existence, la transformation et le développement du milieu, des organismes vivants et des activités humaines » ;7 elle présente l’environnement comme « un patrimoine commun de la nation »8 qui est « une partie intégrante du patrimoine universel »9 et sa protection ainsi que sa gestion rationnelle relèvent de « l’intérêt général ».10 Plusieurs zones écologiques composent l’environnement au Cameroun et quelques instruments politiques visant à orienter sa protection et sa gestion rationnelle ont été mis au point par le gouvernement. 2 Les zones écologiques du Cameroun On peut distinguer les zones écologiques suivantes : la zone soudano-sahélienne, la zone de savane, la zone maritime et côtière et la zone de forêts tropicales. 2.1 La zone soudano-sahélienne La zone soudano-sahélienne est constituée des monts Mandara, des plaines de l’Extrême-Nord et de la vallée de la Bénoué. Cette zone couvre les régions administratives de l’Extrême-Nord et du Nord. Sa végétation est constituée de steppes arbustives diverses, des plaines herbeuses périodiquement inondées qui servent souvent des pâturages aux éleveurs de la région et des pays voisins, des savanes boisées soudano-sahéliennes plus ou moins dégradées aux bords du fleuve Bénoué. Les principales aires protégées sont : les parcs nationaux de la Bénoué11, de Bouba Njidah12, de ____________________ 5 Voir l’article 3 de la loi n° 96/12. 6 Article 5 (2) de la Constitution camerounaise. 7 Voir l’article 4 (k) de la loi n° 96/12. 8 Voir l’article 2 (1) de la loi n° 96/12. 9 (ibid.). 10 Voir l’article 2 (2) de la loi n° 96/12. 11 Créé en 1968, ce parc est estimé à une superficie de 180,000 hectares, voir l’arrêté n° 120/SEDR du 5 décembre 1968. 12 Créé en 1968, ce parc est estimé à une superficie de 220,000 hectares, voir l’arrêté n° 120/SEDR du 5 décembre 1968. LE CAMEROUN ET SON ENVIRONNEMENT 167 Waza13, et de Kalamaloué.14 Parmi les problèmes écologiques majeurs de cette zone, il y a la menace permanente de désertification, caractérisée par la rareté des boisements et de l’eau. Ce phénomène est souvent imputé à deux facteurs : les déficits pluviométriques quasi-permanents et une mauvaise répartition des pluies dans l’espace et dans le temps. La dégradation des sols est due à la diminution du couvert végétal, aux pratiques agropastorales inadaptées et à la mauvaise utilisation des ressources en eau. Le relief de cette zone comprend les montagnes (chaines montagneuses de Poli et des monts Mandara, les pics de Roumsiki et de Mindif), les surfaces inondées, les plaines et les vallées. On y trouve des eaux douces, notamment le lac Tchad, les fleuves Benoué, Mayo Louti, Mayo Sava, Mayo Kaliao. La flore comprend des plantes ligneuses et des arbustes tandis que la faune comprend des mammifères sauvages, des mammifères domestiques ou domestiqués, des poissons d’eau douce et crustacés, plusieurs types de serpents, lézards, grenouilles ou crapauds, plusieurs types d’oiseaux15, etc. Le climat de cette zone est caractérisé par une pluviométrie de type monomodale de durée et d’intensité variables. Les températures sont aussi variables, les maxima pouvant être de l’ordre de 40 à 45°C en avril. On peut y distinguer quatre espaces agro-climatiques,16 à savoir : • les plaines de Mora, Maroua, Kaélé et le Bec-de-canard, où le risque pluviométrique est élevé ; • les piémonts et les montagnes où le risque climatique est plus limité du fait d’une pluviométrie un peu plus abondante (800-900 mm) et mieux repartie ; • la zone intermédiaire des pénéplaines de Guider et de Garoua où le risque de sécheresse est assez faible ; et • la zone allant de Ngong à Touboro où le risque climatique est très limité et la période favorable à la mise en place des cultures atteint généralement deux mois. ____________________ 13 Créé en 1968, il est estimé à une superficie de 170,000 hectares, voir l’arrêté n° 120/SEDR du 5 décembre 1968. 14 Ce parc est estimé à une superficie de 4,500 hectares, voir l’arrêté n° 7 du 4 février 1972. 15 Bird Life International (2012). 16 Voir le rapport sur l’état des ressources phytogénétiques pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture au Cameroun, http://www.fao.org/pgrfa-gpa-archive/cmr/Cameroon_2nd_PGRFA_Report.pdf, consulté le 5 mars 2017. Emmanuel KAM YOGO 168 2.2 La zone de savane La zone des savanes comprend la savane d’altitude de l’Adamaoua, les savanes basses du Centre et de l’Est (zone de transition, zone de savane et forêts galeries), la plaine Tikar et les hauts plateaux de l’Ouest et du Nord-Ouest (zones des montagnes, zone de plaine à bas-fonds, Savannah Woodland, afro-alpine zone, Crater Lakes zone). La zone des savanes couvre les régions administratives de l’Adamaoua et de l’Ouest et partiellement les régions administratives de l’Est, du Centre et du Nord- Ouest.17 C’est une zone qui est dominée par les savanes arbustives que l’on rencontre dans les environs de Bamenda, de Kambé, du Noun, et sur les hauts plateaux de l’Adamaoua et des formations de savanes herbeuses. Son climat est de type tropical avec deux saisons dans la savane d’altitude de l’Adamaoua, la plaine Tikar et les hauts plateaux de l’Ouest et du Nord-Ouest et quatre saisons dans les savanes basses du Centre et de l’Est. Ces différentes savanes sont dans l’ensemble favorables aux activités agropastorales ainsi qu’aux activités sylvicoles. Ceci figure parmi les potentialités de cette zone, à côté des ressources minières importantes dans les basses savanes de l’est. Le potentiel de cette zone en matière faunique est important. On y note l’existence de plusieurs parcs nationaux, notamment : le parc national de la vallée du Mbéré,18 le parc national du Mbam et Djérem.19 De manière générale, la flore de cette zone se caractérise par des plantes ligneuses et les arbustes, des plantes herbacées, des plantes cultivées. Dans l’agroforesterie, les espèces sont choisies par les agriculteurs sur la base de leurs besoins en vue de satisfaire divers usages ; par exemple, les arbres ombrophiles, arbres pour le pâturage (alimentation du bétail), gomme arabique. La faune de cette zone se caractérise par des mammifères sauvages, mammifères domestiques ou domestiqués, des petits ruminants. On compte 437 espèces d’oiseaux dont 379 sont résidentes et 58 sont migratrices.20 Plusieurs insectes terrestres, les sauterelles, les papillons, les termites et de champignons qui ont une importance agricole et sur la sécurité alimentaire y sont trouvés. Il existe aussi des abeilles (production du miel dans les régions de l’Adamaoua et du Nord-Ouest), des termites ailées et les criquets verts, les larves de coléoptère et des champignons. Dans une partie de la zone de savane, notamment dans l’Adamaoua, les cultures destinées à l’alimentation humaine ou du bétail dépassent celles destinées à ____________________ 17 Il faut reconnaître qu’une grande partie de la région du Nord-Ouest est dans la savane et que seule une petite partie, Highland zone et Lowland zone, fait partie de la forêt équatoriale. 18 Créé en 2004, ce parc national est estimé à une superficie de 77,760 hectares (voir le décret n° 2004/0352/PM du 4 février 2004). 19 Créé en 2000, ce parc national mesure 416,512 hectares. (Voir le décret n° 2000/005/PM du 6 janvier 2000). 20 Voir Decoux & Njoya (1997). LE CAMEROUN ET SON ENVIRONNEMENT 169 l’exportation. Ainsi, le maïs constitue la principale culture dont l’adoption par une bonne partie de la population a freiné la production du mil et du sorgho. On y cultive aussi l’arachide, ainsi que les ignames. Alors que dans les hauts plateaux de l’Ouest, toutes sortes de cultures y sont pratiquées : caféier, théier, bananier, maïs, arachide, riz, cultures maraîchères, etc. 2.3 La zone maritime et côtière Le Cameroun partage le littoral atlantique d’environ 402 km s’étendant de la frontière avec le Nigeria au sud à la frontière avec la Guinée équatoriale.21 La zone côtière et maritime représente la zone écologique la plus petite. Elle se situe au fond du golfe de Guinée et est marquée par une concentration humaine importante et le développement des activités industrielles, agricoles, portuaires et pétrolières. Cette zone couvre partiellement les régions administratives du Sud-Ouest, du Littoral et du Sud. La végétation côtière est principalement constituée de la mangrove et des cocotiers. Au-delà de cette végétation côtière, on trouve la forêt dense notamment dans la partie sud du littoral. La zone côtière constitue le principal pôle économique du Cameroun. En marge des industries dont la majorité est localisée dans les centres urbains, plusieurs sociétés agro-industrielles y sont installées. Des pêcheurs artisanaux et les sociétés de pêches industrielles y exploitent des ressources halieutiques marines. Le problème central de la côte maritime est la dégradation progressive des écosystèmes marins et côtiers. Cette dégradation est entretenue par la surexploitation des ressources halieutiques, l’érosion côtière, les pollutions diverses. L’exploitation désordonnée des ressources halieutiques provient des techniques et méthodes de pêche inadaptées et la pêche illégale. L’occupation anarchique des mangroves se traduit entre autres par la coupe abusive des palétuviers avec pour conséquence de favoriser l’érosion. Par ailleurs, l’érosion des berges est causée par de déboisement des rives, l’exploitation anarchique des carrières de sable, le non-respect de l’emprise maritime dans l’occupation des côtes. La forte urbanisation, l’industrialisation incontrôlée de nos côtes, le développement des activités portuaires et maritimes, l’exploitation des produits pétroliers exposent les côtes et les eaux maritimes camerounaises aux dangers de pollutions diverses, notamment par le déversement illégal des déchets. Le Cameroun est signataire de plusieurs conventions internationales sur le droit de la mer, malheureusement, une législation interne lacunaire, les difficultés liées à la coordination entre les différents intervenants et l’inefficacité de contrôle n’ont pas toujours permis de veiller à une gestion saine et durable de la côte maritime. Les stratégies préconisées pour une gestion durable des ____________________ 21 Sayer (1992). Emmanuel KAM YOGO 170 ressources de la côte maritime visent, outre l’exploitation rationnelle des ressources halieutiques, le contrôle de l’érosion côtière et l’élimination des pollutions diverses. Les chutes de la Lobé, les sites naturels rares comme le rocher du loup, les splendides plages de sable blanc, la présence du Mont Cameroun (4,070 m) qui surplombe l’Océan Atlantique, sont autant d’atouts pour le développement de l’activité touristique dans la région côtière. À l’instar du reste du golfe de Guinée. La météorologie de l’équateur influence le climat de la zone côtière du Cameroun. Le climat est de type ‘camerounien’, très humide et chaud, une variante du climat équatorial. Les pluies sont abondantes, en moyenne 2,500 à 4,000 mm, à l’exception de la localité de Debundscha considérée comme l’une des localités les plus pluvieuses du monde, avec 11,000 mm d’eau par an. La pluie tombe suivant un régime monomodal avec une saison sèche très courte.22 Cette zone se caractérise par des habitats marins et côtiers (l’herbier marin et récifs coralliens, forêts de mangroves et autres zones côtières humides, forêts côtières).23 La diversité des poissons marins dans les eaux marines et côtières du Cameroun atteint un total de 557 espèces, y compris 51 espèces endémiques, 43 espèces menacées, 131 espèces pélagiques et 187 espèces d’eaux profondes.24 2.4 La zone de forêts tropicales La zone de forêts tropicales comprend les forêts dégradées du Centre et du Littoral et la forêt dense humide du Sud-Ouest et de l’Est. Cette zone qui couvre en partie les régions administratives du Centre, de l’Est, du Littoral, du Sud-Ouest et du Nord- Ouest et en entier la région du Sud, dispose d’un réseau hydrographique important et son climat est de type équatorial avec quatre saisons. Il y existe des forêts dégradées à cause d’une forte pression sur les forêts denses. L’occupation anarchique de l’espace forestier est le fait entre autres de la présence des activités agropastorales, des activités de braconnage et de l’exploitation illégale des forêts. Le système de production agricole est extensif et est basé sur le brûlis incontrôlé dont les effets sur la forêt sont très désastreux. Les forêts tropicales denses et humides constituent la majorité des forêts du Cameroun et on estime qu’elles couvrent 17 millions d’hectares.25 Les données fournies par le ministère de l’environnement montrent que la zone de forêts tropicales est la plus diversifiée et représente plus de 60% de la bio- ____________________ 22 Voir deuxième rapport sur l’état des ressources phytogénétiques pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture au Cameroun, 23, http://www.fao.org/pgrfa-gpa-archive/cmr/Cameroon_2nd_ PGRFA_Report.pdf, consulté le 5 mars 2017 ; Folack & Gabche (1989). 23 République du Cameroun (2012:12). 24 (ibid.:16). 25 (ibid.:22). LE CAMEROUN ET SON ENVIRONNEMENT 171 diversité camerounaise au total. Concernant les arbres identifiés et nommés, il existe environ 235 familles, 1,179 genres et 8,500 à 10,000 espèces.26 En ce qui concerne la faune, on y note une grande diversité d’espèces dans la forêt tropicale humide (340 espèces de mammifères, 920 espèces d’oiseaux et 274 reptiles. les reptiles sont bien représentés avec une collection de serpents, de lézards et les fleuves abritent des populations de crocodiles).27 Parmi les aires protégées, il y a le parc national de Boumba Bek,28 le parc national de Korup,29 le parc national de Lobeke,30 le parc national de Bakossi,31 le parc national de Takamanda,32 le parc de Mpem et Djim,33 le parc national de Nki34 et le parc national de Deng Deng.35 Une bonne partie de cette zone se caractérise par la pratique de la culture itinérante sur brûlis suivie de jachères pour la restauration de la productivité du sol. On y trouve aussi des cultures pérennes (cacao, caféier, divers arbres fruitiers) et annuelles et pluriannuelles (bananier plantain, canne à sucre, maïs, tabac, cultures maraîchères, tubercules, etc.). 3 Les instruments politiques de gestion de l’environnement au Cameroun L’instrument politique transversal est le PNGE. Il est accompagné d’une diversité d’instruments sectoriels. 3.1 Le Plan national de gestion de l’environnement Le PNGE est le premier instrument de politique de gestion de l’environnement élaboré par le Cameroun au lendemain de la Conférence de Rio sur l’environnement et le développement en 1992. En réalité, le PNGE peut être considéré comme la version camerounaise de l’Agenda 21. Le PNGE élaboré pour la première fois en 1996 constitue un cadre politique idéal concernant les actions à mener en matière de protection ____________________ 26 (ibid.). 27 (ibid.:23). 28 Créé en 2005 (voir le décret n° 2005/3284/PM du 6 octobre 2005). 29 Créé en 1986 et estimé à environ 125900 hectares (voir le décret n° 86/1283 du 30 octobre 1986). 30 Créé en 2001 (voir le décret n° 2002/107/PM du 19 mars 2001) 31 Créé en 2007 et s’étend sur 29,320 hectares (voir le décret n° 2007/1459/PM du 28 novembre 2007). 32 Créé en 2008 avec 67,599 hectares (voir le décret n° 2008/2751 du 21 novembre 2008). 33 Créé en 2004 avec 97,480 (voir le décret n° 2004/0836/PM du 12 mai 2004). 34 Créé en 2005 avec 309,362 hectares (voir le décret n° 2005/3283/PM du 6 octobre 2005). 35 Créé en 2010 avec 52,347 hectares (décret n° 2010/0482/PM du 18 mars 2010). Emmanuel KAM YOGO 172 de l’environnement. La version préliminaire du PNGE est présentée en quatre volumes. Le volume I contient un rapport principal avec une présentation succincte des stratégies du PNGE par secteur d’intervention et des chapitres du cadre général concernant, notamment, l’analyse du problème central, des objectifs et des résultats à atteindre, la description de l’espace géographique, les perspectives de l’évolution démographique et l’analyse des effets sur l’environnement, l’analyse du contexte économique et des effets sur l’environnement, l’analyse du cadre juridique et institutionnel. Le volume 2 contient l’analyse des secteurs d’intervention concernant la description et la formulation des politiques et stratégies sectorielles. Le volume 3 contient la présentation des fiches de projets et des tableaux récapitulatifs (les projets identifiés au niveau central dans le cadre des études sectorielles et les projets identifiés au niveau régional avec la participation des populations dans le cadre des séminaires de concertation et de planification) et enfin, le volume 4 qui contient des tableaux de planification. Élaboré dans une approche visionnaire, le PNGE reconnaît la protection de l’environnement comme étant partie intégrante du processus de développement, consacrant ainsi un lien entre l’environnement et le développement. Il considère l’accès à la croissance comme devant nécessairement se faire à travers une économie verte qui réduit les émissions de gaz à effet de serre tout en évitant les pertes de biodiversité. Révisé en 2012, le PNGE prévoit quatre programmes essentiels accompagnés de onze composantes stratégiques en réaction aux menaces actuelles et aux régressions observées dans l’état de l’environnement au Cameroun. Ces programmes visent à réduire de manière significative les pertes de la biodiversité, ensuite à atténuer les impacts des changements climatiques et de la désertification, puis à lutter contre les pollutions et les nuisances, et enfin à promouvoir le développement durable. Le PNGE est mis en œuvre à travers plusieurs programmes, stratégies et plan d’action couvrant divers secteurs. 3.2 Les programmes, plans d’action et stratégies par secteurs 3.2.1 Les instruments concernant les espaces aquatiques, côtiers ou marins 3.2.1.1 La gestion des ressources en eau En matière de gestion des ressources en eau, on peut relever le Plan d’Action Nationale de Gestion Intégrée des Ressources en Eau (PANGIRE). Étant donné qu’il existe plusieurs facteurs qui empêchent une bonne gestion des ressources en eau, le processus de gestion intégrée cherche à promouvoir la rationalité et la durabilité dans l’usage de l’eau et vise à s’assurer que l’eau est utilisée pour permettre le développement économique et social au Cameroun. De manière globale les principaux en- LE CAMEROUN ET SON ENVIRONNEMENT 173 jeux à prendre en considération en matière de gestion intégrée des ressources en eau au Cameroun sont : l’alimentation en eau potable et l’assainissement des villes et des villages, l’amélioration des rendements agricoles et de la sécurité alimentaire par le développement de l’irrigation, l’alimentation du cheptel et des grandes zones d’élevage du pays en eau, la production hydroélectrique, la navigabilité des principaux cours d’eau du pays, les eaux transfrontalières, la pêche, et la protection des ressources en eau contre diverses sources de dégradation. Hormis le PANGIRE, il y a la Stratégie Nationale sur la Gestion Durable des Eaux et des Sols (SNGDES) dont l’objectif est de constituer un cadre pour harmoniser et mettre en cohérence des initiatives de gestion durable des eaux et des sols afin de répondre aux objectifs de production soutenue dans le secteur agro-sylvo-pastoral, tels que fixés dans le Document de stratégie du développement du secteur rural (DSDSR). Cette stratégie met en relief la problématique de la maîtrise des eaux et des sols ainsi que les contraintes et les solutions y relatives notamment en termes de promotion de la gestion intégrée de ces ressources. Elle a été élaborée avec le concours de Global Water Partnership (GWP-Cameroun) et du Programme des Nations Unies pour le Développement (PNUD). 3.2.1.2 Gestion durable des mangroves Un certain nombre d’initiatives ont été engagées pour la protection des mangroves à l’instar de la stratégie nationale de gestion durable des mangroves et des écosystèmes côtiers.36 Cette stratégie vise la conservation et l’exploitation durable des ressources des écosystèmes des mangroves et de la zone côtière pour qu’ils contribuent efficacement à la satisfaction des besoins locaux, nationaux des générations actuelles et futures. Pour cela, il est nécessaire de diminuer et même de supprimer la dégradation de ces écosystèmes afin de garantir durablement leurs fonctions écologiques, biologiques, économiques et socioculturelles. Il faut reconnaître que la loi-cadre de 1996 n’évoque les écosystèmes de mangroves que dans ses dispositions diverses et finales en indiquant qu’ils « font l’objet d’une protection particulière qui tient compte de leur rôle et de leur importance dans la conservation de la diversité biologique… ».37 La mention de « protection particulière » pourrait laisser croire que les écosystèmes de mangroves devraient être régis par une loi « particulière » organisant leur gestion durable. Pour le moment, telle n’est pas l’option prise par le gouvernement. ____________________ 36 Voir ladite stratégie dans http://www.minep.gov.cm/index.php?option=com_content&view= category, consulté le 14 mars 2017. 37 Voir l’article 94 de la loi n° 96/12. Emmanuel KAM YOGO 174 3.2.1.3 Le projet COAST Le projet COAST a été initié par le Fonds pour l’environnement mondial (FEM) et est exécuté par l’Organisation des Nations unies pour le développement industriel (ONUDI) en collaboration avec l’Organisation mondiale du tourisme (OMT) et le Programme des Nations unies pour l’environnement (PNUE). Le Cameroun fait partie, pour l’Afrique centrale, des pays dans lesquels ce projet doit être mis en œuvre. Les principaux objectifs du projet sont : d’abord, mettre en évidence les meilleures pratiques et technologies existantes pour les investissements en matière de gestion des contaminants et préservation du tourisme collaboratif durable, ensuite élaborer et mettre en œuvre des mécanismes de gouvernance et de gestion durable qui réduisent sensiblement la dégradation des écosystèmes côtiers par les sources terrestres de pollution et de contamination, puis évaluer et répondre aux besoins de formation et de renforcement des capacités en mettant l’accent sur une approche intégrée de la réduction durable de l’écosystème côtier et de la dégradation de l’environnement au sein du secteur touristique, enfin élaborer et mettre en œuvre des mécanismes de saisie, de traitement et de gestion de l’information pour promouvoir la diffusion et le partage de l’information. Au niveau du Cameroun, ce projet a été baptisé « tourisme côtier durable à Kribi ». 3.2.1.4 Le projet sur la jacinthe d’eau La jacinthe d’eau est une plante aquatique envahissante. Elle se prolifère en couvrant la surface de l’eau et menace ainsi la navigation, l’irrigation, la pêche et même la production de l’électricité. Elle provoque également la disparition des nombreuses espèces de faune et de flore. Le projet pilote a commencé en 2010 dans le bassin hydrographique du Wouri avant de s’étendre sur d’autres sites comme le Nyong.38 Ce projet vise à éliminer ces plantes, à maîtriser leur prolifération et dans la mesure du possible les valoriser. ____________________ 38 Voir http://www.minep.gov.cm/index.php?option=com_content, consulté le 14 mars 2017. LE CAMEROUN ET SON ENVIRONNEMENT 175 3.2.2 Les instruments concernant les forêts, la faune et la lutte contre la désertification 3.2.2.1 Le Programme sectoriel foret-environnement Le Programme sectoriel foret-environnement (PSFE) a vu son implémentation commencée en 2005. C’est un instrument de planification de la politique forestière du Cameroun. Au cours de sa première phase, le PSFE avait cinq composantes pour la gestion environnementale des activités forestières, la gestion de la production forestière et la valorisation des produits forestiers, la conservation de la biodiversité et la valorisation des ressources fauniques, la gestion des forêts communautaires et de la faune, ainsi qu’une composante transversale en matière de renforcement des capacités institutionnelles, la formation et la recherche. La seconde phase du PSFE est déjà opérationnelle et comporte des changements institutionnels majeurs en termes de partenaires donateurs et d’organismes d’exécution. 3.2.2.2 La Stratégie nationale des contrôles forestiers et fauniques Cette stratégie a été adoptée en 2005 et se présente comme un instrument d’opérationnalisation des lois et règlements relatifs à la gestion durable des ressources forestières et fauniques. Elle prend en compte les engagements internationaux du Cameroun découlant des conventions multilatérales comme la Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) ou des accords bilatéraux comme celui issu du processus Africa Forest Law Enforcement and Governance (AFLEG). Les objectifs de cette stratégie sont, entre autres, d’augmenter les revenus de l’État et des communautés locales, de garantir le respect des droits des communautés locales, de garantir la durabilité de la production forestière et de préserver la biodiversité et les écosystèmes. 3.2.2.3 La Stratégie 2020 du sous-secteur forets et faune Adoptée en 2012 la stratégie 2020 du sous-secteur forêts et faune39 se veut la traduction de la vision 2035 pour le développement du Cameroun dans le secteur des forêts, de la faune et de la conservation. Les programmes, actions et activités de la stratégie des forêts et de la faune visent, entre autres, à contribuer à la croissance économique, ____________________ 39 Voir ce document dans http://extwprlegs1.fao.org/docs/pdf/Cmr146461.pdf, consulté le 29 janvier 2018. Emmanuel KAM YOGO 176 à créer des emplois et à réduire la pauvreté des populations des zones forestières. Cette stratégie s’adosse entièrement sur le Document de stratégie pour la croissance et l’emploi (DSCE). 3.2.2.4 Le Plan national de lutte contre la desertification Le Plan national de lutte contre la désertification a été élaboré au titre des engagements du Cameroun dans le cadre de la Convention des Nations unies sur la lutte contre la désertification. Cette convention a pour objectif de lutter contre la désertification et d’atténuer les effets de la sécheresse dans les pays gravement touchés, en particulier en Afrique, grâce à des mesures efficaces à tous les niveaux, appuyés par des arrangements internationaux de coopération et de partenariat, dans le cadre d’une approche intégrée en vue de contribuer à l’instauration d’un développement durable.40 Le Plan national de lutte contre la désertification est un instrument essentiel pour la mise en œuvre de cette Convention au Cameroun et est le résultat d’un fructueux processus de concertation tant au niveau national que régional sous l’impulsion de certains partenaires au développement notamment le PNUD avec l’appui du Secrétariat de la Convention sur la lutte contre la désertification. C’est le résultat d’un large consensus entre toutes les parties prenantes. Toutes les grandes orientations stratégiques issues des concertations régionales et nationales sur la lutte contre la désertification ont été synthétisées et présentées dans les cinq axes prioritaires d’intervention suivants : d’abord, l’aménagement et la gestion participative de l’espace, ensuite la gestion durable des ressources naturelles (eau, sols, couvert végétal, faune), puis la restauration des terres dégradées et l’amélioration de la fertilité des sols, en outre le renforcement des capacités des acteurs en matière de lutte contre la désertification, enfin la gestion concertée des ressources partagées au niveau sous régional. Le projet le plus important de ce plan est l’opération sahel vert qui consiste à reboiser certains sites bien identifiés et à aménager d’autres par des plantations d’arbres, la maîtrise de l’eau, et la vulgarisation des actions qui contribueront à freiner la coupe du bois en zone du sahel. 3.2.3 Le Plan national d’adaptation aux changements climatiques au Cameroun L’élaboration du Plan national d’adaptation aux changements climatiques (PNACC) a fait l’objet d’une vaste concertation préliminaire entre 2012 et 2015 dans le respect ____________________ 40 Voir l’article 2 (1) de la Convention des Nations unies sur la lutte contre la désertification. LE CAMEROUN ET SON ENVIRONNEMENT 177 des recommandations de la convention-cadre sur les changements climatiques41 et du cadre pour l’adaptation de Cancún. C’est un document de stratégie nationale dont la finalité est d’accompagner le gouvernement et tous les acteurs de la lutte contre les changements climatiques dans leurs activités d’adaptation à ce phénomène. Il présente un cadre pour guider, orienter, coordonner et mettre en œuvre des initiatives d’adaptation au Cameroun. C’est en définitive un instrument de planification visant à définir et à faire le suivi des activités à réaliser dans les secteurs clés et dans les zones agro-écologiques selon des critères établis de façon concertée entre les différentes parties prenantes. Les objectifs du plan national d’adaptation aux changements climatiques sont : d’abord, la réduction de la vulnérabilité du pays aux incidences des changements climatiques en renforçant sa capacité d’adaptation et de résilience ; ensuite, la facilitation de l’intégration cohérente de l’adaptation aux changements climatiques dans les politiques, programmes et travaux pertinents, nouveaux ou en cours, en particulier dans les processus et stratégies de planification du développement et dans tous les secteurs concernés. 3.2.4 Les instruments concernant la biodiversité 3.2.4.1 Stratégie et plan d’action national pour la biodiversité Le Cameroun a élaboré en 1999 sa première Stratégie et le plan d’action national pour la biodiversite (SPANB 1) qui avait été officiellement validée en 2000. Ce premier document avait été élaboré en application des engagements internationaux du Cameroun dans le cadre de la Convention sur la diversite biologique (CBD). Dix ans après sa validation, la première version de la stratégie et du SPANB 1 a montré quelques faiblesses dues à l’émergence de nouveaux défis et de nouveaux enjeux. Cette situation a rendu nécessaire l’élaboration d’une deuxième version (SPANB 2) qui a été adoptée en 2012. La deuxième version a permis une refonte complète de la première version.42 La SPANB 2 se structure en six chapitres qui présentent notamment l’importance de la biodiversité pour le bien-être des hommes et la nation, la situation actuelle et les tendances en matière de biodiversité, les causes et conséquences de la perte de biodiversité, les buts et objectifs stratégiques de la biodiversité, le plan d’action, et le mécanisme de mise en œuvre, de suivi et d’évaluation. ____________________ 41 Le Cameroun a ratifié la Convention-cadre sur les changements climatiques en octobre 1994 et l’Accord de Paris sur les changements climatiques a été ratifié en juillet 2016. 42 République du Cameroun (2012). Emmanuel KAM YOGO 178 3.2.4.2 La Stratégie nationale sur l’acces aux ressources genetiques et le partage juste et équitable des avantages decoulant de leur utilisation (APA) Cette stratégie nationale a été élaborée avec l’appui du Programme des Nations unies pour l’environnement, la Coopération allemande et le FEM et a été adoptée en 2012, avant même la ratification du protocole de Nagoya par le Cameroun. La vision de cette stratégie est qu’à l’horizon 2020, l’accès aux ressources génétiques soit entièrement réglementé et le partage juste et équitable des avantages découlant de leur utilisation participe à améliorer des conditions de vie des populations et des recettes de l’État.43 De manière globale, cette stratégie vise à orienter l’élaboration d’un cadre national APA conformément aux instruments internationaux. De manière spécifique, cette stratégie vise à permettre au Cameroun de définir les procédures administratives pour l’accès aux ressources génétiques, à définir des mécanismes d’identification et de participation des différentes parties prenantes ainsi qu’à identifier des actions à mener, et à orienter l’intégration de la valorisation des ressources génétiques et des savoirs traditionnels associés dans les politiques nationales de développement. 3.2.4.3 Le Clearing-house mechanism Le Clearing-house mechanism (CHM) est un centre d’implémentation de la Convention sur la diversité biologique qui a été mis sur pied par la première conférence des parties à cette convention. Il constitue un lieu de centralisation et de diffusion de toutes les informations relatives à la diversité biologique. Les objectifs spécifiques du CHM sont : d’abord, favoriser et promouvoir la coopération scientifique et technique à tous les niveaux entre les parties de la convention, ensuite, faciliter l’accès et le transfert de technologies sur la biodiversité, et enfin participer à l’échange d’informations sur la biodiversité. Le Cameroun a ratifié la CBD en 1994 et a également ratifié plus tard le Protocole de Carthagène. Une bonne mise en œuvre de ces instruments internationaux exige la disponibilité d’informations fiables et exhaustives sur la biodiversité. Afin de rendre ces informations accessibles aux différents acteurs, le Cameroun a aussi lancé son Centre d’échange d’informations de la convention sur la diversité biologique dont les activités ont démarré en 1999. En 2011 une Stratégie du CHM Cameroun pour la collecte et diffusion des données sur la biodiversité a été adoptée. Cette stratégie a pour objectif de contribuer à la mise en œuvre de la Convention sur la diversité biologique ____________________ 43 MINEPDED (2012). LE CAMEROUN ET SON ENVIRONNEMENT 179 à l’échelle nationale afin de promouvoir la communication, la coopération technique et scientifique entre toutes les parties prenantes.44 3.2.5 Les instruments concernant d’autres secteurs 3.2.5.1 L’Initiative ST-EP au Cameroun La pauvreté avait été classée par les Nations unies comme l’un des plus grands défis pour le développement du monde lors du Sommet du Millénaire en 2000. Pour relever ce défi, l’OMT a lancé l’Initiative ST-EP (Sustainable Tourism - Eliminating Poverty) lors du Sommet Mondial sur le Développement Durable en 2002 à Johannesburg.45 Étant donné que le Cameroun avait inscrit dans son document de Stratégie de Réduction de la Pauvreté, le tourisme comme un des axes prioritaires de développement, il a été choisi par l’OMT comme pays pilote des régions de l’Afrique centrale et de l’ouest. 3.2.5.2 La Stratégie nationale de gestion des dechets au Cameroun Cette stratégie a été adoptée en 2008 et son objectif global est d’améliorer le cadre de vie des populations par une gestion efficiente des déchets produits sur le territoire national. Les objectifs spécifiques de cette stratégie sont : premièrement d’améliorer l’accès au service de pré-collecte et de collecte des déchets dans les agglomérations, deuxièmement d’améliorer la gestion des déchets par la promotion des méthodes appropriées de traitement des déchets, de recyclage et de valorisation, troisièmement de mettre en place un système durable de gestion des déchets dangereux produits par les ménages, les entreprises et les établissements de santé, quatrièmement de promouvoir les mesures incitatives en vue de susciter l’engagement volontaire des parties prenantes à la gestion efficiente des déchets, et cinquièmement de promouvoir et renforcer la coopération internationale dans la gestion des mouvements transfrontières des déchets dangereux. La mise en œuvre de cette stratégie doit être fixée par les principes fondamentaux de protection de l’environnement.46 ____________________ 44 Voir MINEPDED (2011). 45 Voir http://step.unwto.org/fr/content/contexte-et-objectifs, consulté le 14 mars 2017. 46 MINEP (2008). Emmanuel KAM YOGO 180 4 Conclusion En somme, la diversité naturelle de l’environnement du Cameroun a aussi entraîné l’adoption d’une diversité d’instruments politiques et stratégiques nationaux pour une meilleure gestion de celui-ci. On dénombre plus d’une dizaine de programmes, plans d’action et stratégies au niveau national dans le domaine de l’environnement dont les résultats sont pour le moment mitigés. Puisque le développement du Cameroun semble se tourner vers l’horizon 2035, il reste à souhaiter que cet objectif se poursuive dans une parfaite convergence avec les exigences du développement durable pour réaliser cette équité tant recherchée entre les générations actuelles et les générations futures en matière d’utilisation des ressources naturelles de la nation. Bibliographie indicative Bird Life International, 2012, Important bird areas factsheet: Lake Maga, Blasco. Decoux, JP & SI Njoya, 1997, Saving the forests birds of Cameroon, Faculty of Sciences, University of Yaoundé I. Folack, J & Gabche, CE, 1989, Natural and anthropogenic characteristics of the Cameroon coastal zone, Yaoundé, Institute of Agricultural Research for Development. MINEP / Ministère de l’Environnement et de la Protection de la Nature, 2008, Stratégie Nationale de Gestion des Déchets au Cameroun (période 2007 – 2015). MINEPDED / Ministère de l’Environnement, de la Protection de la Nature et Développement Durable, 2011, Stratégie du CHM Collecte et diffusion des données sur la biodiversité, Yaoundé, MINEPDED. MINEPDED / Ministère de l’Environnement, de la Protection de la Nature et Développement Durable, 2012, Stratégie Nationale sur l’Accès aux Ressources Génétiques, Yaoundé, MINEPDED. République du Cameroun, 1996, Plan National de Gestion de l’Environnement, Volumes I, II, III, et IV, Yaoundé, MINEP & PNUD. République du Cameroun, 2012, Stratégie et Plan d’Action National pour la Biodiversité – Version II, Yaoundé, MINEPDED. Sayer, JA, (ed.), 1992, The conservation atlas of tropical forests – Africa, London, Palgrave Macmillan. 181 CHAPITRE 7: LA QUESTION ENVIRONNEMENTALE DANS LE SYSTÈME JURIDIQUE DU CAMEROUN Jean-Marie TCHAKOUA 1 Introduction L’histoire des institutions et des faits sociaux permet de mieux comprendre le droit camerounais, notamment dans ses sources et sa structuration qu’on juge en général complexes.1 Le Cameroun est un pays qui, de 1884 à 1960, a vécu sous domination étrangère, même s’il n’a jamais été formellement une colonie. Il est en effet passé tour à tour, du régime du protectorat à ceux du mandat et de la tutelle, avant son indépendance. Mais, concrètement, avant cette indépendance, le Cameroun a toujours été administré comme une colonie. C’est pourquoi autant par commodité de langage que pour tenir compte de la réalité des faits, nous utiliserons l’adjectif ‘colonial’ ou le substantif ‘colonie’ pour parler de la période de domination étrangère. Lorsqu’il entame le processus de sa construction dans la configuration territoriale actuelle, le Cameroun est sous protectorat allemand, en vertu du traité de protectorat signé entre l’Allemagne et les rois Douala le 12 juillet 1884. Le pays est dans cette situation jusqu’à la fin de la première guerre mondiale. L’Allemagne ayant perdu la guerre, ses possessions en Afrique passent aux mains des vainqueurs ; le Cameroun est ainsi partagé2 entre l’Angleterre, qui prend la partie occidentale, et la France, qui prend la partie orientale du pays. Ce partage sera entériné plus tard par le traité de Londres conclu en 1922 dans le cadre de la Société des Nations. Les nouveaux maîtres du Cameroun vont s’employer à effacer toutes les traces de la présence allemande. Cette entreprise va réussir assez bien sur le terrain du droit, raison pour laquelle le droit camerounais actuel ne contient aucune marque visible3 de la présence coloniale allemande. ____________________ 1 Tchakoua (2008:30). 2 Le partage a eu lieu le 6 mars 1916. 3 Il faudrait cependant reconnaître que la France a repris à son compte un certain nombre de solutions contenues dans de textes allemands, notamment en matière foncière. Le régime foncier et domanial résultant des décrets français du 11 août 1920, du 21 juillet 1932, du 12 janvier 1938, du 20 mai 1955 et du 21 juillet 1956 reprend l’essentiel du régime mis en place par Jean-Marie TCHAKOUA 182 Dans la partie occidentale du Cameroun, l’Angleterre introduit le droit anglais et le système juridique anglo-saxon, tandis que dans la partie orientale, la France introduit le droit français et le système juridique romano-germanique. Il y a là une première segmentation qui va durablement marquer le droit camerounais puisque la fin de la domination étrangère n’a pas été synonyme de fin d’application des droits et systèmes juridiques étrangers. Les droits étrangers vont cependant faire face aux coutumes locales qu’ils ne pourront pas toujours évincer. Il a donc fallu rechercher une bonne articulation entre les règles en présence, ce qui va donner naissance à une seconde segmentation, visible notamment au niveau des organes appelés à rendre la justice. L’accession du Cameroun à la souveraineté internationale, le 1er janvier 1960 pour la partie orientale, la réunification intervenue le 1er octobre 19614 et l’unification de l’État intervenue le 2 juin 1972, n’ont pas créé l’homogénéité dans l’ordre juridique camerounais. Le système juridique reste en effet construit sur une double combinaison, d’une part, entre les systèmes juridiques anglo-saxon et romano-germanique, d’autre part, entre le droit dit moderne et le droit dit traditionnel, sans qu’à chaque fois on puisse tracer infailliblement la ligne de démarcation entre les différentes composantes. Il faudrait cependant noter que le Cameroun a, depuis l’indépendance, réalisé une abondante production législative, ce qui a fait perdre une bonne partie de leur influence au système juridique anglo-saxon et aux coutumes. La matière environnementale a bénéficié de cette production législative, ce qui la situe en gros hors du champ des complexités du système juridique camerounais. En effet, même s’il a des ramifications dans d’autres domaines, le droit de l’environnement se trouve, pour l’essentiel, dans la loi no 96/12 du 5 août 1996 portant loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement et ses textes d’application. Il ne serait cependant pas juste d’affirmer que les composantes du droit camerounais en recul sont complètement évacuées du jeu, car elles vont retrouver une certaine influence dans des espaces laissés par les textes en vigueur. Ce chapitre montrera que sans être complètement engluée dans les complexités du système juridique camerounais, la question environnementale n’y échappe pas complètement. Il faudrait donc la situer d’une part par rapport au double héritage anglais et français, d’autre part par rapport à l’opposition entre le droit traditionnel et le droit moderne. ____________________ l’Allemagne à travers le décret du 15 juillet 1896, l’ordonnance du 18 avril 1910 et l’arrêté du 27 décembre 1910. 4 Cette date est aussi celle de la cessation de la domination étrangère sur le Cameroun occidental administré par l’Angleterre. LA QUESTION ENVIRONNEMENTALE DANS LE SYSTÈME JURIDIQUE 183 2 La question environnementale et le double héritage anglais et français Parce qu’il a durablement subi la double influence anglaise et française, le Cameroun est écartelé entre les systèmes juridiques anglo-saxon et romano-germanique. L’ex- Cameroun occidental se rattache au premier tandis que l’ex-Cameroun oriental se rattache au second. Naturellement, les colonisateurs n’ont pas introduit seulement leur architecture juridique, mais aussi leur droit substantiel. Lorsqu’il a fallu qu’ils se retirent, ils ont laissé un héritage qui s’est transformé avec l’évolution du Cameroun. Il convient de présenter séparément les éléments reçus en héritage avant de montrer la gestion qui en a été faite après l’indépendance. Sur ce dernier terrain, on voit bien que l’opposition entre les deux systèmes juridiques s’affaiblit, ce dont profite la question environnementale. 2.1 Le système anglo-saxon et le droit applicable dans l’ex-Cameroun occidental Le système juridique anglo-saxon regroupe l’Angleterre, les États-Unis, l’Australie, la Nouvelle-Zélande, le Canada (à l’exclusion du Québec) et tous les pays de l’empire colonial anglais. Dans ce système, le droit n’a pas, en principe, à être recherché dans un corps de règles préétablies d’expression législative ; il est plutôt jurisprudentiel. Il s’est construit au fil des décisions rendues par les juridictions. Qui cherche dans le droit anglais, par exemple, le correspondant du célèbre article 1165 du Code civil applicable au Cameroun sur l’effet relatif des contrats, se verra proposer non pas un article d’un texte, mais la décision rendue dans l’affaire Dunlop Pneumatic Tyre Co. Ltd v. Selfridge and Co. Ltd5. On pourrait trouver d’autres célèbres décisions de justice dans les pays de common law, qui répondent bien aux articles des codes ou autres lois édictées dans d’autres systèmes. Le système anglo-saxon a aussi de fondamental le fait que le droit y est construit sur des décisions prises pour résoudre des cas particuliers soumis au juge ; ces décisions n’affichent aucune prétention à l’abstraction et à la généralisation. On pourrait craindre que, construit sur des décisions de justice, ce système crée de l’insécurité juridique, parce que la solution à un problème peut changer d’un juge à un autre. Pour éviter cette issue, le système anglo-saxon est fondé sur la règle dite du précédent. Il y a nécessité, pour le juge, de s’en tenir aux règles posées par ses prédécesseurs, à propos de cas analogues (stare decisis). Cela dit, le précédent qui lie ne peut provenir que d’une cour d’un certain degré dans la hiérarchie judiciaire. En An- ____________________ 5 Dunlop Pneumatic Tyre Co. Ltd v. Selfridge and Co. Ltd Appeal, Court, Case n° 847 (1915), All England Reports, Rep. 333. Jean-Marie TCHAKOUA 184 gleterre, le précédent à respecter vient de la Chambre des Lords, de la Court of Appeal, et même de la High Court. Au Cameroun, le précédent à respecter doit provenir de la Cour suprême ou, à tout le moins, de la Cour d’appel. Dans ces conditions, il est tentant de conclure à la rigidité du système anglosaxon. Mais ce n’est pas le cas, parce que l’obligation de suivre le précédent n’exclut pas la prise en considération de circonstances particulières des diverses espèces, ce qui permet, par la mise en lumière de ces particularités, d’infléchir la solution précédemment adoptée. Concrètement, le juge ne remet pas en cause le précédent, il le contourne. Le système ne peut bien fonctionner que si les décisions de justice sont publiées et accessibles. Aussi d’importants efforts doivent-ils être faits pour mettre les décisions de justice à la disposition du public, notamment dans le cadre de recueils de décisions. Malheureusement, ces efforts ne sont pas entrepris au Cameroun, ce qui complique singulièrement la tâche des praticiens du droit. L’importance du droit jurisprudentiel (respect du précédent) ne doit cependant pas faire oublier la seconde source du droit dans les pays du système anglo-saxon : la loi proprement dite, qu’on appelle ici ‘statute’.6 Certains auteurs7 pensent même qu’elle est en passe de devenir la source principale du droit dans les pays de common law. Ce jugement est très pertinent pour un pays comme le Cameroun qui compte de plus en plus de lois et règlements, mais aussi qui a ratifié plusieurs conventions internationales applicables sur toute l’étendue du territoire national. La grande division dans la famille de droit anglo-saxonne se fait entre la common law et l’equity. Ce dernier est un corps de règles, comme la common law, et ne doit donc pas être confondu avec l’équité qui est une valeur. On pourrait simplement souligner que l’equity est innervé par l’équité. Le dernier trait caractéristique des droits anglo-saxons est l’importance accordée aux règles d’administration de la justice. Plus précisément, les règles de preuve et de procédure ont autant sinon plus d’importance que les règles substantielles. Il est sûr que la common law et certains statutes anglais sont toujours en vigueur dans l’ex-Cameroun occidental.8 Il est cependant très difficile de prendre la mesure exacte de la survie du droit anglais dans cette partie du territoire camerounais. Au départ, il y a un texte de l’époque coloniale, le Southern Cameroons High Court Laws de 1955. En son article 11, il prévoit l’application, à la partie du territoire camerounais administrée par la Grande-Bretagne de : • la common law ; ____________________ 6 Il s’agit de lois adoptées par le parlement et d’autres textes pris par des autorités compétentes. 7 Anyangwe (1987:90). 8 Pour ces textes anglais entrés par l’intermédiaire du Nigeria, voir Anyangwe (1984:315) et Ngwafor (1993). LA QUESTION ENVIRONNEMENTALE DANS LE SYSTÈME JURIDIQUE 185 • l’equity ; et • les textes d’application générale (statutes of general application) en vigueur en Angleterre au 1er janvier 1900. Une doctrine autorisée soutient qu’il est raisonnable de penser que la common law applicable dans l’ex-Cameroun occidental est celle applicable en Angleterre aujourd’hui.9 En revanche, a été sérieusement discutée la question de savoir si les textes anglais pris postérieurement à 1900, et parfois après l’indépendance du Cameroun, sont applicables dans ce dernier pays. Pour y répondre, on a raisonné en deux temps. D’abord à partir de la notion de texte d’application générale : selon le Southern Cameroons High Court Laws, seuls les textes d’application générale antérieurs au 1er janvier 1900 sont applicables dans l’ex-Cameroun occidental ; un exemple est fourni par le Fatal Accidents Act 1846-186410 ; a contrario, soutient-on, les textes qui ne sont pas d’application générale, comme le Matrimonial Causes Act de 1857, ne sont pas applicables dans l’ex-Cameroun occidental. Dans un second temps, on a invoqué l’article 15 du Southern Cameroons High Court Laws, qui dispose que la High Court juge, en matière de testament, de divorce, de questions relatives au mariage, conformément aux règles et pratiques en vigueur à ce moment-là en Angleterre. En conséquence, en ce qui concerne les matières énumérées, le droit applicable dans l’ex-Cameroun occidental changerait aussitôt qu’il y a changement en Angleterre. C’est le cas avec le Matrimonial Causes Act anglais de 1973, que les juges11 appliquent dans l’ex-Cameroun occidental. On doit cependant se demander s’il est judicieux de convoquer ainsi le droit colonial pour dire dans quelle mesure le Cameroun doit faire recours aux textes coloniaux. Ces textes, pris à l’initiative de l’Angleterre, s’inscrivaient dans la logique du mandat12 que cette dernière avait reçu de la Société des Nations pour administrer le Cameroun occidental comme partie de son territoire. L’accession du Cameroun à la souveraineté internationale a bouleversé la donne, justement parce que le Cameroun a désormais l’entière responsabilité de ses choix législatifs. Dans l’exercice de sa souveraineté, le peuple Camerounais a, dans le cadre de la Constitution, prévu, à titre transitoire, le maintien des textes antérieurs. Ces textes sont forcément et exclusive- ____________________ 9 (ibid.:2). 10 Dans l’affaire Solomon Mukete and 7 others v. Joseph Tarh and 2 others, le juge a refusé la qualité d’ayant droit aux frères d’une victime d’accident de la circulation en se fondant sur le Fatal Accident Act de 1846 qui exclut les frères du cercle des ayants droit. Les amendements ultérieurs de ce texte, en 1976, qui reconnaissent les frères et sœurs, oncles et tantes comme ayants droit ont été repoussés (Appeal case n° CASWP/49/80, inédit). 11 Voir l’affaire Enongenekang v. Enongenekang, Suit n° HCSW/28MC/82 inédit (avec une éloquente justification de l’application du texte anglais). 12 Ce mandat a, par la suite, été transformé en tutelle. Jean-Marie TCHAKOUA 186 ment ceux antérieurs à la date de la Constitution, ainsi qu’il est indiqué à l’article 6813 de la Constitution actuellement en vigueur. Il ne s’agit pas de dire qu’on ne doit plus recourir à la Southern Cameroons High Court Laws, ou à un autre texte de l’époque coloniale. Le propos est plutôt qu’on ne peut aujourd’hui lire et interpréter les textes coloniaux que sous réserve du respect de la souveraineté internationale du Cameroun. L’attitude des juges, dans l’ex-Cameroun occidental, consistant à suivre les changements intervenus en Angleterre, est une sorte d’abdication judiciaire de la souveraineté14, en même temps qu’un dangereux blanc-seing donné au Parlement anglais. L’attitude est d’autant plus curieuse qu’elle vient des juges de culture anglo-saxonne, supposés professionnellement préparés à la création des règles de droit. Tout se passe finalement comme si sans le secours des statutes (les textes), on ne peut pas trancher les différends. Or, dans le système anglo-saxon, les statutes sont considérés comme des règles dérogatoires, la solution de principe étant fournie par la common law. 2.2 Le système romano-germanique et le droit applicable dans l’ex-Cameroun oriental Le système romano-germanique est issu du droit romain auquel s’est superposé l’apport des coutumes germaniques. Il est très éparpillé à travers le monde : pays d’Europe, d’Afrique, du Proche-Orient et d’Amérique latine. Dans ce système, et contrairement au système anglo-saxon, la loi est la source principale du droit. Les textes applicables à telle ou telle matière font très souvent l’objet de codes accessibles aux citoyens : code civil, code pénal, code du travail, code général des impôts, code de la route, etc. Ce phénomène de codification marque l’avènement du règne de la loi, qui est désormais la source officielle du droit. A côté des codes, sont édictées d’autres lois dont le très grand nombre a parfois été dénoncé. On assiste en effet à une sorte d’inflation législative, qui complexifie le droit et le rend parfois indigeste ou, à tout le moins, difficile à connaître. Dans le système romano-germanique, la grande division est faite entre le droit privé et le droit public, chacun de ces domaines étant divisé en plusieurs branches. Pour ____________________ 13 « La législation résultant des lois et règlements applicables dans l’État fédéral du Cameroun et dans les États fédérés à la date de prise d’effet de la présente Constitution reste en vigueur dans ses dispositions qui ne sont pas contraires aux stipulations de celle-ci, tant qu’elle n’aura pas été modifiée par voie législative ou réglementaire. » 14 Cette abdication contrarie le préambule de la Constitution de la République, qui affirme que le Peuple camerounais est « Jaloux de l’indépendance de la Patrie camerounaise chèrement acquise et résolu à préserver cette indépendance. » Toute disposition antérieure, notamment de droit colonial, qui remettrait en cause cette indépendance est contraire à la Constitution et, conformément à l’article 68 de ce texte, n’est pas concernée par le maintien du droit antérieur. LA QUESTION ENVIRONNEMENTALE DANS LE SYSTÈME JURIDIQUE 187 le droit privé, on a le droit civil, le droit pénal, le droit du travail, etc. ; pour le droit public, on a le droit administratif, le droit constitutionnel, etc. Mais loin d’être étanches, ces divisions sont, au contraire, circonstancielles et parfois arbitraires. Les règles d’origine française encore en vigueur dans l’ex-Cameroun oriental sont assez bien identifiables, contrairement à la situation qui prévaut dans l’ex-Cameroun occidental. Au départ de la construction, il y a la volonté d’étendre le droit français aux colonies françaises. Mais cette idée est tempérée par la règle de la spécialité législative, qui voudrait que les seules règles françaises applicables dans chaque territoire administré par la France soient celles qui ont été prises pour ce territoire ou qui lui ont été expressément étendues. Sur cette base, le Cameroun sous administration fran- çaise était régi par beaucoup de textes pris par les autorités coloniales locales ou pris par la métropole et étendues au Cameroun avec ou sans adaptation. Au lendemain de l’indépendance, on pouvait espérer que les autorités du jeune État abrogent tous les textes étrangers introduits pendant la colonisation. Cela n’était possible que si étaient prêts des corps de règles pouvant être adoptées en remplacement du droit colonial. Ces corps de règles n’existaient pas, les coutumes qu’on trouvait çà et là étant liées à des tribus et non applicables à l’échelle nationale (coutume bamiléké, coutume bassa, coutume béti, coutume duala, etc.). Par réalisme, la Constitution du 4 mars 196015 a posé que le droit antérieur (le droit colonial) restera en vigueur jusqu’à son abrogation et son remplacement par de nouvelles dispositions. Cette solution a été reprise par l’article 68 de la Constitution actuellement en vigueur, et la Cour suprême veille à son respect16. C’est pour cette raison que les textes comme le Code civil français de 1804 restent en vigueur au Cameroun. La solution doit être bien comprise : la version du Code civil qui intéresse notre propos est celle en vigueur au Cameroun au 1er janvier 1960. Depuis lors, en France, plusieurs modifications ont été apportées au Code civil, mais ne concernent pas le Cameroun. 2.3 L’affaiblissement de l’opposition entre les deux ex-parties du Cameroun Au plan de leurs caractéristiques, les systèmes juridiques anglo-saxon et romanogermanique s’opposent, entre autres, en ce qui concerne les sources du droit : tandis qu’il est essentiellement jurisprudentiel dans le premier, le droit est essentiellement législatif dans le second. Au plan territorial, chaque système a son champ de départ : l’ex-Cameroun occidental pour le système anglo-saxon et l’ex-Cameroun oriental pour le système romano-germanique. Or, l’évolution qui a commencé avec les indé- ____________________ 15 Voir article 51 de la Constitution du 4 mars 1960. 16 CS, arrêt n° 58 du 12 avril 1978, affaire A Georges / K Ernest, Revue Camerounaise de Droit (RCD) n° 9 (1976) 63. Jean-Marie TCHAKOUA 188 pendances autorise de nouvelles analyses. En effet, la réunification des deux exparties du Cameroun, intervenue en 1961, puis l’unification de l’État intervenue en 1972, se sont accompagnées d’un vaste mouvement d’unification législative qui a fait perdre du terrain à la règle du précédent en usage dans l’ex-Cameroun occidental. C’est dans ce vaste mouvement d’unification législative qu’on peut situer l’adoption, en 1967, des premiers codes applicables à l’échelle nationale, à savoir le code pénal et le code du travail. Il faudrait aussi y situer toutes les lois adoptées par le parlement ainsi que tous les actes réglementaires pris par les autorités centrales que sont le Président de la République, le Premier ministre et les ministres. On comprend alors que s’appliquent sur toute l’étendue du territoire national la réforme foncière de 1974 et ses textes dérivés, la législation sur la forêt et la faune, la loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement et ses textes dérivés, etc. Dans le même temps, le Cameroun a ratifié des conventions internationales en matière environnementale. Comme les lois et règlements, ces conventions sont applicables sur toute l’étendue du territoire national. Même si dans leur contenu elles ont été influencées par les pays anglo-saxon, le fait que les solutions qu’elles consacrent soient fixées dans des textes les rapproche davantage du système juridique romanogermanique que du système anglo-saxon, tout au moins lorsqu’on réfléchit en termes de source formelle du droit. Dès lors qu’en droit interne ou en droit international ces textes existent, il paraît impertinent, dans l’ex-Cameroun occidental, de recourir à la règle du précédent pour rechercher la solution aux problèmes qu’ils résolvent. Ces textes ont forcément abrogé tout précédent judiciaire contraire, pour s’imposer désormais comme seules sources pertinentes. L’effacement du système anglo-saxon ne doit cependant pas être exagéré. Il faudrait en effet prendre conscience que l’uniformisation législative ci-dessus décrite concerne davantage le droit substantiel que le droit procédural. Or, il ne fait pas de doute que lorsque l’unification ne concerne pas à la fois et dans la même mesure les aspects substantiel et procédural, il y a peu de chance que le résultat souhaité soit atteint, ce qui peut se vérifier si l’on réfléchit sur le contentieux environnemental. Actuellement, le contentieux environnemental pourrait être soit pénal, soit administratif, soit encore civil. La procédure pénale a récemment été uniformisée17, ce qui donne à penser que le droit pénal de l’environnement pourrait s’appliquer de la même façon sur toute l’étendue du territoire camerounais, au moins lorsque dans la même affaire le juge ne doit pas statuer sur les intérêts civils. Le contentieux administratif a, lui aussi, été uniformisé aussi bien dans ses règles de fond que dans celles de forme. Mais il faudrait peut-être un peu de temps pour que le personnel et les usa- ____________________ 17 Loi n° 2005/007 du 27 juillet 2005 portant Code de procédure. LA QUESTION ENVIRONNEMENTALE DANS LE SYSTÈME JURIDIQUE 189 gers des tribunaux administratifs récemment créés dans l’ex-Cameroun occidental s’habituent au contentieux administratif inconnu de la tradition juridique anglosaxonne18. Au demeurant, le contentieux administratif n’a jamais fonctionné sans emprunt à la procédure civile, laquelle n’est pas encore uniformisée. C’est justement sur le terrain de cette procédure civile, non encore uniformisée, que se montrera la résistance du système juridique anglo-saxon dans l’ex-Cameroun occidental. Dans certaines de ses configurations, le contentieux environnemental pourrait être un contentieux civil entre personnes privées, et le fait que le juge soit obligé d’appliquer tel texte couvrant tout le territoire national ne garantit pas que la solution finale ne variera pas selon qu’on soit dans l’ex-Cameroun occidental ou dans l’ex-Cameroun oriental. Sur le terrain de l’expression des particularismes, il ne faudrait pas négliger le rôle des acteurs du droit, notamment les auxiliaires de justice. Il faudrait à cet égard se rappeler que la tradition juridique suivie dans l’ex-Cameroun occidental ignore le notaire, acteur très important dans la mise en œuvre du droit dans l’ex-Cameroun oriental. Dans l’ex-Cameroun occidental, le rôle dévolu au notaire est joué par un autre acteur, précisément l’avocat. Mais on ne peut raisonnablement penser que les actes passés le soient dans les mêmes conditions et modalités chez les notaires ou chez les avocats. Tous ces points où pourraient s’exprimer les particularismes de la tradition juridique anglo-saxonne montrent que l’abondance des textes applicables à l’échelle nationale en matière environnementale ne signifie nullement l’uniformisation complète du droit. On verra aussi que les coutumes n’ont pas totalement perdu vocation à s’appliquer. ____________________ 18 C’est depuis la loi constitutionnelle n° 61/24 du 1er septembre 1961 que le contentieux administratif, connu depuis l’époque coloniale dans l’ex-Cameroun oriental, est étendu à tout le territoire camerounais, avec la création de la Cour fédérale de justice. L’ordonnance n° 61/0F/6 du 4 octobre 1961 fixant la composition, les conditions de saisine et la procédure devant la Cour fédérale de justice et le décret n° 64/DF/218 du 19 juin 1964 relatif au fonctionnement de la Cour fédérale de justice statuant en matière administrative viendront fixer les règles procédurales applicables. Mais après une courte période d’éparpillement, le contentieux administratif va être concentré à Yaoundé, devant la juridiction suprême. Cette situation va durer jusqu’à la création des tribunaux administratifs au niveau des régions. Les derniers textes en date, en matière de contentieux administratif, sont la loi n° 2006/016 du 29 décembre 2006 fixant l’organisation et le fonctionnement de la Cour suprême et la loi n° 2006/022 du 29 décembre 2006 fixant l’organisation et le fonctionnement des tribunaux administratifs. Jean-Marie TCHAKOUA 190 3 La question environnementale et l’opposition entre le droit traditionnel et le droit moderne L’histoire de l’opposition entre le droit dit moderne et le droit dit traditionnel est celle d’une progressive prise d’hégémonie du premier face au second. La tendance est tellement forte qu’on avait pronostiqué que lorsque va être adopté le code des personnes et de la famille, les coutumes vont disparaître en tant que source directe du droit.19 La lecture de la loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement permet de nuancer ce pronostic, car cette dernière ménage dans une certaine mesure les coutumes. 3.1 L’hégémonie du droit moderne face au droit traditionnel A l’origine, les sociétés camerounaises étaient régies exclusivement par les coutumes pouvant varier sensiblement d’un espace à un autre. Le déclin des coutumes commence avec la pénétration et la domination étrangères. Les puissances colonisatrices avaient pour ambition de remplacer les coutumes par leur droit, étendu au Cameroun dans sa consistance d’origine ou moyennant quelques adaptations. Le point de départ de ce projet est souvent situé dans la Constitution coloniale allemande de 1886 prévoyant que la législation allemande s’appliquera à l’ensemble des possessions de ce pays. Même comme le Cameroun n’était formellement que sous protectorat allemand, cela ne devait rien changer. Au demeurant, le traité de protectorat conclu le 12 juillet 1884, soit deux ans avant la Constitution coloniale allemande, disposait très clairement que la partie camerounaise abandonnait totalement à la partie allemande ses droits concernant la législation et l’administration. Mais l’Allemagne ne donnait nullement l’impression de vouloir abolir les coutumes locales, notamment dans les rapports entre indigènes. L’organisation judiciaire20 mise en place par l’Allemagne semblait conçue pour ménager les coutumes, puisque les tribunaux coutumiers ont été créés pour les indigènes en 1892. Mais le recours contre les jugements de ces tribunaux était exercé devant un tribunal présidé par un administrateur colonial. L’ordonnance du 25 décembre 1900, qui va restructurer l’organisation judiciaire, ne changera rien à l’hégémonie du droit allemand. Au lendemain de la première guerre mondiale, l’Allemagne vaincue est contrainte de céder le Cameroun à la France et à l’Angleterre. L’entreprise d’imposition du ____________________ 19 Tchakoua (2008:30). 20 Sur la question, lire Sockeng (2005:4). LA QUESTION ENVIRONNEMENTALE DANS LE SYSTÈME JURIDIQUE 191 droit de l’occupant va se poursuivre, aussi bien avec les Français21 qu’avec les Anglais22. Elle va cependant échouer, surtout en droit foncier et en droit de la famille où les populations ont montré une résistance farouche. Au juste, durant toute cette période, les coutumes locales ont, autant que faire se peut, résisté23 à la pression du droit d’origine étrangère, notamment dans les rapports entre indigènes. Comme le prédécesseur allemand, les Anglais et Français vont louvoyer, jusqu’à l’accession du Cameroun à l’indépendance. Au lendemain des indépendances, la question de la place des coutumes dans l’ordre juridique camerounais s’est posée aux autorités du jeune État. Fallait-il les supprimer ou les maintenir ? La doctrine politique de l’unité nationale adoptée par le nouveau pouvoir rendait peu souhaitable le maintien des coutumes qui, toutes, ont un champ d’application personnel et territorial limité parce que rattachées à des tribus. Il n’y avait cependant pas encore un corps complet de règles applicables à l’échelle nationale. C’est pourquoi, comme en ce qui concerne le droit colonial, la solution choisie pour les coutumes fut le maintien. La segmentation droit dit traditionnel / droit dit moderne va naître de ce maintien des coutumes et du droit d’origine coloniale. Le droit colonial est ainsi présenté comme le droit moderne, ce qui va légitimer un certain nombre de manœuvres d’éviction des coutumes très souvent jugées dépassées par l’évolution de la société camerounaise. Au demeurant, on va très facilement mettre dans le bloc du droit dit moderne, qu’on oppose naturellement au bloc du droit traditionnel, toute l’œuvre législative des autorités du Cameroun indépendant, ce qui empêche de bien saisir les nuances de la segmentation. Il est cependant certain que par réalisme, est instituée une concurrence entre le droit écrit et les coutumes. Et pour donner un sens à cette concurrence, la Cour suprême a affirmé que l’option de juridiction emporte l’option ____________________ 21 Lire à cet égard les décrets du 16 avril 1924 fixant le mode de promulgation et de publication des textes réglementaires au Togo et au Cameroun, et du 22 mai 1924 rendant exécutoires dans les territoires du Cameroun placés sous le mandat de la France les lois et décrets promulgués en Afrique équatoriale française antérieurement au 1er janvier 1924, modifié par le décret du 5 mai 1926. Est aussi à lire la Circulaire du Ministre des colonies du 10 septembre 1931 relative à la promulgation et à la publication aux colonies de certains textes législatifs et réglementaires. 22 Lire à cet effet le Southern Cameroons High Court Laws 1955, qui encadre l’application du droit local. Son article 27 (1) dispose : « The High Court shall observe, and enforce the observance of every native law and custom which is not repugnant to natural justice, equity and good conscience, nor incompatible either directly or by implication with any law for the time being in force, and nothing in this law shall deprive any person to the benefit for any such native law and custom. » Et la Cour suprême a jugé que la coutume qui écarte la fille de la succession est contraire à la Constitution et « repugnant to natural justice » (CS n° 14/L du 14 février 1993, affaire Zancho Florence Lum C v Chibikom Peter Fru and Others, Juridis-Info n° 21 (1995), 29, note Ewang. 23 Melone (1972:12). Jean-Marie TCHAKOUA 192 de législation.24 Autrement dit, devant le juge, on appliquera la coutume ou le droit dit moderne selon que les parties au litige ont choisi une juridiction de droit traditionnel ou une juridiction de droit moderne. Les autorités ont cependant fait savoir que le maintien des droits coutumiers était provisoire. La solution résultait implicitement du maintien à titre provisoire des juridictions chargées d’appliquer le droit coutumier25 et d’une importante décision de la Cour suprême, rendue en 1962, qui a affirmé que dans toutes les matières où il a été légiféré, cette législation doit l’emporter sur la coutume.26 Certes, dans cet arrêt, les textes qui s’imposaient devant la coutume n’étaient pas des textes pris par le législateur national après l’indépendance ; il s’agissait plutôt de textes datant de l’époque coloniale (décrets des 13 novembre 1945 et 14 septembre 1951) et, sans doute, porteurs du vieux projet colonial de remplacement intégral des coutumes locales par la législation venue de la métropole. Mais ce n’est pas dans le respect de ce projet colonial que la Cour suprême a élaboré sa solution. La haute juridiction a simplement posé la règle de l’effacement de la coutume devant les textes pris spécialement dans le cadre camerounais pour régir une matière. Dans le contexte actuel, il s’agit essentiellement des textes pris par les autorités du Cameroun indépendant, ce qu’on peut appeler, avec une certaine approximation, ‘loi nationale’. Les juridictions du fond ne comprennent pas toujours la règle posée par la haute juridiction. Ainsi, saisie d’une demande d’expulsion d’un terrain immatriculé, la Cour d’appel du Sud, statuant en matière de droit local, a affirmé : Considérant que l’expulsion sollicitée est fondée sur un titre foncier relevant du droit écrit et non sur une quelconque coutume des parties ; que dès lors la Cour sta- ____________________ 24 CS, arrêt n° 28/CC du 10 décembre 1981, affaire Angoa Parfait C v. Dame Angoa née Biyidi Pauline, RCD n° 21/22, 301 ; n° 120/CC du 15 septembre 1982, affaire Asso’o Benoît c/ Moutikoue Jacqueline ; n° 35/CC du 25 main 1982, affaire Bihina Gabriel c/ Ngamba Jacqueline ; n° 144/CC du 17 mai 1983, affaire Nguele Nsia F. Biloa et autres, RCD n° 29/196. Mais la règle va connaître une grave mésaventure dans plusieurs arrêts de la Cour suprême, n° 86/CC du 18 juillet 1985, affaire Kemajou née Makugam Jeanne c/ Kemajou François et n° 64/CC du 16 avril 1987, Anoukaha et al. (1989:97), commentaire Anoukaha ; voir aussi CS, n° 24/CC du 14 octobre 1992, Juridis-Info, n° 20/1994, 72, note Tchakoua. 25 L’ordonnance n° 72/04 du 26 août 1972, en son article premier, ne citait pas les juridictions de droit traditionnel parmi les juridictions chargées de rendre la justice, mais indiquait, dans les dispositions transitoires, que l’organisation et la procédure des juridictions traditionnelles sont maintenues provisoirement. Ces juridictions ont connu un léger retour en grâce avec la loi n° 2006/015 du 29 décembre 2006 portant organisation judiciaire. Celle-ci cite les juridictions traditionnelles parmi les juridictions chargées de rendre la justice (article 3), même si elle souligne aussi que leur maintien est provisoire (article 31). 26 CS cor, arrêt n° 445 du 3 avril 1962, affaire Bessala Awona c/ Bidzogo Geneviève, Penant 1963, 230, note Lampué. Voir aussi CS cor, 5 mars 1963, Bull. n° 8, 541. LA QUESTION ENVIRONNEMENTALE DANS LE SYSTÈME JURIDIQUE 193 tuant en matière de droit traditionnel, ainsi que le premier juge sont incompétents à connaître d’un tel litige, l’option de juridiction emportant l’option de législation.27 Sur cette motivation, la Cour a annulé la décision du premier juge qui avait ordonné l’expulsion28. Il s’agit là d’une compréhension erronée de la jurisprudence de la Cour suprême sur les conséquences à tirer de l’option de juridiction, le texte en cause, l’ordonnance no 74/01 du 6 juillet 1974 fixant le régime foncier, étant de ceux qui s’imposent devant toutes les juridictions.29 A l’opposé, la Cour d’appel du Centre a fait montre d’une très bonne compréhension de la jurisprudence de la Cour suprême, dans un arrêt rendu le 12 octobre 1989.30 Un jugement du Tribunal du premier degré de Yaoundé avait admis la reconnaissance d’un enfant adultérin conformément à la coutume. Le ministère public avait relevé appel du jugement en se fondant sur la violation de l’article 335 du Code civil qui prohibe ce type de reconnaissance. Pour y répondre, la Cour d’appel, qui avait constaté que la question était traitée par l’article 43 de l’ordonnance no 81/02 du 29 juin 1981 portant organisation de l’état civil et diverses dispositions relatives à l’état des personnes physiques, a renvoyé dos à dos le ministère public et le Tribunal du premier degré en soulignant qu’il « s’agit d’une matière qui n’est soumise ni à la coutume, ni au Code civil, puisque légiférée par l’ordonnance no 81-02 du 29 juin 1981. » La solution est justifiée par le fait qu’une législation nationale est forcément l’expression du génie législatif national et donc la résultante de toutes les coutumes camerounaises31. Dans l’optique de l’unité nationale, une telle législation doit s’imposer face aux coutumes particulières à telle ou telle tribu. Logiquement, il faudrait aussi penser qu’une règle d’origine internationale s’applique devant toutes les juridictions et sur toute l’étendue du territoire national et évince donc toute coutume qui prétendrait s’appliquer. C’est pour toutes ces raisons que le droit coutumier ne s’exprime plus abondamment qu’en droit de la famille32, où n’existe pas encore une législation uniforme et où les conventions internationales ne sont pas souvent d’application directe en droit interne. ____________________ 27 CA du Sud, n° 05/LO du 17 février 2006, affaire Ondoua J Collins c/ ASSIANE Richard, inédit. 28 TPI d’Ebolowa, n° 171/PD du 6 août 2003 (en réalité TPD d’Ebolowa), inédit. 29 De surcroît, il n’était pas demandé au juge de reconnaître un droit en appliquant ce texte, mais seulement de tirer des conséquences d’un droit déjà établi. 30 CA du Centre, 12 octobre 1989 affaire MP c / Amougou François et Mballa Victorine, Juridis- Info n° 5 (1991), 62, obs. Youégo. 31 Dans ce sens Ombiono (1989:7). 32 Le contentieux devant les juridictions de droit traditionnel tourne autour de deux sujets majeurs : le divorce et la succession. Jean-Marie TCHAKOUA 194 Il faudrait aussi dire, à la vérité, que la concurrence entre le droit écrit et le droit coutumier a toujours été une lutte entre inégaux, les autorités ayant toujours pris le parti du droit écrit.33 Des dispositifs subtils sont mis en place pour réduire l’influence du droit coutumier au profit du droit écrit. Au plan national, et conscient du fait que certains éléments de la coutume peuvent être inacceptables, le constituant a affirmé que « La République… reconnaît et protège les valeurs traditionnelles conformes aux principes démocratiques, aux droits de l’homme et à la loi ».34 Bien avant l’introduction de cette solution dans la constitution, la Cour suprême avait affirmé que : Le juge doit écarter la coutume lorsqu’elle est contraire à l’ordre public et aux bonnes mœurs ou encore lorsque la solution à laquelle son application aboutit est moins bonne que celle du droit écrit.35 Dans son principe, la règle posée par la constitution et la Cour suprême est judicieuse. Mais dans sa formulation, elle expose à une confusion sur la ‘loi’ ou le ‘droit écrit’ qui doit prévaloir sur la coutume. Or, dans la logique de l’analyse ci-dessus faite de l’arrêt Bessala Awono, c’est la loi nationale qui doit pouvoir s’imposer sans la moindre discussion face à la coutume. Dans l’ex-Cameroun oriental, le règne des coutumes est menacé, en premier lieu, par la règle de l’article 3 du décret no 69/DF/544 du 19 décembre 1969 fixant l’organisation judiciaire et la procédure devant les juridictions traditionnelles du Cameroun oriental, qui prévoit qu’en cas de conflit de coutumes pour les questions concernant le mariage, le divorce, la puissance paternelle et la garde des enfants, il est statué d’après la coutume sous le régime de laquelle le mariage avait été contracté ou, dans l’incertitude, d’après les principes généraux du droit moderne. Il est arrivé qu’on comprenne cette règle comme signifiant que la coutume ne doit s’appliquer que si son contenu ne contrarie pas celui du Code civil. La Cour d’appel du Sud36 statuant en matière de droit local sur un différend relatif au partage, a ainsi jugé que « les règles régissant ledit domaine par la loi et la coutume étant en conflit, il convient d’appliquer ici les règles du Code civil. » Le règne des coutumes est menacé, en deuxième lieu, par l’organisation judicaire qui ne permet l’expression du droit coutumier qu’au niveau des juridictions du premier degré, de sorte qu’au second degré et à la Cour suprême on n’a véritablement ____________________ 33 Sur la question, lire Banamba (2000:12). 34 Constitution du 2 juin 1972 telle que modifiée par la loi du 18 juin 1996, article premier, alinéa 2. 35 CS n° 70 du 8 juillet 1976, affaire Ateba Victor contre dame Ateba. 36 CA du Sud, n° 12/L du 21 avril 2006, affaire Mbazoa Bernadette c/ Nkotto Menguele Michel, inédit. LA QUESTION ENVIRONNEMENTALE DANS LE SYSTÈME JURIDIQUE 195 affaire qu’au droit écrit. On sait bien qu’il n’y a d’assesseur37 ni à la Cour d’appel, ni à la Cour suprême. A ceux qui se méprendraient sur cette réalité au niveau de la Cour d’appel, la Haute juridiction38 a fait savoir que les assesseurs n’entrent pas dans la composition de la Cour d’appel, même lorsque celle-ci statue sur les appels des jugements des juridictions de droit traditionnel.39 Certes, on pourrait douter de cette solution lorsque la Cour d’appel examine les jugements rendus par les Customary Courts et les Alkali Courts de l’ex-Cameroun occidental. En effet, la loi no 79/04 du 29 juin 1979 rattachant ces juridictions au ministère de la justice indique, en son article 3 alinéa 2 b) et c), que : b) La Cour d’appel statuant sur les jugements des Customary Courts et des Alkali Courts, est complétée par deux assesseurs ayant voix consultative et représentant la coutume des parties. c) Les assesseurs sont choisis parmi ceux des Customary Courts et Alkali Courts n’ayant pas connu de l’affaire en première instance. Intervenue après l’ordonnance no 72/04 du 26 août 1972 portant organisation judiciaire qui ne prévoyait pas l’intervention des assesseurs en appel, la loi de 1979 établissait une solution dérogatoire qui a pu coexister avec la règle générale posée par l’ordonnance citée. On devrait tenir le même raisonnement en ce qui concerne les rapports entre cette loi de 1979 et la nouvelle loi portant organisation judiciaire40, même s’il ne semble pas déraisonnable de penser que c’est par inadvertance que cette dernière n’a pas explicitement abrogé cette dérogation que rien ne semble justifier. A l’absence d’assesseurs en appel et devant la Cour suprême, il faudrait ajouter le fait que la composition des juridictions du premier degré d’instance statuant en matière traditionnelle les prédispose très peu à appliquer véritablement les coutumes. Ces juridictions sont dominées par des personnes dont on peut raisonnablement penser qu’elles ne connaissent pas le contenu de la coutume à appliquer41. En troisième lieu, et dans la logique de ce qui précède sur la composition des juridictions de droit traditionnel, les juges ont souvent maquillé les règles du Code civil qu’ils présentent tantôt comme le contenu originel de la coutume, tantôt comme le ____________________ 37 Les assesseurs sont des personnes qui entrent dans la composition des juridictions de droit traditionnel, avec pour rôle de permettre la connaissance, et donc la bonne application, de la coutume (Voir infra, la 3ème partie de l’ouvrage sur l’organisation judiciaire). 38 CS, 28 février 1974, RCD n° 13 et 14, 166 ; n° 14/L du 21 novembre 2002, affaire Oloa Michel c/ Olao Balla et autres, Juridis-Périodique n° 64 (2005), 46. 39 La notion de juridiction traditionnelle est consacrée dans nos textes et renvoie, bien sûr, à celle de juridiction de droit traditionnel. Nous l’utiliserons malgré les réserves qui peuvent être faites sur la pertinence de l’expression. 40 Loi n° 2006/015 du 29 décembre 2006. 41 Le Tribunal du premier degré est présidé par un fonctionnaire en service dans le ressort du tribunal et, en cas d’empêchement, par le Sous-Préfet de l’arrondissement du siège ou par un adjoint d’arrondissement. Jean-Marie TCHAKOUA 196 résultat de l’évolution de celle-ci.42 On peut y ajouter le fait d’appliquer régulièrement le Code civil, sous le prétexte que la coutume est silencieuse sur telle ou telle question.43 Il est aussi arrivé que le juge applique le Code civil sans la moindre explication, sans doute parce qu’il trouve son application naturelle. Le Tribunal du premier degré de Bafoussam a ainsi appliqué, en matière de sortie d’indivision, l’article 828 du Code civil sur la forme notariée des actes de partage44 et, en matière de divorce, l’article 232 du même code sur l’abandon de foyer conjugal.45 En quatrième lieu, l’option de juridiction ne s’applique pas de la même façon selon qu’on choisit une juridiction de droit moderne ou une juridiction de droit traditionnel. Dans le premier cas, lorsque le demandeur saisit le juge, l’instance est définitivement engagée devant cette juridiction. En revanche, lorsqu’il opte pour une juridiction de droit traditionnel, l’instance ne peut être définitivement liée que pour autant que le défendeur, in limine litis, ne s’y oppose pas. Si le défendeur formule un déclinatoire de compétence, le tribunal se déclare incompétent et le demandeur peut saisir la juridiction compétente de droit dit moderne.46 Dans l’ex-Cameroun occidental, et jusqu’à ce que la loi no 79/04 du 29 juillet 1979 ne rattache les Customary Courts et les Alkali Courts au ministère de la justice, le système des voies de recours prévues contre les jugements de ces juridictions donnait aux autorités administratives (le Sous-préfet, le Préfet et le Premier ministre de l’État fédéré, pendant la République fédérale), le droit de réviser les jugements. La loi de 1979 prévoit désormais que ces décisions peuvent faire l’objet d’un appel devant la Cour d’appel. Mais là encore, ce sont les magistrats professionnels, dont on peut douter de la connaissance de la coutume, qui statuent sur l’appel. Par ailleurs, le Préfet conserve le droit d’ordonner le transfert de toute affaire, du Customary Court à la juridiction de droit moderne. Le dispositif le plus puissant, dans l’entreprise de réduction de l’emprise de la coutume dans l’ex-Cameroun occidental, est cependant la règle de l’article 27 de la Southern Cameroons High Court Laws 1955, qui n’admet l’application de la coutume qu’autant que celle-ci n’est pas « repugnant to natural justice, equity and good conscience ». Les données de référence du contrôle sont floues, ce qui ne peut que donner plus de pouvoirs à celui qui contrôle la ‘validité’ de la coutume. Le contrôle se fera en tout cas à partir d’une référence extérieure à la coutume. ____________________ 42 CS, arrêt 30 du 12 janvier 1971, affaire Dayas Tokoto Loth c/ Dayas Christine in Anoukaha et al. (1989:92). 43 CS, arrêt n° 68/L du 28 juillet 1985, affaire Chimi Moïse c/ Mme Chimi née Tchouanqué Jacqueline, Juridis-Info n° 10, 30, note Anoukaha. 44 TPD de Bafoussam, jugement n° 329/C du 6 juillet 2006, affaire Fonkoua Maurice, inédit. 45 TPD de Bafoussam, jugement n° 289/C du 1er juin 2006, affaire Takam Jean-Marie c/ Takam née Malla Elodie, inédit. 46 Voir article 2 de la loi n° 69/DF/544 du 19 décembre 1969. LA QUESTION ENVIRONNEMENTALE DANS LE SYSTÈME JURIDIQUE 197 Dans les parties du territoire national dominées par l’Islam, ce sont parfois les principes de cette religion qui se sont substitués aux coutumes locales.47 Pourtant, dans un jugement remarquable, le Tribunal du premier degré de Yokadouma explique : « … le principe constitutionnel de laïcité de l’État interdit l’érection de prescriptions religieuses en règles de droit applicables dans le règlement des différends », et conclut qu’un « partage successoral effectué selon la coutume islamique manque de base légale ».48 Le tribunal s’inscrit ainsi dans la jurisprudence de la Cour suprême, qui s’était déjà élevée contre la substitution des prescriptions religieuses à la coutume en soulignant que « La coutume est la manifestation du génie national camerounais dans sa diversité, en dehors de toutes influences religieuse ou étrangère ».49 On voudrait bien suivre la Haute juridiction dans cet arrêt rendu sur un rapport très argumenté50, qui fait le point sur la pénétration et les influences étrangères au Cameroun, ce qui lui permet d’apporter les précisions nécessaires. Mais on peut parier que les assesseurs chargés de dire le contenu de la coutume ne sont pas toujours aussi discursifs et rigoureux. En fait, notre droit dit traditionnel tel que présenté devant les juridictions n’est plus aujourd’hui qu’un amalgame de règles d’origines diverses.51 Et l’existence des Alkali Courts, juridictions de droit traditionnel pour musulmans de l’ex-Cameron occidental, est une preuve que le phénomène religieux n’est pas complètement tenu à l’écart de la recherche de la règle de droit applicable. Le phénomène religieux vient ainsi ajouter un élément supplémentaire à la complexité, même s’il faut reconnaître qu’il n’a pas créé une segmentation comparable à celles qui ont été présentées ci-dessus. Et lorsque la loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement aménage une place pour les us et coutumes locaux, il faudrait penser que la donnée religieuse peut être prise en compte à cette occasion-là. 3.2 La survie des coutumes Pour comprendre la survie des coutumes dans la matière environnementale qui a fait l’objet de plusieurs textes, il faudrait partir de deux indications fortes de la loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement. Le texte indique, d’une part, que la protection et la gestion de l’environnement comportent des aspects sociaux et culturels52, ____________________ 47 CA de Garoua, arrêt n° 42/L du 13 mai 1882 inédit. 48 TPD de Yokadouma, jugement n° 33 du 16 février 2004, inédit. 49 CS, n° 2/L du 10 octobre 1985, RCD n° 30, 427 ; Juridis-Info n° 8, 53, note Anouhaha. 50 Le rapport est du Conseiller Maurice Njeudji. 51 Dans ce sens, Anyangwe (1984:254) ; Danpullo Hamisu (2000:105) ; Ngwafor (1993:1). 52 Voir article 2, alinéa 2, de la loi n° 96/12 du 5 août 1996 portant loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement. Jean-Marie TCHAKOUA 198 d’autre part que les communautés de base sont associées à la mise en œuvre de la politique nationale de l’environnement. La loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement aménage un premier espace à l’application de la coutume lorsqu’elle énonce l’un des principes qui doivent inspirer la gestion de l’environnement et des ressources naturelles, à savoir le principe de subsidiarité. C’est le principe, selon lequel :53 en l’absence d’une règle de droit écrit, générale ou spéciale en matière de protection de l’environnement, la norme coutumière identifiée d’un terroir donné et avérée plus efficace pour la protection de l’environnement s’applique. Il est loisible d’observer que le principe de subsidiarité s’inscrit dans une démarche bien compréhensive de relégation de la coutume au rang de source secondaire du droit. Il faudrait cependant voir qu’ici, on n’est pas dans le schéma classique de confinement de la coutume aux instances spécialisées chargées d’appliquer le droit dit traditionnel. Ainsi, sur le terrain contentieux, la coutume palliera l’absence de la norme écrite, qu’on soit devant une juridiction de droit traditionnel ou devant une juridiction de droit moderne. Mais la formulation du principe de subsidiarité pose quelques problèmes de compréhension qui, mal résolus, pourraient compromettre l’applicabilité des coutumes. Il était peut-être suffisant de prévoir purement et simplement l’application de la coutume pour pallier l’absence de règle écrite, quitte à rejeter la coutume si elle est contraire à l’ordre public. Le législateur s’est montré plus nuancé, ajoutant l’exigence de la plus grande efficacité pour la protection de l’environnement. Dans une première interprétation, on peut retenir que l’application de la coutume est conditionnée au fait qu’elle soit plus efficace pour la protection de l’environnement. Mais alors, on se demande avec quelle norme la comparaison doit être faite, puisque par hypothèse on convoque la coutume parce qu’il n’existe aucune norme écrite applicable. Cette première interprétation conduit donc à l’impasse et doit être rejetée. Dans une seconde interprétation, on pourrait dire que le législateur pose ici une règle de solution de conflit entre les coutumes, règle forcément dérogatoire de celles qui s’appliquent en droit commun. Il s’agirait alors de comparer les coutumes en présence pour retenir celle qui s’avère la plus efficace. Cela suppose qu’on soit en présence de plusieurs coutumes qui revendiquent leur application sur un même terroir, ce qui est peu probable. Pourrait-on aller chercher la coutume jugée plus efficace même hors de l’espace où se pose le problème ? La formulation de la solution légale autorise une réponse affirmative à la question. Mais alors, il faudrait s’attendre à voir appliquer une coutume non seulement inconnue des personnes impliquées dans le problème à résoudre, mais aussi que ces dernières ne sont pas supposées connaître. ____________________ 53 Voir article 9 (f) de la loi n° 96/12 du 5 août 1996. LA QUESTION ENVIRONNEMENTALE DANS LE SYSTÈME JURIDIQUE 199 L’insécurité juridique qui en résulterait est grande, d’autant plus qu’on ne sait pas jusqu’où on pourrait aller chercher la coutume à appliquer et que la solution donnée dans un cas ne peut être qu’une solution d’espèce, non une règle de droit.54 Il en résulte que le principe de subsidiarité ne pourrait être facilement mis en œuvre. La coutume pourrait s’appliquer plus sûrement dans le cadre du règlement des différends. En effet, l’article 93 de la loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement dispose : (1) Les autorités traditionnelles sont compétentes pour régler des litiges liés à l’utilisation de certaines ressources naturelles, notamment l’eau et le pâturage, sur la base des us et coutumes locaux, sans préjudice du droit des parties au litige d’en saisir les tribunaux compétents. (2) Il est dressé un procès-verbal du règlement du litige. La copie de ce procès-verbal dûment signé de l’autorité traditionnelle et des parties au litige ou leurs représentants est déposée auprès de l’autorité administrative dans le ressort territorial de laquelle est située la communauté villageoise où a eu lieu le litige. Il faudrait sans doute admettre que dans ce cadre, les autorités traditionnelles pourront appliquer les us et coutumes, peu importe que ceux-ci soient conformes ou non à la loi. Le différend est en effet réglé non seulement suivant un mode alternatif, mais également par des personnes à qui on demande d’appliquer leurs us et coutumes. La solution retenue ne devrait cependant pas être contraire à l’ordre public. Il reste que l’article 93 ci-dessus repris ne donne pas de solution à un certain nombre de problèmes qu’il pose, notamment en ce qui concerne son articulation avec les autres modes de règlement des différends disponibles au Cameroun. Il est intégré dans un chapitre intitulé « De la transaction et de l’arbitrage ». Les premiers articles du chapitre traitent de la transaction et de l’arbitrage. La transaction ici prévue permet d’éteindre l’action pénale contre les auteurs d’infractions à la législation environnementale. L’arbitrage est prévu sans autre précision, ce qui signifie qu’il faudrait se reporter aux règles relatives à l’arbitrage, notamment dans le cadre de l’Organisation pour l’Harmonisation en Afrique du Droit des Affaires (OHADA). On voit bien que la solution qu’on pourrait obtenir devant les autorités traditionnelles ne serait ni une transaction ni une sentence arbitrale. La voie prévue par l’article 93 n’est pas non plus un mode de règlement qu’on peut intégrer dans l’appareil judiciaire, car le législateur prévoit que les parties conservent le droit de s’adresser aux tribunaux compétents. Il reste à dire dans quelle mesure ce recours aux tribunaux est possible. Il est tendant de soutenir que le choix de la voie de l’autorité traditionnelle ____________________ 54 La solution se comprend tout de même lorsqu’on la prend sous l’angle de la confrontation des intérêts en présence : l’intérêt général en œuvre dans le souci de protection de l’environnement par le recours à la coutume la plus efficace et l’intérêt particulier des personnes impliquées dans le problème à résoudre. Le législateur fait prévaloir l’intérêt général. Jean-Marie TCHAKOUA 200 ferme celle des tribunaux. Mais une telle position est lourde de conséquences, notamment parce que la loi n’a organisé aucun recours contre la décision qui pourrait être prise. Bibliographie indicative Anoukaha, F, Elomo-Ntonga, L & S Ombiono, 1989, Tendances jurisprudentielles et doctrinales du droit des personnes et de la famille de l’ex-Cameroun oriental, Polycopié, Université de Yaoundé. Anyangwe, C, 1987, The Cameroonian judicial system, Yaoundé. Anyangwe, C, 1984, Introduction to law and legal systems, Cours polycopié, University of Yaoundé. Banamba, B, 2000, Regard nouveau sur un texte déjà trentenaire : le cas du décret du 19 décembre 1969 portant organisation et fonctionnement des juridictions traditionnelles de l’ex-Cameroun oriental, 1 (2) Revue Africaine de Sciences Juridiques. Danpullo Hamisu, R, 2000, Interaction, conflict and concord between Islamic Dower and customary bride-price: the case of Cameroon, 43 Juridis-Périodique, 105. Melone, S, 1972, Le Code civil contre la coutume : fin d’une suprématie (A propos des effets patrimoniaux du mariage, Revue Camerounaise de Droit (RCD), 1. Ngwafor, NE, 1993, Family law in Anglophone Cameroon, Regina-Saskatchewan, University of Regina Press. Ombiono, S, 1989, Etude générale des sources du droit des personnes et de la famille, dans : Anoukaha, F, Elomo-Ntonga, L & S Ombiono, Tendances jurisprudentielles et doctrinales du droit des personnes et de la famille de l’ex-Cameroun oriental, Polycopie, Université de Yaoundé. Sokeng, R, 2005, Les institutions judiciaires au Cameroun, 4ème édition, Douala, Macacos. Tchakoua, JM, 2008, Introduction générale au droit camerounais, Yaoundé, Presses de l’Université Catholique d’Afrique Centrale. 201 CHAPITRE 8 : LE DROIT PÉNAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT AU CAMEROUN Frédéric FOKA TAFFO 1 Introduction Le droit pénal de l’environnement fait référence à l’ensemble des règles qui visent à réprimer les atteintes à l’environnement au Cameroun. A ce jour, ce droit reste en construction et n’est pas codifié dans un texte juridique unique mais se retrouve plutôt de manière épars dans divers instruments juridiques qui portent sur des aspects variés de la protection de l’environnement. L’objectif de ce travail, loin d’avoir une quelconque prétention holistique, est de présenter les différentes dispositions pénales sur le fondement desquels le législateur camerounais protège l’environnement. La Cour internationale de justice, dans l’Avis consultatif sur la licéité de la menace ou de l’utilisation des armes nucléaires définit l’environnement comme « l’espace où vivent les êtres humains et dont dépend la qualité de leur vie et de leur santé, y compris pour les générations à venir ».1 Au-delà de cette définition, l’environnement peut aussi se comprendre comme l’ensemble formé par « la faune et la flore sauvages appelées la ‘vie sauvage’, le milieu marin, les cours d’eau et lacs ainsi que l’atmosphère ».2 Dans le cadre camerounais, l’environnement ne se limite pas simplement à des éléments naturels mais couvrent également des éléments artificiels et des équilibres biogéochimiques. Il se définit également comme des ressources naturelles abiotiques et biotiques telles que l’air ambiant, les eaux de surface, les eaux souterraines, les sols, la superficie terrestre, la faune et la flore et les interactions entre les éléments qui tous font partie intégrante du patrimoine culturel et des spécificités sous juridiction du Cameroun.3 Sur le fondement de ces définitions, le droit pénal camerounais de l’environnement est donc constitué de l’ensemble des règles qui prohibent et répriment non seulement les atteintes à la forêt, la faune et la pêche, mais aussi les in- ____________________ 1 Licéité de la menace ou de l’emploi d’armes nucléaires, Avis consultatif, C.I.J. Recueil 1996, 226, para. 29. 2 Kiss (2005:3). 3 Loi n° 2003/2006 du 21 avril 2003 portant régime de sécurité en matière de biotechnologie moderne au Cameroun, article 5 (22). Frédéric FOKA TAFFO 202 fractions de pollution de l’eau, du sol et de l’atmosphère. Dès lors, le droit pénal de l’environnement porte à la fois sur la répression des atteintes à l’espace où vivent les êtres humains et sur l’interdiction de toutes activités dont l’impact peut être dommageable, durablement ou non, à l’environnement et avoir un effet nuisible sur la santé humaine. 2 Les infractions contre la forêt, la faune et la pêche La protection de la nature, la préservation des espèces animales et végétales et de leurs habitats, le maintien des équilibres biologiques et des écosystèmes, et la conservation de la diversité biologique et génétique contre toutes les causes de dégradation et des menaces d’extinction sont d’intérêt national. Il est du devoir des pouvoirs publics et de chaque citoyen de veiller à la sauvegarde du patrimoine naturel4 qui, selon ce qui précède, est entre autres constitué de la forêt, de la faune et des ressources halieutiques. 2.1 Les atteintes à la forêt La forêt se définit comme l’ensemble des terrains comportant une couverture végétale dans laquelle prédominent les arbres, arbustes et autres espèces susceptibles de fournir des produits autres qu’agricoles. La protection du patrimoine forestier est garantie par l’État.5 Ce patrimoine forestier est constitué des domaines forestiers permanent ou non permanent. Le domaine forestier non permanent est constitué de terres forestières susceptibles d’être affectées à des utilisations autres que forestières. Le domaine forestier permanent, encore appelé forêts permanentes ou forêts classées, est constitué de terres définitivement affectées à la forêt et/ou à l’habitat de la faune. Sont considérées comme en faisant partie les forêts domaniales et les forêts communales. Ces forêts permanentes doivent couvrir au moins 30% de la superficie totale du territoire national et représenter la diversité écologique du pays. Chaque forêt permanente doit faire l’objet d’un plan d’aménagement arrêté par l’administration compétente.6 ____________________ 4 Loi n° 96/12 du 5 août 1996 portant loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement, article 62. 5 Loi n° 94/01 du 20 janvier 1994 portant régime des forêts, de la faune et de la pêche, articles 2 et 11. 6 (ibid.:articles 20-22). LE DROIT PÉNAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT AU CAMEROUN 203 L’aménagement d’une forêt permanente se définit comme étant la mise en œuvre sur la base d’objectifs et d’un plan arrêtés au préalable, d’un certain nombre d’activités et d’investissements, en vue de la protection soutenue de produits forestiers et de services, sans porter atteinte à la valeur intrinsèque, ni compromettre la productivité future de ladite forêt, et sans susciter d’effets indésirables sur l’environnement physique et social. Cet aménagement comprend entre autres les opérations de reboisement et de régénération naturelle ou artificielle. La violation des prescriptions d’un plan d’aménagement d’une forêt permanente ou communautaire, ou la violation des obligations en matière d’installations industrielles, ou des réalisations des clauses des cahiers de charges entraîne soit la suspension, soit en cas de récidive, le retrait du titre d’exploitation ou le cas échéant, de l’agrément.7 Par ailleurs, du fait de la prédation de ses produits végétaux ligneux et non ligneux, de la demande en terrains agricoles et de la poussée de l’urbanisation, la forêt est en proie à de nombreuses atteintes qui sont réprimées par le droit camerounais. A titre d’exemple, il est interdit de provoquer, sans autorisation préalable, un feu susceptible de causer des dommages à la végétation du domaine forestier national. De même, tout feu tardif est interdit.8 En ce qui concerne le défrichement de tout ou partie d’une forêt domaniale, celui-ci ne peut se faire qu’en cas de déclassement total ou partiel de cette forêt. Le défrichement renvoie au fait de supprimer les arbres ou le couvert de la végétation naturelle d’un terrain forestier, en vue de lui donner une affectation non forestière, quels que soient les moyens utilisés à cet effet. Quels que soient les cas, la mise en œuvre de tout projet de développement susceptible d’entraîner des perturbations en milieu forestier est subordonnée à une étude préalable d’impact sur l’environnement.9 Il convient de rappeler que la réalisation d’un projet sans étude d’impact préalable, alors que celui-ci tombe dans le champ des projets le commandant, est punie d’une amende de 2,000,000 à 5,000,000 de francs CFA et d’une peine d’emprisonnement de six mois à deux ans.10 Au surplus, la mise en défens ou le classement des terrains en forêts domaniales entraînent l’interdiction de défricher ou d’exploiter les parcelles auxquelles ils s’appliquent. De même, l’affectation en zone à écologie fragile permet de réglementer l’utilisation des ressources naturelles desdits terrains. Un terrain peut être mis en défens, déclaré zone à écologie fragile, ou classés, selon les cas, forêt domaniale de protection, réserve écologique intégrale, sanctuaire ou réserve de faune, lorsque la ____________________ 7 (ibid.:articles 23, 64 et 65). 8 Décret n° 94/436/PM du 23 août 1995 fixant les modalités d’application des régimes des forêts, article 6. 9 Loi n° 94/01 du 20 janvier 1994 portant régime des forêts, de la faune et de la pêche, article 14-16. 10 Loi n° 96/12 du 5 août 1996 portant loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement, article 79. Frédéric FOKA TAFFO 204 création ou le maintien d’un couvert forestier est reconnu nécessaire à la conservation des sols, à la protection des berges d’un cours d’eau, à la régulation du régime hydrique ou à la conservation de la diversité biologique.11 Les auteurs des infractions aux mesures de protection des forêts ci-dessus présentées sont pénalement responsables et passibles des peines prévues à cet effet. La loi de 1994 sur les forêts au-delà de la responsabilité pénale individuelle, consacre également la responsabilité pénale des personnes morales pour toutes les infractions contre la forêt, la faune et les produits halieutiques. Comme autre innovation, les administrations chargées des forêts, de la pêche et de la faune sont civilement responsables des actes de leurs employés commis dans l’exercice ou à l’occasion de l’exercice de leurs fonctions.12 De façon plus concrète, il est prévu une peine d’emprisonnement de dix jours et une amende de 5,000 à 50,000 francs CFA à l’encontre des auteurs des infractions telles que l’allumage d’un incendie dans une forêt du domaine national ; la circulation sans autorisation à l’intérieur d’une forêt domaniale ; l’exploitation par autorisation personnelle de coupe dans une forêt du domaine national pour une utilisation lucrative, ou au-delà de la période ou de la quantité accordée ; le transfert ou la cession d’une autorisation personnelle de coupe.13 Les peines sont un peu plus rigoureuses et varient entre vingt jours et deux mois d’emprisonnement et une amende de 50,000 à 200,000 francs CFA pour les personnes auteurs des violations des normes relatives à l’exploitation des produits forestiers spéciaux ; l’exploitation par permis, dans une forêt du domaine national, de produits forestiers non autorisés, ou au-delà des limites du volume attribué et / ou de la période accordée en violation de la loi ; le transfert ou la cession d’un permis d’exploitation en violation de la loi ; et l’abattage sans autorisation d’arbres protégés en violation de la loi.14 Au surplus, sont également punis le défrichement ou l’allumage d’un incendie dans une forêt, une zone mise en défense ou à écologie fragile ou d’affectation à une vocation autre que forestière d’une forêt appartenant à un particulier en violation de la loi ; l’exploitation forestière non autorisée dans une forêt du domaine national ou communautaire en violation de la loi ; l’exploitation par vente de coupe dans une forêt du domaine national au-delà des limites de l’assiette de coupe délimitée et/ou la période accordée en violation de la loi ; la non délimitation des licences d’exploitation forestière et assiettes de coupe en cours ; l’usage frauduleux, la contrefaçon ou la destruction des marques, marteaux forestiers, bornes ou poteaux utilisés ____________________ 11 Loi n° 94/01 du 20 janvier 1994 portant régime des forêts, de la faune et de la pêche, article 17. Voir aussi décret n° 94/436/PM du 23 août 1995 fixant les modalités d’application des régimes des forêts, article 3. 12 (ibid.:articles 150 et 153). 13 (ibid.:article 154). 14 (ibid.:article 155). LE DROIT PÉNAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT AU CAMEROUN 205 par les administrations chargées des forêts, de la faune et de la pêche. Les auteurs de ces infractions encourent une peine d’emprisonnement d’un mois à six mois et une amende de 200,000 à 1,000,000 de francs CFA.15 La peine d’amende est de 1,000,000 à 3,000,000 de francs CFA et la peine d’emprisonnement est de six mois à un an en cas d’exploitation par vente de coupe, dans une forêt domaniale, au-delà des limites de l’assiette de coupe délimitée et/ou du volume et de la période accordée en violation de la loi ; et en cas d’exploitation frauduleuse par un sous-traitant dans le cadre d’un contrat de sous-traitance s’exerçant dans une forêt domaniale en violation de la loi. Ces différentes peines sont aggravées pour des infractions quasi similaires mais contrevenant à des dispositions légales différentes. L’amende peut alors aller de 3,000,000 à 10,000,000 de francs CFA et d’un an à trois ans d’emprisonnement.16 Les peines ci-dessus prévues sont doublées en cas de récidive, en cas d’implication d’un officier de police judiciaire ou avec sa complicité ; et en cas de violation d’une barrière de contrôle forestier.17 2.2 Les atteintes à la faune La faune peut être définie comme l’ensemble des espèces faisant partie de tout écosystème naturel ainsi que toutes les espèces animales ayant été prélevées du milieu naturel à des fins de domestication. Ces espèces animales vivant sur le territoire du Cameroun sont réparties en trois classes de protection A, B et C. Les espèces animales relevant de la classe A sont intégralement protégées et ne peuvent, en aucun cas, être abattues. Toutefois, leur capture ou détention est subordonnée à l’obtention d’une autorisation délivrée par l’administration chargée de la faune. Les espèces de classe B bénéficient d’une protection, mais peuvent être chassées, capturées ou abattues après obtention d’un permis de chasse. Enfin, les espèces de la classe C sont partiellement protégées. Nonobstant ce qui précède, la chasse de certains animaux peut être fermée temporairement sur tout ou partie du territoire national par l’administration chargée de la faune.18 Avant de s’appesantir sur les dispositions encadrant et réprimant la chasse et les méthodes de chasse, il est au premier chef intéressant de noter que les atteintes à la faune n’impliquent pas que celles qui sont liées au braconnage, mais également celles qui peuvent porter atteinte à la santé ou à l’intégrité physique des animaux. En effet, la protection de la nature, la préservation des espèces animales et végétales et ____________________ 15 (ibid.:article 156). 16 (ibid.:articles 157 et 158). 17 (ibid.:article 162). 18 (ibid.:articles 3, 78 et 79). Frédéric FOKA TAFFO 206 de leurs habitats, le maintien des équilibres biologiques et des écosystèmes, et la conservation de la diversité biologique et génétique contre toutes les causes de dégradation et les menaces d’extinction sont d’intérêt national. Il est du devoir des pouvoirs publics et de chaque citoyen de veiller à la sauvegarde du patrimoine naturel.19 Par conséquent, la production, la distribution ou l’utilisation d’engrais contenant des substances nocives à la santé animale est une infraction.20 De même, est puni d’une amende de 5,000,000 à 25,000,000 de francs CFA et d’un emprisonnement d’un mois à deux ans, tout titulaire d’un titre minier, d’un permis ou d’une autorisation qui mènent des activités sans veiller à la protection de la faune et de la flore.21 Au surplus, il est interdit de déverser dans le domaine forestier national, ainsi que dans les domaines public, fluvial, lacustre et maritime, un produit toxique ou déchet industriel susceptible de détruire ou de modifier la faune et la flore.22 A ces mesures protégeant la santé animale se greffent d’autres règles juridiques qui ont pour but de réglementer les méthodes et procédés de chasse. Ainsi, tout procédé de chasse, même traditionnel, de nature à compromettre la conservation de certains animaux peut être interdit ou réglementé par l’administration chargée de la faune. Qui plus est, sauf autorisation spéciale de ladite administration, sont interdites les méthodes telles que la poursuite, l’approche et le tir de gibier en véhicule à moteur ; la chasse nocturne, notamment la chasse au phare, à la lampe frontale et, en général, au moyen de tous les engins éclairants conçus ou non à des fins cynégétiques ; la chasse à l’aide des drogues, d’appâts empoisonnés, de fusils anesthésiques et d’explosifs ; la chasse à l’aide d’engin non traditionnel ; la chasse au feu ; l’importation, la vente et la circulation des lampes de chasse ; la chasse au fusil fixe et au fusil de traite ; la chasse au filet moderne. Concernant les armes de chasse, est prohibée toute chasse effectuée au moyen d’armes ou de munitions de guerre composant ou ayant composé l’armement réglementaire des forces militaires ou de police. Il en est de même pour toute chasse effectuée à l’aide d’armes à feu susceptibles de tirer plus d’une cartouche sous une seule pression de la détente ; de projectiles contenant des détonants ; de tranchées ou de fusils de traite ; et de produits chimiques.23 L’exercice du droit de chasse est subordonné à l’octroi d’un permis ou d’une licence de chasse qui est personnelle et incessible. Est considéré comme acte de chasse, toute action visant à poursuivre, tuer, capturer un animal sauvage ou guider ____________________ 19 Loi n° 96/12 du 5 août 1996 portant loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement, article 62. 20 Loi n° 2003/007 du 10 juillet 2003 régissant les activités du sous-secteur engrais au Cameroun, article 17. 21 Loi n° 001-2001 du 16 avril 2001 portant Code minier, articles 87 et 107. 22 Loi n° 94/01 du 20 janvier 1994 portant régime des forêts, de la faune et de la pêche, article 18. 23 (ibid.:articles 80, 81 et 106). LE DROIT PÉNAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT AU CAMEROUN 207 des expéditions à cet effet ; et le fait de photographier et filmer des animaux sauvages à des fins commerciales. La chasse traditionnelle est autorisée sur toute l’étendue du territoire, sauf dans les forêts domaniales pour la concession de la faune et dans les propriétés des tiers.24 Les interdictions concernant les actes de chasse ne s’appliquent pas aux actes de légitime défense. En effet, personne ne peut être sanctionné pour un fait d’acte de chasse contre un animal protégé, commis dans la nécessité immédiate de sa défense, de celle de son cheptel domestique et / ou celle de ses cultures. La légitime défense existe toutes les fois où des animaux constituent un danger pour les personnes et / ou les biens ou sont de nature à leur causer des dommages. La preuve de la légitime défense, ainsi que les trophées résultant de cet acte, doivent être fournis dans un délai de soixante-douze heures au responsable de l’administration chargée de la faune le plus proche.25 Concernant les peines, les infractions ci-dessus présentées peuvent être, suivant les cas, punies d’une amende de 5,000 à 10,000,000 francs CFA et d’un emprisonnement de dix jours à trois ans ; ou doublées en cas de récidive ou de complicité avec les officiers de police judiciaire, ou de chasse à l’aide de produits chimiques ou toxiques.26 2.3 Les atteintes aux ressources halieutiques Les ressources halieutiques désignent les poissons, les crustacés, les mollusques et les algues issus de la mer, des eaux saumâtres et des eaux douces, y compris les organismes vivant appartenant à des espèces sédentaires dans ce milieu. L’activité d’exploitation de ces ressources est la pêche ou la pêcherie qui renvoie à la capture ou le ramassage des ressources halieutiques ou toute autre activité pouvant conduire à la capture, ou au ramassage desdites ressources, y compris l’aménagement et la mise en valeur des milieux aquatiques, en vue de la protection d’espèces animales par la maîtrise totale ou partielle de leur cycle biologique.27 Pour la protection et la sauvegarde de ces ressources, la loi interdit le déversement, l’immersion et l’incinération dans les eaux maritimes, de substances de toute nature susceptibles de porter atteinte à la santé de l’homme et aux ressources biologiques maritimes ; et de nuire aux activités maritimes, y compris l’aquaculture et la pêche.28 ____________________ 24 (ibid.:articles 85-87). Voir aussi décret n° 94/436/PM du 23 août 1995 fixant les modalités d’application des régimes des forêts, article 3. 25 (ibid.:articles 82-84). 26 (ibid.:articles 154-162). 27 (ibid.:articles 4 et 5). 28 Loi n° 96/12 du 5 août 1996 portant loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement, article 31. Voir aussi l’article 62 de la même loi. Frédéric FOKA TAFFO 208 Les différents types de pêche se distinguent suivant les moyens mis en œuvre pour obtenir des ressources halieutiques et les permis de pêche sont répartis en quatre types.29 Le droit de pêche dans le domaine maritime et le domaine public fluvial appartient à l’État. La pêche y est toutefois ouverte sous certaines conditions. L’exercice de la pêche est subordonné à l’obtention d’une licence en ce qui concerne la pêche industrielle, d’un permis de pêche en ce qui concerne les autres catégories de pêche, à l’exception de la pêche traditionnelle ou artisanale de subsistence.30 Toutefois, des restrictions peuvent être apportées à l’exercice du droit de pêche en vue notamment de garantir la protection de la faune et des milieux aquatiques, ainsi que celle de la pêche traditionnelle ; et de maintenir la production à un niveau acceptable.31 Pour ce faire, de nombreux procédés, méthodes ou engins de pêche sont proscrits. Il s’agit entre autres de l’utilisation d’engins traînant sur une largeur de trois mille marins à partir de la ligne de base (cette ligne de base est définie par le pouvoir réglementaire) ; de l’utilisation pour tous les types de pêche, de tous les moyens ou dispositifs de nature à obstruer les mailles de filets ou ayant pour effet de réduire leur action sélective, ainsi que le montage de tout accessoire à l’intérieur des filets de pêches, à l’exception des engins de protection fixés à la partie supérieure des filets, à condition que les mailles aient une dimension au moins double du maillage minimum autorisé et qu’ils ne soient pas fixés à la partie postérieure du filet ; et l’utilisation dans l’exercice de la pêche sous-marine fluviale, lagunaire, lacustre de tout équipement tel qu’un scaphandre autonome. Sont également interdites la pratique de la pêche à l’aide de la dynamite ou de tout autre explosif ou assimilé de substances chimiques, de poisons, de l’électricité ou de phares, d’armes à feu, de pièges à déclenchement automatique ou de tout autre appareil pouvant avoir une action destructrice sur la faune ou le milieu aquatique ; la capture, la détention et la mise en vente des ressources halieutiques protégées ou la pêche dans toute zone ou secteur interdit par l’administration chargée de la pêche.32 Les peines prévues pour ces pratiques hostiles aux ressources halieutiques sont les mêmes que celles prévues en cas d’atteintes à la faune tel que nous les avons présentées ci-haut. ____________________ 29 Loi n° 94/01 du 20 janvier 1994 portant régime des forêts, de la faune et de la pêche, articles 109 et 120. 30 (ibid.:articles 115 et 117). 31 (ibid.:article 126). 32 (ibid.:article 127). LE DROIT PÉNAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT AU CAMEROUN 209 3 Les infractions de pollution de l’eau, de l’atmosphère et du sol La pollution se définit entre autres comme : Les déchets produits ou détenus dans des conditions de nature à entraîner des effets nocifs sur le sol, la flore et la faune, à dégrader les sites ou les paysages, à vicier l’air ou les eaux et, d’une façon générale, à porter atteinte à la santé de l’homme ainsi qu’à l’environnement….33 Le droit camerounais prohibe et punit toute action qui résulte en la pollution de l’eau, de l’atmosphère, du sol ou du sous-sol. 3.1 Les atteintes à l’eau D’après la loi de 1998 portant régime de l’eau, « l’eau est un bien du patrimoine commun de la Nation dont l’État assure la protection et la gestion et en facilite l’accès à tous ». La protection dont il est ici question vise les eaux de surface, les eaux souterraines, les eaux de source et les eaux minerals.34 La loi enjoint toute personne physique ou morale, propriétaire d’installations susceptibles d’entraîner la pollution des eaux, de prendre toutes les mesures nécessaires pour limiter ou en supprimer les effets. A ce titre, sont interdits le nettoyage et l’entretien des véhicules à moteur, des machines à combustion interne et d’autres engins similaires à proximité des eaux. De même, sont interdits ou soumis à autorisation préalable selon les cas, le rejet, le déversement, le dépôt, l’immersion ou l’introduction de manière directe ou indirecte dans les eaux de certaines substances nocives ou dangereuses.35 S’inscrivant dans le sens de la lutte contre la pollution des eaux, le Code pénal camerounais punit d’un emprisonnement de quinze jours à six mois et d’une amende de 5,000 à 1,000,000 de francs CFA celui qui, par son activité pollue une eau potable susceptible d’être utilisée par autrui.36 Les sanctions sont aggravées par la loi portant régime de l’eau à l’encontre de toute personne qui pollue et altère la qualité des eaux. Dans ce cas, la peine d’emprisonnement encourue est de cinq à quinze ans et d’une amende de 10,000,000 à 20,000,000 de francs CFA.37 Par conséquent, une interdiction absolue est prévue à l’encontre de tout déversement, écoulement, jet, infiltration, enfouissement, épandage, dépôt, direct ou indirect, dans les eaux de toute matière solide, liquide ou gazeuse et, en particulier, les déchets industriels, agricoles et atomiques. Cette interdiction vise de manière spécifique ces matières lorsqu’elles sont ____________________ 33 Cornu (2014:772). 34 Loi n° 98-005 du 14 avril 1998 portant régime de l’eau, article 2 et 3. 35 (ibid.:article 6 et 5). 36 Loi n° 2016/007 du 12 juillet 2016 portant Code pénal, article 261 (a). 37 Loi n° 98-005 du 14 avril 1998 portant régime de l’eau, article 16. Frédéric FOKA TAFFO 210 susceptibles d’altérer la qualité des eaux de surface ou souterraines ou des eaux de la mer dans les limites territoriales ; ou de porter atteinte à la santé publique ainsi qu’à la faune et la flore aquatiques ou sous-marines.38 L’interdiction et la répression de tout déversement dans les eaux des déchets toxiques sont réaffirmées par la loi portant régime des forêts, de la faune et de la pêche39 et par la loi-cadre sur l’environnement. Cette dernière loi interdit le déversement, l’immersion et l’incinération dans les eaux maritimes sous juridiction camerounaise, de substances de toute nature. Sont spécifiquement visées les substances susceptibles de porter atteinte à la santé de l’homme et aux ressources biologiques maritimes ; de nuire aux activités maritimes ; d’altérer la qualité des eaux maritimes ; et de dégrader les valeurs d’agrément et le potentiel touristique de la mer et du littoral.40 Sont également strictement interdits l’immersion, l’incinération ou l’élimination par quelque procédé que ce soit, des déchets dans les eaux continentales et/ou maritimes sous juridiction camerounaise.41 Toutes ces infractions de pollution et d’altération de la qualité des eaux sont punies d’une amende de 1,000,000 à 5,000,000 de francs et d’un emprisonnement de six mois à un an. Le montant maximal de ces peines est doublé en cas de récidive.42 La peine d’emprisonnement est cependant la même que celle mentionnée ci-dessus mais le montant des amendes réévalué de 10,000,000 à 50,000,000 de francs à l’encontre de tout capitaine de navire qui se rend coupable d’un rejet dans les eaux maritimes sous juridiction camerounaise d’hydrocarbures ou d’autres substances liquides nocives pour le milieu marin et qui constitue une pollution conformément aux dispositions de la loi-cadre sur l’environnement et aux conventions internationales auxquelles le Cameroun est partie.43 3.2 Les atteintes à l’atmosphère Les peines ci-dessus énoncées en cas de pollution d’une eau potable par le Code pénal s’appliquent également à celui qui, par son activité pollue l’atmosphère au point ____________________ 38 Loi n° 98-005 du 14 avril 1998 portant régime de l’eau, article 4. Voir aussi la loi n° 96/12 du 5 août 1996 portant loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement, articles 29 et 53. Voir également la loi n° 2003/003 du 21 avril 2003 portant protection phytosanitaire, article 36. 39 Loi n° 94/01 du 20 janvier 1994 portant régime des forêts, de la faune et de la pêche, article 161 (2). 40 Loi n° 96/12 du 5 août 1996 portant loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement, article 31. 41 (ibid.:article 49 et 50). 42 (ibid.:article 82). 43 (ibid.:article 83). LE DROIT PÉNAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT AU CAMEROUN 211 de le rendre nuisible à la santé publique.44 Ces peines s’appliquent également à celui qui, par maladresse, négligence ou inobservation des règlements, occasionne la pollution avant, pendant ou après un traitement phytosanitaire.45 Ces dispositions sont également applicables aux cas où le rejet dans l’air, l’eau ou le sol d’un polluant est soumis à une autorisation préalable et que ladite autorisation n’a pas été délivrée à la personne responsable du rejet dans l’atmosphère d’un agent pollutant.46 Les peines encourues dans ce cas sont une amende de 1,000,000 à 5,000,000 de francs et un emprisonnement de six mois à un an.47 De façon spécifique, ces peines sanctionnent celui qui porte atteinte à la qualité de l’air ou provoque toute forme de modification de ses caractéristiques susceptibles d’entraîner un effet nuisible pour la santé publique ou pour les biens. Elles sanctionnent également celui qui émet dans l’air toute substance polluante notamment les fumées, poussières ou gaz toxiques corrosifs ou radioactifs, au-delà des limites fixées par la réglementation en vigueur. Les peines ci-dessus indiquées sanctionnent enfin celui qui émet des odeurs qui, par leur concentration ou leur nature, s’avèrent particulièrement incommodantes pour l’homme.48 3.3 Les atteintes au sol et au sous-sol D’après la loi-cadre sur l’environnement, le sol, le sous-sol et les richesses qu’ils contiennent, en tant que ressources limitées, renouvelables ou non sont protégés contre toutes formes de dégradation. Ainsi, le législateur camerounais a prévu des mesures particulières de protection destinées à lutter contre la pollution du sol et de ses ressources par les produits chimiques, les pesticides et les engrais.49 C’est dans ce sens que la loi sur la protection phytosanitaire encourage l’utilisation des produits phytosanitaires sans danger pour la santé humaine, animale et pour l’environnement.50 Pour rendre cette mesure effective, l’importation ou l’exportation des végétaux ou produits végétaux, sols et milieux de culture contaminés par des organismes nuisibles est prohibée. Il en est de même de la détention des produits phytosanitaires obsoletes.51 ____________________ 44 Loi n° 2016/007 du 12 juillet 2016 portant Code pénal, article 261 (b). 45 Loi n° 2003/003 du 21 avril 2003 portant protection phytosanitaire, article 36. 46 Loi n° 96/12 du 5 août 1996 portant loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement, article 53. 47 (ibid.:article 82). 48 (ibid.:articles 21 et 60). 49 Loi n° 96/12 du 5 août 1996 portant loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement, articles 36 et 53. 50 Loi n° 2003/003 du 21 avril 2003 portant protection phytosanitaire, article 2. 51 (ibid.:articles 9 et 24). Frédéric FOKA TAFFO 212 La pollution des sols ne résultant pas uniquement de l’utilisation des produits phytosanitaires mais pouvant avoir des origines diverses et variées, le Code minier prohibe et punit également les techniques et méthodes d’exploitation minières non conformes aux nécessités de protection de l’environnement.52 Au surplus, la loi-cadre sur l’environnement punit d’une amende de 1,000,000 à 5,000,000 de francs CFA et d’un emprisonnement de six mois à un an celui qui pollue et dégrade les sols et soussols. Cette sanction vient se greffer à celle qui est prévue à l’encontre de toute personne qui réalise un projet nécessitant une étude d’impact sans avoir au préalable mener une étude visant à déterminer l’impact de ce projet sur l’environnement, notamment en termes de pollution et de dégradation des sols et sous-sols. Les contrevenants visés dans ce cas risquent un emprisonnement de six mois à deux ans et une amende de 2,000,000 à 5,000,000 de francs.53 Cette étude d’impact environnemental est notamment exigée en cas d’utilisation intensive d’engrais dans une exploitation agricole. En effet, l’utilisation intensive d’engrais dans une exploitation agricole est soumise à une évaluation préalable de l’état physique et chimique du sol. Cette évaluation de l’impact des engrais sur l’exploitation et sur l’environnement doit être faite régulièrement. Au-delà de cette obligation d’étude d’impact environnemental, un contrôle de la qualité des engrais utilisé est institué.54 Par conséquent, le refus de se prêter aux formalités de contrôle de la qualité des engrais ou de se soumettre aux procédures de contrôle de l’utilisation des engrais constitue une infraction. Il en est de même de la production, la distribution et/ou l’utilisation d’engrais contenant des substances nocives ou des propriétés nuisibles, même utilisées à faibles doses et pouvant porter atteinte à la santé humaine, animale et à l’environnement. Les personnes reconnues coupables de ces infractions encourent une peine d’emprisonnement d’un à cinq ans et une amende de 50,000 à 100,000,000 de francs CFA.55 4 Les autres infractions au droit à un environnement sain Les autres infractions au droit à un environnement sain dont il s’agit ici font référence à la gestion des déchets et des substances radioactives, les atteintes à la santé publique et les atteintes aux biens culturels. ____________________ 52 Loi n° 001/2001 du 16 avril 2001, articles 87 et 107. 53 (ibid.:article 82 et 79). L’article 79 est à lire conjointement avec l’article 17. 54 Loi n° 2003/007 du 10 juillet 2003 régissant les activités du sous-secteur engrais au Cameroun, articles 6, 7 et 9. 55 (ibid.:article 17 et 18). LE DROIT PÉNAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT AU CAMEROUN 213 4.1 La gestion des déchets et des substances radioactives Le législateur camerounais dispose de manière assez rigoureuse sur la protection de l’homme et de de son environnement contre les risques susceptibles de découler de l’utilisation, soit d’une substance radioactive, ou de l’exercice d’une activité impliquant une radio exposition. Ainsi, le régime de protection offert par la loi sur la radioprotection vise entre autres la préservation de l’air, de l’eau, du sol, de la flore et de la faune ; et la préservation ou la limitation des activités susceptibles de dégrader l’environnement.56 Les peines prévues par cette loi sont assez dures et peuvent aller d’un emprisonnement de cinq à vingt ans et d’une amende de 200,000 à 20,000,000 de francs CFA pour tout contrevenant aux dispositions de la loi sur la radioprotection. Les infractions visées sont le fait de provoquer, par négligence ou par imprudence, une exposition aux rayonnements ionisants ou un accident nucléaire ; et le fait d’exercer, sans autorisation préalable, des activités relatives au cycle du combustible nucléaire ainsi que l’installation de dispositifs et d’équipements nucléaires. Il s’agit également du fait de détruire, aux fins de sabotage, tout ou partie d’une installation radioactive ou d’une installation nucléaire. Cette dernière infraction est passible de la peine de mort.57 Le traitement, le rejet et l’élimination des déchets radioactifs sont régis par la législation portant sur les déchets toxiques, radioactifs et dangereux.58 Cette législation prévoit également la peine de mort pour toute personne non autorisée qui procède à l’introduction, à la production, au stockage, à la détention, au transport, au transit ou au déversement sur le territoire camerounais des déchets toxiques et/ou dangereux sous toutes leurs formes. De même, elle punit d’un emprisonnement de cinq à dix ans et d’une amende de 5,000,000 de francs CFA toute personne non autorisée qui ne procède pas à l’élimination immédiate des déchets toxiques et/ou dangereux générés par son entreprise.59 Le Code pénal, reprenant cette incrimination, élargit l’intervalle de l’amende susceptible d’être payée en disposant qu’elle peut aller de 5,000,000 à 500,000,000 de francs CFA.60 Ce montant qui paraît bien lourd vient faire écho à la peine de mort et démontre à suffisance l’attachement du législateur camerounais à protéger l’environnement et les citoyens camerounais de toute nuisance résultant du déversement des déchets toxiques, radioactifs ou dangereux. Notons cependant la perplexité du juge lorsqu’il est appelé à se prononcer sur cette infraction. Cette perplexité naît ____________________ 56 Loi n° 95/08 du 30 janvier 1995 portant sur la radioprotection. 57 (ibid.:articles 7 à 9). 58 (ibid.:article 13). 59 Loi n° 89-27 du 29 décembre 1989 portant sur les déchets toxiques et dangereux, article 4. 60 Loi n° 2016/007 du 12 juillet 2016 portant Code pénal, article 229-1. Frédéric FOKA TAFFO 214 du fait que pour les mêmes faits, la loi-cadre sur l’environnement prévoit une peine d’amende dont le plancher est fixé à 50,000,000 au lieu de 5,000,000 de francs même si le plafond reste quant à lui maintenu à 500,000,000 de francs CFA. Notons que d’après cette loi-cadre l’amende s’accompagne automatiquement d’une peine d’emprisonnement à perpétuité.61 Il ressort de tout ce qui précède que les déchets doivent être traités de manière écologiquement rationnelle afin d’éliminer ou de réduire leurs effets nocifs sur la santé de l’homme, les ressources naturelles, la faune et la flore, et sur la qualité de l’environnement en général. Il est ainsi mis à la charge de toute personne ou entité qui produit ou détient des déchets la charge de les éliminer ou de les recycler ellemême, ou de les faire éliminer ou recycler auprès des installations agréées par l’Administration, notamment celle en charge de l’environnement. En outre, ces personnes ou entités sont tenues d’assurer l’information du public sur les effets sur l’environnement et la santé publique des opérations de production, de détention, d’élimination ou de recyclage des déchets, ainsi que sur les mesures destinées à en prévenir ou à en compenser les effets préjudiciables.62 Ces déchets se rapportent à ceux qui sont produits sur le territoire national. Par conséquent, sont formellement interdits, compte dûment tenu des engagements internationaux du Cameroun, l’introduction, le déversement, le stockage ou le transit sur le territoire national des déchets produits hors du Cameroun.63 On peut donc souligner en conclusion qu’il est interdit de déverser dans le domaine forestier national, ainsi que dans les domaines public, fluvial, lacustre et maritime, un produit toxique ou déchet industriel susceptible de détruire ou de modifier la faune et la flore.64 Le Code minier lui aussi oblige tous les titulaires de titres miniers et de carrières à assurer une exploitation rationnelle des ressources minières en harmonie avec la protection de l’environnement. Ils doivent notamment veiller entre autres à la prévention ou à la minimisation de tout déversement dans la nature ; à la diminution des déchets dans la mesure du possible ; et à la disposition des déchets non recyclés d’une façon adéquate pour l’environnement et après information et agrément des Administrations chargées des mines et de l’environnement. Le défaut d’observer ces règles peut être puni d’une amende de 5,000,000 à 25,000,000 de francs CFA et d’un emprisonnement d’un mois à deux ans.65 ____________________ 61 Loi n° 96/12 du 5 août 1996 portant loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement, article 80. 62 (ibid.:articles 42 et 43). 63 (ibid.:article 44). 64 Loi n° 94/01 du 20 janvier 1994 portant régime des forêts, de la faune et de la pêche, article 18. 65 Loi n° 001-2001 du 16 avril 2001 portant Code minier, articles 87 et 107. LE DROIT PÉNAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT AU CAMEROUN 215 4.2 Les atteintes à la santé publique Il existe une connexité entre protection de la santé humaine et protection de l’environnement. L’on ne peut dès lors envisager de façon autonome les atteintes à l’environnement en occultant les atteintes à la santé humaine, causées directement ou incidemment par l’activité de l’homme sur l’environnement. C’est dans ce sens que la définition de l’environnement donnée par la Cour internationale de justice prend tout son sens vu qu’elle commande de protéger non seulement l’espace où vivent les êtres humains et dont dépend la qualité de leur vie et de leur santé, mais aussi de protéger directement la santé humaine.66 Sur ces prémisses, la loi sur la protection phytosanitaire prévoit que les traitements chimiques doivent être exécutés dans le respect des bonnes pratiques agricoles édictées par l’autorité compétente, afin de préserver la santé humaine et animale et de protéger l’environnement des dangers provenant de la présence ou de l’accumulation de résidus de produits phytosanitaires. Par conséquent, les méthodes de traitement des denrées stockées doivent garantir l’absence ou la présence à des teneurs tolérées, des résidus des produits phytosanitaires, et préserver les qualités organoleptiques des produits traités.67 Dans le même ordre d’idée, l’exploitation minière ne peut se faire sans veiller à la promotion ou au maintien de la bonne santé générale des populations. C’est ainsi qu’est puni d’une amende de 5,000,000 à 25,000,000 de francs CFA et d’un emprisonnement d’un mois à deux ans, celui qui se livre à des activités minières sans se conformer aux règles relatives aux mesures de sécurité et d’hygiène des populations et à la protection de l’environnement.68 La loi-cadre sur l’environnement met aussi à la charge de toute personne désireuse d’ouvrir un établissement classé l’obligation de mener une étude des dangers afin de déterminer notamment les risques pour l’environnement et le voisinage. Ces dangers sont entre autres ceux qui peuvent porter atteinte à la santé, la sécurité, la salubrité publique, l’agriculture, la nature et l’environnement en general.69 Cette même loi exige un contrôle sur toutes les substances chimiques nocives et/ou dangereuses qui, en raison de leur toxicité, ou de leur concentration dans les chaînes biologiques, présentent ou sont susceptibles de présenter un danger pour la santé humaine, le milieu naturel et l’environnement en général. L’Administration chargée de l’environnement est mandatée pour en surveiller la ____________________ 66 Voir note 1. 67 Loi n° 2003/003 du 21 avril 2003 portant protection phytosanitaire, article 19. Voir aussi la loi n° 2003/007 du 10 juillet 2003 régissant les activités du sous-secteur engrais au Cameroun, article 17. 68 Loi n° 001-2001 du 16 avril 2001 portant Code minier, articles 87 et 107, lus conjointement avec l’article 84. 69 Loi n° 96/12 du 5 août 1996 portant loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement, articles 55 (2) et 54. Frédéric FOKA TAFFO 216 production ou l’importation au Cameroun.70 Toute infraction aux dispositions de la loi sur l’importation, la production ou la détention et / ou l’utilisation des substances nocives ou dangereuses est sanctionnée d’une peine d’emprisonnement variant entre deux et cinq ans et d’une amende pouvant aller de 10,000,000 à 50,000,000 de francs CFA.71 Toujours dans le souci de préserver la santé humaine, les émissions de bruits et d’odeurs susceptibles de nuire à la santé de l’homme, de constituer une gêne excessive pour le voisinage ou de porter atteinte à l’environnement sont interdites.72 La peine encourue dans ce cas est de quinze jours à six mois d’emprisonnement et d’une amende de 5,000 à 1,000,000 de francs CFA pour celui qui, par son activité pollue l’atmosphère au point de la rendre nuisible à la santé publique. Cette peine est aggravée si celui-ci, par sa conduite, facilite la communication d’une maladie contagieuse et dangereuse ; auquel cas la peine d’emprisonnement varie de trois mois à trois ans.73 4.3 Les atteintes aux biens culturels D’après la loi-cadre sur l’environnement, la protection, la conservation et la valorisation du patrimoine culturel et architectural sont d’intérêt national et, à ce titre, font partie intégrante de la politique national de protection et de mise en valeur de l’environnement. Dans sa définition de l’environnement, cette la loi-cadre vise audelà de la géosphère, l’hydrosphère et l’atmosphère, les aspects culturels.74 Inclure les biens culturels dans la définition de l’environnement n’est pas étrange. Cornu, en définissant l’environnement, y inclut « la conservation des sites et monuments ».75 La Convention de l’UNESCO de 1972 rappelle la connexité entre les patrimoines culturel et naturel. Le patrimoine culturel est constitué entre autres des monuments (œuvres architecturales, de sculpture ou de peinture monumentales qui ont une valeur universelle exceptionnelle du point de vue de l’histoire, de l’art ou de la science) et des sites (œuvres de l’homme ou œuvres conjuguées de l’homme et de la nature, ainsi que les zones, y compris les sites archéologiques qui ont une valeur universelle ex- ____________________ 70 (ibid.:articles 57 (1) et 59 (1)). 71 (ibid.:article 81). 72 (ibid.:article 60(1)). 73 Loi n° 2016/007 du 12 juillet 2016 portant Code pénal, articles 261 et 260. 74 Loi n° 96/12 du 5 août 1996 portant loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement, articles 39 et 2. 75 Cornu (2014:408). LE DROIT PÉNAL DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT AU CAMEROUN 217 ceptionnelle du point de vue historique, esthétique, ethnologique ou anthropologique).76 Une fois ces préalables clairement posés, l’on comprend mieux les dispositions du Code pénal qui sanctionnent la dégradation des biens publics ou classés et les atteintes au patrimoine culturel et naturel national. Sur ces fondements, toute personne qui détruit ou dégrade soit un monument, statut ou tout autre bien destiné à l’utilité ou à la décoration publique et élevé par l’autorité publique ou avec son autorisation, soit un immeuble, objet mobilier, monument naturel ou site, inscrits ou classés, encourt une peine d’emprisonnement d’un mois à deux ans et une amende de 20,000 à 120,000 francs CFA.77 Les peines prévues pour la seconde infraction sont un emprisonnement de six mois à deux ans et une amende de 100,000 à 3,000,000 de francs CFA pour toute personne qui, entre autres et sans l’autorisation de l’autorité compétente, procède à la destruction, à la dégradation et à la pollution des biens culturels.78 5 Conclusion Il découle de l’ensemble de ce qui précède que le droit pénal de l’environnement est assez dense au Cameroun. En effet, il apparaît comme un déphasage déconcertant lorsque l’on observe la réalité de l’environnement au Cameroun après avoir pris connaissance de ce corpus de règle. Dans la réalité, les cours d’eau continuent d’être continuellement pollués aussi bien par les ménages que par les industries et les commerces sans qu’aucune sanction concrète ne soit prise à leur égard. La faible épaisseur du contentieux pénal de l’environnement au Cameroun est symptomatique de la méconnaissance ou de la défiance à l’égard de ce corps de règle qui, à l’évidence, est pourtant très dense. Par conséquent donc, le grand chantier de la protection de l’environnement au Cameroun, but et fin ultime de cet arsenal normatif, ne sera possible qu’à travers une mise en œuvre effective des normes qui ont été discutées cihaut. Toutefois, ceci suppose une appropriation de ces règles par les différents acteurs du processus judiciaire à savoir non seulement les juges, mais aussi les populations, les organisations de la société civile et les autorités municipales. Cette appropriation passe irrémédiablement par la sensibilisation, la formation et l’information aux nécessités de protéger l’environnement que ce soit au moyen d’actions individuelles ou collectives, ou à travers l’ouverture de procédures judiciaires à l’encontre de tous ceux qui attentent à la sécurité et à l’intégrité de l’environnement. ____________________ 76 Convention concernant la protection du patrimoine mondial culturel et naturel, article 1. 77 Loi n° 2016/007 du 12 juillet 2016 portant Code pénal, article 187. 78 (ibid.:article 187-1 (2)). Frédéric FOKA TAFFO 218 Bibliographie indicative Ambomo, M, 2013, Le juge pénal international face à la protection de l’environnement, 00-2013 Revue africain de droit de l’environnement, 57. Capo-Chichi, A, 2008, Le droit pénal de l’environnement dans l’espace francophone, dans : Actes de la Réunion constitutive du comité sur l’environnement de l’AHJUCAF, Porto-Novo, AH- JUCAF. Cornu, G, 2014, Vocabulaire juridique, 10e edition, Paris, PUF. Foka Taffo, F, 2016, La protection pénale internationale de l’environnement in Cahier africain des droits de l’homme, 13 Développement Durable en Afrique, 231. Fotso Chebou Kamdem, FV, 2015, La répression des infractions relatives à la protection de la nature dans les systèmes juridiques français et camerounais, Thèse de doctorat, Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3. Kiss, A, 2005, Du régional à l’universel : la généralisation des préoccupations environnementales, 60 Revue Internationale et stratégique, https://www.diplomatie.gouv.fr/IMG/pdf/0504-KISS- FR-2.pdf, consulté le 30 janvier 2018. Robert, P, 1993, Les défis du droit pénal de l’environnement : les régimes de responsabilité pénale de Sault Ste-Marie à Wholesale Travel, 34 (3) Les Cahiers du Droit, 803, https://www.erudit.org/fr/revues/cd1/1993-v34-n3-cd3796/043235ar.pdf, consulté le 30 janvier 2018. Thoca Fanikoua, F, 2012, La contribution du droit pénal de l’environnement à la répression des atteintes à l’environnement au Bénin, Thèse de doctorat, Université de Maastricht. SECTION 4 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN CAMEROON GESTION ENVIRONNEMENTALE AU CAMEROUN 221 CHAPITRE 9 : LE CADRE INSTITUTIONNEL DE LA GESTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT AU CAMEROUN Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 1 Introduction Le passage de la théorie à la pratique dans le processus de protection de l’environnement nécessite la création et le fonctionnement réel d’institutions adéquates sur le plan national. Si depuis les années soixante-dix déjà des institutions de protection de 1’environnement ont commencé à voir le jour sur le plan international, ce n’est qu’au cours de la dernière décennie du 20e siècle que le Cameroun a commencé à se doter d’institutions spécifiquement consacrées à cette cause. De manière très claire, la Constitution de 1996 dispose que « L’État veille à la défense et la promotion de l’environnement ».1 En dehors du Président de la République qui définit la politique nationale de l’environnement2, du gouvernement qui en assure la mise en œuvre3, du Parlement4 qui vote toutes les lois à l’instar de celles relatives à l’environnement et du pouvoir judiciaire qui doit rendre justice y compris dans le domaine de l’environnement, les institutions nationales de protection de l’environnement sont éparpillées et multiples. Dans cet éparpillement et cette multiplicité, la coordination entre institutions est inefficace. Cet état des choses peut se justifier soit par la jeunesse de certaines institutions soit par la nouveauté des prérogatives attribuées en matière environnementale à des institutions déjà anciennes. Même si on assiste à la montée de quelques institutions privées, l’œuvre de protection de l’environnement est surtout menée au sein des ____________________ 1 Voir le préambule de la Constitution de 1996. 2 Voir l’article 3 de la loi n° 96/12. 3 Selon la loi n° 96/12 le gouvernement élabore des stratégies, plans ou programmes nationaux pour assurer la conservation et l’utilisation durable des ressources de l’environnement. 4 Même si l’article 26 (2) de la Constitution de 1996 n’indique pas clairement l’environnement comme faisant partie du domaine de la loi, on peut considérer les dispositions relatives au régime domanial, foncier et minier et au régime des ressources naturelles (article 26 (2) d)) comme englobant toutes les questions environnementales. Par ailleurs, il convient de préciser que le Parlement camerounais a un Réseau des parlementaires pour la gestion durable des écosystèmes (REPAR). Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 222 institutions publiques. Parmi celles-ci, certaines se trouvent au niveau central du pouvoir de l’État et d’autres sont décentralisées. 2 Les institutions centrales de protection de l’environnement Parmi les institutions centrales, on peut distinguer les départements ministériels et des structures centrales de coordination. 2.1 Les départements ministériels Certains ministères ont une compétence générale en matière d’environnement, d’autres sont spécialisés dans des secteurs précis. 2.1.1 Les ministères ayant des compétences transversales C’est dans la mouvance de la conférence des Nations Unies sur l’environnement et le développement tenue en 1992 à Rio de Janeiro que le Cameroun se dote d’une structure ministérielle ayant une compétence générale en matière d’environnement. En effet, c’est par le décret n° 92/069 du 9 avril 1992 portant organisation du gouvernement que le Ministère de l’environnement et des forêts (MINEF) voit le jour pour la toute première fois au Cameroun ; ceci illustre la prise dc conscience suscitée auprès des pouvoirs publics par les préparatifs du Sommet de Rio. Ce nouveau ministère est organisé par le décret n° 92/265 du 29 décembre 1992 et se voit confier la gestion des secteurs qui, jusqu’alors, relevaient notamment du Ministère de l’agriculture, du Ministère du plan et de l’aménagement du territoire, du Ministère du tourisme...etc. Près de douze ans après sa création, le Ministère des forêts et de la faune est scindé en deux départements ministériels distincts :5 le Ministère des forêts et de la faune et le Ministère de l’environnement, de la protection de la nature et du développement durable.6 Le Ministère de l’environnement, de la protection de la nature et du développement durable est responsable de l’élaboration et de la mise en œuvre de la politique gouvernementale en matière d’environnement et de protection de la nature dans une ____________________ 5 Voir le décret n° 2004/320 du 8 décembre 2004 portant organisation du gouvernement. 6 C’est en 2011 que le ‘développement durable’ est ajouté dans la dénomination de ce Ministère par le décret n° 2011/408 du 9 décembre 2011 portant organisation du gouvernement. LE CADRE INSTITUTIONNEL DE LA GESTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 223 perspective de développement durable.7 Il est notamment chargé de la définition des modalités et des principes de gestion rationnelle et durable des ressources naturelles, de la définition des mesures de gestion environnementale en liaison avec les ministères et organismes spécialisés concernés, de l’élaboration des plans directeurs sectoriels de protection de l’environnement en liaison avec les départements ministériels intéressés, de la coordination et du suivi des interventions des organismes de coopération régionale ou internationale en matière d’environnement et de la nature en liaison avec le Ministère des relations extérieures et les administrations concernées, du suivi de la conformité environnementale dans la mise en œuvre des grands projets, de l’information du public en vue de susciter sa participation à la gestion, à la protection et à la restauration de l’environnement et de la nature, de la négociation des conventions et accords internationaux relatifs à la protection de l’environnement et de la nature et de leur mise en œuvre en liaison avec le Ministère des relations extérieures. Il exerce la tutelle sur l’Observatoire national sur les changements climatiques (ONACC). Quant au Ministère des forêts et de la faune il a également vu le jour en décembre 2004, sa mission est d’élaborer, de mettre en œuvre et d’éva1uer la politique de la nation en matière de forêt et de faune. Il est ainsi chargé de la gestion et de la protection des forêts du domaine national, de l’aménagement et de la gestion des aires protégées, de la mise au point et du contrôle de 1’exécution des programmes de régénération, de reboisement, d’inventaire et d’aménagement des forêts, du contrôle du respect de la réglementation dans le domaine de l’exploitation forestière par les différents intervenants, de l’application des sanctions administratives lorsqu’il y a lieu, de la liaison avec les organismes professionnels du secteur forestier, de l’aménagement et de la gestion des jardins botaniques, de la mise en application des conventions internationales ratifiées par le Cameroun en matière de faune de forêts et de chasse en liaison avec le Ministère des relations extérieures et du suivi des organisations sous régionales actives dans la préservation des écosystèmes. Il assure la liaison entre le gouvernement camerounais et l’Organisation internationale des bois tropicaux et la Commission des forêts d’Afrique centrale en relation avec le Ministère des relations extérieures. Par ailleurs, il exerce la tutelle sur l’Agence nationale de développement des forêts (ANAFOR), l’École nationale des eaux et forêts et l’École de faune de Garoua. ____________________ 7 Voir le décret n° 2012/431 du 1er octobre 2012 portant organisation du Ministère de l’environnement, de la protection de la nature et du développement durable. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 224 2.1.2 Les ministères ayant des compétences sectorielles Plusieurs départements ministériels à travers les missions qui leur sont assignées interviennent dans des secteurs précis de protection de l’environnement complétant ainsi les activités déployées par les deux ministères qui ont des compétences transversales. C’est ainsi que le Ministère de l’administration territoriale et de la décentralisation est, entre autres, responsable de la protection civile ;8 à ce titre, il assure l’élaboration, la mise en œuvre et le suivi de la réglementation et des normes en matière de prévention, de gestion des risques et des calamités naturelles ainsi que la coordination des actions nationales et internationales en cas de catastrophe naturelle. Le Ministère de l’agriculture s’occupe, entre autres, du génie rural, de la protection phytosanitaire des végétaux, de la planification des programmes d’amélioration du cadre de vie en milieu rural et de l’élaboration et du suivi de la réglementation du secteur agricole. Il assure la liaison entre le gouvernement et l’Organisation des Nations unies pour l’agriculture et l’alimentation, le Fonds international du développement agricole ainsi que le Programme alimentaire mondial en collaboration avec le Ministère des relations extérieures. Il exerce la tutelle sur la Chambre d’agriculture, des pêches, de l’élevage et des forêts (CAPEF) et sur plusieurs entreprises publiques du secteur agricole.9 Le Ministère des arts et de la culture est responsable, entre autres, de la préservation des sites et monuments historiques, des musées, et de la protection du patrimoine culturel.10 Le Ministère de l’habitat et du développement urbain est chargé, entre autres, du suivi de l’application des normes en matière d’assainissement et de drainage et du suivi du respect des normes en matière d’hygiène et de salubrité, d’enlèvement et de traitement des ordures ménagères.11 Le Ministère des domaines, du cadastre et des affaires foncières est en charge, entre autres, de l’élaboration des textes législatifs et réglementaires relatifs aux secteurs domaniaux, cadastraux et fonciers, de la gestion du domaine public et du domaine privé de l’État, de la gestion du domaine national et des propositions d’affectation, de la protection des domaines public et privé de l’État contre toute atteinte, en liaison avec les administrations concernées.12 ____________________ 8 Voir l’article 8 (5) b, du décret n° 2011/408 du 9 décembre 2011. 9 Voir l’article 8 (7) du même décret. 10 Voir l’article 8 (8) du même décret. 11 Voir l’article 8 (23) du même décret. 12 Voir l’article 8 (11) du même décret. LE CADRE INSTITUTIONNEL DE LA GESTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 225 Le Ministère de l’élevage, des pêches et des industries animales est chargé, entre autres, de l’élaboration et de la mise en œuvre de la politique du gouvernement en matière d’élevage, des pêches et de développement des industries animales et halieutiques. Il assure la tutelle de la société de développement et d’exploitation des productions animales, de la mission de développement de la pêche artisanale maritime et du laboratoire national vétérinaire.13 Le Ministère de l’eau et de l’énergie a pour mission d’élaborer, de mettre en œuvre et d’évaluer la politique de l’État en matière de production, de transport et de distribution de l’énergie et de l’eau. À ce titre, il est chargé de l’élaboration des stratégies et des plans gouvernementaux en matière d’alimentation en eau et en énergie, de la prospection, de la recherche et de l’exploitation des eaux en milieu urbain et rural, de l’amélioration quantitative et qualitative de la production d’eau et d’énergie, de la promotion des investissements dans les secteurs de l’eau et de l’énergie en liaison avec le Ministère de l’économie, de la planification et de l’aménagement du territoire et les administrations concernées, de la promotion des énergies nouvelles en liaison avec le Ministère de la recherche scientifique et de l’innovation, de la régulation de l’utilisation de l’eau dans les activités agricoles, industrielles et sanitaires en liaison avec les administrations concernées, du suivi de la gestion des bassins d’eau, du suivi de la gestion des nappes phréatiques, du suivi du secteur pétrolier et gazier aval, et du suivi des entreprises de régulation dans les secteurs de l’eau et de l’énergie. Il exerce la tutelle sur les établissements et les sociétés de production, de transport, de distribution et de régulation de l’eau, de l’électricité, du gaz et du pétrole.14 Le Ministère des mines, de l’industrie et du développement technologique a pour mission d’élaborer des stratégies de développement des industries en valorisant les ressources naturelles et les mines du pays. Il est chargé de l’élaboration de la cartographie minière, de la prospection géologique et des activités minières, de la valorisation des ressources minières, pétrolières et gazières, de la gestion des ressources naturelles minières et gazières, du suivi du secteur pétrolier amont, de la promotion de l’industrie locale, du développement des zones industrielles, de la promotion des investissements dans le secteur des mines, de l’industrie et du développement technologique en relation avec le Ministère de l’économie, de la planification et de l’aménagement du territoire et les administrations concernées, de l’élaboration et de la mise en œuvre du plan d’industrialisation du pays, de la transformation locale des produits miniers, agricoles et forestiers en relation avec le Ministère de l’agriculture et du développement rural et du Ministère des forêts et de la faune, du développement technologique en relation avec le Ministère de la recherche scientifique et de ____________________ 13 Voir l’article 8 (15) du même décret. 14 Voir l’article 8 (12) du même décret. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 226 l’innovation, de la veille technologique en matière industrielle en liaison avec les administrations concernées, de la promotion et de la défense d’un label de qualité pour les produits destinés au marché local et à l’exportation en relation avec les administrations concernées, du suivi des activités de l’Office national des zones franches industrielles et de la mission d’amenagement et de gestion des zones industrielles et du suivi des normes et de la qualité en liaison avec les administrations concernées. Il exerce la tutelle sur les sociétés publiques ou parapubliques intervenant dans son secteur de compétence, des organismes d’intervention et d’assistance aux industries et des sociétés d’encadrement du secteur minier, notamment : l’Agence des normes et de la qualité (ANOR), l’Office national des zones franches industrielles, la Chambre de commerce, d’industrie, des mines et de l’artisanat (CCIMA), et la Mission d’aménagement et de gestion des zones industrielles.15 Le Ministère l’économie, de la planification, et de l’aménagement du territoire est chargé, en matière d’aménagement du territoire, de la coordination et de la réalisation des études d’aménagement du territoire, tant au niveau national que régional, du suivi de l’élaboration des normes et règles d’aménagement du territoire et du contrôle de leur application, du suivi et du contrôle de la mise en œuvre des programmes nationaux, régionaux ou locaux d’aménagement du territoire, du suivi des organisations sous régionales s’occupant de l’aménagement en liaison avec les ministères concernés. Il suit les activités de la Commission du Bassin du Lac Tchad et de l’Autorité du Bassin du Niger.16 Le Ministère de la recherche scientifique et de l’innovation est responsable de l’élaboration et de la mise en œuvre de la politique du gouvernement en matière de recherche scientifique et d’innovation. Il exerce la tutelle sur plusieurs structures techniques qui jouent un rôle non négligeable dans la gestion de l’environnement. Il s’agit notamment de la Mission de promotion des matériels locaux, de l’Agence nationale de radio protection (ANRP) et des instituts de recherche tels que l’Institut de recherche agricole pour le développement, l’Institut de recherche géologique et minière, l’Institut de recherche des plantes médicinales, et l’Institut national de cartographie.17 Le Ministère de la santé publique ayant pour mission, entre autres, de veiller au développement des actions de prévention et de lutte contre les épidémies et des pandémies et de promouvoir la médecine préventive18, devra en principe mener des actions en direction de la protection de l’environnement et ce, d’autant plus qu’il doit ____________________ 15 Voir l’article 8 (26) du même décret. 16 Voir l’article 8 (13) du même décret. 17 Voir l’article 8 (30) du même décret. 18 Voir l’article 8 (32) du même décret. LE CADRE INSTITUTIONNEL DE LA GESTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 227 contribuer à la meilleure gestion des déchets médicaux et pharmaceutiques conformément à la réglementation en vigueur.19 Le Ministère du tourisme et des loisirs est, entre autres, en charge de l’inventaire et de la mise en valeur des sites touristiques. Il peut à ce titre promouvoir l’écotourisme. Le Ministère des transports est chargé, entre autres, de l’aviation civile, des navigations fluviale et maritime, des transports routiers et ferroviaires et de la météorologie. Il devra normalement jouer un rôle important dans la lutte contre la pollution dans les activités de transports. Il suit les affaires de l’Organisation mondiale de la météorologie.20 Le Ministère des travaux publics est, entre autres, chargé d’effectuer toutes études nécessaires à l’adaptation des infrastructures, des bâtiments publics et des routes aux écosystèmes locaux en liaison avec le Ministère chargé de la recherche scientifique, les institutions de recherche ou d’enseignement et de tout autre organisme compétent.21 La direction générale des douanes du Ministère des finances est chargée, entre autres, de la protection de l’environnement. 2.2 Les structures centrales de coordination et de consultation en matière de gestion de l’environnement Ce sont des organes qui regroupent plusieurs ministères et d’autres institutions publiques ou privées. Ces structures contribuent à l’harmonisation et à la coordination de la politique gouvernementale en matière d’environnement. On peut y classer notamment, le Comité interministériel de l’environnement, la Commission nationale consultative pour l’environnement et le développement durable et le Comité national de l’eau. 2.2.1 Le Comité interministériel de l’environnement Placé auprès du ministre charge de l’environnement,22 ce Comité assiste le gouvernement dans ses missions d’élaboration, de coordination, d’exécution et de contrôle ____________________ 19 Voir l’arrêté n° 003/MINEPDED du 15 octobre 2012 fixant les conditions spécifiques de gestion des déchets médicaux et pharmaceutiques. 20 Voir l’article 8 (32) du décret n° 2011/408. 21 Voir l’article 8 (37) du même décret. 22 Voir le décret n° 2001/718/PM du 3 septembre 2001 créant ce Comité. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 228 des politiques nationales en matière d’environnement et de développement durable. À ce titre, il doit : • veiller au respect et à la prise en compte des considérations environnementales notamment dans la conception et la mise en œuvre des plans et programmes économiques, énergétiques et fonciers ; • approuver le rapport bisannuel sur l’état de l’environnement établi par l’administration chargée de l’environnement ; • coordonner et orienter l’actualisation du Plan national de gestion de l’environnement ; • donner un avis sur toute étude d’impact sur l’environnement ; et • assister le gouvernement dans la prévention et la gestion des situations d’urgence ou de crise pouvant constituer des menaces graves pour l’environnement ou pouvant résulter de sa dégradation. Présidé par une personnalité nommée par le ministre en charge de l’environnement, ce Comité se réunit en tant que de besoin et au moins une fois par trimestre sur convocation de son président. Son secrétariat est assuré par la direction du développement des politiques environnementales. 2.2.2 La Commission nationale consultative pour l’environnement et le développement durable Cette commission assiste le gouvernement dans le domaine de l’élaboration de la politique nationale relative à l’environnement et au développement durable, ainsi que dans la coordination et le suivi de la mise en œuvre de ladite politique.23 À ce titre, elle doit : • veiller sur la réalisation des activités découlant de l’Agenda 21 telles qu’adoptée à l’issue de la conférence des Nations Unies sur l’environnement et le développement ; • assurer l’évaluation des progrès accomplis dans l’exécution des engagements souscrits par le gouvernement dans le cadre de l’Agenda 21 ; • analyser les divers rapports établis dans le cadre du suivi de l’application des différentes conventions internationales relatives à l’environnement et au développement durable ; et • préparer les contributions du gouvernement destinées à la commission de développement durable de l’ONU et en exploiter les comptes rendus et recommandations. ____________________ 23 Voir le décret n° 94/259/PM du 31 mai 1994 créant cette commission. LE CADRE INSTITUTIONNEL DE LA GESTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 229 Présidée par le Premier ministre ou, sur délégation de ce dernier, par le ministre en charge de l’environnement, cette commission comprend des représentants de plusieurs ministères, des églises, de l’islam, des ONG, du Parlement, de la CCIMA et de la CAPEF. Cette commission se réunit deux fois par an en session ordinaire sur convocation du président et peut aussi se réunir en session extraordinaire. 2.2.3 Le Comité national de l’eau Le comité national de l’eau est institué par la loi n° 98/005 du 14 avril 1998, en son article 26. Il a été organisé par un texte réglementaire en 200124 qui abroge le décret n° 85/758 du 30 mai 1985 créant déjà à l’époque un comité national de l’eau au Cameroun. Il est chargé d’étudier et de proposer au gouvernement les mesures et actions tendant à assurer la conservation, la protection et l’utilisation durables de l’eau, d’émettre des avis sur des problèmes concernant l’eau, et de proposer aussi des mesures qui concourent à la gestion rationnelle de l’eau. Présidé par le ministre de l’eau, ce comité comprend des représentants des ministères chargés des finances, de la santé publique, de l’environnement, de l’aménagement du territoire, de l’urbanisme et habitat, de l’administration territoriale, de l’agriculture, des pêches, de la météorologie, du développement industriel et du commerce. Les concessionnaires des services publics de l’eau et de l’électricité en sont aussi membres ainsi que le président de la CAPEF et un représentant de l’association des maires. 2.2.4 Le Comité national Man and the Biosphere Ce comité a été créé en février 2017 par le Premier ministre.25 Il est un organe consultatif placé sous l’autorité du ministre chargé de la faune et a pour mission de trouver un équilibre durable entre les nécessités de conservation de la diversité biologique, de promotion du développement économique et de sauvegarde des valeurs sociales et culturelles associées. De manière spécifique, ce comité est chargé de soumettre au gouvernement les recommandations du conseil international de coordination du programme sur l’homme et la biosphère au sujet des sites inscrits sur la liste du réseau mondial des réserves de biosphère, de veiller à la cohérence et à ____________________ 24 Voir le décret n° 2001/161/PM du 8 mai 2001 fixant les attributions, l’organisation et le fonctionnement du Comité national de l’eau. 25 Voir le décret n° 2017/0593/PM du 15 février 2017 portant création, organisation et fonctionnement du Comité national Man and the Biosphere. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 230 l’harmonisation des différentes interventions dans les réserves de biosphère, d’élaborer et d’actualiser le fichier national des réserves de biosphère, de promouvoir les échanges d’expertise, d’assurer le développement des systèmes de communication et de base des données du programme sur l’homme et la biosphère, d’assurer la promotion des activités du développement durable autour des sites des réserves de biosphère, de participer aux activités des réseaux régionaux et du réseau mondial des réserves de biosphère, de préparer les rapports à transmettre au comité international de coordination du programme sur l’homme et la biosphère. Présidé par le ministre de la faune assisté du ministre de l’environnement comme vice-président, ce comité comprend un représentant du Ministère en charge de la recherche scientifique, un représentant du ministère en charge de l’éducation de base, un représentant du ministère en charge de la culture, un représentant du ministère en charge de l’agriculture, un représentant du ministère en charge des pêches, un représentant du ministère en charge de l’enseignement supérieur, un représentant du ministère en charge de l’eau, un représentant du ministère en charge des transports, un représentant du ministère en charge des relations extérieures, un représentant du ministère en charge des domaines, deux représentants des organisations non gouvernementales opérant dans le domaine de la conservation et de l’environnement autour des sites de réserve de biosphère, un représentant de l’autorité traditionnelle des communautés vivant autour de chaque site de réserve de biosphère. 3 Les institutions décentralisées et les chambres consulaires 3.1 Les institutions de la décentralisation territoriales et les chefferies traditionnelles La décentralisation consiste en un transfert par l’État, aux collectivités territoriales décentralisées, des compétences particulières et de moyens appropriés.26 Les collectivités territoriales sont des personnes morales de droit public et ont pour mission de promouvoir le développement économique, social, sanitaire, éducatif, culturel et sportif. À ce titre, elles jouent un rôle dans la protection de l’environnement dans l’étendue de leurs différents territoires. La loi n° 2004/018 fixant les règles applicables aux communes et la loi n° 2004/19 fixant les règles applicables aux régions déterminent les compétences respectives des communes, des communautés urbaines et des régions en matière d’environnement. Ces lois viennent donc renforcer certaines dispositions de la loi n° 96/12 du 5 août 1996 sur la gestion de ____________________ 26 Voir l’article 1 de la loi n° 2004/17 du 22 juillet 2004 d’orientation de la décentralisation. LE CADRE INSTITUTIONNEL DE LA GESTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 231 l’environnement selon lesquelles les collectivités territoriales décentralisées assurent l’élimination des déchets produits par les ménages, conformément à la réglementation en vigueur.27 3.1.1 Les compétences des communes en matière d’environnement Les compétences suivantes sont transférées aux communes28 dans le domaine de l’environnement : • l’alimentation en eau potable ; • le nettoiement des rues, chemins et espaces publics communaux ; • le suivi et le contrôle de gestion des déchets industriels ; • les opérations de reboisement et la création de bois communaux ; • la lutte contre l’insalubrité, les pollutions et les nuisances ; • la protection des ressources en eaux souterraines et superficielles ; • l’élaboration de plans communaux d’action pour l’environnement ; • la création, l’entretien et la gestion des espaces verts, parcs et jardins d’intérêt communal ; • la gestion au niveau local des ordures ménagères ; • la création et l’aménagement d’espaces publics urbains ; • l’élaboration des plans d’occupation des sols, des documents d’urbanisme, d’aménagement concerté, de rénovation urbaine et de remembrement ; • l’organisation et la gestion des transports publics urbains ; • les opérations d’aménagement ; • la délivrance des certificats d’urbanisme, des autorisations de lotir, des permis d’implanter, des permis de construire et de démolir ; • l’aménagement et la viabilisation des espaces habitables ; • la création de zones d’activités industrielles ; et • l’autorisation d’occupation temporaire et de travaux divers. En l’absence d’un service de police municipale, le maire peut créer un service d’hygiène chargé de la police sanitaire dans la commune29 et le responsable d’un tel service doit prêter serment avant d’entrer en fonction,30 car sa mission est très proche du travail d’un officier de police judiciaire à compétence spéciale dans la mesure où il devra engager des procédures sanctionnant les infractions en matière d’hygiène et de salubrité. Cette formalité de prestation de serment rappelle l’exigence faite aux ____________________ 27 Voir l’article 46 de la loi n° 96/12 du 5 août 1996 relative à la gestion de l’environnement. 28 Loi n° 2004/018 du 22 juillet 2004, articles 16 et 17. 29 Voir l’article 92 (1) de la loi de 2004 sur les communes. 30 (ibid.). Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 232 agents publics appelés à exercer les fonctions d’inspecteurs ou de contrôleurs de l’environnement31. Le maire est chargé de la police municipale32 dont l’objet est d’assurer le bon ordre, la sûreté, la tranquillité, la sécurité et la salubrité de la localité où il a été élu.33 C’est dans ce sens que la loi n° 96/12 du 5 août 1996 portant loicadre sur la gestion de l’environnement indique que « les communes doivent prendre toutes mesures exécutoires destinées, d’office, à faire cesser le trouble » provoqué par des nuisances sonores ou olfactives, lorsque l’urgence le justifie.34 Enfin la loi n° 94/01 du 20 janvier 1994 portant régime des forêts, de la faune et de la pêche prévoit l’existence des forêts communales qui relèvent du domaine privé des communes concernées.35 La forêt communale est celle qui fait l’objet d’un acte de classement au profit d’une commune précise ou qui a été plantée par celle-ci. Les produits forestiers résultant de l’exploitation d’une forêt communale appartiennent exclusivement à la commune qui en est propriétaire. Par ailleurs, pour les zones urbaines, il est exigé des communes de respecter un taux de boisement au moins égal à 800 m2 d’espaces boisés pour 1,000 habitants.36 3.1.2 Les compétences des communautés urbaines en matière d’environnement Les compétences suivantes sont transférées à la communauté urbaine37 dans le domaine de l’environnement : • la création, l’entretien, la gestion des espaces verts, parcs et jardins communautaires ; • la gestion des lacs et rivières d’intérêt communautaire ; • le suivi et le contrôle de la gestion des déchets industriels ; • le nettoiement des voies et espaces publics communautaires ; • la collecte, l’enlèvement et le traitement des ordures ménagères ; • la création, l’aménagement, l’entretien, l’exploitation et la gestion des équipements communautaires en matière d’assainissement et des eaux usées et pluviales ; ____________________ 31 Voir le décret n° 2012/2808/PM du 26 septembre 2012 fixant les conditions d’exercice des fonctions d’inspecteur et de contrôleur de l’environnement. 32 Voir l’article 86 de la loi n° 2004/18 du 22 juillet 2004 fixant les règles applicables aux communes. 33 Voir l’article 87 de la loi n° 2004/18 du 22 juillet 2004. 34 Voir l’article 60 (3) de la loi n° 96/12. 35 Voir l’article 30 de la loi n° 94/01. 36 Voir l’article 33 de la loi n° 94/01. 37 Voir l’article 110 de la loi n° 2004/018 du 22 juillet 2004 fixant les règles applicables aux communes. LE CADRE INSTITUTIONNEL DE LA GESTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 233 • l’élaboration des plans communautaires d’action pour l’environnement, notamment en matière de lutte contre les nuisances et les pollutions, et en matière de protection des espaces verts ; • les opérations d’aménagement d’intérêt communautaire ; • la constitution des réserves foncières d’intérêt communautaire ; • la planification urbaine, les plans et schémas directeurs, les plans d’occupation des sols ou les documents d’urbanisme en tenant lieu. À cet effet, la communauté urbaine donne son avis sur le projet de schéma d’aménagement du territoire avant son approbation ; • la création, l’aménagement, l’entretien, l’exploitation et la gestion des voiries communautaires primaires et secondaires, de leurs dépendances et de leurs équipements, y compris l’éclairage public, la signalisation, l’assainissement pluvial, les équipements de sécurité et les ouvrages d’art ; et • la coordination des réseaux urbains de distribution d’énergie et d’eau potable. 3.1.3 Les compétences des régions en matière d’environnement Les compétences suivantes transférées aux régions38 dans le domaine de l’environnement : • la gestion, la protection et l’entretien des zones protégées et des sites naturels relevant de la compétence de la région ; • la mise en défens et autres mesures locales de protection de la nature ; • la gestion des eaux d’intérêt régional ; • la création de bois, forêts et des zones protégées d’intérêt régional suivant un plan dûment approuvé par le représentant de l’État ; • la réalisation de pare-feu et de mise à feu précoce, dans le cadre de la lutte contre les feux de brousse ; • la gestion des parcs naturels régionaux, suivant un plan soumis à l’approbation du représentant de l’État ; • L’élaboration, la mise en œuvre et suivi des plans ou schémas régionaux d’actions pour l’environnement ; • l’élaboration de plans régionaux spécifiques d’intervention d’urgence et de prévention des risques ; • la coordination des actions de développement ; ____________________ 38 Voir l’article 19 de la loi n° 2004/019 du 22 juillet 2004 fixant les règles applicables aux régions. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 234 • l’élaboration conformément au plan national, du schéma régional d’aménagement du territoire ; • la participation à l’élaboration des documents de planification urbaine et des schémas directeurs des collectivités territoriales ; et • le soutien à l’action des communes en matière d’urbanisme et d’habitat. 3.1.4 Les compétences des chefferies traditionnelles en matière d’environnement Selon la loi n° 96/12 portant loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement, les autorités traditionnelles ont compétence pour régler des litiges liés à l’utilisation de certaines ressources naturelles, notamment l’eau et le pâturage, sur la base des us et coutumes locaux.39 Lorsqu’un tel litige est réglé par une autorité traditionnelle, un procès-verbal est dressé et signé conjointement par ladite autorité et les parties concernées ou leurs représentants. Une copie dudit procès-verbal est déposée auprès de l’autorité administrative territorialement compétente. Le règlement d’un litige environnemental par l’autorité traditionnelle n’annule pas le droit des parties concernées de saisir les tribunaux compétents en cas de non-satisfaction. La compétence reconnue aux autorités traditionnelles pour régler certains litiges dans le domaine de l’environnement peut être considérée comme un renforcement du principe de subsidiarité en droit de l’environnement. Selon ce principe, lorsqu’il n’existe pas une règle juridique écrite, générale ou spéciale en matière de protection de l’environnement, la norme coutumière identifiée d’un terroir donné et adéquate pour protéger l’environnement s’applique.40 Bien entendu, l’autorité traditionnelle va appliquer les us et coutumes, puisque la loi le lui permet. Bien que ne faisant pas juridiquement partie des institutions de la décentralisation territoriale au Cameroun au sens de la loi sur la décentralisation, les chefferies traditionnelles que l’on considère toujours comme des auxiliaires de l’administration sont de véritables autorités locales jouissant d’une légitimité qui, dans la plupart des cas, ne dépend pas du pouvoir central, mais plutôt du terroir concerné. Ces autorités traditionnelles ne se retrouvent donc pas dans le registre de la déconcentration ; elles sont de facto administrativement décentralisées. ____________________ 39 Voir l’article 93 (1) de la loi n° 96/12. 40 Voir l’article 9 (f) de la loi n° 96/12. LE CADRE INSTITUTIONNEL DE LA GESTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 235 3.2 Les institutions de la décentralisation technique La décentralisation technique permet aux entités décentralisées, notamment les établissements publics, de gérer un service public en bénéficiant de la personnalité morale et de l’autonomie financière. Ces entités ne disposent que d’une compétence d’attribution qui correspond à l’objet du service public qui leur est confié. Dans le domaine de l’environnement, on peut dénombrer des entités comme l’ANAFOR, l’ANOR, l’ANRP et l’ONACC parmi les institutions de la décentralisation technique. 3.2.1 L’Agence nationale d’appui au développement forestier (ANAFOR) L’ANAFOR est une société à capital public ayant l’État comme actionnaire unique.41 Elle est dotée de la personnalité morale et de l’autonomie financière. L’ANAFOR a pour objet d’appuyer la mise en œuvre du programme national de développement des plantations forestières privées et communautaires. Pour cela, elle doit réaliser des études, planifier, suivre et évaluer le programme, coordonner, promouvoir, puis rechercher des financements nationaux et internationaux. Ensuite, elle doit fournir des semences et des plants aux opérateurs privés et communautaires, ainsi qu’un appuiconseil pour les projets de plantations. Enfin, elle est appelée à exécuter toute tâche qui lui est confiée par le ministère chargé des forêts, sa tutelle technique. 3.2.2 L’Agence nationale de radioprotection (ANRP) Créée en octobre 2002,42 l’ANRP est un établissement public administratif doté de la personnalité juridique et de l’autonomie financière. Il est sous la tutelle technique du ministère chargé de la recherche scientifique et sous la tutelle financière du Ministère des finances. L’ANRP a pour objet d’assurer la protection des personnes, des biens et de l’environnement contre les effets de rayonnements ionisants. De manière spécifique, ses missions consistent à : • proposer des normes en matière de radioprotection ; • enregistrer, examiner et soumettre à la tutelle, les demandes d’acquisition, de détention, de fabrication, de cession, de transformation, d’utilisation, ____________________ 41 Voir le décret n° 2002/156 de juin 2002 approuvant les statuts de l’Agence nationale d’appui au développement forestier. 42 Voir le décret n° 2002/250 du 31 octobre 2002 portant création, organisation et fonctionnement de l’Agence nationale de radioprotection. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 236 d’entreposage, de transport, d’importation, d’exportation de substances radioactives et sources radioactives, d’installation de dispositifs et équipements nucléaires ; • donner son avis sur les demandes d’autorisation d’exploration et d’extraction des minerais uranifères et de thorium dans le respect des dispositions du Code minier ; • exécuter les opérations de contrôle de qualité des équipements et faire des inspections destinées à vérifier au niveau de tout établissement utilisant des rayonnements ionisants ; • appliquer la réglementation en matière radiologique ; • mettre en place des dispositifs permettant de prévenir les accidents radiologiques ou intervenir en cas de besoin ; • proposer des plans d’urgence radiologique ; • enregistrer les données relatives à la dosimétrie de l’environnement et des milieux professionnels ; • soumettre à l’appréciation de l’autorité compétente, des recommandations sur les questions relatives à l’utilisation pacifique de l’énergie nucléaire ; • organiser la formation, acquérir et diffuser l’information et la documentation relatives à la radioprotection ; • développer avec les organismes nationaux et internationaux intéressés la coopération scientifique et technique en matière de radioprotection ; • émettre un avis sur les projets de textes législatifs ou réglementaires en matière de radioprotection ; et • offrir, dans le domaine de ses missions et de son expertise, des prestations aux administrations publiques ou aux particuliers à travers des études, des consultations ou encore en soumissionnant à des appels d’offres. 3.2.3 L’Agence des normes et de la qualité (ANOR) Créée en septembre 200943, l’ANOR est un établissement public administratif doté de la personnalité juridique et de l’autonomie financière. Elle est placée sous la tutelle technique du ministère chargé de l’industrie et sous la tutelle financière du ministère chargé des finances. La principale mission de cette agence est de contribuer à l’élaboration et à la mise en œuvre de la politique gouvernementale dans le domaine de la normalisation et de la qualité au Cameroun. À cet effet, elle est chargée d’élaborer et d’homologuer des normes, de certifier la conformité aux normes, de ____________________ 43 Voir le décret n° 2009/296 du 17 septembre 2009 portant création, organisation et fonctionnement de l’Agence des normes et de la qualité. LE CADRE INSTITUTIONNEL DE LA GESTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 237 promouvoir les normes et la qualité auprès des institutions publiques, parapubliques et privées, de suivre la coopération internationale en la matière, de conduire des études sur la normalisation, de proposer des mesures pour améliorer la qualité des produits et des services, et de diffuser des informations sur les normes et la qualité. L’ANOR publie annuellement un rapport sur la promotion des normes et de la qualité des produits et services au Cameroun adressé au ministre de l’industrie qui, à son tour, transmet une copie au Premier ministre et au Président de la République avec ses observations. Le Conseil d’administration de l’ANOR comprend des représentants de plusieurs départements ministériels44 à côté de ceux de la présidence de la république et des services du Premier ministre. On y trouve également des représentants du secteur privé, des associations des consommateurs et du personnel. La grande surprise dans la composition de ce conseil d’administration est l’absence d’un représentant du Ministère de l’environnement. Cette absence est très surprenante parce que le système national de normalisation comprend aussi des normes de protection de l’environnement45 et des préoccupations environnementales sont perceptibles dans la loi camerounaise relative à la normalisation.46 3.2.4 L’Observatoire national des changements climatiques (ONACC) Créé en décembre 200947, l’ONACC est un établissement public administratif doté de la personnalité juridique et de l’autonomie financière. Il est placé sous la tutelle technique du Ministère de l’environnement et sous la tutelle financière du Ministère des finances. Sa mission est de suivre et d’évaluer les impacts socio-économiques et environnementaux, des mesures de prévention, d’atténuation et/ou d’adaptation aux effets néfastes et risques liés à ces changements. Ainsi, il est spécifiquement chargé d’établir les indicateurs climatiques pertinents pour le suivi de la politique environnementale, de mener des analyses prospectives visant à proposer une vision sur l’évolution du climat, de fournir des données météorologiques et climatologiques à tous les secteurs de l’activité humaine concernés et de dresser le bilan climatique annuel du Cameroun. Par ailleurs, il est aussi chargé d’initier et de promouvoir des études sur la mise en évidence des indicateurs, des impacts et des risques liés aux changements climatiques, de collecter, analyser et mettre à la disposition des décideurs publics, privés ainsi que des différents organismes nationaux et internationaux, ____________________ 44 Tels que les ministères chargés notamment de l’industrie, du commerce, des finances, de l’économie, de la santé publique, de l’agriculture. 45 Article 5 (1) de la loi n° 96/11 du 5 août 1996 relative à la normalisation. 46 Voir, entre autres, l’article 7 de ladite loi. 47 Voir le décret n° 2009/410 du 10 décembre 2009 portant création, organisation et fonctionnement de l’Observatoire national des changements climatiques. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 238 les informations de référence sur les changements climatiques au Cameroun, d’initier toute action de sensibilisation et d’information préventive sur les changements climatiques, de servir d’instrument opérationnel dans le cadre des autres activités de réduction des gaz à effet de serre, de proposer au gouvernement des mesures préventives de réduction d’émission de gaz à effet de serre, ainsi que des mesures d’atténuation et/ou d’adaptation aux effets néfastes et risques liés aux changements climatiques, de servir d’instrument de coopération avec les autres observatoires régionaux ou internationaux opérant dans le secteur climatique, de faciliter l’obtention des contreparties dues aux services rendus au climat par les forêts à travers l’aménagement, la conservation et la restauration des écosystèmes et de renforcer les capacités des institutions et organismes chargés de collecter les données relatives aux changements climatiques, de manière à créer, à l’échelle nationale, un réseau fiable de collecte et de transmission desdites données. 3.3 Les chambres consulaires et l’assemblée consultative Les chambres consulaires sont une catégorie spécifique d’établissements publics, dotés de la personnalité juridique et de l’autonomie financière, chargés de représenter et de défendre les intérêts de leurs ressortissants auprès des pouvoirs publics. Elles assument des missions d’intérêt professionnel et des missions de service public48. Dans le cadre de leurs missions, les chambres consulaires comme la chambre d’agriculture, des forêts et des pêches et la chambre de commerce, d’industrie, des mines et de l’artisanat peuvent jouer un rôle non négligeable pour la bonne gestion de l’environnement. C’est d’ailleurs dans cette perspective que ces deux chambres consulaires ont des représentants au sein de la Commission nationale consultative pour l’environnement et du développement durable49 et le président de la chambre d’agriculture est membre du Comité national de l’eau.50 En dehors de ces chambres consulaires, il y a le Conseil économique et social qui est une assemblée consultative. ____________________ 48 Loi n° 2001/016 du 23 juillet 2001 fixant le statut des Chambres consulaires. 49 Voir le décret n° 94/259/PM du 31 mai 1994 portant création de ladite commission. 50 Voir le décret organisant le Comité national de l’eau. LE CADRE INSTITUTIONNEL DE LA GESTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 239 3.3.1 La chambre de commerce, d’industrie, des mines et de l’artisanat (CCIMA) Anciennement connue sous la dénomination de Chambre de commerce, d’industrie, des mines51, cette chambre consulaire a connu un changement de dénomination en 2001 en devenant la CCIMA.52 Elle est placée sous la tutelle du Ministère du commerce et son siège est fixé à Douala, contrairement à la plupart des institutions qui ont leurs sièges à Yaoundé. Son rôle auprès des pouvoirs publics est celui d’un organe consultatif qui représente les intérêts commerciaux, industriels, miniers et artisanaux. Elle est consultée, entre autres, sur les projets de lois et de textes réglementaires relatifs aux activités commerciale, industrielle, minière, artisanale et de prestations de services ainsi que sur toutes questions relevant de sa compétence dans lesdits secteurs. 3.3.2 La Chambre d’agriculture, des pêches, de l’élevage et des forêts du Cameroun (CAPEF) Antérieurement connue sous l’appellation de Chambre d’agriculture, de l’élevage et des forêts du Cameroun,53 cette chambre consulaire a connu un changement de dénomination en 2009 pour devenir la Chambre d’agriculture, des pêches, de l’élevage et des forêts du Cameroun en abrégé CAPEF.54 Cette Chambre est un établissement public doté de la personnalité juridique et de l’autonomie financière. Elle est placée sous la tutelle technique du ministre chargé de l’agriculture et sous la tutelle financière du ministre chargé des finances. Son siège est fixé à Yaoundé, au contraire de la chambre de commerce dont le siège est à Douala. C’est un organe consultatif qui représente les intérêts des professionnels de l’agriculture, de la pêche, de l’élevage, de la forêt et de la faune auprès des pouvoirs publics. Elle assure des missions de consultation, de promotion économique, de formation professionnelle et des missions spécifiques. Elle est consultée notamment sur les projets de lois et de textes réglementaires des activités relevant de son domaine de compétence. Elle est également consultée sur la création des offices, des organismes publics et privés ou la recon- ____________________ 51 Voir le décret n° 86/231 du 13 mars 1986 portant statuts de la Chambre de commerce, d’industrie et des mines. 52 Voir le décret n° 2001/380 du 27 novembre 2001 portant changement de dénomination et réorganisation de la chambre de commerce, d’industrie des mines et de l’artisanat du Cameroun. 53 Voir le décret n° 78/525 du 12 décembre 1978 portant statut de la Chambre d’agriculture, de l’élevage et des forêts du Cameroun, modifié et complété par le décret n° 84/004 du 10 janvier 1984. 54 Voir le décret n° 2009/249 du 6 août 2009 portant changement de dénomination et réorganisation de la chambre d’agriculture, de l’élevage et des forêts du Cameroun. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 240 naissance des associations d’utilité publique, à caractère national ou international dans son domaine de compétence. Ainsi, copies de tous les actes signés y relatifs lui sont transmises pour exploitation, de même que sur toute autre question en matière d’agriculture des pêches, d’élevage, des forêts et de la faune. Dans le cadre de ses missions de promotion économique, elle organise des campagnes promotionnelles visant à accroître les ventes de la production agricole, animale, halieutique, forestière et faunique, à l’intérieur et à l’extérieur du pays. À ce titre, elle a un rôle déterminant dans la mise en œuvre d’une gestion rationnelle des ressources naturelles. En outre, elle participe au développement de la recherche scientifique ainsi qu’à la vulgarisation des techniques agricoles, animales, halieutiques, sylvicoles et fauniques dans le cadre des conventions de partenariat établies avec les administrations publiques et les organismes privés nationaux et internationaux et présente semestriellement des notes de conjoncture sur l’évolution et les moyens d’accroître la prospérité desdits secteurs. 3.3.3 Le Conseil économique et social Le Conseil économique et social est une assemblée consultative créée par l’article 54 de la Constitution de 1996. Il a été réorganisé en 2017 par une loi55 abrogeant celle de 1986 et élargissant ses attributions au domaine de l’environnement. Selon cette loi, la mission du Conseil économique et social est de conseiller le pouvoir exécutif en matière économique, sociale, culturelle et environnementale. À la demande du Chef du gouvernement, il peut mener des enquêtes sur la mise en œuvre du plan de développement économique, social, culturel et environnemental et peut être associé à l’évaluation des politiques publiques dans le domaine de l’environnement. Par ailleurs, il peut soumettre au Président de la République ou au gouvernement des propositions de réforme impliquant l’environnement. 4 Conclusion En somme les institutions publiques de protection de l’environnement au Cameroun sont nombreuses et interviennent dans plusieurs secteurs. Mais toute la question reste au niveau de leur efficacité qui reste limitée par deux facteurs : le manque de moyens financiers et techniques, puis dans une moindre mesure, l’absence de l’expertise dans certains secteurs. Plusieurs institutions publiques bénéficient de la coopération bilatérale et multilatérale qu’entretient le Cameroun avec les autres États ainsi que des ins- ____________________ 55 Voir la loi n° 2017/009 du 12 juillet 2017 fixant les attributions, l’organisation et le fonctionnement du Conseil économique et social du Cameroun. LE CADRE INSTITUTIONNEL DE LA GESTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 241 titutions internationales à travers le monde. Mais cette coopération ne leur permet pas encore, en tout cas la plupart, de surmonter leur inefficacité. Cette inefficacité des institutions environnementales étatiques entraîne presque automatiquement l’ineffectivité de plusieurs règles juridiques de protection de l’environnement au Cameroun. Heureusement que les communautés de base et les associations de défense de l’environnement dont le rôle est reconnu par la loi56 prennent le relai. ____________________ 56 Voir notamment les articles 3 et 8 de la loi n° 96/12 du 5 août 1996 portant loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement. 242 CHAPTER 10: PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN CAMEROON Christopher F. TAMASANG & Andre Felix Martial TCHOFFO 1 Introduction Environmental degradation in general and its threat to human wellbeing has become one of the most unavoidable topics in general international, and consequently domestic discourse. One of the major stakes in environmental discourse in particular is how to balance the offsets between development and protection of the environment. It is true that each state has the sovereign right to design and pursue her development objectives as she deems fit but in recent years, the modus of development opted for by each state is no longer a thing reserved within her exclusive purview, but one that attracts the general attention of states that make up the international community. Within the context of developing countries like Cameroon, this sort of new trend which comprises international scrutiny of domestic development becomes a bit delicate because development needs are hoisted in urgency meanwhile international concerns for environmental protection constitutes the rope with which the length of the said development is measured. The considerations highlighted above only reveal that environmental protection and the pursuit of development are two hands of which one cannot wash itself clean without the help of the other so as to achieve human wellbeing. In the same spirit, international law rules and principles cannot be dissociated from domestic policy and decision making processes relating to the environment and development nexus. It may be expected from the latter consideration that domestic policy makers should simply refer to some sort of international environmental code that contains the general orientations and directions of the international community, but there is no such code. Rather, bits and patches of environmental exigencies are scattered into assorted multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs) and related instruments, each with its own specificity. So in the absence of an international environmental law compendium, the general orientations relating to the conservation and management of natural resources may only be obtained through a synergy and cluster of these MEAs which, PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN CAMEROON 243 it should be said, is not an easy task. Some of the prescriptions contained in these texts are said to be soft, and others hard,1 and so it may be a pretty meticulous exercise for a state to tap out the general environmental considerations from these texts through the abovementioned clusters and synergy. What then may be a simpler formula? Almost every legal discipline has some rules, values, principles and even maxims which, for the most part, constitute expressions that synthesise the subject matter of the whole discipline so that with just a few of these expressions, we may be able to discern the substratum of that particular area of studies.2 Environmental law is not an exception; in effect, there are a number of principles which, it may be argued, make up the foundations of this discipline as well as a general guidance and orientation for policy makers and state action. So rather than referring to particular texts in a bid to determine the rules that guide or shape action relating to environmental management, it may be more practical to simply look at these principles to see how they have been received by international texts and case law and then translated into the national environmental management processes. This chapter therefore sets out to make an appraisal of the extent to which Cameroonian law relating to environmental management incorporates principles of international environmental management. To this end, the work devolves in six sections of which the first is an introduction; the second, deals with conceptual clarifications; the third is an analysis of the fundamental principles of environmental management in Cameroon while the fourth section indicates the limited extent to which these principles are treated under Cameroonian law. The fifth and sixth sections consider some of the challenges which hinder smooth incorporation of principles of environmental management into legislative crafting, general conclusion and way forward respectively. It is hoped that that this paper may inform policy and decision-makers on how to better translate general environmental law principles into policy considerations that guarantee a more sustainable management of the environment and its resources. ____________________ 1 ‘Soft Law’ refers to the category of texts that do not contain rigorous legal provisions but rather general principles, breach of which may not really invite immediate and deterring sanctions. They are either inspirational sources of law or later on mature into hard law. An example includes the Rio Declaration of 1992 from the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development. An example of a ‘hard law’ on the other hand is the Convention on Biodiversity (1992). 2 A good example of a discipline whose subject matter is contained in its principles or maxims is equity. Some of the relevant maxims that constitute the bedrocks of equity include: equity acts in personam and not in rem; delay defeats equity; equality is equity; equity follows the law; he who seeks equity must do equity and he who comes to equity must come with clean hands; equity looks at that as done which ought to be done and equity looks at the intent to impute an obligation. Christopher F. TAMASANG & Andre Felix Martial TCHOFFO 244 2 Why principles of environmental law in general and principles of environmental management in particular? 2.1 Theoretical foundations of principles of (environmental) law Whether we talk of principles of law or principles of environmental law, they all are abstract. In a generic manner, these principles are all founded on equity, ethics and good conscience. Most of them are therefore said to be imbedded in natural law. It should be said immediately that founded on these basis, principles of law remain abstract, general in nature and most of all non-binding. The reason is because abstract rules – such as the rules of morality and good conduct in society are not enforceable at law. It is the reason why it is common to hear people say general principles of law are non-binding. But are these the only foundations of principles? At this juncture, it may be interesting to highlight the fact that some – most of these so-called general principles of (environmental) law are identified and consecrated in legal texts and instruments. This sort of legal consecration not only plays the same role that codification of customary norms3 play in relation to these principles, but most of all, it gives the principles some judicial viability and enforceability. We may like to single out the example of the legal recognition and consecration of principles of law in Article 38 (1) (c) of the Statutes of the International Court of Justice. At the national level, principles of environmental management are contained in Article 9 (a) – (f) of the 1996 Law Establishing the Regime of Environmental Management in Camerooon4 (herinafter referred to as the ‘1996 Law’). The only problem is that the law referred to here above is a framework law and its legal enforceability is not as enough as to command any specific legal enforceability of these principles. In any case, the baseline is that principles of law may also be founded on legal texts once they are identified and ascribed some particular legal regimes. This is not as if to mean that legal texts create principles of law, they rather constitute solid basis or foundations for these principles. This is the same case with the principles that are upheld and consecrated by powerful locus classicus decisions of precedents.5 Once this ____________________ 3 The codification of customary norms serves a number of purposes. First, it is to secure the customary rule and make it long-lasting without any dangers of modification of the rule of its disappearance in time. Through codification, the customary rule can also become an erga omnes rule which becomes binding to all states, whether they are members of the treaty of codification or not. Codification equally and arguably provides easier judicial enforceability since the custom is henceforth covered by a text. It should be said in passing that the principal organ in charge of codification in international law is the International Law Commission that prepares draft instruments of codification. 4 Law No. 96/12 of 5 August 1996 Establishing the Regime of Environmental Management in Camerooon. 5 The Trail Smelter Arbitration was between USA and Canada, 3 RIAA 1907 (1941). PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN CAMEROON 245 happens, the court decision through which the principle is consecrated as a precedent consequently becomes the basis – jurisprudential basis – of the principle. Writers sometimes identify and elaborate generously on the scope and significance of certain principles which may not be based on any text or court decision yet. Viewed from this angle, we may refer to the consecration by scholars as the doctrinal consecration. Almost every contemporary writer6 in international environmental law devotes some time to consider principles of environmental law at length. 2.2 Sources and role of principles in law and environmental law in particular If we go by the general formula for determining the sources of international law in general provided by the Article 38 (1) of the Statutes of the International Court of Justice, general principles of law constitute a non-negligible source of international environmental law. But the question is to know whether the principles of environmental law can be given the same status as the general principles of international law. Both categories of principles are abstract, come from equity, ethics and natural law. In this way, they usually inspire judges and policy makers in taking decisions on a given subject. With this similitude, one may say that the principles of environmental law can be accorded same status with those of international law in general. These principles are philosophical and ideological in nature and are of general application and recognition, for the most part, unlike environmental values that are usually more context-specific. It may be interesting to make the clarification here at once that general principles of environmental law, just like general principles of international law are not direct sources of law like written law for instance. We consider principles only to be secondary or inspirational sources of law. Taking the famous separation of powers theory7 into consideration, every legal system should have a legitimate authority competent to make laws. It is the law that comes from such authority that is considered to be of direct application. So general principles of environmental law are not of that category, but only inspire and guide judges and policymakers in the decisions that they take. ____________________ 6 See notably authors like Bell & McGillivray (2008:41-75); Sands & Peel (2012:187-236); Fisher et al. (2013:402-457); Louka (2006:49-57); Sand (2003:231-289); Ebbeson & Okowa (2009:411-429); Sunkin et al. (2002:1-91); Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos (2011:83-105). 7 The separation of powers theory is the theory according to which every legal system should have three arms of government: the legislative, the executive and the (federative, that is in the original version of the theory by John Locke) judiciary, as systematised by Baron Charles Louis de Seconda alias Montesquieu. The law making organ is the legislative, the organ if implementation is the executive and the organ of enforcement is the judiciary. Christopher F. TAMASANG & Andre Felix Martial TCHOFFO 246 2.3 Some conceptual clarifications 2.3.1 What is environmental management? Environmental management within the context of Cameroon includes all the operations geared towards the improvement and preservation of the state of the environment, both in its natural resources in general and ecosystem, as well as how to interfere with the environment rationally in order to achieve human wellbeing as highlighted in Article 2 (2) of the 1996 Law. Any project aimed at achieving development in whatever form that must pass through interference with natural resources is subject to a set of stringent rules aimed at ensuring that the said development is not achieved at the expense of environmental sanity. 2.3.2 What do we mean by the environment? At the national level, the environment, in the light of the provisions of the 1996 Law refers to:8 all the natural or artificial elements and biogeochemical balances they participate in, as well as the economic, social and cultural factors which are conducive to the existence, transformation and development of the environment, living organism and human activities. From the above definition, what can one consider to be environmental law? Generally, law is defined as a body of rules and regulations that govern human life in a given society and at a given time. If we go by this definition and with respect to the definition of the environment above, then one may say that environmental law is the body of rules and regulations that govern human life in and man’s interaction with the environment at a given time and place. 3 Fundamental principles of environmental management under Cameroonian law For purpose of smooth understanding of the role of each, the principles may be split into three categories: there are principles that seek to make a blend between environmental control and socio-economic development; principles that seek to reduce or prevent likely harm to the environment; and finally, principles that affix liability for damage caused on the environment. The first part of this section will be consecrated ____________________ 8 See Article 4 (k) of the 1996 Law. PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN CAMEROON 247 to the theoretical formulation of the principles while the second part will be dedicated to an assessment of the practical utility and implementation of these principles in Cameroon. Relevant statutory provisions are contained in Articles 1 and 9 (a) – (f) of the the 1996 Law. 3.1 Theoretical presentation of the principles 3.1.1 Principles that reconcile environmental management and socio-economic development There are at least four principles that guide and orientate state action: the principle of sustainable development, the principle of permanent sovereignty over natural resources, the principle of integration and the principle of participation. Each of these deserves some individual consideration in turns. 3.1.1.1 The principle of sustainable development 3.1.1.1.1 Meaning of sustainable development Of all the principles of environmental law, the principle of sustainable development has the most contested definition because it means different things to different people. This is why the meaning of the principle is said to be context-specific and purpose-driven. One of the gist from the Stockholm Conference was that the environment was to be protected for the sake of it, thereby overlooking the development aspects of it.9 The United Nations then created the Brundtland Commission in Nairobi to give it a thought. The result of the works of that Commission was, inter alia, one of the most solicited definitions of sustainable development. According to that Report, sustainable development is “…development that meets the needs of the present generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs”.10 The principle of sustainable development does not really feature under Chapter III of the 1996 Law entitled ‘Fundamental Principles’. This sends the signal that the Cameroonian legislator does not exactly consider the concept as a principle. The leg- ____________________ 9 Tamasang (2008:146). 10 Brundtland Commission Report (1987). Christopher F. TAMASANG & Andre Felix Martial TCHOFFO 248 islator however defines sustainable development, even though not as a principle, but as a key word under Chapter I of the 1996 Law that deals with “Definitions”.11 3.1.1.1.2 Some manifestations of the principle Writers identify different sets of elements that spring from the principle, but others treat some of these components of the principle as independent principles on their own. The most common elements of the principle include intra-generational equity (or wise use12 and equitable utilisation) and intergenerational equity. From these two, we can be able to explain how the principle manifests itself through certain obligations. First, there is the obligation of equitable utilisation13 which translates the requirement of intra-generational equity. This duty or obligation was articulated in early judicial decisions regarding the sharing of freshwater resources.14 The duty is also contained in the 1997 United Nations Watercourses Convention. It should be remarked that equity is a principle that is hard to pin down15 and many authors16 have argued that equitable considerations introduce an especially subjective element in the interpretation of international environmental law. On the one hand, the principle may be interpreted to mean that the use of natural resources of the earth should be done on a 50/50 proportion. From another viewpoint, it may be interpreted to mean that those who have priority in the use of certain resources should benefit from maximum protection. Yet again, the principle may suggest that the use of natural resources is based ____________________ 11 The definition of sustainable development under the 1996 Law is provided by Article 4 (d). According to that section, sustainable development “shall be a mode of development which aims at meeting the development needs of present generations without jeopardizing the capacities of future generations”. 12 See Tamasang (2015). 13 Louka (2006:53). The author considers equitable utilization to be a distinct principle of international environmental law on its own but we prefer to treat it here as a subset of the principle of sustainable development. 14 Lac Lanoux Case (Spain v. France), 12 RIAA, 285. See also Gabcikovo-Nagymaros Project between Hungary and Slovakia (1998) 37 ILM 162 (Danube Dam). 15 The concept of equity is hard to pin down because several meanings can be given to it. Among the most common one, equity is understood to mean good conscience, moral rectitude and natural justice. It also refers to a shield that was developed in England to protect the law from its own inherent weaknesses and limitations (see Lord Cowper in the Case of Dudley and Ward v. Lady Dudley). Today, equity is no longer absolutely associated with discretion and conscience because the rules are now as formalistic and systematised as those of Common Law so that the meaning of equity today may not really be same as the meaning it got in the 16th Century. 16 Notably Louka (2006:53). PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN CAMEROON 249 on factors that are independent of where the property is situated within national confines. Another manifestation of the principle is the responsibility that we owe future generations. Richard Driss17 notes that at the start of the Century, cities were not crowded, rural areas were more active and pollution was not known to be an international problem. Today, “science has given birth to monsters” and the threat of a polluted planet looms. As time evolves, the question receives a bolder imprint: what kind of environment do we want to leave to future generations? In fact, if a child is born today, by 2035 he will be 18 years old. Are the efforts that we put in place sufficient to guarantee the achievement of the goals designed by the international community? Our responsibility to future generations is coded in our very existence; we come from the past and study our ancestors as well as their behaviour. So one unavoidable component of our development and wellbeing is how much we are able to guarantee the wellbeing of future generations. 3.1.1.2 The principle of permanent sovereignty over natural resources 3.1.1.2.1 Significance and foundation of the principle Before saying anything about this principle, it may be good to point out that the 1996 Law does not make mention of it in the famous Article 9 (a)-(f) that contains all the principles envisaged by the legislator in matters of environmental management. This is not as if to mean that this principle is completely disregarded in matters of environmental management in Cameroon. On the contrary, even if the principle does not come out clearly in the 1996 Law, it is specifically alluded to in the Cameroonian Constitution18 as the basis for development and the principle that governs the cooperation between Cameroon and any other state to achieve the said development.19 The 1996 Law being subject to the Constitution must therefore take on board the provisions of the latter in the process of environmental management in Cameroon. What are the foundations of the principle? First, the principle is announced in Principle 21 of the Stockholm Conference20 according to which “states have, in ac- ____________________ 17 Driss (1998:21). 18 The Constitution referred to above is Law No. 2008/1 of 14 April 2008 to amend and supplement some provisions of Law No. 96/6 of 18 January 1996 to amend the Constitution of 2 June 1972. 19 See paragraph 3 of the Cameroonian Constitution. 20 The 1972 United Nations Conference on Human Environment is popularly known and referred to as the Stockholm Conference that held in Sweden. This meeting is the first remarkable gathering of the international society to try and shape environmental policy. It was attended by Christopher F. TAMASANG & Andre Felix Martial TCHOFFO 250 cordance with the UN Charter, and the principles of international law, the sovereign right to exploit their own resources pursuant to their own environmental policies…”. This enunciation by Principle 21 became a cornerstone of international environmental law and twenty years after – in the Rio Declaration21, states were almost absolutely unable to change the language or modify the enunciation. It should be indicated that the principle of permanent sovereignty over natural resources is enunciated simultaneously with the obligation not to cause environmental harm and since 1972, both principles have been respected as such without decoupling. We have decided to untangle them in our present analysis by reason of the different categories into which we have classified them such that it may not be convenient to discuss both of them under the same category. It should also be made clear that the principle of permanent sovereignty over natural resources was not born in the Stockholm Conference; since about 1952, the principle had been seen in many UN Resolutions22 geared towards the need to balance the rights of sovereign states over their resources with the desire of foreign companies to ensure legislative certainty and stability of investment. Besides the Stockholm and Rio Conferences, the principle is also contained in a number of texts23 such as the Convention on Biological Diversity (1992) which provides that states have “sovereign rights…over their natural resources” and that the ____________________ 113 countries (even though only India and Sweden were represented by their respective Heads of States). 21 Summit took place in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 1992. This is history’s single most reported event (over 9,000 journalists), 178 nations represented and 115 heads of states present. Unlike in Stockholm, the South had taken consciousness of environment and development concerns. The South therefore expressed the concern at Rio that environmental protection should not be done at the expense of their development and that the North should bear primary responsibility for suffering caused by environmental degradation so far. The North on its part, even more conscious of the need to protect the environment and interfere with it rationally seemed to lay much emphasis, logically, on sustainable development. From the summary of the two positions (between North and South), it appears that while the South paid more attention to intra generational equity, the North laid emphasis but on intergenerational equity. 22 For more details see van Wyk (2017). See for instance UNGA Resolution 1803 (XVII) (1962). In this Resolution, it was indicated that, “the right of peoples and nations to permanent sovereignty over their natural wealth and resources must be exercised in the interest of their national development of the wellbeing of the people of the state concerned”. 23 The principle is contained in the preamble of the United Nations Framework Convention to Fight against Climate Change in which parties are urged to “respect state sovereignty in international cooperation to fight against climate change”. The International Tropical Timber Agreement (ITTA) also acknowledges “the sovereignty of producing members over their natural resources” in its Article 1 (old) and preambular paragraph (d) of the 2006 amendment of the Agreement. The Ramsar Convention of 1971 makes it clear that the inclusion of national wetland sites in its list of wetlands does not “prejudice the exclusive sovereign rights of…the party in whose territory the wetlands is situated” (Article 2 (3) of the Convention). PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN CAMEROON 251 authority to determine access to genetic resources rests with the national governments and is subject to national legislation.24 Besides international texts and MEAs specifically, the principle of permanent sovereignty over natural resources is also enunciated in a number of court decisions. An example in perspective is the decision of the International Court of Justice in the case of Kuwait v. American Independent Oil Company25 in which the ICJ had the opportunity to bring clarity on the significance of the principle. In effect, the ICJ equally indicated several years after this case that the principle is one that can be considered as part of customary international law.26 3.1.1.2.2 The principle of permanent sovereignty as an enhancement to democracy An interesting issue on which to ponder, especially within the context of developing countries and Cameroon in particular, is what connection there is between sovereignty over natural resources and democracy. Some scholars27 hold the view that the mutual democratisation of states and their societies appears to operate in a virtuous relationship with more reflective ecological modernisation at the domestic level as well as more effective environmental citizenship by such states. It is also true that this virtuous relationship cannot be deepened without a move from liberal democracy to ecological democracy.28 Despite growing levels of environmental recognition and awareness, liberal democratic states have been unable to resolve or significantly minimise many ecological problems. Liberal democracies continue to construct decisions and design policies geared towards acceleration of investment, production and consumption all to be championed by the private sector. When these states permit social actors to displace ecological costs on to others, it restricts the ability for environmental victims to enjoy the full range of freedoms that liberalism supposedly upholds. This includes the freedom to participate or otherwise be represented in the making of decisions that bear upon their own lives. Ecological democracy (green democratic state) is most suited in this context and field of studies than liberal democracy as it enables a more concerted political questioning of traditional boundaries between what is public and private, domestic and international, intrinsically valuable and instrumentally valuable. The rationale behind ____________________ 24 See Article 15 (1) of the CBD. See also Article 6 of the 2010 Nagoya Protocol to the CDB that governs access to genetic resources. 25 Kuwait v. American Independent Oil Company 21 ILM 976 (1982). 26 ICJ Advisory Opinion on the Legality of the Threat or Use of Nuclear Weapons (1996). 27 See for instance Eckersley (2004:241). 28 (ibid.). Christopher F. TAMASANG & Andre Felix Martial TCHOFFO 252 ecological democracy is that all those potentially affected by ecological risks ought to have some meaningful opportunity to participate, or be represented in the determination of policies or decisions that may generate risks.29 A flipside however of perceiving sovereignty in green democratic states as a shield is the responsibility for neighbouring states not to cause environmental harm which will be discussed later. 3.1.1.3 The principle of integration The principle of integration is not included in the list of principles outlined in Article 9 of the 1996 Law. This notwithstanding, the principle is observed in practice especially in the actions and plans of the administration as we shall see in the second part of this section in which we discuss the practical utility of principles of environmental management in Cameroon. The principle is equally identified in section five below as one of the principles that are developed and observed more in practice but without any much legislative consideration. Environmental protection requirements must be integrated into the definition and implementation of all areas of policy in particular with a view to promoting sustainable development.30 The European Community Treaty provides that environmental protection requirements must be integrated into other community policies such as policies that have to do with agriculture and industry-related policies.31 The principle of integration seeks to incorporate environmental consideration into all policy areas. The aim here is to avoid otherwise contradictory objectives that result from a failure to take into account environmental protection or resources conservation goals. For instance, the failure to consider environmental consequences of liberalising air travel or road construction programmes designed to meet priority transport objectives may possibly ensue when environmental concerns are not sufficiently integrated in the drafting of the budgetary law. 3.1.1.4 The principle of participation The principle of participation is constructed on the premise that in order to ensure effective implementation of environmental laws and actions at all levels, individuals ____________________ 29 (ibid.:243). 30 Article 6 of the European Community Treaty. This Article lends more impetus to the allegation that sustainable development is the paramount consideration of all which the other principles must strive to attain. 31 (ibid.:Article 175). PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN CAMEROON 253 should be able to participate in environmental decision making.32 The principle may be understood as if to mean that it only seeks to ensure or guarantee procedural rights for citizens. This will be an erroneous interpretation because the principle of participation requires a little more than just procedural rights. For instance, the principle seeks to ensure the flow of information as well as guarantee the mainstreaming of local and indigenous people in every decision making process. In this light, it may be fair to say that environmental issues are best handled with the participation of all citizens concerned at the respective levels of society. For instance, at the national level, every individual should have appropriate access to information relating to the environment that is held by public authority; including information on hazardous materials and activities in their communities and the opportunity to participate in decision making processes. In this way, at the national level, states must facilitate and encourage public awareness, effective access to judicial and administrative proceedings as well as guarantee the availability of redress and remedy through these processes. The principle of participation is contained in Article 9 (e) of the 1996 Law. Under this law, the principles manifests through three points: access to information, the duty to protect the environment and consultation or public debate before certain decisions are taken. The enunciation of the principle under that section of the law is rather vague and limited in scope. Just one isolated example may strengthen this argument: the Article is silent on the issue of access to justice especially the extension of locus standi for public-interest litigations. Issues of access to justice are instead addressed in Article 8 (2) of the 1996 Law which does not fall under the title of ‘Fundamental Principles’, and even then, the issue of public interest litigation which is a contemporary development is apparently missing in the law. In a nutshell therefore, the principle of participation, from the above presentation, has three major canons: first we have participation in decision making; availability and access to information; and finally, access to judicial procedures. 3.1.2 Principles that relate to the reduction or prevention of likely harm 3.1.2.1 The precautionary principle The 1996 Law simply retakes the view that lack of certainty, given the current scientific and technological knowledge should not retard the adoption of effective and commensurate measures aimed at preventing a risk entailing serious and irreversible ____________________ 32 Sunkin et al. (2002:53). Christopher F. TAMASANG & Andre Felix Martial TCHOFFO 254 damage to the environment at an economically acceptable cost.33 We have adopted a binary approach to the presentation of this principle: on the one hand, we will look at the significance and foundation of the principle while on the other, we will consider the manifestation of the principle through its link with future generations which in turn links up the principle to sustainable development. The precautionary principle is to the effect that in case of serious and imminent harm which is irreversible, lack of scientific certainty shall not be a reason for postponing cost-effective measures to prevent environmental degradation. The principle is founded upon the assumption that science cannot absolutely predict how or why adverse impacts will occur or what their effects may be on man and the ecosystem. So the principle applies where there is absence of proof but availability of information sufficient enough to prevent risk. Where reasonable evidence exists, actions aimed at avoiding adverse impacts of harm become necessary. In this sense, the precautionary principle is all about “being safe rather than being sorry”.34 Very often, our experience in environmental matters reveals that when we are certain, we rather become impotent because it is too little too late to repair the damage. The precautionary principle carries with it a structure of ideas which enable us to take decisions which seek ecological balance for the benefit of our human society. It offers guidance, within the embrace of the law, as to how we might interfere least, or least damagingly in the ecosystems that support life on earth. In addition, the principle provides a philosophical authority to take decisions in the face of uncertainty. Thus the principle becomes symbolic of the need for change in human behaviour towards the environment that sustains our existence; it challenges science but respects the basic principles of ecology.35 It should be clarified that the precautionary principle is not the same as the preventive principle. In effect, much of the confusion surrounding the principle’s interpretation relates to its distinction from the more traditional standards of environmental prevention. According to Agius and Busuttil,36 the precautionary principle in both its conceptual core and its practical implications, is preventive, but not all preventive standards are precautionary. In fact, any particular preventive standard may be either non-precautionary or precautionary and in various degrees, but it cannot be ‘unpreventive’. Prevention and elements of sustainable development can be traced back even to the 1930s but precautionary language made its grand apparition in the mid-1980s. This is why the UN Secretary General in 1990 said that the principle “has been en- ____________________ 33 See Article 9 (a) of the 1996 Law. 34 Bell & McGillivray (2008:55). 35 Agius & Busuttil (1998:93). 36 (ibid.:99). PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN CAMEROON 255 dorsed by virtually all recent international forums”.37 From inception, the principle has constantly provided disagreement as to its meaning and effects among states and international judicial practice. Opponents of the principle have decried its potential to over-regulate and thus limit human activity.38 This notwithstanding, the principle is considered as one of general application and is linked to sustainable development.39 There is some evidence that states now begin to support this interpretation even though there is no unanimity on this viewpoint. The ICJ in 1995 described the principle in the Nuclear Test Case (between New Zealand and France) as a widely accepted and operative principle in international law even though France claimed that the status of the principle in international law was « tout à fait incertain ». We understand why when it was proposed that the principle should be included in the French Constitution as part of the Environmental Charter, the French Scientific Establishment went radical about the idea.40 The longstanding conceptual debate about the principle has accordingly been supplemented by discussion of its implementation which has in turn given rise to a number of related questions about its nature and practicability: • Is the principle scientific (rather than being ideological)? • If so, can it be made operational in policy and regulation settings? • If yes, can its implementation be subjected to meaningful judicial review? • If not, does that call the practical usefulness of the principle to question?41 Besides this jurisprudential consecration and recognition,42 the principle has equally attracted a wide range of textual consecration through diverse international texts.43 ____________________ 37 An example is the Ministerial Declaration of the Second International Conference on the Protection of the North Sea on in November 1986, London. The states affirmed that: “…in order to protect the North Sea from possibly damaging effects of the most dangerous substances, a precautionary approach is necessary…” Again, signatories to the Baltic Sea Declaration adopted at the Baltic Environmental Conference held at Ronneby, Sweden, on 2 September 1990, agreed to “apply the precautionary principle, that is to take effective action to avoid potentially damaging impacts of substances that are persistent, toxic and liable to bioaccumulate” see 1 Year Book of International Environmental Law (1990), 423-429. Finally, the principle reappears in COP 9 of the Convention on the prohibition of International Trade in Endangered Species held in Fort Lauderdale – USA, 7-8 November 1994. 38 Sands & Peel (2012:218). 39 See the Bergen Ministerial Declaration on Sustainable Development in the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) Region, 16 May 1990. In effect, paragraph 7 of that Declaration is to the effect that in order to achieve sustainable development, policies must be based on the precautionary principle. 40 Paterson (2011). 41 For a detailed discussion on these questions and the precautionary principle, see Paterson (2011:85). 42 See further The Southern Bluefish Tuna Cases – New Zealand v. Japan and Australia v. Japan (2001) IRL 148; see also the Mox Plant Case – Ireland v. The United Kingdom (2002) 41 ILM 405. Christopher F. TAMASANG & Andre Felix Martial TCHOFFO 256 It should be indicated that the implementation of intergenerational and intragenerational equity has been more explicit in practice than most of the other principles of environmental law. One significant by-product of intergenerational rights is the position that everyone has the right to live in a balanced, ecologically safe and healthy environment. This places an obligation on the present generation to take all precautionary means necessary to conserve the diversity of culture and natural resource base just in same way as we obtained the right to access the legacy of the past generation.44 The precautionary principle interpreted in this way lends more credence to the assertion that most, if not all, the other principles of environmental law seek to achieve the objective of sustainable development. 3.1.2.2 The principle of preventive action Under the 1996 Law still, the legislator makes mention of preventive action and correction of threats to the environment by using the best available techniques at an economically acceptable cost.45 It may be expedient for us to consider the significance and foundations of the principle in international and national law. The principle of preventive action is to the effect that states bear the responsibility to ensure that activities within their jurisdiction or control do not cause damage to the environment of other states or areas beyond the limits of national jurisdiction. It has been clarified above already that the principle of preventive action may be muddled with the precautionary principle but the two mean different things even though both of them promote the prevention of environmental harm as an alternative to bringing remedy to harm that is already caused. In a nutshell, the precautionary principle works well in moments of scientific uncertainty meanwhile the preventive principle may even be pursued by relying on scientific certainty. The principle is contained in a number of international instruments of which one of the most common is the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (Principles 2, 11 and 14). But before then, the principle was already enunciated in Principles 6, 7, 15, 18 and 24 of the Stockholm Declaration of 1972. ____________________ 43 The principle is contained in the preamble of the 1985 Vienna Convention on the Protection of the Ozone Layer as well as in the preamble of the 1987 Montreal Protocol to that Convention and the June 1990 amendment to the Protocol. Many scholars consider that the core of the principle lies in Principle 15 of the Rio Declaration. The principle features in the UNFCCC in Article 3 (3); The 1979 Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution as well as in the preamble of its Additional Protocol II relating to Further Reduction of Sulphur Emissions – 1994, UN DOC.GE. 94. 31969. 44 Weiss (1990). 45 Article 9 (b) of the 1996 Law. PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN CAMEROON 257 The preventive principle had equally featured, before 1992, in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, 1982 (Article 194) as well as the 1985 Vienna Convention on the protection of the ozone layer, Article 2 (2) (b) and in the preamble of the 1987 Montreal Protocol to the said Convention. The Convention on Biological Diversity as well as the Climate Change Convention all give some legality to the principle.46 3.1.2.3 The responsibility not to cause environmental harm This principle is one of the many principles that are left out of the list of principles presented in the 1996 Law. In any case, the requirements of the principle can be deduced from the reading of the principles of prevention and precautionary action discussed under the said law. The obligation not to cause environmental harm is a principle that is associated with the principle of permanent sovereignty over natural resources. In this way, the principle acts as a measure to limit or prevent absolute sovereignty of states by imposing on them the duty to make sure that the exercise of sovereign rights does not damage their immediate environment or that which is beyond national confines. All states have pledged their loyalty to this principle and the ICJ in the Nuclear Test Cases indicated that the principle has become an erga omnes in international law. The principle thus presented raises a few pertinent questions: What is environmental damage? What type of environmental damage is prohibited (is it just any type of damage or the most serious and significant ones)? What standard of care is applicable to the obligation; is it absolute, strict or fault-based? What is the measure of damage? These questions have been considered at length by Sands and Peel.47 It is posited that this principle gets its source from customary international law.48 If we buy this idea, then it may be worthy to point out that custom stands as one of the major sources of international law in general and IEL in particular. The obligation not to cause environmental harm also enjoys some international recognition.49 This principle signifies that no state has the right to cause damage to the environment in breach of international standards. In effect, this principle is closely associat- ____________________ 46 See Article 8 (h) and 14 (1) (d) of the CDB; Article 2 of the Biosafety Protocol to the CBD and Article 2 (2) (d) (i) and Article 5 of the Nagoya Protocol. The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change makes provision for the principle of preventive action in its Article 2. 47 Sands & Peel (2012:Chapter 17). 48 See Hunter et al. (1998:345). 49 In effect, we notice that this principle is consecrated in a number of international instruments such as in Section 21 of the Stockholm Declaration and Article 2 of the Rio Declaration. Christopher F. TAMASANG & Andre Felix Martial TCHOFFO 258 ed with other principles such as good neighbourliness.50 It is not because a state has permanent sovereignty over her natural resources that the exercise of this right should breach the rights of her neighbours (to a healthy environment for instance), and the interests of the world at large. Any sustainable development process which passes through green trade must be done with respect to this obligation not to cause environmental harm. The scope and contours of the principle however remain an issue of construction in international doctrine because the issue has not yet been subject to any international judicial clarification. So for instance, what is the degree of harm that can trigger the obligation and what standard should be made binding on the state are all questions of construction. It has been indicated above already that the principle is founded on Principle 21 of the Stockholm Declaration that makes provision for permanent sovereignty over natural resources as well as the obligation not to cause environmental harm. It must however be pointed out that the principle predates the Stockholm Conference; its origin can be traced as far back as the Trail Smelter Arbitration51 in which it was held that: under the principles of international law…no state has the right to use or permit the use of her territory in such a manner as to cause injury by fumes in or to the territory of another of the parties or persons therein… Several years later, Judge De Castro in the Nuclear Test Cases stated in his dissent that the rule laid down in the Trail Smelter Arbitration was one of customary international law. In this light, one may say that the obligation not to cause environmental harm derives from the customary rule of good neighbourliness. Again, the UN Charter in its Article 71 reminds the members that: “their policies in the metropolitan areas must be based on the general principle of good neighbourliness”. The principle is again contained in Article 3 of the United Nations Environmental Programme Draft Principles as well as Article 193 of the Law of the Sea Convention, 1982. Besides the Trail Smelter, other cases have recognised by principle, such as the Corfu Channel Case between UK and Albania (1949);52 the Lac Lanoux Case53 brings out the clarification that states must not enjoy their rights to the extent that it encroaches on the rights of others. ____________________ 50 See Hunter et al. (1998:374) for details on this principle. 51 The Trail Smelter Arbitration was between USA and Canada, 3 RIAA 1907 (1941). 52 ICJ Reports 4, at 22. 53 Spain v. France, 12 RIAA, at 285. PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN CAMEROON 259 3.1.2.4 The principle of substitution The principle of substitution enunciated under the 1996 Law is to the effect that in the absence of a written general or specific rule of law on environmental protection, the identified customary norm of a given land, accepted as more efficient for environmental protection, shall apply.54 The latter principle is quite important and contextual as it gives some room for customary rules and practices to apply in matters of environmental management and protection. This principle is not commonly found in the doctrine of international environmental law and so some credit must be given to the Cameroonian legislator for consecrating this principle which is an expression of the intention to uphold and include customary laws and practices in the general environmental management process. At this point, it may be good to indicate, in passing, that other principles of environmental law that fall under this category include the principle of substitution and the principle of common heritage of humankind.55 3.1.3 Principles that seek to affix responsibility for environmental harm 3.1.3.1 The principle of common but differentiated responsibility The principle of common but differentiated responsibility is contained in Principle 7 of the Rio Declaration. In Article 3 (i) of the UNFCCC, it is provided that “parties should act to protect the climate system on the basis of equity and in accordance with their common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capacities.” The principle further gives rise to two sets of obligations: the obligation to protect the environment (expressed in form of common responsibilities) and the obligation to consider differing circumstances in relation to each state’s contribution (this is otherwise referred to as differentiated responsibilities). It must be pointed out that this is a principle that mostly concern the relationship and cooperation between states at the international level to handle or address environmental concerns. So even though we may not see it in the principles identified in the 1996 Law, Cameroon demonstrates her commitment to respect her own share of international responsibility to minimise environmental worries translated through the management plans and actions contained in other legal instruments. ____________________ 54 See Article 9 (f) of the 1996 Law. 55 Hunter et al. (1998:335-343). Christopher F. TAMASANG & Andre Felix Martial TCHOFFO 260 3.1.3.2 The polluter pays principle According to Principle 10 of the Rio Declaration, the polluter should bear the expenses for carrying out pollution control and prevention measures so as to ensure that the environment is in an acceptable state. In other words, the cost of these measures should be reflected in the cost of goods and services which cause pollution in their production and/or consumption. The polluter pays principle is based on the fact that those who are responsible for pollution should meet the cost of its consequences. This principle is however highly contested and may bring to light retrospective liability for historic pollution. As such, the principle may turn around to impose a duty to pay for pollution control measures as well as a wider responsibility on the producers of waste. The principle of liability and the polluter pays principle are contained in Article 9 (d) and (c) respectively. The former is not very common in international environmental discourse unlike the later which is one of the most notorious of the principles of environmental management in international environmental law doctrine and legal instruments. There appears to be a problem with the way the polluter pays principle is couched in the English version of the 1996 Law which we will point out here below and then advice the use of the French version which is the original version of the text while the English version is only an inexact translation. According to Article 9 (d) of the 1996 Law, the author of any act that endangers human health and the environment shall or cause the said conditions to be eliminated in such a way as to avoid the said effect. The so-called ‘pollute and pay’ principle provides that charges resulting from measures aimed at preventing, reducing and fighting against pollution and the rehabilitation of polluted areas shall be borne by the polluter.56 In effect, the contention we are raising here begins from the expression used in the law, to wit, ‘the pollute and pay principle.’ If this is intended to be an incorporation of the famous polluter pays principle of international environmental law, then we humbly submit that the two expressions do not seem to convey the same technical message. The first expression appears to be an incentive while the second appears to be more deterrent. The pollute and pay suggests that one who has the ability to pay may go ahead and pollute and this may work out to the advantage of bigger entities that interfere with natural resources and the environment in general, to the detriment of smaller but ‘clean’ corporations. Again, even if this were to be the case, the general objective of sustainable development which is the virtue that all principle must strive to attain would be defeated. On the other side, this interpretation may not have been the intention of the legislator, in which the expression still betrays his in- ____________________ 56 See Article 9 (c) of the 1996 Law. PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN CAMEROON 261 tention and thus becomes misleading. If we take away the conjunction ‘and’, we may arrive at ‘polluter pays’ which means that the conjunction rather opens a leeway in the law making it possible for polluters to escape through the cracks. The French version of the 1996 Law appears to be better in its caption than the English version. The former version talks of the principle of ‘pollueur-payeur’ which is not the same as the ‘pollute and pay’ principle captioned in the English version. While awaiting the revision and proper translation of the said 1996 Law, we submit that the English caption should be avoided as it is misleading. 3.2 Practical utility and implementation of the principles of environmental management The utility and implementation of these principles in Cameroon will be assessed from two perspectives; from an administrative and from a judicial perspective. Each one of them needs to be considered independently. 3.2.1 Utility and implementation through administrative regulations and actions 3.2.1.1 Administrative regulations that consecrate principles of environmental management It must be pointed out that there is a plethora of administrative regulations that enhance the implementation of specific principles either in specific texts or more than one principle enshrined in such texts. We will use a selected few of these texts to illustrate the fact that the principles enunciated in the 1996 Law do not remain only in the said law but are followed up in administrative regulations. The first law we will like to identify is Order No. 0070/ MINEP/05 of 22 April 2005 to determine the different types of operations the realisation of which is subject to the rule of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA; since 2013, we refer to it as Environmental and Social Impact Assessment).57 It is true that EIA is not exactly a principle of environmental law, but a subset of the polluter pays principle (Article 9 (c) of the 1996 Law) as well as the principle of precaution (Article 9 (a) of the 1996 Law). The 2005 Order above makes a list of all the types of activities that will be subject to assessment58 and this is not only precautious but also an indication to any ____________________ 57 See Decree No. 2013/0171/PM of 14 February 2013 on Environmental and Social Impact Assessment. 58 See to this effect Articles 3 and 4 of the 2005 Order. Christopher F. TAMASANG & Andre Felix Martial TCHOFFO 262 potential polluter that in case his activity will be more damaging to the environment than economically gainful, he may be estopped from carrying out such activity. Even when the EIA is positive, the person carrying out the activity shall be responsible for cleaning up any pollution and treating resultant wastes. There is, in same vein, a regulation jointly enacted by Ministry of Environment, Nature Protection and Sustainable Development (MINEPDED) and the Ministry of Commerce (MINCOMMERCE). The instrument in question is Order No. 004/12 of 24 October 2012 on the Regulation of the Manufacture, Importation and Commercialisation of Non-Biodegradable Packages. Pursuant to the polluter pays principle, the responsibility not to cause environmental damage and the principle of liability, the 2012 Order above provides that all dealers in non-biodegradable packages shall be responsible for the management of the resultant waste.59 In addition, for anyone to deal in such packages, such an operator must obtain a prior permit60 from the competent instance. The adoption of this law by the two ministries in question is an isolated example of the readiness of the government to be bound by the cannons of the principles of environmental management. Finally, we have Order No. 002/MINEPDED/2012 of 15 October 2012 that establishes Special Conditions for the Management of Industrial and Dangerous Waste. The provisions of this law relating to the subject matter identified seek to enhance the implementation and respect of the same principles indicated in the previous paragraph. Yet again, this is another manifestation of the fact that the principles legislated upon in the 1996 Law inspire and guide the executive arm of government in adopting regulations on environmental management. But how then are these principles translated into practice? The following subsection answers the question. 3.2.1.2 Principles of environmental management in the practical actions of the cameroonian administration With a single example, we will be able to illustrate how government action is planned and executed with respect to the principles of environmental management. We will like to use the example of recent initiatives of the Ministry of Forestry (MINFOF) to taste genetically modified species and organisms in Cameroon pursuant to the Law on Biosafety.61 Section II of the 2007 enabling instrument62 to the ____________________ 59 This provision is contained in Article 3 (1) and (2) of the 2012 Order. 60 See Article 4 (1) of the 2012 Law. 61 Law No. 2003/006 of 21 April 2003 to Lay down Safety Regulations governing Modern Biotechnology in Cameroon. 62 The enabling instrument to this Law is Decree No. 2007/0737/PM of 31 May 2007 Establishing the Modalities for the Application of Law No. 2003/006 of 21 April 2003. PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN CAMEROON 263 above mentioned law is entitled Public Consultation and Participation. Under that section, Articles 46 and 47 of the 2007 Decree provide that in order for any action of modern biotechnology to be carried out in Cameroon, the project team must be able to do public consultations in view of sampling the opinions of the populations in the project site. Once the opinions are obtained they are handed over to the Technical Committee on Biosafety63 of MINFOF. This Committee carefully studies the opinions of the populations and then give a reasoned (motivated) opinion which may be positive or negative in relation to the execution of the project. The technical opinions of these experts will then be transmitted to the Minister in charge of Forestry and Wildlife for him to either authorise or cancel the particular project that has been initiated. This is the modus operandi for the execution of any project that has to do with the testing of species to see whether they are genetically modified or not.64 Through this example, we see that the principle of participation is taken to be a principle that guides the actions of the administration as well as it plays a vital role in determining whether a plan or project initiated by the government can be achieved or not. 3.2.2 The judiciary and the implementation of principles of environmental management in Cameroon The practical implementation of the principles of environmental management as contained in the 1996 Law is not left in the hands of the administration alone; it is as well an objective of the law-enforcement organ which is the judiciary. Through a selected few cases, we will show how the irrational exploitation of resources as well as pollution of the environment is sanctioned by the courts. It must however be indicated that the judicial implementation of the principles of environmental management is not exactly absolutely admirable; in the course of our discussion under this section, we will indicate where the judiciary did not meet up with the role expected of her and consequently what would be ideal in the respective circumstances. ____________________ 63 The Technical Committee on Biosafety at MINFOF was created by Decree No. 039/CAB/PM of 30 January 2012 on the Creation, Organisation and Functioning of the National Committee on Biosafety. 64 The procedure for execution of projects relating to Biosafety was confirmed to us by Angèle Ziekine, Sub-director at MINFOF. Christopher F. TAMASANG & Andre Felix Martial TCHOFFO 264 3.2.2.1 Implementation of the responsibility not to cause environmental damage and the principle of liability We can see the role of the judiciary in the practical implementation of these principles through the famous case of The People of Cameroon v. Bisong Daniel Nkwo alias Bucande.65 The case was entertained in the Court of First Instance of Nguti, Southwest Region of Cameroon, in which the defendant stood trial on four counts for poaching with respect to the 1994 Wildlife Law.66 Among his charges, the defendant was accused of killing 19 elephants (a class A protected specie under the 1994 Law) and for illegally hunting in the Bayang-Mbo wildlife sanctuary which is equally a highly protected area. Mr. Batuo Paul led the prosecution as the Senior State Counsel for Bangem. In her reasoned judgement delivered on 11 March 2004 the court found the accused guilty and sentenced him to two years imprisonment with a fine of one million francs CFA. Alternatively, the defendant could serve another two years imprisonment in lieu of the said fine. In addition, the court ordered that the elephant teeth should be handed to the World Conservation Society (WCS) as exhibit ‘A’ for preservation. Through this judgement, we see that the court was guided by and strictly applied the principle of liability and obligation not to cause environmental harm. The principles of environmental management therefore consolidated the sanctions previewed by the 1994 Wildlife Law above. The same principles inspired the court and were upheld in the case of The People v. Sadou Mana and Three Others.67 The case was filed before the Court of First Instance of Garoua in the Northern Region of Cameroon in which the defendants were tried for poaching, receiving and trafficking black rhinoceros which again is a class A protected specie under the 1994 Wildlife Law in the Benue National Park. The first defendant was sentenced to two years imprisonment and a fine of 300,000 francs CFA for poaching. The other defendants were found guilty for receiving and each one of them were sentenced to six months imprisonment with a fine of 200,000 francs CFA each. ____________________ 65 2004 (unreported) CFING/107c/03/04. 66 The Wildlife Law in question is Law No. 94/01 of 20 January 1994 on Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries Regulation. In effect, the defendant was held, inter alia, to have violated Articles 18 (2) and 158 of the said Law. 67 The case was filed in its original French version as Affaire Ministère Public et Ministère de l’Environnement et de Forets v. Sadou MAna, Bowana Raoul, Nana Augustin and Haoua Bolade (unreported), Judgement No. 568/COR of 6 January 1998. PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN CAMEROON 265 3.2.2.2 The judiciary and the principle of participation On many occasions, the courts have had to permit and recognise the participation of Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) in the identification, investigation, prosecution of offenders and execution of judgements. These NGOs give tremendous and most often much needed technical support to the entire legal process. Evidence of this was seen in the case of The People of Cameroon v. Bisong Daniel mentioned above, in which the judicial machinery was triggered by WCS. The complaint in that case was actually presented to the State Counsel by David Hoyle the then director of WCS. The director in question testified in court as the first prosecution witness while the other staff of the NGO gave evidence to the prosecution. It should be recalled to this effect that the court, after landing her sentence ordered that the teeth of the animal be handed to WCS for preservation. This tells of the willingness of the court to acknowledge and consolidate the participation of other stakeholders in the process of environmental management. In the same vein, in the case of The People (MINEF) v. Bertrand Van Den Brink and Groupement Coop Buns,68 investigations were conducted with the assistance of the Foundation for Environment and Development (FEDEV). It is this NGO that actually visited the locus and recorded the polluting activities of the defendants.69 FEDEV actually played the role of the plaintiff in the case of Foundation on Environment and Development (FEDEV) v. Bamenda Urban Council70 in which the NGO filed the action on behalf of the population. The possibility for an NGO such as this one is a clear manifestation of the principle of participation that takes into account the aspect of extension of locus standi for public interest litigations. Unfortunately, this case is one of those which still await judgement in the High Court of Bamenda which will be discussed below. 3.2.2.3 The judiciary fails to apply the polluter pays principle In the case of The People (MINEF) v. Bertrand Van Den Brink, the Bamenda Court of First Instance missed the opportunity to enforce the observance of the polluter pays principle. The case was investigated by the Northwest Provincial Chief of Brigade Control for MINEF, as then it was. After investigation, the case was forwarded to the legal department. The director of the defendant company faced an eight charge ____________________ 68 CFIB/87c/03-04. 69 The Report can be obtained from Ref. No. MINEF / PDEF / NWP / PSCB / 43, Report of Pollution of Natural Waterways Chum, Bafut-Wum Road. 70 Suit No. HCB/117M/04-05. Christopher F. TAMASANG & Andre Felix Martial TCHOFFO 266 count for pollution of natural waters, air pollution, harvesting communal forest without prior assessment and failure to rehabilitate degraded sites caused by exploitation of laterite in violation of the 1994 Wildlife Law and the 1996 Law. The defendant was a European and after being served with the court process, he left Cameroon and failed to show up. The court was therefore frustrated by the absence of the defendant. The facts of this case reveal that the defendant potentially committed gross violation against the polluter pays principle and challenged the readiness of the authorities that be to enforce the principle. A few procedural issues were ignored in this case. In the first place, absence of a defendant may be a cause for discontinuity of criminal action but not the same for a civil action. If the criminal action was discontinued, there was still possibility to pursue a civil action. On the other hand, service of a process and subsequent departure of the latter does not exactly frustrate the action considering that there is what we refer to as substituted service which may happen with the collaboration of the ministries in charge of external relations of the two countries. Again, an international arrest warrant may be sought or the defendant tried by any other court if we consider that the nature of the damage caused was not only a problem for Cameroon but raised common concern for humankind. Taken from this viewpoint, the offence committed by the defendant can be said to be hosti humanum generis (hostile to humanity as a whole) and thus give rise to universal jurisdiction. We therefore think that had the competent authorities pressed harder and further, justice would have been achieved but the apparent disinterestedness and may be ignorance of the authorities is one of the reasons that pushes us to advocate for the creation of specialised environmental courts below. 4 Addressing the insufficient consideration of principles of environmental management in the 1996 law 4.1 Absence in Cameroonian law of some basic principles of contemporary environmental management The principles of environmental management discussed in this write-up are those contained in the 1996 Law on Environmental Management in Cameroon. The principles envisaged by this law are six in number and contained in Article 9 (a)-(f). It may be logical to argue that at the time the law was enacted, the principles of environmental law were not as developed as we find them today. In effect, the majority of contemporary writers in the discipline identify a dozen of these principles or something around that neighbourhood. The consequence is that some of the most outstanding principles of environmental management that obtain today are not contained in the law and while we may strive to observe them in practice, they have no legal backing and regime at the national level. In the following subsection, we will pick out a few PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN CAMEROON 267 glaring examples of the principles of environmental management that are either absent or poorly addressed under the 1996 law. 4.1.1 Absence of the Erga Omnes principle in the 1996 law The expression ‘erga omnes’ is a Latin phrase which means towards everyone or again towards all. Legally speaking therefore, an erga omnes obligation is one that binds everybody, so we say it is generally binding. In international law, the fulfilment of the obligations or requirements contained in this principle is of interest to all states considering that the subject matter of such obligations is of importance to the international community as a whole. So breach of such an obligation raises concerns not only to the victimised state but also to all the other members of the international community. Therefore once these obligations are breached, every state must be considered justified in invoking the responsibility of the guilty state committing the internationally wrongful act. An example of an erga omnes rule is the right to selfdetermination. At the national level, the principle urges judges to give a wider interpretation to cases on breach of environmental principles in order that this covers the harm that has been caused on the environment since the environment is a universal common heritage of which that of Cameroon is only an integral part.71 What this means is that the judge who is seised of an environmental matter, has according to this principle, to give the widest interpretation that considers such a harm as having been perpetrated to the universal environment. This is therefore different from the traditional interpretation which is always limited to serving the interest of the parties to a case brought before the judge. The absence of this principle in the 1996 law really betrays the extent of reconciliation of the provisions of the law with contemporary developments in the discipline. 4.1.2 Absence of the principle of common concern for humankind The principle of common concern for humankind has been discussed in earlier parts of this work and so we need not duplicate the explanations at this point. What is important to point out here is the fact that the major environmental concerns today are addressed at the international level not as the particular problems of the places that give rise to these concerns, but as the common and shared responsibility of all states. ____________________ 71 Section 2 (1) of the 1996 Law. Christopher F. TAMASANG & Andre Felix Martial TCHOFFO 268 Issues such as climate change, global warming, loss of biodiversity and forest loss all constitute issues of concern for the community of states in general. In the same light, any developmental project or initiatives must be guided by the principle of common concern for humankind. Cameroon being one of those countries that distinguish themselves in natural wealth and capital, she depends a lot on this natural capital for her development. But if the development itself is not sustainable, its adverse effects may create common concerns for humankind. Failure of the 1996 law to properly address this principle despite its role and status in international environmental law exposes a huge vacuum in the said law and its inability to take on board contemporary trends contained in these principles. 4.1.3 Misplacement of the principle of sustainable development The 1996 Law in effect does not mention the principle of sustainable development anywhere in the section consecrated for ‘fundamental principles’ split into the various subsections of Article 9. One may be tempted to argue that the principle of sustainable development is, according to the dominant opinion, the most paramount principle of all and has become a virtue which all the other principles of environmental management must seek to enhance. If this argument sells through, one may understand why the Cameroonian legislator failed to include sustainable development under the section consecrated for principles of environmental management. The above argument notwithstanding, we still think that sustainable development as a cardinal principle of international environmental law deserved to be identified and elaborated in Article 9 of the 1996 Law. It becomes even more worrying when we read earlier sections of the said law which make explicit reference to sustainable development, but in those parts it becomes unclear whether the concept is intended to be understood as a principle or an environmental value. In Chapter 1 of the 1996 Law that defines key terminologies of the law, Article 4 (d) clearly defines the concept of sustainable development, which definition is not very distant from most of the definitions resorted to in international environmental law. This gives the impression that sustainable development will only be treated as a key term in the dispositions of the law and not exactly one of the fundamental and why not most paramount principle of environmental management. If the 1996 Law above has to be subject to any revision, at least for purposes of clarity, we suggest that the principle of sustainable development be considered under the section of the law dedicated to fundamental principles and under that category, it must be made to feature as the most dominant or basic of the principles. PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN CAMEROON 269 4.2 Challenges to the development of principles on environmental management in Cameroon 4.2.1 Impasse between what obtains in theory and in practice One major challenge that is faced in Cameroon in matters of development of principles of environmental management is that there is absence of legal basis or backing for some of the principles that are developed in practice. On the one hand, the reason may be due to the fact that the law only mentions such principles superficially without any comprehensive details or an enabling instrument. On the other hand, it may happen that some of the principles that are taken into consideration by the diversity of actors in environmental management such as the ministries of environment and of forestry in the execution of plans and projects are not actually found in the law. This is the case with principles such as common but differentiated responsibility and common concern for humankind, just to name these two. This situation makes it rather difficult to legislate on such principles that exist in practice while the law is still silent or unsatisfactory about them. As such, the legal regime governing such principles usually comes from international prescriptions rather than domestic legislation that best translates the readiness and willingness of a state to comply and enforce the observance of the same international requirements. 4.2.2 Timidity of doctrine in the discipline Environmental law being a relatively new discipline in general and in Cameroon in particular, we expect to witness the type of doctrinal timidity in the discipline especially on sensitive issues such as the role of principles in matters of environmental management. It may be good to recall here that legislators may not necessarily be experts in the discipline of law but with the duty to make law, they sometimes hugely depend on the contributions of experts and scholars to achieve their mission. We may therefore begin to understand why the 1996 law on environmental management in Cameroon does not really treat the subject of ‘fundamental principles’ of environmental management comprehensively. Yet again, since the passage of the law in 1996 as a framework legislation, we expect some modification of the said law over twenty years afterwards today but the literature as well on the subject within the time frame indicated cannot be very reliable and inspiring for the legislator. Christopher F. TAMASANG & Andre Felix Martial TCHOFFO 270 4.2.3 The 1996 law challenged by contemporary trends The 1996 Law on Environmental Management in Cameroon was enacted just a few years after the Rio Summit of 1992 and the passage and entry into force of some of its outcome documents like the CBD and UNFCCC. While it may be good to laud the effort and promptitude with which the Cameroonian legislator adopted the 1996 Law, we may not also continue relying on that twenty years afterwards. The intensity and emphasis of environmental exigencies in the modern society is not exactly the same as they were at the time of enactment of the law. The following illustration may be worthwhile. The parties to the Rio Declaration of 1992 thought it wise to convene another summit in the same venue twenty years later; that was in 2012, to take stock of the level and extent of achievement of the objectives set out in 1992 as well as change the emphasis and attention so that which marries contemporary trends. In 1972 in the Stockholm Declaration, the emphasis was on human environment (man and his relationship with the environment); in 1992 in Rio, the emphasis was on environment and development while in 2002 in Johannesburg and 2012 in Rio, sustainable development and poverty eradication were the guiding considerations. If the 1996 law was adopted at the wake of the Rio Summit of 1996 as if inspired by it, then the time is rather ripe for the revision of the said law since the agenda of the initial Rio summit has taken a wider dimension. We may begin to see why sustainable development is not included in the 1996 law as a fundamental and all englobing principle meanwhile it was a major concern in Johannesburg in 2002 and in Rio+20 in 2012. In same way, no mention is made of the principle of common concern of humankind and the erga omnes principle. Therefore, if there is no room for the modification of this law, it may be hard to envisage the development of principles of environmental management to suit the purpose and status that befits them today. It may be added that the 1996 law in question is only a framework legislation and not an environmental code for instance which is still highly desired and awaited. 5 Conclusion and way forward 5.1 Conclusion A global appreciation of the above write up only leads to the conclusion that there is some synchronisation between international environmental requirements contained in its general principles and Cameroonian Law on environmental management. This harmony is not however a perfect one because some of the founding principles of international environmental law are not given proper consideration under the 1996 Law while others are simply poorly conceived. It may be quite biased to say that princi- PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN CAMEROON 271 ples of environmental management in Cameroon are properly put in practice without any hitches. In the light of the challenges relating to the crafting and implementation of principles of environmental management discussed in the previous section of this work, some recommendations have been designed in view of enhancing the role of principles in general environmental management. 5.2 Way forward 5.2.1 Revision of the 1996 Cameroonian law on environmental management It may be good to recall here that the 1996 Law in question was adopted just four years after the Rio Summit on Environment and Development and not very distant from the date of entry into force of most of the Rio-outcome instruments. This makes the 1996 Law not entirely obsolete today but void of provisions that espouse contemporary environmental trends and issues. Principles such as erga omnes and common concern for humankind are completely neglected in the law meanwhile such principles are modern fabrics of international environmental management. The law therefore needs to be revised in order to broaden the scope and substances of the principles of environmental management. 5.2.2 The need for enabling instruments to enhance the implementation of some principles There is need for the adoption of enabling instruments that will give more effect to some of the fundamental and guiding principles of environmental management in Cameroon. An enabling instrument for instance is necessary for the rehabilitation of polluted areas as a subset of the polluter pays principle. This has already been done for some of the principles such as the principle of participation whose implementation is enabled by the law on Environmental Impact Assessment as modified by the 2013 Law on Environmental and Social Impact Assessment. 5.2.3 The creation of specialised environmental courts or tribunals A while ago we made mention of the erga omnes principle whose pointers are specifically poised at the judge. We do not expect judges to have the same level of training and knowledge in environmental matters as much as he/she does in other legal branches. In the case of Cameroon, there is yet no branch consecrated for the training of environmental judges in the National School of Administration and Magistracy. It Christopher F. TAMASANG & Andre Felix Martial TCHOFFO 272 is not therefore unexpected for magistrates (whether standing or sitting) who leave from this institution to have the kind of disinterestedness in enforcing environmental considerations and principles as they do. It is only fairly recently that environmental studies were introduced in the National School of Administration and Magistracy (ENAM). The introduction of environmental education in institutions in charge of training of magistrates in French-speaking and English-speaking African countries is still under preparation and negotiation. The last meeting on the subject was organised in Yaoundé under the auspices of UNEP, Francophonie and ECOWAS in February 2018. On the basis of such developments, we see that the issue of insufficient capacity of judges and traditional court systems in building environment-related issues is not an allusion but a reality. References Agius, E & S Busutil (eds), 1998, Future generations and environmental law, London, Earthscan Publications. Bell, S & D McGillivray, 2008, Environmental law, 7th edition, Oxford, Oxford University Press. Coyle, S & K Morrow, 2004, Philosophical foundations of environmental law: property, rights and nature, Cambridge, Hart Publishing. Driss, R, 1998, The responsibility of the state towards future generations, in: Agius, E & S Busutil (eds), 1998, Future generations and environmental law, London, Earthscan Publications, 21-26. Ebbeson, J & P Okowa, 2009, Environmental law and justice in context, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. Eckersley, E, 2004, The green state: rethinking democracy and sovereignty, Cambridge, The Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Fisher, E, B Lange & E Scotford, 2013, Environmental law: texts, cases and materials, Oxford, Oxford University Press. Hunter, H, J Salzmann & D Zaelke, 1998, International environmental law and policy, New York, Foundation Press. Louka, E, 2006, International environmental law: fairness, effectiveness and world order, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. Paterson, J, 2011, The precautionary principle: practical reason, regulatory decision-making and judicial review in the context of fuctional differentiation, in: Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos, A, New environmental foundations, 3rd edition, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group, 83-104. Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos, A, 2011, New environmental foundations, 3rd edition, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Sands, P & J Peel, 2012, Principles of international environmental law, 3rd edition, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. Sunkin M, DM Ong & R Wight, 2002, Source book on environmental law, 2nd edition, London, Cavendish Publishing. Tamasang, CF, 2008, Sustainable development: some reflections with regards to the new constitutional dispensation in Cameroon, 15 (1) African Law Review, 142. PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN CAMEROON 273 Tamasang, CF, 2015, Crafting and implementation of multilateral environmental agreements: are parliamentarians useful actors? 4 (6) Revue Africaine de Droit Public, 44. Tchoffo, AFM, 2013, Green trade, sustainable development and the protection of basic human rights in Africa: the case of Cameroon, Dissertation for Diplome d’Etudes Approfondies, University of Yaoundé II. Weiss, EB, 1990, Our rights and obligations to future generations for the environment, 84 The American Journal for International Law, 198. van Wyk, S, 2017, The impact of climate change law on the principle of state sovereignty over natural resources, Baden-Baden, Nomos. 274 CHAPTER 11: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT UNDER CAMEROONIAN LAW Christopher F. TAMASANG & Sylvain N. ATANGA 1 Introduction Environmental concerns have been at the centre of economic, social and political considerations both at the national and international levels since the last half of the 20th century. This is because of increased awareness and recognition of the fact that the protection and improvement of the environment is a major issue which affects the wellbeing of peoples and economic development throughout the world,1 which is a necessity for the survival and continuous existence of humans on the planet. This global recognition comes against a background of direct and indirect unprecedented deleterious effects of man’s developmental activities on the environment especially since the industrial revolution, which has resulted into unmeasurable environmental degradation and the depletion of natural resources. These concerns made the need for information on the potential effects (environmental, social, economic, etc.) of developmental initiatives imperative. The most effective solution to this need is the development of environmental impact assessment (EIA) which has not only been prescribed by most soft law and hard law instruments of a global character, but has been domesticated into the local legislations of most countries in the world including Cameroon. EIA has become a major environmental management tool/technique in almost all national legal jurisdictions. EIA has also become a condition for funding by international finance donors. For instance, funding from the World Bank is subject to EIA since 1989, especially for ‘category A’ projects.2 Environmental and social impact assessment is also used as conditionality for the African Development Bank’s ‘category 1’ projects, i.e. operations likely to cause ____________________ 1 This was recognised in para. 2 of the Preamble to the Declaration of the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment held in Stockholm in1972. 2 A proposed project is classified as ‘category A’ if it is likely to have significant adverse environmental impacts that are sensitive, diverse, or unprecedented. These impacts may affect an area broader than the sites or facilities subject to physical works; Stuart & McGillirray (2008:434). ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT UNDER CAMEROONIAN LAW 275 significant environmental and social impacts, to ensure compliance with the Bank’s environmental and social policies.3 At the national level, banks have set up departments that implement the banks’ loan policy by making EIA a condition for granting loans for projects that impact on the environment. They term it ‘loans for green environment’.4 EIA is the process of predicting the likely deleterious effects of a proposed project, policy, plan or programme on the environment prior to a decision being made about whether or not the promoter of the project should proceed. It is a technique that presents in a systematic manner a technical assessment of impacts on the environment that the project is likely to cause and explains the significance of predicted impacts and as a result, it indicates the scope for modification or mitigation.5 EIA describes a process that produces a written statement to be used to guide decision-making, with several functions. First, it should provide decision-makers with information on environmental consequences of proposed activities and in some cases, programmes and policies, and their alternatives. Second, it requires decisions to be influenced by that information. And thirdly, it provides a mechanism for the participation of potentially affected persons in the decision making process.6 The objective of this chapter is to examine how in theory and practice, EIA is regulated under Cameroonian law. This will necessitate a conceptual clarification of EIA, establishment of the legal basis for its application at the international and national levels, a critical analysis of EIA procedure and practice in Cameroon and finally, the assessment of the effectiveness of IEA practice in Cameroon 1.1 Conceptual clarification of EIA Before we arrive at what environmental impact is, it will be expedient to have an understanding of the various words that make up the expression EIA: ‘Impact assessment’ (IA) simply defined is the process of identifying the future consequences of a current or proposed action. The ‘impact’ is the difference between what would happen with the action and what would happen without it.7 The concept of ‘environment’ in impact assessment evolved from an initial focus on the biophysical components to a wider definition, including the physicalchemical, biological, visual, cultural and socio-economic components of the total en- ____________________ 3 AfDB (2001:10); AfDB (2015:37). 4 One would for example find in this category at Afrikland First Bank, Union Bank of Africa, United Bank of Cameroon SCB- Credit Lyonnais, National Financial Credit Bank, etc. 5 Japanese Environmental Agency (1999:1). 6 Sands (2012:601). 7 International Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA), see www.iaia.org/resources accessed on 28 January 2018. Christopher F. TAMASANG & Sylvain N. ATANGA 276 vironment. The Cameroonian legislator seems to have wholeheartedly adopted this evolution of defining environment in a holistic manner. The framework law on environmental management8 (hereinafter referred to as the Framework Law on Environmental Management) defines the environment as9 all the natural or artificial elements and biogeochemical balances they participate in, as well as the economic, social and cultural factors which are conducive to the existence, transformation and development of the environment, living organisms and human activities. The International Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA) defines EIA as10 the process of identifying, predicting, evaluating and mitigating the biophysical, social, and other relevant effects of development proposals prior to major decisions being taken and commitments made. Increasing concerns in developed economies about the impact of human activities on human health and on the biophysical environment led to the development of the concept of EIA in the 1960s, and to its adoption as a legally-based decision-support instrument later in that decade to assess the environmental implications of proposed development. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) in the USA, which became effective on 1st of January 1970, was the first of many EIA laws and procedures in countries around the world. The NEPA required federal agencies to integrate environmental values into their decision making processes by considering the environmental impacts of their proposed actions and reasonable alternatives to those actions. NEPA defines EIA as a11 systematic interdisciplinary approach which will ensure the integrated use of the natural and social sciences and the environmental design arts in planning and decision making which may have impact on man’s environment. The European Union approved a Directive on EIA in 1985.12 Currently, EIA is a requirement in most countries of the world including Cameroon. Some EIA systems or jurisdictions constrain EIA to the analysis of impacts on the biophysical environment while others include the social and economic impacts of development proposals. Some financial institutions (e.g. the African Development Bank) use the expression ‘environmental and social impact assessment’ (ESIA) to emphasise the inclusion (and the importance) of the social impacts.13 This is also the case in Cameroon since 2013. ____________________ 8 Law No. 96/12 of 5 August 1996 relating to Environmental Management in Cameroon. 9 Article 4 of Law No. 96/12 of 5 August 1996 relating to Environmental Management. 10 IAIA (2009:1). 11 Section 102 (A) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. 12 Council Directive 58/337/EEC on Assessment of the effects on certain public and private projects on the environment. 13 Economic Commission for Africa (2005). ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT UNDER CAMEROONIAN LAW 277 The need to apply IA to strategic levels of decision-making (e.g., policies, legislation, plans, and programs) led to the development of strategic environmental assessment (SEA). SEA is generally understood as an impact assessment process that aims to mainstream environmental, social, economic, and health issues and ensure the sustainability of strategic decisions. Legal provisions for SEA are emerging, in many cases associated with EIA institutions and legislation. The European Union approved a directive on the environmental assessment of plans and programs in 2001. The SEA is gaining increasing acceptance as a tool that is used early in decision-making to help inform decisions at the sectoral and regional level and to set the parameters for alternatives analysis. In Cameroon, the current decree laying down procedures for carrying out EIA in Cameroon14 recognises three types of impact assessments including the SEA. In Cameroon, EIA was first echoed in 1996 in the Framework Law on Environmental Management, Article 17, whose 2005 enabling Decree defined EIA as “…a systematic study in view of determining whether or not a project has negative effects on the environment”.15 This Decree was later replaced in 2013 to extend EIA to include three different studies including ESIA, SEA and environmental impact statement (EIS) which will be seen subsequently. 1.2 The legal bases for EIA in international environmental law The importance of EIA can never be undermined for it has been recommended and prescribed by many soft law as well as hard law international environmental instruments: As early as 1972, Principles 13 and 14 of the Stockholm Declaration 1972 identify the adoption of an integrated and coordinated approach by States to their development planning as a means of achieving rational management of resources, which constitutes an essential tool for reconciling any conflict between the needs of development and the need to protect and improve the environment. This was EIA in its embryonic stage. IEA was fully recognised in 1992 at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, held in Rio de Janeiro. Principle 17 of the Final Declaration is dedicated to EIA: ____________________ 14 Decree No. 2013/0171/PM of 14 February 2013 laying down rules for conducting environmental and social impact studies. 15 Section 2 of Decree No. 2005/0577/PM of 23 February 2005 on the procedures for carrying out EIA. Christopher F. TAMASANG & Sylvain N. ATANGA 278 Environmental impact assessment, as a national instrument, shall be undertaken for proposed activities that are likely to have a significant adverse impact on the environment and are subject to a decision of a competent national authority. In Chapter 37 (Capacity Building) of Agenda 21,16 capacity building (both public and private) to evaluate the environmental impact of all development projects is underscored. Furthermore, Chapter 8 of Agenda 21 articulates the requirement for integrating environment and development at policy, planning and management levels for improved decision-making. These include conducting national reviews of economic, sectoral and environmental policies, strategies and plans; strengthening institutional structures; developing or improving mechanisms to facilitate the involvement of all concerned; and establishing domestically determined procedures. Five years after United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) (Rio+5), the Programme for Further Implementation of Agenda 21, an outcome of the review of progress achieved in implementing UNCED agreements, identified yet again, environmental and social impact analysis based on participatory principles, as an important policy instrument for integrating the economic, social and environmental objectives of sustainable development. The Millennium Development Goals, adopted by 189 nations and signed by 147 heads of state and governments during the UN Millennium Summit in 2000, provide a framework for the integration of the principles of sustainable development into country policies and programs, which is one of the aims of SEA. Ten years after UNCED, at the World Summit on Sustainable Development in 2002, the Johannesburg Declaration on Sustainable Development was adopted. An important element contained in this declaration is the collective responsibility to advance and strengthen the interdependent and mutually-reinforcing pillars of sustainable development – economic, social and environment at all levels. In addressing the challenges of unsustainable patterns of consumption and production, the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation identifies the use of EIA procedures as a key action to be undertaken.17 There are other international conventions that contain specific provisions relating EIA. In the domain of conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) urges member countries18 to introduce appropriate procedures requiring environmental impact assessment of its proposed projects that are likely to have significant adverse effects on biological diversity with a view to ____________________ 16 Agenda 21 is an action plan and outome of the Earth Summit (UN Conference on Environment and Development) held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 1992. 17 UN (2003). 18 Article 14 of the CBD. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT UNDER CAMEROONIAN LAW 279 avoiding or minimizing such effects and, where appropriate, allow for public participation in such procedures. The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), Article 206 provides as follows: when states have reasonable ground for believing that planned activities under their jurisdiction or control may cause substantial pollution of or significant and harmful changes to the marine environment, they shall, as far as practicable assess the potential effects of such activities on the marine environment. 1.3 Legal bases for the application of environmental impact assessment in Cameroon Cameroon has been actively involved in international environmental action since the birth of environmental law especial in terms of participating in international meetings on the subject, and in signing and ratifying multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs).19 It is therefore not surprising that Cameroon has domesticated the spirit and prescriptions of these international instruments into national legal frameworks on environment and environment related sectors like the forestry, wildlife and mining. The Cameroonian Constitution facilitates this task by giving the possibility and setting out modalities for adopted and ratified treaties to be applicable in Cameroon as national law. It provides that that duly approved or ratified treaties and international agreements, shall following their publication override national laws, provided the other parties implement the said treaty or agreement.20 EIA origin in Cameroon can be traced back to the enactment of Law No. 94/001 of 20 January 1994 that lays down the requirements for the management of forestry, wildlife and fisheries. It was however limited to projects that may affect the equilibrium of the forest only. This law provides that “the initiation of any development project that is likely to perturb a forest or aquatic environment shall be subject to a prior study of the environmental hazard”.21 EIA was introduced fully into the local law through Law No. 96/12 of 5 August 1996 relating to environmental management which was the first national legislation on environmental management. Section 17 of this law provides as follows: (1) The promoter or owner of any development, project, labour or equipment, which is likely to endanger the environment, owing to its dimension, nature or the impact of its activities on the ____________________ 19 As early as 1972, she was a participant to the Stockholm Conference on the Human Environment. 20 Article 45. 21 Section 16 (2). Christopher F. TAMASANG & Sylvain N. ATANGA 280 natural environment shall carry out an environmental impact assessment. This assessment shall determine the direct or indirect incidence of the said project on the ecological balance of the zone where the plant is located or any other region, the physical environment and quality of life of populations and the impact on the environment in general. (2) The environment impact assessment shall be included in the file submitted for public investigation where such a procedure is provided for. (3) The impact assessment shall be carried out at the expense of the promoter. The above law equally provides that the conditions for the implementation of the EIA provisions will be laid down by another instrument.22 It was not until February 2005, that is, nine years later, that a Prime Ministerial Decree No. 2005/0577/PM to lay down the procedure for carrying out EIA formally launched the EIA procedure. According to Alemagi et al.23 the Decree is monumental because it represents the first attempt made by the Government of Cameroon to incorporate the legal and procedural framework governing EIA into a comprehensive legal document. This was consolidated by the publication and enactment of Order No. 0070/MINEP of March 2005 by MINEP (as then it was) prescribing the different categories of projects that would necessitate an EIA.24 Later on, Decree No. 2013/0171/PM to lay down rules for conducting environmental and social impact assessment (hereinafter referred to as the 2013 Decree) will amend and replace Decree No. 2005/0577. The 2013 decree explicitly mentions the social aspect of the impact study, as it is refers to environmental and social impact assessment (ESIA) rather than to environmental impacts assessment (EIA). This caused a change in appellation from EIA to ESIA. This appellation has officially been recognised and became a peculiarity of Cameroon. The 2013 decree also introduced strategic environmental and social assessment (SEA) and the environmental impact statement (EIS) as tools for environmental assessment. The latest improvement on ESIA was carried out in February 2016 with two Ministerial Orders; one to elaborate on the categories of operations subject to ESIA and SEA, and the other to define the content for a modelled terms of reference (ToR). ____________________ 22 Section 17(4). 23 Alemagi et al. (2007:1). 24 This was to implement the provisions of Section 19 of the Environmental Management Law which provided that “the list of categories of operations whose implementation is subject to an impact assessment as well as the conditions under which the impact assessment is published shall be laid down by an enabling decree of this law”. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT UNDER CAMEROONIAN LAW 281 2 The procedure and practice of environmental impact assessment in Cameroon From the foregoing, it becomes clear that the current legislation for EIA in Cameroon is the Framework Law on Environmental Management, the application of which is enabled by Decree No. 2013/0171/PM. These legislations provide for three types of EIA that must be conducted under Cameroonian law by the promoter or owner of any development, project, labour or equipment, which is likely to endanger the environment, owing to its dimension, nature or the impact of its activities on the natural environment. These include ESIA, the SEA and the EIS. This is in conformity with the trend in international legal practice which has evolved to lay emphasis on the social aspect of the impact study and also the development of strategic environmental impact assessment. In fact, Article 7 of the 2013 Decree provides that the promoter or owner of any development project, establishment, programme or policy, must carry out an ESIA, SEA or EIS under pain of sanctions envisaged in the law inforce. The 2013 Decree also provides that the list of activities subject to ESIA and SEA and the content of the ToR will be provided by an Order of the minister in charge of environment25 while the list of activities subject to EIS shall be provided by local councils in consultation with the decentralised services of the ministry in charge of the environment.26 It will be pertinent to examine the procedure for carrying out each type of impact assessment and most importantly, analyse the extent to which the provisions of the laws in inforce are complied with. A distinction can be made between the ESIA and the SEA process on the one hand that have similar procedures, and the EIS procedure on the other. 2.1 Environmental and social impact assessment (ESIA) Section 2 (1) of the 2013 Decree defines ESIA as an study that is aimed at determining the negative and positive effects of a project on the environment. This definition has not changed much from that contained in the 2005 Decree for even though ‘social’ has been added to the new appellation, the definition does not expressly make mention of the social aspect of the assessment. But environment here must be interpreted broadly as defined by Article 4 of the Framework Law on Environmental Management to include social, economic and cultural dimensions. ____________________ 25 Section 8 (1). 26 Section 8 (2). Christopher F. TAMASANG & Sylvain N. ATANGA 282 Ministerial Order No. 00001/MINEPDED of 9 February 2016 fixes different categories of operations whose realisation is subject to ESIA and SEA. This Order amends and replaces the 2005 Order that defines activities subject to EIA. The Order classifies projects requiring an ESIA into two categories. Category 1 projects are those projects requiring a simple ESIA while Category 2 projects are those projects requiring a detailed ESIA study. Articles 9 and 10 of the 2013 Decree prescribe the requisite contents for reports emanating from a simple and a detailed EIA study. According to Article 9, a report originating from a ‘simple EIA study’ must comprise: the summary of the study in a simple language and in English and French, the description of the current environment where the project is envisaged, a description of the project, a review of the legal and institutional provisions and requirements relevant to the activity, a report of the field work, an inventory and the description of the impacts of the project on the environment including envisaged mitigating measures together with an estimate of the corresponding cost, the approved terms of reference of the study, environmental and social management plan and the bibliographic references. The contents of a report emanating from a ‘detailed ESIA study’ as prescribed by Article 10 of the 2013 Decree must include: the summary of the study in a simple language, and in English and French: a description and analysis of the initial state of the site and its physical, biological, human, and socio-economic environment; a description and analysis of all the components as well as natural and socio-cultural resources likely to be affected by the project, including reasons for choosing the site; a description of the project; the presentation and analysis of the different alternatives; the reason for choosing the project amongst other possible solution; the identification and evaluation of the possible effects of implementing the project on the natural and human environment; an indication of the envisaged measures for avoiding, reducing, eliminating or compensating the detrimental effects of the project on the environment together with an estimate of the corresponding cost; a program for the sensitization and information including minutes of meetings held with the public, NGOs, syndicates and other organized groups affected by the project; an environmental management plan comprising surveillance mechanisms and the environmental follow up of the project and, where necessary, a compensation plan; and the terms of reference of the study including the bibliographic references. To go about the ESIA, the promoter shall submit to the competent administration and MINEPDED in addition to the general project file his application for the conduct of the ESIA with the ToR of the study and a receipt of payment of examination fees amounting to FCFA 1,500,000 for the ToR for a summary ESIA and FCFA ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT UNDER CAMEROONIAN LAW 283 3,000,000 for a summary ESIA and FCFA 2,000,000 for the ToR for a comprehensive ESIA and FCFA 5,000,000 for a comprehensive ESIA.27 The general project file shall contain the following information: (i) a general description of the project or activity, (ii) a request for completion of the ESIA mentioning the social relevance of the project, social capital, the respective sector of the activity and the number of jobs provided through the project, (iii) the ToRs of ESIA accompanied by a descriptive checklist describing and supporting the project, with the emphasis on preservation of the environment and the reasons for choosing the site, (iv) the receipt of payment of examination fees as provided for in Article 17 of the 2013 Decree. Article 8 (3) of the Decree prescribes that the MINEPDED shall provide a standard model of Terms of Reference (ToR) for the EIS, the ESIA and SESA depending on the activities. This Order was promulgated in 2016.28 Upon receipt of the application, the competent authority has a maximum of ten days to transmit same together with its reasoned comments in relation to the ToRs to MINEPDED. The MINEPDED has 20 days from the date of receipt of the application with reasoned opinion of the competent authority, to take its decision regarding the approval of the ToRs, failure of which the terms of reference shall be considered approved. This decision comprises of a checklist of the content of the ESIA study to be carried in relation to the type of project, the type of analysis required and the responsibilities and obligations of the proponent.29 This approval gives the proponent the go-ahead to do a full-scale environmental impact study based on the set of specifications of the ToRs and any other indications contained in the approval. The conduct of summary and comprehensive ESIA is to be entrusted, at the choice of the proponent, to a consultant, a consulting firm, a non-governmental organisation or an association approved by the MINEPDED with a priority given to nationals in the case of equal qualifications.30 This is unlike the case of EIS where the proponent can recruit any expert by reason of his competence to conduct it. The law lays gives the ministry the authority to approve experts for ESIA because of the gravity to the potential risks the project poses on the environment. This prevents the possibility of having incompetent persons or structure carrying out assessments which may result to inaccurate reports thereby defeating the very purpose of the study. The law makes public consultations an integral part of the assessment process after the approval of the ToR. These consultations consist of meetings between the ____________________ 27 Article 13 (1) of the 2013 Decree. 28 Through Order No. 00002/MINEPDED of 8 February 2016 to define modelled types and content of the term of reference. 29 Art 13 (4) of the 2013 Decree. 30 Article 14 of the 2013 Decree. Christopher F. TAMASANG & Sylvain N. ATANGA 284 promoter and/or his consultants and the population affected by the project in the locality within which the project is executed. These consultations are aimed at informing the population about the study, registering any eventual opposition to the project and permitting the opinion of the population to be expressed in the conclusions of the study.31 The 2013 Decree guarantees a high involvement and effective participation of the population by providing that the proponent must transmit to the representative of the population 30 days before the first meeting, a programme of the public consultation which must be approved by the administration in charge of the environment comprising; the dates and places of meetings, a descriptive and explicit essay of the project and the purpose of the consultation.32 Minutes of every consultation meeting are produced and signed by the representatives of the population and appended to the report of the ESIA study. The law does however not make provisions or defines who is considered ‘population’ and ‘representative of the population’ respectively. We propose that persons who make up these consultation meetings should be those whose stakes can be hampered by the implementation of a project and representatives should be local chiefs who should hire the services of experts in case they lack the competence to understand the issues at stake. The law therefore leaves a loophole by not defining who should be present in such meetings, giving the promoter or consultancy firm the liberty to select who shall take part in the meeting. Often the persons who attend these meetings barely understand the purpose for which they are called. This makes the public consultations baseless and futile. After the ESIA study, two copies of the environmental and social impact report are submitted to the competent administration (CA) and twenty to the administration in charge of the environment. As soon as the CA receives the Report, it evaluates and forms an opinion which is transmitted to Ministry for Environment, Nature Conservation and Sustainable Development (MINEPDED). It is at this stage that the MINEPDED puts in place a mixed team (MINEPDED and CA) to conduct field trips for the purpose of checking or verifying qualitatively as well as quantitatively, information contained in the report and collecting the views of the population concerned in a public meeting. This public meeting enables the team to correlate the information in the report with the views of the public. The mixed team has 15 days within which to forward its findings to the Inter-Ministerial Committee for the Environment (CIE) for simple ESIA studies and 20 days for detailed studies. MINEPDED forwards to CIE the report of the ESIA, the report of the assessment of the EIA made by the MINEPDED, and the report of the assessment of records of public consultations and public hearings for consideration. When the CIE is summoned to examine an EIA report, it analyses the report in terms of form and content. ____________________ 31 Article 20 (3) of the 2013 Decree. 32 Article 21 of the 2013 Decree. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT UNDER CAMEROONIAN LAW 285 CIE concludes its review with an advice report, which summarises the major findings or observations that captured the attention of members at the end of the evaluation of the report. The opinion of the CIE is essential prior to the approval of an EIA by the Minister for the environment. MINEPDED then decides on the admissibility of the ESIA and notifies the promoter 20 days upon receipt of the mixed committee report. The Minister in charge of the environment informs the proponent of the admissibility of the report and have it published in the press, radio, etc. or they formulate comments for making the ESIA admissible.33 The approval of the EIA report is a prerequisite for the decision to carry on the project. In practice, the approval of the EIA report means the granting of environmental compliance certificate. The decision is based on the following documents: the EIA report, the evaluation report of the mixed team as an outcome of the review process, the public participation documents and the recommendations of the CIE. The Minister decides on the impact study. Three possible decisions can be arrived at: • a favourable decision: an environmental compliance certificate is issued. This is the document that authorises the promoter to execute his project and serves as prima facie proof that he has complied with the regulations inforce; • a conditional decision: the minister tells by writing the promoter what to do to comply and get the environmental compliance certificate; or • a non-favourable decision: it implies the prohibition of the implementation of the project. The ESIA procedure is quite complex and this is a guarantee for proper screening to ensure greater efficacy in the impact assessment study. 2.2 Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) This is a formal and exhaustive systematic process which permits the evaluation of the environmental effects of a policy, plan or programme that has multiple components.34 Proponents of the above type of policies, plans or programs which can have effects on the environment can carry out SEA, but during execution or extension of the project, each project phase can be subject to a separate ESIA. The type of activity subject to SEA is determined by the Ministerial Order No. 00001/MINEPDED of 9 February 2016 fixing different categories of operations whose realisation is subject to ____________________ 33 Article 18 of the 2013 Decree. 34 Article 2 (3) of the 2013 Decree. Christopher F. TAMASANG & Sylvain N. ATANGA 286 ESIA and SEA. The procedure for the carrying out SEA is not different from that of ESIA. 2.3 Environment impact statement (EIS) EIS is made for small-scale projects or business / facilities that are not subject to an audit or ESIA but are likely to have significant effects on the environment. It can be carried out either before the establishment of the project, during its establishment and installation or in the course of its execution. The list of activities subject to EIS is defined by the local council in consultation with the decentralised department of MINEPDED.35 The involvement of communal units in EIA is a commendable novelty for it permits for effective monitoring and a sense of participation in regulating activities that affect them. Before starting an EIS, the promoter must have the related draft ToRs approved. In this regards, a file containing the following contents has to be submited to the municipality of the locality where the project would be implemented: • the general dossier with information on the project or activity; • a request for completion of the EIS mentioning the social relevance of the project, social capital, the respective sector of the activity and the number of jobs provided through the project; • the ToRs of EIS accompanied by a descriptive checklist describing and supporting the project, with the emphasis on preservation of the environment and the reasons for choosing the site; and • the receipt of payment of examination fees to be determined by the municipalities. Two copies of the file are sent to decentralised services of MINEPDED.36 The decentralised services of MINEPDED have 15 days to give its opinion on the ToRs. If the municipality does not react within 30 days after the deposit of the draft ToRs, the latter shall be deemed approved37 permitting the proponent to carry out the study. The realisation of the EIS is under the responsibility of the promoter of the project or activity which is to be undertaken. An EIS can be conducted by anyone with the required expertise and who may be hired by the proponent for it. Once the EIS is finalised, the proponent shall submit the report to the municipality (number of copies not specified) and pay the fees for the report review whose ____________________ 35 Article 8 (2) of the 2013 Decree. 36 Article 15 of the 2013 Decree. 37 (ibid.). ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT UNDER CAMEROONIAN LAW 287 amounts and methods of collection would be determined and specified by relevant municipalities.38 The municipality has 30 days from the date of receipt of the EIS to give an answer to the proponent after receiving the advice of the local responsible services of the MINEPDED. Three answers are possible after the impact statement was examined: • a favourable decision: the attestation of conformity is issued by the municipality to the promoter; • a conditional decision: the municipality tells to the promoter by writing which measures have to be taken to comply and receive the attestation of conformity; or • a non-favourable decision: prohibition of implementation of the project or suspension of activities concerned.39 3 Adjudication mechanisms in environmental impact assessment in Cameroon Enforcement is indispensable to the effectiveness of any law or regulation. Cameroonian EIA Law provides a number of guarantees and safeguards to ensure compliance with EIA provisions. These measures which are both administrative and judicial are available to various stakeholders involved in the process to redress violations of the law and resolve conflicts. 3.1 Administrative mechanisms These are mechanisms that are used by the central authority in charge of EIA, that is the ministry in charge of the environment to ensure compliance with the environmental and social management plan (ESMP) approved in the EIA study. These mechanisms are available only after the issuance of the certificate of environmental conformity (CEC). 3.1.1 Routine checks and surveillance Article 27 of the 2013 Decree gives MINEPDED the responsibility to ensure administrative and technical surveillance of the implementation of the ESMP after the issu- ____________________ 38 Article 19 (2) of the 2013 Decree. 39 Article 19 (3) of the 2013 Decree. Christopher F. TAMASANG & Sylvain N. ATANGA 288 ance of the CEC to ensure compliance. There are three scenarios that can be envisaged at the end of the said surveillance. 3.1.2 Reporting obligation According to Article 27 (3), the promoter is required to produce quarterly reports of the implementation of the environmental and social management plan addressed to the ministry in charge of the environment. The law is rather silent on what happens where the promoter fails to produce such a report. 3.1.3 Adoption of corrective or additional measures The ministry in charge of the environment is empowered to adopt corrective or additional measure where upon submission of the quarterly report of implementation of the ESMP, it is realised that some effects where initially insufficiently considered. In such a case, the administration in charge of the environment may also hire the services of private experts following public contract rules to carryout studies on the aspects of the assessment that were initially not sufficiently considered. Where in the course of surveillance the administration detects cases of noncompliance with the ESMP or the promoter fails to comply with reporting obligations, the law does not make any specific provisions on measures to be taken to ensure regularity. However it is discernible from previous dispositions of the law that the following administrative measures may be taken by the ministry in charge of environment: • warnings; • suspention of CEC; or • withdrawal of CEC. The question that becomes obvious is whether there are any administrative recourse mechanisms available to communities that are directly affected by the activities requiring EIA, where the promoter fails to comply with the provisions of the law by for instance, non-execution of the project in conformity with the ESMP. Even though the law is silent on this question, members of such a community can address a complaint to the minister in charge of the environment, who may, if the complaint is founded, adopt any of the administrative measures mentioned above. Another case worth addressing is that of blatant disregard of EIA procedures by a project proponent or where after carrying out ESIA and SEA, a negative response is given by the competent authority but the promoter goes ahead to execute the project. Again the promoter may start executing his project before a final decision is made on ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT UNDER CAMEROONIAN LAW 289 his application file. Once again, even though the law is silent on this question, practice shows that the promoter may either be suspended definitely or indefinitely without prejudice to penalties under the Law on Environmental Management. Where the suspension is indefinite, the project owner may be required to carry out an environment audit in compliance with Decree No. 2013/0172 on environmental audit, for the suspension to be uplifted. 3.2 Judicial mechanisms Besides the administrative measures envisaged above, there are also judicial mechanisms that can be adopted by different stakeholders of the EIA. The following stakeholders may have locus standi in an EIA related judicial action: 3.2.1 The administration in charge of the environment As indicated above, the law gives the administration in charge of the environment the competence to oversee the EIA process. The said administration may bring an action against a promoter to whom CEC has been issued in an administrative court where administrative actions prove to be abortive. More so, where a promoter implements a project needing impact assessment, without carrying out such assessment, the administration may, besides taking suspension measures, also sue in ordinary law courts to have the promoter pay damages for causing harm on the environment through its activities which ought to have been guided by EIA processes if one was undertaken. This can happen where the promoter causes harm on the environment through his/her own fault, through no fault of his or through others under his authority and control. Still within ordinary courts of law, the criminal judge is competent and has been trying criminal violations of environmental prescriptions especially involving violations of EMP. Such competence is conferred on the criminal judge by the Penal Code40 but also the Framework Law on Environmental Management in Cameroon.41 ____________________ 40 Law No. 2016/007 of 12 July 2016. 41 Article 79. Christopher F. TAMASANG & Sylvain N. ATANGA 290 3.2.2 Local communities Local communities can bring an action in an administrative court against the administration in charge of the environment. Such action will premised on the ground that local communities are involved in the assessment process through public consultations42 which is one of the conditions for the grant of the CEC. Where the administration is bias, corrupt and produces inaccurate reports in the course of validation of the EIA report, against the interest of the community or in disregard of their observations, the latter can bring an action in an administrative court against the administration in charge of the environment and join the promoter of the project as a codefender. This can also be done on behalf of the communities by a civil society organisation and recognised under existing laws (associations, non-governmental organisations) working in the field of environmental protection. This then justifies not only their locus standi but also public interest in the prejudice that has been caused on the environment by violating the EMP. This can result in the suspension/withdrawal of the CEC by the administration in charge of the environment by a decision of the court without prejudice to criminal/civil sanctions. Another basis for local community action is the principle of participation through which locus standi is extended to local communities that can bring an action on a public as a whole interest basis or through representatives in the interest of the community at large as per Article 8 (2) of the Law of Environmental Management. Such an action can be brought against the promoter who is acting in irregularity. Civil society organisations may also act as plaintiff on behalf of the local communities against violators of EIA regulations.43 3.2.3 Action by the promoter of the project The promoter can bring an action in an administrative court against the competent administration. Considering the fact that the CEC on the basis of which the project is executed is an administrative act, the promoter has valid ground to bring an action against the administration before an administrative judge. This action can arise where the administration is bias or makes false appreciation of the ESIA application leading to inaccurate results. ____________________ 42 Tamasang (2008). 43 Article 8 of the Law on Environmental Management. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT UNDER CAMEROONIAN LAW 291 3.3 Alternative dispute resolution mechanisms A range of other mechanism exist regarding disputes between the administration in charge of the environment and promoters of projects as well as other stakeholders in the environment sector. Such alternative dispute resolution (ADR) mechanisms include compromise and arbitration. 3.3.1 Compromise The Framework law provides that the administration in charge of the environment44 has full rights to effect a compromise but this must be done only at the behest of the defaulter. This is what is called a compromise. In fact, the objective of the law is actually to reconcile the interest of business operators with that of protecting the environment so that business can prosper and at the same time services are paid to the environment and its resources. In any event, this seems to be the spirit that guided the 1996 legislator in crafting the compromise provisions. This may be legitimate thinking because of the advantages that a compromise may bring to the promoter of the project in terms of saving the costs of proceedings. However, considering the difficulties involved and time constraints, one may equally see it as a provision for the administration in charge of the environment to fill its coffers while sacrificing court action. However, it must be stated that the amount to be paid in relation to the compromise must not be lower than the minimum of the corresponding sanction provided for by the law.45 Although compromise is encouraged, it must be effected before any court procedures are engaged, otherwise such a compromise may be challenged and rendered null and void. 3.3.2 Arbitration Arbitration has been held to be the most common ADR mechanism. It is a formal measure where parties to an environmental dispute may settle their differences through a joint agreement before an arbitrator, in this case not usually named in advance because of the nature of the dispute. This is a provision of the Framework law.46 One may equally highlight the fact although the parties to the dispute have chosen arbitration, the outcome of it may not prejudiced a subsequent court action at ____________________ 44 Article 91 (1). 45 Article 91 (2). 46 Article 92. Christopher F. TAMASANG & Sylvain N. ATANGA 292 the initiative of either of the parties intended to challenge the arbitral award, the competence of the arbitrator. 4 Challenges to the effective implementation of environmental and social impact assessment in Cameroon 4.1 Inadequate scientific and baseline data The EIA law of Cameroon fully dictates the administrative procedures that need to be followed in order to obtain planning permission. The use of baseline information ensures that identified and evaluated impacts are traced within the EIA process, thus providing an efficient method of predicting the significance of impacts through existing environmental conditions. Insufficient or inadequate scientific and baseline data on the environment in most sectors in Cameroon undermine the efficiency and quality of ESIA and the whole EIA process. 4.2 Incompetent personnel and over-centralisation A Prime Ministerial Decree47 designating the Inter-Ministerial Advisory Committee for Environmental Impact Study was found to be inappropriate. In fact, in a series of personal communications with a senior specialist in the environmental management of highway projects in the Ministry of Public Works, a senior policy officer with a local NGO and a Director at the MINEP, it was revealed that the committee is composed of persons who lack the necessary expertise. A committee of this sort is supposed to include scientists and a multidisciplinary technical staff with the requisite knowledge of ESIA and its applicability in their respective sectors. The problem probably stems from the fact that the ESIA review and approval is centralised in Yaoundé and the officials lack a robust mastery of the ecological, physical, chemical, socio-economic and cultural environment of communities where EIA projects are envisaged. This will often lead to judgements and opinions that are flawed and baseless. ____________________ 47 See Article 15 (2) of Decree No. 2005/0577/PM. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT UNDER CAMEROONIAN LAW 293 4.3 Ineffective public participation in ESIA processes Indeed, public participation is a fundamental component of the ESIA process. As Wood48 explains, EIA is not EIA without consultation and participation. The European Commission strongly advocates public participation arguing that it increases the accountability and transparency of the decision – making process. The role and importance of public participation in environmental decision-making cannot be overlooked. The European Commission further established that effective public participation in the taking of decisions enables the public to express their views, and the decision maker has to take account of options and concerns which may be relevant to those decisions, thereby increasing the accountability and transparency of the decision-making process and contributing to public awareness of environmental issues and support for the decisions taken. However, looking at the current legal and procedural disposition regulating EIA in Cameroon, it is glaring that public participation is not statutorily protected. Indeed, it is poorly represented in terms of timing and communicational hurdles. Even though Article 17 of the 2005 Decree states that the promoter or proponent shall send to the representatives of the population concerned at least thirty days before the date of the first meeting the program of public consultations comprising the date and venue of meetings, the descriptive and an explanatory report of the project and the purpose of consultations. But looking at the legal provision, it is not clear when this first meeting should be scheduled during the EIA process and under what circumstances these consultations should be made. In fact, it would even seem that the first public participation is at the discretion of the proponent. This epitomises the fact that the public is treated with disdain in the current legal disposition. Indeed, the public should know exactly when the law mandates them to take part in public consultation within the framework of the EIA procedure in Cameroon. Although Article 20 (1) of the 2013 Decree states that the environmental impact study shall be carried out with the participation of the population concerned, through consultations and public meetings, for the purpose of sampling the opinion of the population on the project. Paragraph 2 of the same Article further stipulates that “public consultation shall refer to meetings held during the study in the locality concerned by the project”. As for public audience, it shall aim at advertising the study, recording possible oppositions to the project and enabling the population to give their say on the findings of the study. What impedes effective public participation with regard to the aforementioned provision is ineffective communication. Although Pidgin English and French are used to transmit fundamental knowledge about proposed EIA projects to the illiterate ____________________ 48 Wood (2002). Christopher F. TAMASANG & Sylvain N. ATANGA 294 Cameroon populace during public consultation, available information to enable the public to participate effectively during public meetings is difficultly grasped by the lay person. The problem is accentuated by the lack of public knowledge on legal issues and the fact that most legal documents in Cameroon are in French, presenting a constraint to the English speaking population. 4.4 Problem of specialisation of judicial personnel Most judges in Cameroon today were trained in an era in which environmental law was not a component of their training. They therefore have inadequate competence in environmental issues and so fail to fully appreciate EIA matters brought before them. This leads to decisions that at times do not adequately reflect the law in force. 4.5 Inadequate human resources One of the factors that impede effective EIA implementation in Cameroon is the inadequacy of scientists and technical staff or personnel. It would seem that so far only one institution49 offers a post-graduate program in EIA in Cameroon. 4.6 Corruption within the EIA Processes Corruption is a canker-worm that has eaten deep into the fabrics of the Cameroonian society affecting every area and sector, not leaving out EIA enforcement institutions. Corruption in the form of bribes, preferential treatment, nepotism, cronyism and even state capture can be observed in every stage of the law enforcement process in Cameroon. 5 Conclusions and recommendations The provisions of the Framework Law on Environmental Management addressing Environmental and Social Impact Assessment and its numerous enabling instruments which are undergoing amendments to suit the emerging society, constitutes a milestone in the management of environment in Cameroon for it takes EIA to another level to cover dimensions that are yet to be covered by the environmental laws of ____________________ 49 CRESA-Forêt-Bois – a regional centre affiliated to the University of Dschang. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT UNDER CAMEROONIAN LAW 295 most African countries. But as it is the general phenomenon in Cameroon, like in many African countries, implementation of these legal instruments lags behind. There is a need to improve on the implementation of this law in order to dwindle the gap between theory and practice. We therefore recommend the following: • community and public participation should be heightened in the public consultation process by ensuring that parties concerned are educated on the importance of participating in such consultations and also on real effects of such projects on their environment; • decentralisation of ESIA and SEA processes by amending the law to give decentralised organs more role in the process; • eradication of corruption in EIA processes and inclusion of environmental education in the training of personnel of the judiciary; and • increase the involvement of experts in different commissions and bodies in charge of validating and monitoring EIA processes. References AfDB / African Development Bank, 2001, Environmental and social impact procedures for African Development Bank’s public sector operation, https://www.afdb.org/fileadmin/uploads/ afdb/Documents/Policy-Documents/ENVIRONMENTAL%20AND%20SOCIAL%20 ASSESSMENT%20PROCEDURES.pdf, accessed 6 February 2018. AfDB / African Development Bank, 2015, Environmental and social assessment procedures (ESAP), 1 (4) Safeguard and Sustainabitly series, Abidjan, African Development Bank, https://www.afdb.org/fileadmin/uploads/afdb/Documents/Publications/SSS_–vol1_–_Issue4_- _EN_-_Environmental_and_Social_Assessment_Procedures__ESAP_.pdf, accessed 6 February 2018. Alemagi, D, VA Sondo & J Ertel, 2007, Constraints to environmental impact assessment practice: a case study of Cameroon, 9 (3) Journal of Environmental Impact Assessment Review, 357. Economic Commission for Africa, 2005, Review of the application of environmental impact assessment in selected African countries, Addis Abeba, UNECA. IAIA / International Association for Impact Assessment, 2009, What is impact assesment?, https://www.iaia.org/uploads/pdf/What_is_IA_web.pdf, accessed 6 February 2018. Japanese Environment Agency, 1999, Environmental impact assessment for international cooperation: furthering the understanding of environment impact assessment systems for experts engaged in international cooperation activities, Japan, Overseas Environmental Cooperation Centre. Sands, P, J Peel, A Fabra & R Mackenzie, 2012, Principles of international law, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. Stuart, B & D McGillirray, 2008, Environmental law, 7th edition, Oxford, Oxford University Press. Tamasang, CF, 2008, Sustainable development: some reflections with regards to constitutional dispensation in Cameroon, 2 African Law Review. Wood, C, 2002, Environmental impact assessment: a comparative review, 2nd edition, Harlow, Prentice Hall. 296 CHAPITRE 12 : LA REGLEMENTATION DES ÉTABLISSEMENTS CLASSÉS AU CAMEROUN ET LA PROTECTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT Paule Jessie NANFAH 1 Introduction Les préoccupations environnementales ont fait l’objet d’une réelle prise en compte par le droit positif camerounais dans les années 1990,1 dans la dynamique de grandes rencontres internationales sur le sujet, inaugurées par la Conférence des Nations unies à Rio sur l’environnement et le développement en 1992. [L’]introduction fort significative des préoccupations environnementales dans un corpus institutionnel et normatif qui, jusque-là, en avait été sevré, traduit l’intérêt que les pouvoirs publics camerounais ont voulu marqué à la protection de l’environnement dans ce pays à la fin du XXe siècle.2 Cette mobilisation nationale en faveur de la protection de l’environnement, soutenue par les efforts internationaux en la matière, ne s’est pas démentie avec le temps. Avec l’«insertion des dispositions à vocation environnementale dans la Constitution nationale»3, l’adoption d’une loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement, de nombreuses lois sectorielles, d’un plan national pour la gestion de l’environnement, ainsi que l’adoption de tous les textes juridiques qui ont suivi en cette matière, « l’ordre juridique camerounais s’est…enrichi d’un important arsenal en matière de protection de l’environnement ».4 Par ailleurs, on a pu constater que5 la dynamique environnementaliste, qui préconise un nouvel art de vivre à travers les notions de gestion écologiquement rationnelle et de développement durable, s’accroît. Il ne peut en être autrement car l’Homme, par ses œuvres, sape inconsciemment ou non, avec une puissance redoutable son propre climat, et risque de se placer dans une situation irréversible d’autodestruction. ____________________ 1 Andela (2009:422). 2 (ibid.). 3 (ibid.). 4 Foumena (2017:308). 5 (ibid.:306). ÉTABLISSEMENTS CLASSÉS ET LA PROTECTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 297 Dans le même sens, en tenant compte de l’impact des activités humaines sur l’environnement, et en évoquant de ce fait le lien entre environnement et développement, on peut convenir que, « s’il est vrai que le développement excessif est préjudiciable à l’environnement, il est vrai aussi qu’un environnement pollué est un obstacle au développement ».6 De ce point de vue, on peut noter que le Cameroun, concerné par la problématique du développement, s’est engagé dans un processus de relance de son industrialisation. Dans ce sens, il a élaboré et s’efforce de mettre en œuvre des politiques et stratégies pour accélérer ce processus. Pour atteindre ce résultat, le gouvernement camerounais,7 convaincu du rôle moteur des infrastructures dans la facilitation des échanges et la promotion d’une croissance forte et durable…, entend investir massivement dans les infrastructures…tout en mettant l’accent sur la modernisation de l’appareil de production. De telles perspectives supposent l’existence d’un tissu industriel structuré et performant, et donc, un accroissement du nombre d’entreprises susceptibles de figurer dans la catégorie des établissements classés en raison des dangers que présentent leurs activités. L’arrêté du 1er octobre 1937 fixant les règles à appliquer en matière d’hygiène et de salubrité publique, semble être le premier élément à prendre en compte pour l’identification d’une réglementation des établissements classés au Cameroun, même si son apparition n’était que l’expression du8 souci de la puissance coloniale de transporter ou d’étendre sur les territoires d’outre-mer dont elle assure l’administration, certains textes touchant notamment à l’hygiène et à la salubrité publique. À partir d’une jurisprudence relative aux troubles de voisinage, notamment dans les litiges impliquant des entreprises ou des industries, le juge camerounais a contribué à dessiner les premiers contours de cette réglementation.9 Ces premiers indices de l’existence d’une réglementation sur les établissements dangereux, insalubres ou incommodes seront suivis par des textes plus récents comme la loi n° 96/12 du 5 août 1996 portant loi-cadre relative la gestion de l’environnement et la loi n° 98/015 du 14 juillet 1998 relative aux établissements classés dangereux, insalubres ou incommodes. ____________________ 6 Treves (1998:348). 7 Document de stratégie pour la croissance et l’emploi. Cadre de référence de l’action gouvernementale pour la période 2010-2020, août 2009, 14-18. Voir également, Ministère de l’economie, de la planification et de l’aménagement du territoire (2009:9). 8 Kamto (1992). 9 (ibid.). Paule Jessie NANFAH 298 Si chacun de ces textes législatifs propose une définition des établissements classés qui n’est pas tout à fait la même, la loi du 14 juillet 1998 présente l’avantage principal d’être plus précise dans sa définition que la loi-cadre. En effet, alors que cette dernière se contente de donner un aperçu général de ce qu’elle entend par établissements classés, la première formule sa définition avec une énumération assez détaillée de ce qu’il faut identifier comme établissements classés, ainsi que des intérêts qu’elle entend protéger. Il en ressort que sont considérés comme des établissements classés dangereux, insalubres ou incommodes :10 les usines, les ateliers, les dépôts, les chantiers, les carrières, et de manière générale, les installations industrielles, artisanales ou commerciales exploitées ou détenues par toute personne physique ou morale, publique ou privée, et qui présentent ou peuvent présenter soit des dangers pour la santé, la sécurité, la salubrité publique, l’agriculture, la nature et l’environnement en général, soit des inconvénients pour la commodité du voisinage. La nature des entreprises concernées suggère que le secteur économique est visé et que le contenu de cette réglementation peut avoir des incidences sur les perspectives de développement du Cameroun. Dans la vision programmée du Cameroun, il apparaît clairement que le développement de l’industrie, manufacturière notamment, joue un rôle clé pour son émergence économique. De ce fait, on peut craindre une augmentation des pollutions, des nuisances et autres dangers pour la sécurité et la salubrité publique, la santé, et l’environnement. Ainsi qu’on a déjà pu le remarquer, au Cameroun11 l’accroissement et la densification du tissu industriel ont engendré une augmentation considérable des risques d’accidents et autres désagréments …. La nécessité de prévenir ces risques a pris de l’ampleur ces derniers temps, au regard du nombre d’accidents et des nuisances survenues tant au niveau des installations classées publiques ou privées. Si les risques sont actuels et réels, il convient de relever que les établissements classés font l’objet d’un encadrement juridique. On peut considérer qu’il s’agit d’un aspect positif sur lequel le processus de développement économique du Cameroun peut utilement s’appuyer pour prendre son essor, même si son contenu interroge, notamment en ce qui concerne son efficacité, au regard de la diversité des intérêts à protéger. Dans un monde dominé par le système capitaliste qui recherche avant tout l’efficacité économique,12 ____________________ 10 Article 2, du loi du 14 juillet 1998 relative aux établissements classés dangereux, insalubres ou incommodes. 11 Ministère des mines, de l’industrie et du développement technologique (2016:3). 12 Hugon (2005:113). ÉTABLISSEMENTS CLASSÉS ET LA PROTECTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 299 l’environnement pose avec acuité, les questions de la viabilité du modèle de développement des pays industrialisés et de leur généralisation à l’échelle mondiale et celle de la compatibilité entre la pauvreté des pays en développement et la priorité donnée à l’environnement. Le Cameroun étant concerné par ces enjeux, il a semblé important de s’intéresser, à la réglementation des établissements classés dans ce pays au regard de ses effets sur la protection de l’environnement, la question de savoir dans quelle mesure cette réglementation prend en compte et contribue à la protection de l’environnement. C’est à partir de deux piliers, le contrôle des pollutions et des nuisances (2) et la prévention des risques (3), sur lesquels semble reposée la réglementation des établissements classés, qu’un début de réponse peut être amorcé. 2 Le contrôle des activités polluantes et dangereuses Le contrôle des activités polluantes et dangereuses est à la base de la réglementation des établissements classés. En effet, cette réglementation a pour but d’organiser l’exercice de l’activité industrielle, commerciale, agricole et artisanale tout en garantissant la protection d’un certain nombre d’intérêts. 2.1 Les intérêts protégés L’une des caractéristiques de la réglementation des établissements classés est la diversité des intérêts pris en compte. Ces intérêts, énumérés à l’article 2 de la loi relative aux établissements classés,13 concernent la santé, la sécurité et la salubrité publique, l’agriculture, la nature, l’environnement et la commodité du voisinage. Il s’agit d’une délimitation qui révèle le souci du législateur de garantir l’ordre public, de protéger le cadre de vie des populations, tout en réaffirmant le droit à un environnement sain consacré par la Constitution.14 En incluant la salubrité et la sécurité publiques au rang des intérêts qu’elle protège, la loi relative aux établissements classés s’inscrit dans la perspective de l’exercice de la police administrative qui a pour objet le maintien de l’ordre public, par les autorités publiques compétentes. Dans ce cadre il s’agit d’une police spéciale,15 dans la mesure où cette loi s’applique à une catégorie particulière de bâti- ____________________ 13 Loi n° 98/015 du 14 juillet 1998 relative aux établissements classés dangereux, insalubres ou incommodes. 14 Loi n° 96/06 du 18 janvier 1996 portant révision de la Constitution du 2 juin 1972, modifiée et complétée par la loi n° 2008/01 du 14 avril 2008. 15 La réglementation sur les installations classées pour la protection de l’environnement est considérée comme une police spéciale en France et rien ne permet de supposer qu’il n’en est Paule Jessie NANFAH 300 ments, en l’occurrence les établissements classés que sont les usines, les ateliers, les dépôts, les chantiers, les carrières et, de manière générale, les installations industrielles, artisanales ou commerciales qui présentent ou peuvent présenter des dangers pour les intérêts que ladite loi protège. Ainsi, il apparaît que la protection des différentes composantes de l’environnement contre les nuisances et les risques liés aux activités humaines participent du maintien de l’ordre public. À cet égard, on a pu affirmer que16 l’existence de nombreuses polices spéciales en matière d’environnement souligne avec force la multiplicité des intérêts publics qui s’attachent à sa protection et la variété des facettes de…[l]’ordre public environnemental. Il convient par ailleurs de souligner qu’en raison du caractère contingent et évolutif attaché à l’ordre public, on a noté que « l’objectif de salubrité a donné une acception plus large : celle de la sécurité sanitaire liant santé et protection de l’environnement ».17 Au Cameroun, on peut identifier cette dynamique en se référant à l’article 1 de la loi relative aux établissements classés qui dispose que « la présente loi régit, dans le respect des principes de gestion de l’environnement et de protection de la santé publique, les établissements classés dangereux, insalubres ou incommodes. » Cette affirmation fait clairement apparaître l’importance accordée à l’environnement et à la santé dans cette réglementation et paraît en constituer le pilier. Le souci ici étant de protéger les populations et l’environnement contre les nuisances causées par les activités des entreprises. De fait, il apparaît que la protection de l’environnement, et donc le droit y relatif, sont au cœur de la réglementation des établissements classés et cette unité se cristallise autour de la notion du cadre de vie. Bien que les textes juridiques camerounais relatifs aux établissements classés ne mentionnent pas de manière expresse le cadre de vie, rien a priori n’interdit de penser que cette réglementation vise à offrir aux populations un cadre de vie d’une certaine qualité, notamment lorsqu’on met cette finalité en lien avec le droit à un environnement sain que la Constitution garantit à chaque individu et l’exigence qui est faite aux établissements classés de prendre en compte et de respecter, dans la conduite de leurs activités, la commodité du voisi- ____________________ pas de même au Cameroun étant donné que les règles juridiques de ce pays en la matière, remplissent les conditions qui permettent d’identifier une police spéciale : une police administrative qui s’applique à certaines catégories d’administrés, à certaines activités, et/ou à certains bâtiments. Elle est définie par des textes spécifiques aux dispositions plus précises que celle de la police administrative générale ; en outre, les autorités compétentes sont différentes de celle de la police administrative générale. Voir Morand-Deviller (2005:576). 16 Sauvé (2017:6). 17 Morand-Deviller (2005:564). ÉTABLISSEMENTS CLASSÉS ET LA PROTECTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 301 nage. L’idée étant de limiter les inconvénients résultant de ces activités au strict minimum pour les riverains et donc, d’éviter les conflits de voisinage. Ces conflits peuvent naître des perturbations18 résultant du voisinage, d’une proximité plus ou moins directe, avec l’entreprise, l’établissement classé qui en est la source. Le trouble qui en résulte19, lorsque son anormalité est établie, est susceptible d’engager la responsabilité civile de son auteur, sans qu’il soit nécessaire de prouver sa faute. Cependant, ce régime de responsabilité semble affaibli par l’énoncé de l’article 32 de la loi relative aux établissements classés, notamment en son alinéa 2 qui insiste sur la prise en compte de la faute de la victime dans la réparation du préjudice. Cela paraît d’autant plus regrettable que le législateur camerounais semble n’avoir abordé la question des troubles de voisinage qu’à partir de l’angle des accidents et sinistres éventuels qui peuvent survenir en raison du mauvais fonctionnement de l’établissement classé en cause. Ce qui semble être en contradiction avec les dispositions qui renvoient aux inconvénients pour la commodité du voisinage, résultant des activités des établissements classés. 2.2 Les activités concernées Pour que les textes juridiques relatifs aux établissements classés s’appliquent à une activité, il faut que cette activité soit susceptible de porter atteinte aux intérêts protégés par la loi. En effet, la définition des établissements classés précise que les activités concernées doivent présenter des dangers ou des inconvénients pour les intérêts énumérés. Le critère de la nuisance, réelle ou potentielle, étant déterminant dans ce cadre. Mais, comme le souligne Michel Prieur, « le fait de présenter de tels inconvénients, s’il est nécessaire, n’est pas suffisant, il faut de plus que l’activité en question ait fait l’objet d’un classement dans une nomenclature ».20 La prise en compte du critère de la nuisance, entendue comme un facteur de trouble et son résultat dommageable,21 est une manifestation de la volonté de protéger la santé des populations, la salubrité, la sécurité de leur cadre de vie, mais aussi l’environnement et les autres éléments qui entrent dans le champ des intérêts protégés par les règles juridiques sur les établissements classés. De plus, elle révèle la ____________________ 18 Nuisances sonores, olfactives, visuelles, dégradations, pollutions, contamination du cadre de vie, etc. 19 Conceptualisé dans la théorie juridique des troubles anormaux du voisinage, notamment en droit civil. Mais on observe que le domaine d’application de cette théorie se développe avec la multiplication des atteintes à l’environnement. 20 Prieur (2004:490). 21 Cornu (2004:611). Paule Jessie NANFAH 302 place de la lutte engagée contre les pollutions et les nuisances dans un monde où on observe une industrialisation constante des économies et une urbanisation des modes de vie, et qui est de manière permanente à la recherche d’un équilibre entre les exigences de développement économique, d’innovation technologique, de protection de la santé et préservation du patrimoine naturel et architectural.22 Elle permet également de reconnaître l’influence des règles de lutte contre les pollutions et les nuisances, et donc des prémisses de la réglementation des établissements classés, sur le développement du droit de l’environnement.23 La nomenclature quant à elle, peut être comprise comme la classification méthodique des éléments d’un ensemble,24 ou de manière plus précise, comme une liste positive des activités présentant des risques potentiels et dès lors soumises à un contrôle. Elle permet de considérer qu’« une installation est dite classée lorsque du fait de ses inconvénients ou dangers, elle a fait l’objet d’une inscription sur une liste appelée nomenclature ».25 Cette nomenclature étant le reflet de la vision qu’ont ceux qui procèdent à son élaboration sur les installations qui font l’objet d’un classement26, elle constitue par essence, une donnée appelée à changer afin de s’adapter aux évolutions technologiques et industrielles, du contexte dans lequel la réglementation des installations classées doit être mise en œuvre et du niveau d’efficacité recherché.27 Enfin, l’importance de cette nomenclature peut s’apprécier en fonction du régime auquel les installations classées sont soumises : déclaration, ou autorisation, suivant la gravité des dangers ou inconvénients que l’installation est susceptible de provoquer. Il faut cependant noter qu’à ce jour, contrairement à ce qui a été annoncé par la loi, la nomenclature et donc le classement des établissements n’a pas encore fait l’objet d’un acte réglementaire.28 Il existe simplement une liste qui répertorie les établissements classés par région et par filière, élaborée par le ministère compétent en la matière.29 L’absence d’une nomenclature dans ce cadre est de nature à affecter l’effectivité d’une réglementation qui se révèle alors incomplète, malgré les efforts du ministère compétent pour se doter d’une liste qui pourrait constituer un point de départ dans la formalisation de la nomenclature. D’autre part, l’inexistence de la no- ____________________ 22 Sauvé (2016:2). 23 Morand-Deviller (2015). 24 Cornu (2004:602). 25 Prieur (2004:490). 26 Massard-Guilbaud (2011:23-29). 27 Ces développements, qui traduisent les évolutions sont de la matière, sont effectués à partir de la réglementation française des installations classées qui, à ce jour, est l’une des plus aboutie. 28 Article 2 (2) de la loi relative aux établissements classés dangereux, insalubres ou incommodes. 29 Ministère des mines, de l’industrie et du développement technologique (2014). ÉTABLISSEMENTS CLASSÉS ET LA PROTECTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 303 menclature fait perdre sa consistance, et dans une certaine mesure sa pertinence, à la typologie des établissements classés qui sont répartis par la loi en établissements de première classe et en établissements de deuxième classe, car c’est par l’effet de la nomenclature que le classement des activités polluantes est opéré et que les industriels et autres propriétaires d’établissements classés sont soumis au régime de police administrative. En conclusion, on peut dire qu’un établissement classé ne peut être reconnu comme tel que si ses activités sont inscrites dans une liste faisant office de nomenclature et si le risque de nuisance, réel ou potentiel, de celles-ci sur les intérêts protégés mentionnés plus haut est avéré. Ce qui confirme la nécessité de l’existence d’une nomenclature afin de mieux organiser, la prévention des risques industriels et environnementaux. 3 La prévention des risques et la sanction des atteintes à l’environnement La réglementation des établissements classés apparaît comme le cadre légal dont l’objet est de connaître et de prévenir les pollutions, les dangers et les risques que leurs activités génèrent ou sont susceptibles de générer. De manière générale, on regroupe ces risques dans deux catégories : les risques industriels et les risques environnementaux. La violation des règles destinées à limiter, voire à éviter la survenance d’accidents ou de troubles anormaux de voisinage entraîne des sanctions qui peuvent prendre diverses formes. 3.1 La prévention des risques industriels et environnementaux Entendu comme un évènement accidentel se produisant sur un site industriel mettant en jeu des produits et/ou des procédés dangereux et ayant des conséquences graves pour le personnel, le voisinage et l’environnement, le risque industriel est l’objet de la réglementation des établissements classés. Si d’une manière générale les sites apparaissant comme les plus dangereux sont classés, il ne faut pas en conclure qu’un site qui n’est pas classé ne présente pas de danger. Quant au risque environnemental, plus difficile à définir, il renvoie à la survenance possible d’incidents ou d’accidents causés par des activités et qui peuvent affecter l’environnement. Il est généralement évalué en tenant compte de la probabilité de survenance d’un évènement et du niveau de danger. Pour limiter la probabilité de survenance des accidents liés à l’existence des risques industriels et/ou environnementaux, la réglementation sur les établissements classés met à la charge des exploitants l’obligation d’identifier les risques de leurs activités et de proposer des mesures correctives avant de les éliminer ou les réduire. Paule Jessie NANFAH 304 Dans cette perspective, ils doivent fournir un certain nombre d’études d’incidence30 et mettre en œuvre des prescriptions techniques formulées par l’Administration compétente en vue de garantir la sécurité du fonctionnement de l’établissement classé. Les études dites d’incidence sont des études scientifiques imposées par les textes31 et que les exploitants doivent généralement fournir dans leur dossier de demande d’autorisation. Il s’agit notamment d’une étude d’impact, d’une étude de dangers et du plan d’urgence. En ce qui concerne l’étude d’impact, l’article 3 du décret n° 99/818/PM du 9 novembre 1999 fixant les modalités d’implantation et d’exploitation des établissements classés dangereux, insalubres ou incommodes, l’identifie comme l’une des pièces du dossier de demande d’autorisation en vue de l’implantation d’un établissement classé. Cette étude d’impact doit être élaborée selon les modalités prévues par la législation et la réglementation en vigueur.32 L’étude d’impact a pour vocation de décrire toutes les incidences prévisibles de la mise en service de l’établissement classé. Elle a pour finalité d’éclairer la décision de l’autorité compétente pour accorder l’autorisation et d’informer le public s’agissant des conséquences environnementales du fonctionnement du futur établissement. Si l’étude d’impact et l’étude des dangers33 ont en commun d’identifier les incidences possibles résultant du fonctionnement de l’établissement classé et bien qu’elles relèvent du principe de prévention et dans une certaine mesure du principe de précaution, « elles se distinguent par la vocation de l’étude d’impact à se saisir des conséquences d’un fonctionnement normal de l’installation et celle de l’étude des dangers à appréhender les accidents sur le site ».34 Avec l’étude des dangers, l’exploitant s’inscrit dans une dynamique prospective qui lui permet d’envisager les risques d’accidents internes et externes liés à l’établissement autorisé :35 ____________________ 30 Deharbe (2007:203). 31 Au Cameroun, par la loi-cadre sur la gestion de l’environnement, la loi relative aux établissements classés, les textes relatifs aux études d’impact et à l’audit environnemental, notamment. 32 Loi n° 96/12 du 5 août 1996 portant loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement. Décret n° 2013/0171/PM du 14 février 2013 fixant les modalités de réalisation de l’étude d’impact environnemental et social. Décret n° 2013/0172/PM du 14 février 2013 fixant les modalités de réalisation de l’audit environnemental et social. Arrêté n° 00001/MINEPDED du 8 février 2016 fixant les différentes catégories d’opérations dont la réalisation est soumise à une évaluation environnementale stratégique ou à une étude d’impact environnemental et social. Arrêté n° 00002/MINPDED du 8 février 2016 définissant le canevas type des termes de référence et le contenu de la notice d’impact environnemental. 33 Article 3 du décret n° 99/818/PM du 9 novembre 1999 fixant les modalités d’implantation et d’exploitation des établissements classés dangereux, insalubres ou incommodes. 34 Deharbe (2007:205). 35 (ibid.:220). ÉTABLISSEMENTS CLASSÉS ET LA PROTECTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 305 Consacrée aux conséquences environnementales d’un fonctionnement anormal des activités…, l’étude des dangers a pour objet de rendre compte de l’examen effectué par l’exploitant pour caractériser, analyser, évaluer, prévenir et réduire les risques d’une installation ou d’un groupe d’installations…,que leurs causes soient intrinsèques aux produits utilisés, liées aux procédés mis en œuvre ou dues à la proximité d’autres risques d’origine interne ou externe à l’installation. Elle précise l’ensemble des mesures de maîtrise des risques mises en œuvre à l’intérieur de l’établissement, qui réduisent le risque à l’intérieur et à l’extérieur de l’établissement, à un niveau jugé acceptable par l’exploitant. L’étude des dangers présente en outre l’avantage de poser les bases pour l’élaboration du plan d’urgence de l’établissement classé. Celui-ci est destiné « à assurer l’alerte des autorités compétentes et des populations avoisinantes en cas de sinistre ou de menace de sinistre, l’évacuation du personnel ainsi que les moyens pour circonscrire les causes du sinistre ».36 Cette énonciation lapidaire semble indiquer que le contenu du plan d’urgence est laissé à la discrétion de l’exploitant. Il est seulement précisé que ce plan doit être agréé par les Administrations compétentes qui s’assurent périodiquement du bon état et de la fiabilité des matériels prévus pour la mise en œuvre dudit plan. Il convient également de retenir que l’étude d’impact, l’étude des dangers et le plan d’urgence sont des pièces du dossier exigibles à tous les exploitants qui font une demande en vue soit d’obtenir l’autorisation d’une implantation d’un établissement classé (établissement de première classe), soit pour en faire la déclaration (établissement de deuxième classe). Il en va de même pour ce qui concerne les prescriptions techniques, même si dans les textes relatifs aux établissements classés on fait référence aux prescriptions techniques lorsqu’on parle d’un établissement de première classe et de prescriptions générales ou additionnelles lorsqu’on réfère à un établissement de deuxième classe. Ces prescriptions ont pour objet de sauvegarder les intérêts protégés, bien que les deux textes soient muets sur leur contenu, qu’il appartient à l’Administration de définir. En outre, la possibilité est laissée à l’exploitant d’un établissement de deuxième classe de solliciter du ministre compétent, la suppression ou l’atténuation de certaines prescriptions auxquelles il est soumis. Les études d’incidence et les prescriptions techniques visent à garantir que l’établissement classé fonctionne de manière à générer le moins de dangers, de risques et donc d’accidents ou de troubles anormaux de voisinage. Ce sont des obligations à la charge des exploitants et pour s’assurer que ces obligations sont respectées et mises en œuvre, des inspections et contrôles sont organisés. ____________________ 36 Article 12 de la loi relative aux établissements classés dangereux, insalubres ou incommodes et articles 3 et 14 du décret n°99/818 PM du 9 novembre 1999 fixant les modalités d’implantation et d’exploitation des établissements classés dangereux, insalubres ou incommodes. Paule Jessie NANFAH 306 L’inspection et le contrôle des établissements classés renvoient à l’ensemble des opérations menées dans lesdits établissements dans le cadre de la surveillance administrative et technique et visant à prévenir les dangers et les inconvénients de leurs activités.37 Cette inspection permet d’assurer les missions de police en matière de sécurité des installations, de préservation de la santé et de protection de l’environnement. Conduites par des inspecteurs assermentés, les inspections sont organisées par le décret n° 2014/2379/PM du 20 août 2014 fixant les modalités de coordination des inspections des établissements classés dangereux, insalubres ou incommodes. Si ce texte a fait œuvre utile en précisant les conditions et les modalités des inspections, le problème du nombre insuffisant d’inspecteurs reste entier, au regard du nombre des établissements classés à évaluer sur l’ensemble du territoire national. Si on peut également se féliciter de la création d’un Comité national des inspections, il faut encore s’assurer de son fonctionnement, et veiller à ce que tous les inspecteurs disposent des compétences qui leur permettront d’effectuer des contrôles efficaces, de prescrire des mesures réellement en mesure de garantir la sécurité industrielle, la commodité du voisinage et la protection de l’environnement. Les constatations inscrites dans les procès-verbaux et autres rapports à l’issue des missions de contrôle des inspecteurs peuvent donner lieu à des sanctions, notamment lorsque les établissements inspectés ne fonctionnent pas d’une manière conforme à la réglementation et portent atteinte aux intérêts protégés. 3.2 La sanction des atteintes à l’environnement Le non-respect des règles juridiques relatives à l’autorisation, à la déclaration et / ou au fonctionnement d’un établissement classé, constaté à l’issue d’une inspection et après une mise en demeure de se conformer à la réglementation signifiée à l’exploitant dans les conditions et délais prévus, peut entraîner la responsabilité dudit exploitant et donner lieu à une variété de sanctions. 3.2.1 Les sanctions administratives La réglementation des établissements classés confère à l’autorité compétente, une fonction de police administrative et met à sa disposition un arsenal de sanctions à l’encontre des exploitants d’établissements classés. ____________________ 37 Article 17, loi relative aux établissements classés dangereux, insalubres ou incommodes. ÉTABLISSEMENTS CLASSÉS ET LA PROTECTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 307 Les comportements sanctionnés au titre de cette réglementation concernent le nonrespect par l’exploitant d’un établissement classé des conditions qui lui sont imposées et le fonctionnement d’un établissement classé sans le titre exigé en vertu de la réglementation. Ainsi, les articles 28 et suivants de la loi relative aux établissements classés prévoient qu’en cas d’inobservation des conditions imposées à l’exploitant, le ministre compétent peut prendre des sanctions administratives. Mais avant, l’inexécution de la réglementation doit être constatée par un inspecteur assermenté dans le cadre d’un contrôle effectué et après une mise en demeure invitant l’exploitant à se conformer à la réglementation en vigueur dans un délai ne pouvant excéder trois mois, ou deux mois lorsqu’on est dans l’hypothèse du fonctionnement d’un établissement classé en l’absence de titre. Une fois ces conditions remplies, et si l’exploitant n’a pas obéi à la mise en demeure, le ministre en charge des établissements classés38 peut procéder d’office, aux frais de l’exploitant, à l’exécution des mesures prescrites, obliger l’exploitant à consigner entre les mains d’un comptable public une somme correspondant au montant des travaux à réaliser, laquelle sera restituée à l’exploitant au fur et à mesure de l’exécution desdits travaux et le cas échéant, procéder au recouvrement forcé de cette somme, suspendre par arrêté, le fonctionnement de l’établissement jusqu’à exécution des conditions imposées. Mais une porte de sortie a été aménagée pour l’exploitant à l’effet de lui permettre d’échapper à ces sanctions. En effet, par une saisine de l’autorité compétente, il peut solliciter une transaction. Cette procédure doit être antérieure à toute procédure judiciaire éventuelle et aboutir à la fixation d’un montant à verser par l’exploitant à l’Administration. À ce stade il convient de souligner, pour le regretter, la faiblesse du contentieux administratif dans ce cadre. En effet, bien qu’il y ait de la matière39, la relative indifférence du juge administratif camerounais sur les questions environnementales de manière générale, et en particulier en ce qui concerne les établissements classés, interpelle d’autant plus qu’il est susceptible de connaître des questions y afférentes.40 Les enjeux liés à une plus grande implication du juge administratif camerounais s’agissant de la protection de l’environnement devraient susciter chez celui-ci une plus grande prise de conscience de la41 mesure de la consécration juridique de la notion d’environnement sain dans l’ordre juridique camerounais. Il devrait, comme son homologue judiciaire, s’inviter dans le « combat écologiste ». ____________________ 38 Article 28 de la loi relative aux établissements classés dangereux, insalubres ou incommodes. 39 Tcheuwa (2006:40). 40 Foumena (2017:311). 41 Expression de Dupuy reprise par Maljean-Dubois et cité par Foumena (2017). Paule Jessie NANFAH 308 Tant la protection de l’environnement par ses soins apparaît d’autant plus indispensable que le risque d’atteinte grave à la sécurité de l’environnement n’est plus une éventualité, la menace étant grandissante et inéluctable42, notamment lorsqu’on évoque la matière des établissements classés. 3.2.2 La responsabilité civile et pénale de l’exploitant En raison des préjudices causés par les activités de son établissement classé, l’exploitant peut voir sa responsabilité civile engagée sur la base des articles 1382 et suivants du Code civil, même s’il dispose d’un titre autorisant son établissement à fonctionner et qu’il respecte les conditions qui lui sont imposées. Et dans l’hypothèse du mauvais fonctionnement de l’établissement classé, la faute de l’exploitant n’aura pas besoin d’être prouvée.43 En principe, la responsabilité de l’établissement classé est engagée dès qu’il est établi que sa présence et son fonctionnement affectent gravement le voisinage. Dans ce cadre, il convient de signaler qu’en ce qui concerne le contentieux relatif aux établissements classés, le juge camerounais a davantage été saisi des litiges concernant les troubles de voisinage. À cet égard, Kamto a indiqué que, bien que44 la notion de ‘trouble de voisinage’ paraît étrangère à notre culture sociale, elle est en pratique reçue par la jurisprudence camerounaise qui admet « la responsabilité du propriétaire dans tous les cas où il cause à des voisins des inconvénients résultant du voisinage ». Il en est ainsi, notamment d’usine ou d’industrie répandant des odeurs malsaines, des émanations putrides ou des fumées délétères… ;45 d’une société des travaux publics dont les activités entraînent la stagnation des eaux de pluie à l’entrée de la concession d’un particulier… ;46 d’un propriétaire qui, par des travaux d’aménagement effectués sur son propre terrain, cause un ‘trouble de fait’ à son voisin, c’est-à-dire une ‘agression matérielle contre la possession’, en l’occurrence un déséquilibre de niveau entre les deux fonds résultants des travaux de terrassement et entraînant un éboulement… ; 47 de deux entreprises industrielles qui, en orientant exclusivement vers la propriété d’un voisin toutes les eaux recueillies sur leurs terrains, accroissent le volume initial des eaux et leur nocivité, « ce qui a pour conséquence regrettable une érosion considérable »… ;48 d’une entreprise dont les activités produisent un bruit insupportable pour les voisins ….49 ____________________ 42 (ibid.). 43 Article 32 de la loi relative aux établissements classés dangereux, insalubres ou incommodes. 44 Kamto (1992). 45 Cour d’Appel de Yaoundé, 16 août 1975, Société Paterson Zochonis cl Atangana Protais. 46 Tribunal de Grande Instance de Yaoundé, 12 octobre 1983, Nkouedjin Yotnda cl Société EXARCOS. 47 C.A. de Yaoundé, 3 juin 1987, Nguema Mbo Samuel cl Anoukaha François. 48 TGI de Douala, 3 octobre 1983, Dimite Thomas c/CICAM et GUINNESS – CAMEROUN. ÉTABLISSEMENTS CLASSÉS ET LA PROTECTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 309 Quant à la responsabilité pénale, elle vient en soutien des sanctions administratives lorsqu’elles ne suffisent pas à obtenir de l’exploitant qu’il respecte ses obligations. Mais il semble que le contentieux pénal relatif aux établissements classés, de même d’ailleurs que le contentieux civil, se caractérise encore par une grande pauvreté, le juge camerounais n’ayant apparemment pas encore eu l’occasion de se prononcer à ce sujet. Pourtant,50 l’organisation de la gestion de l’environnement en République du Cameroun représente une terre fertile pour l’action en justice, soit devant le juge judiciaire (civil et pénal) soit devant le juge administratif suite à un excès de pouvoir résultant de l’action de l’administration chargée de l’environnement. Le juge pénal tout particulièrement voit son domaine considérablement précisé et clarifié par la loi du 5 août 1996, nonobstant quelques renvois généraux au Code pénal. En effet cette loi est revenue très largement sur les infractions, crimes et autres délits non seulement en prévoyant leur nature, mais aussi en fixant le montant des amendes et des peines d’emprisonnement encourues, et la loi relative aux établissements classés est venue renforcer ces dispositions pénales et ouvrir un nouveau champ d’action au juge pénal. 4 Conclusion En guise de conclusion, il apparaît que la réglementation des établissements classés est une pièce importante de l’architecture juridique de protection de l’environnement et de la santé des hommes au Cameroun. Au regard des intérêts qu’elle protège, elle se situe au cœur du dispositif juridique de lutte contre les pollutions et les nuisances. Cette réglementation repose sur la préservation des intérêts qu’elle énonce à partir de deux grands principes, la nécessité d’informer les pouvoirs publics avant l’implantation de l’établissement classé par le moyen d’une demande d’autorisation ou de déclaration, et l’obligation de respecter les prescriptions techniques formulées par l’Administration compétente, ces prescriptions visant à assurer une meilleure protection de l’environnement. Si on peut se féliciter de l’existence de cette réglementation qui apparaît néanmoins être assez sommaire, on peut regretter qu’une nomenclature n’ait pas encore été élaborée et ne permette pas d’avoir une pleine visibilité sur ce qu’est un établissement classé au Cameroun. La liste utilisée par le ministère en charge des établissements classés est un bon point de départ, mais pour produire tous ses effets juridiques, il faudrait encore qu’elle soit formulée dans les conditions prévues par la ____________________ 49 Ordonnance de référé du 10 juin 1985. 50 Tcheuwa (2006:41). Paule Jessie NANFAH 310 loi.51 Bien que son effectivité en soit atténuée, cette réglementation constitue une opportunité pour la prévention des risques et la sanction des atteintes à l’environnement. Mais il faut bien admettre que le contentieux environnemental, et donc des établissements classés, reste limité.52 À cet égard, le rôle du juge, tant judiciaire qu’administratif apparaît déterminant pour faire progresser la jurisprudence en faisant face au défi environnemental que peuvent suggérer les litiges dont il est saisi, en particulier celles qui résultent de l’activité des établissements classés. Du point de vue jurisprudentiel, cette matière paraît être un champ vierge que le juge camerounais tarde à investir, malgré toutes les promesses qu’il suppose s’agissant de la réaffirmation du droit de l’homme à vivre dans un environnement sain consacré par la Constitution. Bibliographie indicative Andela, JJ, 2009, Les implications juridiques du mouvement constitutionnel du 18 janvier 1996 en matière d’environnement au Cameroun, 4 Revue Juridique de l’Environnement, 421. Cornu, G, 2004, Vocabulaire juridique, 2e edition, Paris, PUF. Deharbe, D, 2007, Les installations classées pour la protection de l’environnement, Paris, Litec. Foumena, GT, 2017, Le juge administratif, protecteur de l’environnement au Cameroun ?, 2 Revue de Droit International et de Droit Comparé, 303. Hugon, P, 2005, Environnement et développement économique : les enjeux posés par le développement durable, 60 (4) Revue Internationale et Stratégique, 113. Kamto, M, 1992, Rapport introductif. Droit et politiques publiques de l’environnement au Cameroun, Yaoundé, CERDIE. Massard-Guilbaud, G, 2011, L’élaboration de la nomenclature des établissements classés au XIXe siècle, ou la pollution définie par l’État, 62 (2) Annales des Mines - Responsabilité et environnement, 23. Ministère de l’economie, de la planification et de l’aménagement du territoire, 2009, Cameroun Vision 2035, Yaoundé, Ministère de l’economie, de la planification et de l’aménagement du territoire. Ministère des mines, de l’industrie et du développement technologique, 2016, Guide d’inspection des établissements classés au Cameroun, Yaoundé, Ministère des mines, de l’industrie et du développement technologique. Morand-Deviller, J, 2005, Cours de droit administratif, 9e edition, Paris, Montchrestien. Morand-Deviller, J, 2015, Le droit de l’environnement, Paris, PUF. Prieur, M, 2004, Droit de l’environnement, Paris, Dalloz. ____________________ 51 Article 2 (2) de la loi relative aux établissements classés dangereux, insalubres ou incommodes. 52 Tcheuwa (2006:42). ÉTABLISSEMENTS CLASSÉS ET LA PROTECTION DE L’ENVIRONNEMENT 311 Sauvé, JM, 2017, L’ordre public. Regards croisés du Conseil d’État et de la Cour de cassation, L’ordre public. Regards croisés du Conseil d’État et de la Cour de cassation. Tcheuwa, JC, 2006, Les préoccupations environnementales en droit positif camerounais, 1 Revue Juridique de l’Environnement, 21. Treves, T, 1998, Le rôle du droit international de l’environnement dans l’élaboration du droit interne de l’environnement : quelques réflexions, dans : Kiss, MA, Les hommes et l’environnement, Paris, éd. Frison-Roche. 312 CHAPITRE 13 : DROIT ET POLITIQUE DE GESTION DES CATASTROPHES ET RISQUES AU CAMEROUN Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 1 Introduction Situé dans le bassin du Congo et au centre du golfe de Guinée, le Cameroun est exposé à une variété de catastrophes. La Fédération internationale de la croix rouge a développé une loi type en partenariat avec d’autres institutions internationales1 qui définit la catastrophe comme :2 Toute perturbation grave du fonctionnement de la société, constituant une menace réelle et généralisée à la vie, à la santé, aux biens ou à l’environnement, que la cause en soit un accident, un phénomène naturel ou une activité humaine, et qu’il s’agisse d’un événement soudain ou du résultat de processus de longue durée, à l’exclusion des conflits armés. Les catastrophes auxquelles le Cameroun est exposé sont, entre autres, les inondations, les tremblements de terre et secousses séismiques, les gaz mortels d’origine lacustre, les éruptions volcaniques, les avalanches rocheuses, les glissements de terrain, les feux de brousse et les sécheresses. Ces catastrophes comportent un certain nombre de dangers éventuels, plus ou moins prévisibles, considérés comme des risques. La protection civile indique que le Cameroun est menacé par des risques écologique, technologique, sanitaire, sismique, d’inondation et de mouvement de masse.3 Pour permettre au Cameroun de mieux s’organiser face aux catastrophes, la loicadre sur la gestion de l’environnement prescrit l’établissement4 [d’]une carte nationale et des plans de surveillance des zones à haut risque de catastrophes naturelles, notamment les zones à activité sismique ou volcanique, les zones inondables, les zones ____________________ 1 Notamment le Bureau des Nations unies pour la coordination des affaires humanitaires (OCHA) et l’Union interparlementaire (UIP) et l’Organisation mondiale des douanes (OMD). 2 Voir l’article 3 de la loi type relative à la facilitation et à la réglementation des opérations internationales de secours et d’assistance au relèvement initial en cas de catastrophe. 3 Voir la typologie des risques présentée par le ministère de l’administration territoriale et de la décentralisation : http://minatd.cm/dpc/index.php, consulté le 3 mars 2017. 4 Voir l’article 70 de la loi n° 96/12 du 5 août 1996 portant loi-cadre sur la gestion de l’environnement. DROIT ET POLITIQUE DE GESTION DES CATASTROPHES ET RISQUES 313 à risque d’éboulement, les zones à risque de pollution marine et atmosphérique, les zones de sécheresse et de désertification, ainsi que les zones d’éruption magmato-phréatique. Par ailleurs, la prévention des risques doit obéir aux principes consacrés5 en matière de protection de l’environnement tels que le principe de prévention, le principe de précaution, le principe de responsabilité, le principe de subsidiarité, le principe de participation et le principe pollueur-payeur.6 La gestion des catastrophes et risques implique la prévision et la prévention de ceux-ci, ainsi que la préparation et l’organisation des interventions sur le terrain et la réhabilitation des sites touchés. Aucune loi ne peut interdire la survenance d’une catastrophe, surtout naturelle. La première catastrophe naturelle de l’humanité, le déluge dont Noé fut le principal rescapé,7 fut une décision punitive divine contre la race humaine. Le début et la fin de cette catastrophe furent décidés par Dieu, ainsi que le moyen de sauvetage qui fut l’arche et les rescapés. Aucun humain n’y put rien. La vidéo du président américain Donald Trump appelant à la prière devant les ouragans en septembre 2017 aux États-Unis illustre largement cette impuissance de l’humain devant les catastrophes naturelles. Les effets des catastrophes naturelles ont toujours été au-dessus des capacités de résistance de l’être humain, d’où la nécessité d’organiser en permanence la gestion de ces phénomènes. La gestion des catastrophes et risques au Cameroun s’opère dans un cadre normatif, institutionnel et politique en pleine évolution et bénéficie de l’appui de la coopération internationale aussi bien au niveau régional qu’au niveau universel. 2 L’évolution du cadre institutionnel, normatif et politique de la gestion des catastrophes et risques au Cameroun Après la survenance de la catastrophe du lac Nyos en août 19868 le Cameroun s’est progressivement doté d’un cadre institutionnel, normatif et politique qui a connu une évolution cohérente depuis les années 80 jusqu’à nos jours. 2.1 L’évolution des institutions de gestion des catastrophes et risques Depuis presque deux décennies, le Cameroun a entrepris de renforcer son cadre institutionnel de gestion des catastrophes et risques afin de réduire leurs effets directs et ____________________ 5 Voir l’article 71 de la loi n° 96/12. 6 Voir l’article 9 de la loi n° 96/12. 7 Voir la Bible dans Genèse 7, versets 1-21. 8 Ministère de l’administration territoriale et décentralisation (2006:24). Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 314 indirects sur son territoire. Ce renforcement institutionnel s’est manifesté par la création des structures appropriées. 2.1.1 La direction de la protection civile du Ministère de l’administration territoriale et de la décentralisation La protection civile est une mission régalienne de l’État à vocation interministérielle et transversale qui incombe au Président de la République, qui en définit la politique générale.9 Cette mission régalienne « consiste à assurer en permanence la protection des personnes, des biens et de l’environnement contre les risques d’accidents graves, de calamités ou de catastrophes, ainsi que contre les effets de ces sinistres »,10 ce qui implique des mesures de prévention, de protection et d’organisation des secours. La protection civile interpelle l’intervention de plusieurs acteurs tels que les collectivités territoriales décentralisées, le système des Nations unies, les organisations intergouvernementales, les agences de développement, les organisations non gouvernementales et les populations. La structure administrative chargée de la protection civile a évolué au fil des années, passant d’un simple service à une cellule, puis d’une cellule à une direction.11 C’est au cours des années 90 que la direction de la protection civile a effectivement vu le jour à la faveur d’une nouvelle organisation du Ministère de l’administration territoriale.12 Quelques années plus tard, en 2004 précisément, à l’occasion d’une nouvelle organisation du gouvernement, la protection civile était devenue un des trois axes stratégiques de l’action du Ministère de l’administration territoriale et de la décentralisation, les deux autres étant l’administration du territoire et la décentralisation.13 En 2011, toujours à l’occasion d’une nouvelle organisation du gouvernement, la protection civile est consacrée comme un des domaines de compétences du Ministère de l’administration territoriale.14 La direction de la protection civile qui figure parmi les structures techniques de ce ministère est chargée : • de l’organisation générale de la protection civile sur l’ensemble du territoire national ; • des études sur les mesures de protection civile en temps de guerre comme en temps de paix ; • des relations avec les organismes nationaux et internationaux de protection civile ; ____________________ 9 Voir l’article 2 de la loi n° 86/016 du 6 décembre 1986. 10 Voir l’article 1 de la loi n° 85/016 du 6 décembre 1986. 11 Sur cette évolution, voir le rapport sur l’état de la protection civile au Cameroun 2006, 85. 12 Voir le décret n° 98/147 du 17 juillet 1998 portant organisation de ce ministère. 13 Voir le décret n° 2004/320 du 8 décembre 2004 portant organisation du gouvernement. 14 Voir le décret n° 2011/408 du 9 décembre 2011 portant organisation du gouvernement. DROIT ET POLITIQUE DE GESTION DES CATASTROPHES ET RISQUES 315 • de la préparation des stages de formation du personnel de la protection civile en liaison avec la sous-direction des ressources humaines ; • de l’examen des requêtes en indemnisation et aides financières des personnes victimes de calamités ; • du contrôle de l’utilisation des aides ; • de la coordination des moyens mis en œuvre pour la protection civile, notamment les secours, le sauvetage, la logistique, l’utilisation des forces supplétives et auxiliaires ; • des transferts des corps ; et • du suivi et de la gestion des aides. L’organigramme du Ministère de l’administration du territoire et de la décentralisation indique que la direction de la protection civile comprend une cellule des études et de la prévention et une sous-direction de la coordination et des interventions.15 2.1.2 Le Corps national des sapeurs-pompiers Le Corps national des sapeurs-pompiers (CNSP) est une formation militaire interarmées spécifique de protection civile.16 Il est placé sous l’autorité directe du ministre chargé de la défense et mis pour emploi à la disposition du ministre chargé de l’administration territoriale et de la décentralisation.17 En outre, le CNSP peut agir au profit des autres départements ministériels dans le cadre des missions qui lui sont dévolues. Les formations en unités du CNSP sont placées sous réquisition permanente et peuvent agir auprès des autorités administratives et des collectivités territoriales décentralisées pour les missions suivantes : • la lutte contre les calamités et leurs séquelles ; • les secours aux personnes et aux biens en péril ; • la participation à la gestion des catastrophes ; • la participation aux études et aux actions préventives intéressant son domaine de compétence. En période de crise, le CNSP peut être placé dans sa spécificité, par décret du Président de la République, sous le commandement du chef d’état-major général des armées. Dans ce cas, il reçoit ses missions de l’autorité militaire compétente. Le CNSP ____________________ 15 Voir le décret n° 2005/104 du 13 avril 2005 portant organisation du ministère de l’administration territoriale et de la décentralisation. 16 Voir l’article 1er du décret n° 2001/184 du 25 juillet 2001 portant réorganisation du corps national des sapeurs-pompiers. 17 (ibid.). Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 316 est dirigé par un commandant, officier supérieur nommé par décret du Président de la République. Le commandant est alors chargé de la conduite des activités spécifiques du corps, de la conception générale de l’action et de la permanence des services, de la mise sur pied, de la préparation, de l’instruction et du maintien en condition des unités de sapeurs-pompiers. Ainsi, à ce titre, sous l’autorité du ministre de la défense, participe-t-il entre autres, à la conception et à la mise en place des plans d’urgence pour faire face aux catastrophes et aux accidents graves. Le CNSP comprend : l’Étatmajor, le centre national d’instruction et des formations et unités territoriales. 2.1.3 Les organes et mécanismes de supervision et de coordination Ils sont de plusieurs ordres et on peut citer, entre autres, le Conseil national de protection civile, l’observatoire national des risques, la plate-forme nationale pour la réduction des risques de catastrophes, la commission d’analyse des risques de construction et la commission d’agrément des plans d’urgence. 2.1.3.1 Le Conseil national de protection civile Le Conseil national de protection civile (CNPC) est un organisme consultatif auprès du Président de la République en matière de protection civile. Il a été créé en 198618 et organisé en 199619 et regroupe l’essentiel des hauts responsables gouvernementaux du secteur sous les auspices du Secrétaire général de la Présidence de la République. Présidé par le secrétaire général de la Présidence de la République ou par son représentant en tant que de besoin, le Conseil comprend les membres ci-après :20 • le secrétaire général des services du Premier ministre ; • le ministre chargé de l’administration territoriale et de la décentralisation ou son représentant ; • le ministre chargé de la défense ou son représentant ; • le ministre chargé de la santé publique ou son représentant ; • le ministre chargé des relations extérieures ou son représentant ; • le ministre chargé des finances ou son représentant ; • le ministre chargé de la justice ou son représentant ; • le ministre chargé de la communication ou son représentant ; ____________________ 18 Voir l’article 3 de la loi n° 86/016 du 6 décembre 1986. 19 Voir le décret n° 96/054 du 12 mars 1996 qui fixe la composition et les attributions du Conseil national de la protection civile. 20 Article 3 du décret n° 96/054. DROIT ET POLITIQUE DE GESTION DES CATASTROPHES ET RISQUES 317 • le ministre chargé des transports ou son représentant ; • le ministre chargé des affaires sociales ou son représentant ; • le ministre chargé de l’environnement, de la protection de la nature et du développement durable ou son représentant ; • le secrétaire d’État à la sécurité intérieure ou son représentant ; • le directeur général de la recherche extérieure ou son représentant ; et • le président national de la croix-rouge camerounaise ou son représentant. Le CNPC est chargé de la mise en œuvre de la politique générale de protection civile, en temps normal comme en période de crise, telle que définie par le Président de la République, et peut faire toute suggestion utile en la matière.21 Aussi, pour l’accomplissement de ses missions, le Conseil procède, notamment, tout d’abord à une évaluation nationale détaillée des risques de catastrophes naturelles et technologiques, d’accidents graves et de calamités, ensuite à la mise à jour permanente d’un inventaire de fournitures, de matériels, de moyens et de personnels pouvant être mobilisés en cas de situation d’urgence et enfin, aux études générales sur les mesures de protection civile en temps de paix comme en temps de guerre. En outre, il propose au Président de la République des mesures de prévention appropriées. Bien plus, il coordonne les moyens mis en œuvre pour la protection civile, notamment les secours, le sauvetage, la logistique et l’utilisation des forces supplétives et des corps auxiliaires. Le Conseil arrête, après approbation du Président de la République, un plan national d’intervention et d’organisation des secours.22 En cas de crise, de calamité ou de catastrophes déclarées, le CNPC se réunit de plein droit et s’érige en cellule de crise en vue de la coordination au niveau national des activités des organismes de protection civile. Toutefois il siège au moins une fois l’an sur convocation de son président. En effet, pour l’exécution de ses missions, le CNPC est assisté par un comité technique permanent qui en est l’organe exécutif, par des comités techniques régionaux et par des comités techniques départementaux. Ses ressources proviennent notamment du budget de l’État, des interventions ponctuelles de ce dernier ainsi que des dons et legs. 2.1.3.2 L’Observatoire national des risques Il constitue l’une des structures de concertation et de coordination entre les différentes administrations concernées, les organismes publics ou privés, nationaux et internationaux impliqués dans la gestion préventive des risques et ayant été mises en ____________________ 21 Article 4 du décret n° 96/054. 22 Article 6 du décret n° 96/054. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 318 place pour faciliter le développement et l’efficacité des mesures de protection civile sur l’étendue du territoire national. À cet effet, il représente un mécanisme de veille sécuritaire mis en place par arrêté du Premier ministre.23 Sa mission consiste à collecter, analyser, stocker et diffuser les informations sur les risques naturels, technologiques, industriels et anthropiques. À ce titre, il veille notamment à : • la mise en place à l’échelle nationale, d’un dispositif d’observation des sites et autres installations à risque, assorti d’un système fiable de collecte et de transmission des données et informations sur les risques ; et • la publication d’un bulletin conjoncturel des risques et à la mise en œuvre de toute autre action de sensibilisation et d’information préventive sur les risques. L’Observatoire est placé sous l’autorité du ministre chargé de l’administration territoriale et de la décentralisation. Sa structuration comprend une coordination, des correspondants et un secrétaire permanent. Le coordonnateur est le secrétaire général du MINATD, les membres sont désignés par les administrations et organismes auxquels ils appartiennent. La coordination se réunit en tant que de besoin au moins une fois par trimestre. Les points focaux se recrutent aussi bien au niveau des autres administrations que dans les services de l’État dans chaque région. 2.1.3.3 La Plate-forme nationale pour la réduction des risques de catastrophes La plate-forme nationale pour la réduction des risques de catastrophes quant à elle est un cadre permanent de concertation et de collaboration entre l’ensemble des partenaires nationaux et internationaux de la protection civile créée par le ministre de l’administration territoriale et de la décentralisation.24 Cette plateforme visait la mise en œuvre du cadre d’action de Hyogo 2005-2015 qui préconisait l’intégration des préoccupations de protection civile dans tous les plans et programmes de développement afin que les nations et communautés soient plus résilientes face aux catastrophes. ____________________ 23 Cet arrêté n° 037/PM a été signé le 19 mars 2003 portant création, organisation et fonctionnement d’un Observatoire national des risques. 24 Voir l’arrêté n° 0120/A/MINATD/DPC/CEP/CEA2 du 17 septembre 2010. DROIT ET POLITIQUE DE GESTION DES CATASTROPHES ET RISQUES 319 2.1.3.4 La Commission d’analyse des risques de construction Cette commission fonctionne au sein du Ministère des travaux publics et regroupe les principaux intervenants de la chaîne de la protection civile en matière de bâtiment. Elle est considérée comme l’une des structures de concertation et de collaboration ayant été mises en place pour faciliter le développement et l’efficacité des mesures de protection civile sur l’étendue du territoire national au plan opérationnel, et elle est un cadre de concertation en matière des normes de construction des immeubles de grande hauteur ou à usage public. 2.1.3.5 La Commission d’agrément des plans d’urgence Elle est une plate-forme interministérielle sous l’autorité du ministère chargé de l’industrie. Son rôle est d’approuver les outils d’opération interne en cas de crise que les établissements classés (entreprises potentiellement pourvoyeuses de risques) soumettent à la validation des pouvoirs publics avant le démarrage de leurs activités en application de l’article 56 de la loi n° 96/012 du 5 août 1996 portant loi-cadre relative à la gestion de l’environnement25 et de l’article 12 de la loi n° 98/015 du 14 juillet 1998 relatif aux établissements classés dangereux, insalubres ou incommodes.26 2.2 L’évolution des règles juridiques de gestion des catastrophes et risques Les règles juridiques générales en matière de gestion des catastrophes et risques au Cameroun ont évolué au lendemain de la catastrophe du lac Nyos en 1986 jusqu’au début du 21e siècle avec la prise de conscience des risques biotechnologiques. ____________________ 25 Cet article exige que l’exploitant de tout établissement de première ou deuxième classe établisse un plan d’urgence propre à assurer l’alerte des autorités compétentes et des populations avoisinantes en cas de sinistre ou de menace de sinistre, l’évacuation du personnel et les moyens pour circonscrire les causes du sinistre. Ce plan doit être agréé par les administrations compétentes. 26 Cet article stipule : « L’exploitant de tout établissement classé est tenu d’établir un plan d’urgence propre à assurer l’alerte des autorités compétentes et des populations avoisinantes en cas de sinistre ou de menace de sinistre, l’évacuation du personnel, ainsi que les moyens pour circonscrire les causes du sinistre ». Puis, « le plan d’urgence doit être agréé par les administrations compétentes qui s’assurent périodiquement du bon état et de la fiabilité des matériels prévus pour la mise en œuvre du dit plan ». Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 320 2.2.1 La loi de 1986 sur la protection civile et le décret de 1998 sur l’organisation des plans d’urgence La loi de 198627 est celle qui porte sur la réorganisation générale de la protection civile. Cette loi présente la protection civile sous plusieurs angles notamment : l’objet et l’organisation générale de la protection civile, les moyens de celle-ci et leur emploi et les dispositions pénales en la matière. Les fautes et infractions commises par les personnels utilisés dans l’exécution des tâches de protection civile relèvent en temps normal des organes disciplinaires des corps d’origine de ces personnels et des juridictions de droit commun. En temps de mise en garde, d’état d’urgence ou d’exception, de mobilisation, les mêmes fautes et infractions ressortirent aux organismes disciplinaires et juridictions militaires.28 Quant au décret sur l’organisation des plans d’urgence29, il contient des prescriptions non seulement au niveau des plans d’urgence, mais aussi au niveau du secours en cas de catastrophes ou de risque majeur. 2.2.2 La loi de 1995 portant sur la radioprotection Cette loi vise à assurer la protection de l’homme et de son environnement contre les risques susceptibles de découler de l’utilisation d’une substance radioactive ou de l’exercice d’une activité impliquant une radio-exposition.30 La protection envisagée par cette loi concerne d’abord la préservation de l’air, de l’eau, du sol, de la flore et de la faune, ensuite la préservation ou la limitation des activités susceptibles de dégrader l’environnement, enfin le maintien ou la restauration des ressources que la nature offre à l’homme.31 Les activités autorisées sur la base de cette loi ne doivent pas impliquer des risques incontrôlables pour la santé et la sécurité des personnes et doivent comporter la mise en œuvre des mesures et précautions suffisantes pour protéger de façon optimale les biens, les personnes et l’environnement. Enfin, l’exploitant d’une source radioactive ou d’une installation nucléaire doit couvrir les risques liés au fonctionnement de celle-ci par une police d’assurance. Cette police d’assurance doit être étendue aux personnes, aux biens et à l’environnement.32 ____________________ 27 Loi n° 86/016 du 6 décembre 1986 portant réorganisation générale de la protection civile. 28 Article 10 de la loi n° 86/016 du 6 décembre 1986 portant réorganisation générale de la protection civile. 29 Décret n° 98/031 du 9 mars 1998 portant organisation des plans d’urgence et de secours, en cas de catastrophe ou de risque majeur. 30 Voir l’article 1 de la loi n° 95/08 du 30 janvier 1995 portant sur la radioprotection. 31 Voir l’article 2 de la loi n° 95/08. 32 Voir l’article 12 de la loi n° 95/08 du 30 janvier 1995 sur la radioprotection. DROIT ET POLITIQUE DE GESTION DES CATASTROPHES ET RISQUES 321 2.2.3 La loi-cadre de 1996 sur la gestion de l’environnement Afin de prévenir et de contrôler les accidents dans les établissements classés, cette loi exige que leurs responsables procèdent, avant toute ouverture, à une étude des dangers.33 Celle-ci doit comporter les indications suivantes : • le recensement et la description des dangers suivant leur origine interne ou externe ; • les risques pour l’environnement et le voisinage ; • la justification des techniques et des procédés envisagés pour prévenir les risques, en limiter ou en compenser les effets ; • la conception des installations ; • les consignes d’exploitation ; et • les moyens de détection et d’intervention en cas de sinistre. L’exploitant de tout établissement de première ou de deuxième classe, tel que défini par la législation sur les établissements classés, est tenu d’établir un plan d’urgence propre à assurer l’alerte des autorités compétentes et des populations avoisinantes en cas de sinistre ou de menace de sinistre, l’évacuation du personnel et les moyens pour circonscrire les causes du sinistre.34 Le plan d’urgence doit alors être agréé par les administrations compétentes qui s’assurent périodiquement du bon état et de la fiabilité des matériels prévus pour la mise en œuvre du plan. Aussi, s’agissant des risques et catastrophes naturelles, il est établi à l’initiative de chaque administration compétente, de concert avec les autres administrations concernées, et sous la coordination de l’administration chargée de l’environnement, une carte nationale et des plans de surveillance des zones à haut risque de catastrophes naturelles, notamment les zones à activité sismique ou volcanique, les zones inondables, les zones à risques d’éboulement, les zones à risque de pollution marine et atmosphérique, les zones de sécheresse et de désertification, ainsi que les zones d’éruption magmato-phréatique.35 2.2.4 La loi n° 98/015 du 14 juillet 1998 relative aux établissements classés dangereux, insalubres ou incommodes Cette loi divise les établissements classés dangereux, insalubres ou incommodes en deux classes suivant les dangers ou la gravité des inconvénients inhérents à leur exploitation. La première classe comprend les établissements dont l’exploitation ne ____________________ 33 Article 55 (alinéa 1) de la loi-cadre de 1996 portant sur la gestion de l’environnement. 34 Article 56 de la loi n° 96/012. 35 Article 70 de la loi n° 96/012. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 322 peut être autorisée qu’à la condition que des mesures soient prises pour prévenir les dangers ou les inconvénients ; ceux d’entre eux qui sont générateurs de pollutions solides, liquides ou gazeuses doivent procéder à l’auto surveillance de leurs rejets. Le ministre chargé des établissements classés délimite autour des établissements de première classe un périmètre de sécurité à l’intérieur duquel sont interdites les habitations et toute activité incompatible avec le fonctionnement desdits établissements.36 La deuxième classe comprend les établissements qui ne présentent pas des dangers et inconvénients importants.37 L’exploitant de tout établissement classé est tenu d’établir un plan d’urgence propre à assurer l’alerte des autorités compétentes et des populations avoisinantes en cas de sinistre ou de menace de sinistre, l’évacuation du personnel, ainsi que les moyens pour circonscrire les causes du sinistre. 2.2.5 Les règles juridiques particulières aux risques biotechnologiques Selon la loi sur le régime de sécurité en matière de biotechnologie moderne au Cameroun, la gestion des risques est définie comme toutes38 mesures appliquées pour s’assurer que la manipulation d’un organisme est saine. Les conditions requises pour la gestion des risques changent souvent en fonction d’une évaluation des risques. Une expérimentation à haut risque par exemple peut être gérée grâce à l’application des mesures de confinement appropriées visant à réduire les risques. L’évaluation des risques de moindre degré peut indiquer dans quelle mesure les procédures d’évaluation de risques peuvent être allégées ou supprimées. Les travaux biotechnologiques sont classés en quatre niveaux de sécurité :39 niveau de sécurité 1 (projets de biotechnologie reconnus comme ne présentant pas de risque pour la communauté et pour l’environnement), niveau de sécurité 2 (projets de biotechnologie reconnus comme présentant des risques mineurs pour la communauté ou l’environnement), niveau de sécurité 3 (projets de biotechnologie reconnus comme présentant de légers risques pour la communauté ou l’environnement), niveau de sécurité 4 (projets de biotechnologie reconnus comme présentant des risques certains ou à probabilité élevée, pour la communauté ou l’environnement). ____________________ 36 Voir l’article 7 de la loi n° 98/015 du 14 juillet 1998 relative aux établissements classés dangereux, insalubres ou incommodes. 37 Voir l’article 3 de la loi n° 98/015. 38 Voir l’article 5 (27) de la loi n° 2003/006 du 21 avril 2003 portant régime de sécurité en mati- ère de biotechnologie moderne au Cameroun. 39 Voir l’article 6 de la loi n° 2003/006. DROIT ET POLITIQUE DE GESTION DES CATASTROPHES ET RISQUES 323 Cette loi prévoit que l’évaluation des risques40 dans toute activité en rapport avec les organismes génétiquement modifiés doit tenir compte du principe de précaution, et doit être menée convenablement afin de garantir la sécurité humaine, animale et végétale, ainsi que la protection de la biodiversité de l’environnement.41 Elle peut en outre prendre en compte les avis des experts et les lignes directrices élaborées par les organisations internationales. L’absence des connaissances scientifiques ou du consentement des hommes de science ne doit pas être interprétée comme indicateur d’un certain niveau de risque acceptable. L’évaluation des risques a cinq objectifs : identifier les risques probables, évaluer la probabilité des risques, gérer les risques, analyser les coûts / bénéfices liés aux risques, et considérer l’efficacité des alternatives durables à l’introduction des organismes génétiquement modifiés, ainsi que le principe de précaution.42 L’évaluation des risques est entreprise au cas par cas. Avant toute dissémination intentionnelle dans l’environnement ou toute mise en circulation des organismes vivants modifiés, des organismes génétiquement modifiés ou des produits dérivés, une évaluation minutieuse des risques doit être réalisée.43 Elle intègre plusieurs autres paramètres parmi lesquels : les spécificités relatives à l’organisme doté de nouveaux traits, les dangers potentiels, les connaissances ou expériences que l’on a de l’organisme, l’indication de ce que l’organisme génétiquement modifié libéré sera utilisé comme alimentation humaine ou animale, etc. Aussi, est-il interdit de procéder au mouvement vers d’autres pays ou de s’engager dans des activités d’importation et de mouvement dont le but consisterait à relocaliser ou exporter des substances en rapport avec les organismes génétiquement modifiés susceptibles d’avoir ou ayant la capacité de provoquer une dégradation de l’environnement ou un changement irréversible dans l’équilibre écologique de la diversité biologique, ou dont le caractère dangereux pour la santé humaine, animale, végétale est prouvé. Par ailleurs, concernant la gestion des risques proprement dite,la responsabilité de proposer des mesures de gestion des risques proportionnelles au niveau des risques réels ou virtuels inhérents à la dissémination de l’organisme ou flux des gènes de l’organisme incombe à l’utilisateur de tout organisme génétiquement modifié, ou produit dérivé, au cours de l’utilisation en milieu confiné ou de la dissémination intentionnelle dans l’environnement44. Bien plus, afin de s’assurer de la stabilité dans l’environnement, des génomes et des traits, les spécialistes de l’évaluation des risques sont chargés de veiller à ce que tout organisme génétiquement modifié ou ____________________ 40 Dans le contexte de cette loi, le risque est défini comme la « conjugaison de l’ampleur des conséquences d’un danger, s’il survient, et la probabilité que les conséquences vont se produire » (article 5 (43)). 41 Voir l’article 18 de la loi n° 2003/006. 42 Voir l’article 19 de la loi n° 2003/006 du 21 avril 2003. 43 Article 20 (alinéa 1) de la loi n° 2003/006 du 21 avril 2003. 44 Article 23 (1) de la loi n° 2003/006 du 21 avril 2003. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 324 produit dérivé, importé ou de production locale, soit soumis à une période d’observation proportionnelle, selon le cas, à son cycle de vie ou à sa période de reproduction avant son passage à l’utilisation envisagée.45 En outre, en cas d’importation des organismes génétiquement modifiés, ou de produits dérivés, l’exportateur ou promoteur se charge d’assurer l’appui technique et financier nécessaire à l’évaluation et à la gestion des risques.46 2.3 L’évolution du cadre politique de gestion des catastrophes et risques Le cadre politique de gestion des catastrophes et risques est établi dans trois documents qui présentent les orientations et les options des pouvoirs publics en la matière. Il s’agit du Programme national de prévention et de gestion des catastrophes (PNPGC), du plan national de convergence et du plan national d’adaptation aux changements climatiques. 2.3.1 Le Programme national de prévention et de gestion des catastrophes Le Programme national de prévention et de gestion des catastrophes (PNPGC) est un document qui a été mis en place par le gouvernement avec la coopération du Programme des Nations unies pour le développement. Le PNPGC vise donc à doter le gouvernement d’une vision proactive, apte à rendre son action plus efficace. Les études suivantes ont été menées dans le cadre de ce programme : • la révision de la réglementation et de la législation en vigueur ; • l’élaboration d’un plan d’action national des interventions ; • l’élaboration d’un programme de formation des personnels et structures chargés de la protection civile ; • la recherche sur les risques et catastrophes naturelles et technologiques ; • l’étude sur le volet sectoriel transport en matière de prévention et gestion des catastrophes ; • le volet santé et programme national de sensibilisation ; et • l’élaboration d’un plan national de transmission en matière de prévention et gestion des catastrophes. Le PNPGC a permis le renforcement des capacités des structures de l’État en matière de gestion des catastrophes et risques. ____________________ 45 Article 23 (alinéa 2) de la loi n° 2003/006 du 21 avril 2003. 46 Article 24 de la loi n° 2003/006 du 21 avril 2003. DROIT ET POLITIQUE DE GESTION DES CATASTROPHES ET RISQUES 325 2.3.2 Le Plan national de contingence Afin de renforcer les moyens de lutte contre les catastrophes tant sur le plan opérationnel que sur le plan stratégique, le Cameroun s’est doté d’un Plan national de contingence. Ce document constitue un cadre d’orientation politique et technique de l’action des partenaires internationaux, des organismes nationaux et autres intervenants dans la gestion des risques et catastrophes. En plus, il présente des synergies et des actions coordonnées pour des situations de crise que peuvent générer les risques. À cet égard, chaque intervenant doit élaborer son propre plan sectoriel de contingence en tenant compte de son mandat et de ses missions régaliennes. Ce n’est qu’à ce prix que le plan national de convergence sera plus visible, efficient et efficace pour la politique nationale de gestion des catastrophes et des risques. 2.3.3 Le Plan national d’adaptation aux changements climatiques Les changements climatiques constituent sûrement l’enjeu majeur de notre siècle et préoccupent la communauté scientifique internationale ainsi que les pays du monde entier en raison de leurs impacts négatifs, potentiels et avérés, sur les hommes et les écosystèmes. Le Cameroun n’est pas exempté de cette situation et fait déjà face à une récurrence anormale de phénomènes climatiques extrêmes tels que la violence des vents, les températures élevées ou de fortes précipitations qui mettent en danger les communautés humaines, les écosystèmes et les services qu’ils fournissent. Les changements climatiques sont à l’origine de plusieurs catastrophes et risques qu’il convient de prévenir à court, moyen et long terme. C’est ainsi que le Plan national d’adaptation aux changements climatiques (PNACC) a été réalisé afin de permettre au Cameroun de faire face à ce phénomène ainsi qu’à ses effets néfastes. Le PNACC est un document de stratégie nationale qui donne un cadre pour guider la coordination et la mise en œuvre des mécanismes d’adaptation du Cameroun aux changements climatiques. C’est aussi un instrument de planification visant à définir et à suivre les activités prioritaires à réaliser dans les secteurs clés et pour chacune des cinq zones agro-écologiques du Cameroun. Le PNACC a pour objectifs : • de réduire la vulnérabilité du pays aux incidences des changements climatiques en renforçant sa capacité d’adaptation et de résilience ; et • de faciliter l’intégration de l’adaptation aux changements climatiques dans les politiques, programmes et travaux pertinents, nouveaux ou en cours, en particulier les processus et stratégies de planification du développement, dans tous les secteurs concernés et à différents niveaux, selon qu’il convient. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 326 Ce document suit les recommandations de la sixième session de la conférence des parties à la convention-cadre des Nations unies sur les changements climatiques. Son élaboration a fait l’objet au préalable d’une vaste concertation de 2012 à 2015 et a suivi un processus à la fois intégratif, participatif, inclusif, spécifique et dynamique. Présentant l’état des lieux des changements climatiques au Cameroun, il ressort qu’au cours des cinq dernières décennies, l’on a observé une régression des précipitations, une augmentation de la température moyenne annuelle et une recrudescence des catastrophes telles que des éboulements, des coulées de boues, des sécheresses, des chutes de pierres, des glissements de terrain, etc. En somme, la stratégie nationale d’adaptation aux changements climatiques présente des mesures d’ensemble interpellant les secteurs du pays, publics et privés, pour les aider à structurer leurs propres projets. En somme, les mesures proposées dans ce plan vont permettre une plus grande résilience et une plus grande capacité d’adaptation aux impacts des changements climatiques, et donc une meilleure gestion des catastrophes et risques engendrés par ce phénomène. Le cadre politique de gestion des catastrophes et risques nécessite un appui de la coopération internationale pour l’implémentation de toutes les mesures qui y sont proposées. 3 La coopération internationale et la gestion des risques et catastrophes au Cameroun Le Cameroun s’implique dans des programmes de coopération internationale en matière de gestion des risques et catastrophes aussi bien au niveau africain qu’au niveau universel. 3.1 La coopération au niveau africain La coopération africaine relative à la gestion des risques et catastrophes se situe au niveau continental et au niveau sous régional de l’Afrique centrale. L’Afrique est le seul continent au monde ayant connu une augmentation du nombre de catastrophes déclarées au cours de la dernière décennie. Vivement préoccupée par les souffrances et la perturbation des activités de développement qu’engendrent les catastrophes en Afrique et inspirée par la nouvelle donne interplanétaire, la troisième session ordinaire du sommet de l’Union africaine tenue en Éthiopie du 6 au 8 juillet 2004 a favorablement accueilli la stratégie régionale afri- DROIT ET POLITIQUE DE GESTION DES CATASTROPHES ET RISQUES 327 caine de réduction des risques de catastrophes47, élaborée en collaboration avec le secrétariat du NEPAD, avec l’appui de l’ONU ainsi que de la Banque africaine de développement. Ce document qui présente la stratégie mise en place par les pays africains pour la réduction des risques de catastrophes afin de contribuer à l’avènement d’un développement durable et à l’éradication de la pauvretéen intégrant la réduction des risques de catastrophes aux initiatives de développement, a été entériné lors de la 10e réunion ministérielle africaine sur l’environnement. Il suggère un certain nombre de grands axes d’action qui s’accordent avec le Cadre d’Action de Hyogo,48 et qui sont susceptibles de faciliter la gestion des catastrophes sur le continent. Le Conseil exécutif de l’Union africaine, lors de la huitième session ordinaire tenue du 16 au 21 janvier 2006 à Khartoum au Soudan, a approuvé le programme d’action africain 2006-2010 sur la réduction des risques de catastrophes élaboré conformément à la stratégie et a exhorté tous les États membres de l’Union et les communautés économiques régionales (CER) à la mettre en œuvre. Par ailleurs, la prorogation et l’enrichissement du programme d’action pour couvrir la période jusqu’en 2015 ont été débattus et acceptés à la deuxième réunion consultative de la plateforme régionale en mai 2009, et adoptés par la conférence des ministres, puis approuvés par le conseil exécutif de l’Union africaine en 2010. Les CER ont de ce fait la responsabilité de coordonner les initiatives entre les États dans le cadre de la stratégie régionale africaine et d’opérationnaliser le programme d’action sur la base de leurs stratégies régionales de réduction des risques de catastrophes. C’est sous ce prisme que s’inscrit la stratégie régionale de la CEEAC pour la prévention des risques et la gestion des catastrophes et l’adaptation aux changements climatiques.49 Elle s’appuie alors sur les priorités du Cadre d’Action de Hyogo et s’inscrit sur la vision tracée par l’Union africaine. L’Afrique centrale est exposée à des risques de catastrophes de divers types, induisant une forte prévalence de vulnérabilité qui influe sur les efforts que mènent les États pour sortir du sous-développement. Aussi, au cours des trente dernières années, la région Afrique centrale a enregistré une série de catastrophes, dont les plus importantes auront été entre autres, les émanations de gaz toxiques, les éruptions volcaniques, les inondations, les glissements de terrain, les incendies et l’afflux des réfugiés. De surcroît, elle fait face à des intempéries, épidémies et à une multitude d’accidents de la voie publique. Ces populations sont exposées aux risques liés aux dangers suivants : les séismes, les éruptions volcaniques, les émanations de gaz, les ____________________ 47 Voir ce document dans https://www.unisdr.org/2005/task-force/workinggroups/wgafrica/NEPAD-DRR-Strategy-FRENCH.pdf, consulté le 10 mars 2017. 48 Le cadre d’action de Hyogo est le principal instrument que les États membres des Nations unies ont adopté pour réduire les risques de catastrophes. 49 Voir ce document dans http://www.fao.org/fileadmin/user_upload/drought/docs/CEEAC_ 2012_Stratégie-PRGC_adopte.pdf, consulté de 10 mars 2017. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 328 coulées boueuses, les cyclones tropicaux, les inondations, les sécheresses, les tornades, les orages, les foudres, la pollution environnementale ou la déforestation, les diverses épidémies, pandémies, les incendies, les risques chimiques, les accidents aériens, maritimes, ferroviaires et routiers, les risques liés au terrorisme et les conflits armés avec leurs caravanes de réfugiés, etc. Face à cet état de choses, les États membres de la CEEAC reconnaissent le besoin de mettre en place une approche proactive, globalisante et soutenue de gestion des risques de catastrophes de manière à les prévenir et à réduire l’impact désastreux des aléas sur les vies et le développement socio-économique des populations de la région. C’est ainsi que l’élaboration d’une stratégie régionale Afrique de prévention des risques de catastrophe avait été décidée en juin 2003 au cours de la réunion consultative sur la prévention des risques de catastrophes en Afrique. Ce travail avait été précédé d’un état des lieux de la prévention des risques de catastrophes en Afrique dont les conclusions indiquaient des lacunes dans les domaines suivants : les structures institutionnelles, l’identification des risques, la gestion du savoir, la gouvernance et les réponses d’urgence. Au terme d’un processus consultatif qui avait impliqué les Communautés économiques régionales et les États, la stratégie avait été officiellement reconnue en juillet 2004 lors du Sommet de l’Union africaine, tenu à Addis-Abeba en Éthiopie. Le but de la stratégie de la CEEAC pour la prévention des risques et la gestion des catastrophes dans la région Afrique centrale est de contribuer à l’atteinte du développement durable et à la diminution de la pauvreté à travers la réduction substantielle des impacts sociaux, économiques et environnementaux des catastrophes conformément à la stratégie régionale africaine et au Cadre d’Action de Hyogo. Au niveau des États de la CEEAC, la promotion des partenariats avec le secteur privé, les organisations intergouvernementales et non gouvernementales pourra constituer un apport important aux efforts de financement public. 3.2 La coopération au niveau mondial Le Cameroun coopère avec l’Organisation internationale de la protection civile et avec le système des Nations unies en matière de gestion des catastrophes et de prévention des risques. DROIT ET POLITIQUE DE GESTION DES CATASTROPHES ET RISQUES 329 3.2.1 La coopération avec l’Organisation internationale de la protection civile L’Organisation internationale de la protection civile (OIPC)50 est une institution intergouvernementale qui a pour objectifde contribuer au développement par les États de systèmes propres à assurer la protection et l’assistance aux populations, ainsi qu’à sauvegarder les biens et l’environnement face aux catastrophes naturelles et dues à l’homme. L’OIPC fédère des structures nationales créées par les États dans le but de les unir et de favoriser la solidarité entre elles. En outre, elle a plusieurs missions visant entre autres à : • développer et maintenir une liaison étroite entre les organisations s’occupant de la protection et du sauvetage des populations et des biens ; • encourager et assurer l’échange d’informations, d’expériences, de cadres et d’experts entre les différents pays en matière de protection et de sauvegarde des populations et des biens ; • recueillir et diffuser les informations sur les principes d’organisation, de protection et d’intervention concernant les dangers qui peuvent menacer les populations par suite d’inondations, de tremblements de terre, d’avalanches, de grands incendies, tempêtes, ruptures de barrage ou autres formes de destruction, de la contamination de l’air et de l’eau, ou par suite d’attaques au moyen d’engins modernes de guerre ; • aider les membres à former parmi la population une opinion éclairée en ce qui concerne la nécessité viable de la prévention, de la protection et de l’intervention en cas de catastrophe ; et • stimuler les recherches dans le domaine de la protection et du sauvetage des populations et des biens par la voie de l’information, de la publication d’études et par tout autre moyen approprié, etc. Son fonctionnement est assuré par l’assemblée générale, le conseil exécutif et le secrétariat. Le Cameroun est admis comme membre de l’OIPC en 198951 et entretient un excellent niveau de partenariat avec celle-ci, notamment dans le domaine de la formation des cadres de la direction de la protection civile et du corps national des sapeurs-pompiers. Le Cameroun a ratifié la convention- cadre d’assistance en matière de protection civile adoptée sous les auspices de l’OIPC le 22 mai 2000.52 À travers cette convention, les États-parties s’engagent à favoriser la coopération entre ____________________ 50 La constitution de l’OIPC a été adoptée le 17 octobre 1966 et entrée en vigueur le 1er mars 1972. 51 Voir http://www.icdo.org/fr/propos-de-loipc/membres/etats-membres, consulté le 10 mars 2017. 52 Voir le décret n° 2002/018 du 18 janvier 2002 portant ratification de la convention-cadre d’assistance en matière de protection civile. Emmanuel D. KAM YOGO 330 services de protection civile en matière de formation de personnel, d’échanges d’informations et d’expertise et à réduire les délais d’intervention.53 3.2.2 La coopération avec le système des Nations unies La survenance des catastrophes au Cameroun a permis de prendre conscience non seulement de la pertinence de la politique de protection civile dans le pays, mais aussi de la nécessité d’un appui de la coopération bilatérale et multilatérale, notamment avec le système des Nations unies. À cet effet, parmi les institutions onusiennes la coopération avec l’Office de coordination des affaires humanitaires (OCHA) et celle avec le Programme des Nations unies pour le Développement (PNUD) en matière de gestion des catastrophes et risques sont remarquables. Dans le souci de renforcer les moyens de lutte contre les catastrophes non seulement sur le plan opérationnel, mais aussi et surtout sur le plan stratégique, le Cameroun bénéficie de l’appui technique de l’OCHA. Cet appui technique s’est manifesté dans le cadre de l’élaboration du PNPGC en 1998. En septembre 2010, lors de l’atelier portant sur la préparation aux situations d’urgence et la familiarisation avec le système des Nations unies pour l’évaluation et la coordination en cas de catastrophe tenu à Yaoundé au Cameroun, il a été recommandé à l’OCHA de désigner un conseiller humanitaire auprès de la CEEAC. Dans le but de faire face à la forte prévalence des risques, le gouvernement camerounais a opté pour une politique vigoureuse de prévention et de gestion des catastrophes. C’est ainsi que grâce au concours du PNUD, le plan national de contingence et le programme national de prévention et de gestion des catastrophes ont été élaborés. Le PNUD a en outre soutenu l’accompagnement technique et opérationnel de l’ensemble du processus de formulation du plan national d’adaptation aux changements climatiques. En 2005, le Cameroun a participé à la conférence mondiale sur la prévention des catastrophes qui a adopté le cadre d’action de Hyogo pour 2005-2015 : pour des nations et des collectivités résilientes face aux catastrophes. Ce cadre d’action de Hyogo a suscité, au niveau du Cameroun, la création de la plate-forme nationale pour la réduction des risques de catastrophes. Pour le reste, le Cameroun coopère aussi avec le Fonds des Nations unies pour l’enfance, la Fédération internationale des sociétés de Croix-Rouge et du Croissant rouge ainsi qu’avec des partenaires techniques et financiers bilatéraux dans le domaine de la gestion des catastrophes et risques. ____________________ 53 Voir l’article 2 de la convention-cadre d’assistance en matière de protection civile. DROIT ET POLITIQUE DE GESTION DES CATASTROPHES ET RISQUES 331 4 Conclusion Trois décennies après la survenance de la catastrophe naturelle la plus meurtrière du Cameroun indépendant, la catastrophe du lac Nyos, les pouvoirs publics semblent avoir pris conscience de ce que la prévention est la meilleure approche pour faire face à toute sorte de calamité. Même si aucune loi ne peut interdire la survenance des catastrophes, une politique préventive peut bien limiter les impacts de celles-ci. Cette politique préventive doit mettre l’accent sur l’éducation des populations en matière de risques et catastrophes et s’appuyer sur les communautés de base et la société civile afin de vulgariser les réflexes pour prévenir, sauver et secourir dans le contexte actuel de dégradation de l’environnement. Cette implication des populations à la base semble faire défaut actuellement au Cameroun.54 Bibliographie indicative Dauphiné, A & D Provitolo, 2013, Risques et catastrophes : observer, spatialiser, comprendre, gérer, Paris, Armand Colin. Ministère de l’administration territoriale et de la décentralisation, 2006, 1986-2006 : Remember Lake Nyos, Rapport sur l’état de la protection civile au Cameroun, Yaoundé, Ministère de l’administration territoriale et de la décentralisation. Picard, M & E Powrie, 2016, Disaster risk management law and policy, in: Ruppel, OC & K Ruppel-Schlichting (eds), 2016, Environmental law and policy in Namibia, 3rd edition, Windhoek, Hans-Seidel-Foundation, 371-388. Yanou Tchingankong, M, 2014, La gestion par le haut des catastrophes au Cameroun. Une expression de l’apprentissage étatique des politiques publiques, 18 & 19, (1-2), Polis-Revue Camerounaise de Science Politique, 101-127. ____________________ 54 Yanou Tchingankong (2014). SECTION 5 LAND, AGRICULTURE AND URBANISATION LA TERRE, L’AGRICULTURE ET L’URBANISATION 335 CHAPITRE 14 : LE RÉGIME FONCIER ET DOMANIAL AU CAMEROUN Jean-Marie Vianney BENDEGUE Le régime foncier et domanial camerounais est le produit de son histoire (1), issue d’un processus de parturition jonché d’étapes et de séquences successives marquées par les apports des diverses influences dont il est la synthèse et qui justifient sa substance (2), mais dont les faiblesses, en partie source de litiges (3), appellent des réformes en perspective (4). 1 La genèse En sus de son socle traditionnel de base, le régime foncier et domanial camerounais s’est constitué au fil du temps, à la faveur des trois principaux grands moments qui structurent le processus de son élaboration, à savoir : les périodes précoloniale, coloniale et postcoloniale. 1.1 La période précoloniale La tenure foncière au Cameroun précolonial n’est pas isolée. Elle s’insère dans une coutume totalisante qui considère l’espace comme un tout dont la terre est un élément constitutif axial. Trois piliers émergent de cette tenure foncière. La terre est considérée comme un bien sacré, un bien commun, mais aussi et surtout un bien patrimonial et productif. Triptyque de base auquel se superpose le rôle prégnant des monarchies et des chefferies traditionnelles dans la gouvernance foncière des sociétés. Jean-Marie Vianney BENDEGUE 336 1.1.1 Le triptyque de base Au Cameroun, la terre n’a pas qu’une simple portée utilitaire ou usuelle. Elle a une valeur religieuse, une dimension sacrée incontestable. La nature sacrée des biens fonciers est en phase avec l’esprit général des coutumes.1 Il existerait ainsi un ‘Chef de la pluie’ dans la région de Mokolo.2 Chez les Bassas, le berceau de leur race serait la Ngok-litouba, pierre à trou, montagne pourvu d’un orifice à son sommet.3 Chez les Bamilékés, la terre serait en relation étroite avec les aïeux de la tribu ; les crânes des ancêtres, représentés par des basaltes, seraient utilisés pour marquer les frontières de la terre tribale et il s’établirait ainsi une confusion, d’une part, entre la terre des aïeux et les aïeux eux-mêmes, d’autre part, entre le chef et la terre, celui-ci étant « un homme qui sort de la terre pour devenir un Mfom ».4 Chez les Bakokos, l’idée d’appropriation individuelle ne se posait même pas, puisque la terre appartenait au Ngué, génie souterrain.5 Dans la région de Kribi, les Batangas ne pouvaient procéder à l’achat ou à la vente d’aucun terrain sur leur propre territoire, mais un Batanga pouvait acheter un champ à un ressortissant d’une autre tribu, et le revendre.6 Les camerounais tiennent à garder les terres en propriétés coutumières puisque « Les terres appartiennent aux ancêtres ; elles doivent rester propriétés coutumières même si elles ne sont pas mises en valeur »7 Le sacré apparaît ainsi comme la fondation et le ciment du collectif. Selon le degré variable des organisations ou des groupes qui structurent la société, la terre est gérée au sein des familles, lignages, clans, villages, sous-tribus, tribus, chefferies, lamidats, royaumes, sultanats ou autres. Dans l’ensemble, la propriété est collective et non privée. L’habitant est titulaire d’un droit à l’intérieur de sa collectivité ; il n’est pas détenteur d’un titre de propriété.8 La notion de propriété privée n’est donc pas complètement absente de la tenure foncière traditionnelle, mais celle-ci n’est pas envisagée en dehors du tissu serré des relations sociales et communautaires. L’appartenance à la communauté apparaît comme la précondition pour l’accès à la propriété foncière. Le rapport au foncier en dehors de la famille, du groupe ou de la communauté d’appartenance est difficile à appréhender. Les droits individuels ne sont pas niés. Mais ils n’existent que comme des démembrements de la propriété collective. D’où une certaine forme de patrimonialité foncière collective. ____________________ 1 Binet (1951:2 et 5). 2 (ibid.:2). 3 (ibid.:3). 4 (ibid.:3-4). 5 (ibid.:4). 6 (ibid.). 7 Tjouen (1981:7). 8 Gourou (1970:80). LE RÉGIME FONCIER ET DOMANIAL AU CAMEROUN 337 Le Cameroun précolonial est une société essentiellement paysanne et la terre constitue la base même de sa survie. La terre est donc à la fois un bien patrimonial et un bien économique. La notion de bien patrimonial telle qu’envisagée ici n’a pas le même contenu mais n’est pas très différente de celle inhérente au Code civil, d’un bien ou d’un droit appréciable en argent, ayant une valeur d’échange, cessible et transmissible à un nouveau titulaire, susceptible d’être échangé contre d’autres droits, transmissibles aux héritiers, saisissable et prescriptible par voie de prescription acquisitive ou extinctive.9 A la différence fondamentale que tout se déroule en vase clos, à l’intérieur du groupe social, la cession à des tiers extérieurs étant formellement proscrite. L’économie dans ce contexte de sociétés fermées ou faiblement ouvertes sur le monde, est d’abord une économie véritablement circulaire, de subsistance. L’homme en est la véritable valeur. Un tel système n’est pas autorégulé. Les institutions de commandement traditionnel y jouent un rôle clé. 1.1.2 Le rôle prégnant des monarchies et des chefferies traditionnelles Très schématiquement, le Cameroun précolonial est structuré en10 trois grandes zones à la fois humaines et physiques : les savanes du Nord où s’opposent musulmans et païens, le Sud forestier, domaine des Bantou, et l’Ouest, ou plus exactement les hauts plateaux appelés Grassfields (terres herbeuses) à l’originalité si puissante. Au regard de la tenure foncière traditionnelle, c’est principalement le Roi, le Sultan ou le Chef11, selon les cas, qui assure la gestion des droits sur la terre. Les variations contextuelles relèvent pour l’essentiel de la dichotomie entre les sociétés dites organisées, caractérisées par une emprise forte du pouvoir central sur la gestion des terres, ce qui est notamment le cas dans les féodalités musulmanes du septentrion et les monarchies et dynasties traditionnelles de l’ouest, et les sociétés dites acéphales, caractérisées par un leadership foncier faible, à l’aune du leadership politique global, comme dans les villages païens du nord et la plupart des sociétés bantous du sud forestier et côtier, nonobstant l’existence ci et là que quelques grands chefs mythiques, à l’instar de Rudolph Douala Manga Bell, Martin Paul Samba, Charles Atangana, Manimben, Somo et autres. ____________________ 9 Terre & Simler (2014:34). 10 Marguerat (1976:1-2). 11 En l’espèce qui peut être chef de village, de canton, de lignage, de famille ou autre. Jean-Marie Vianney BENDEGUE 338 1.2 La période coloniale Dans le cadre de la période coloniale, le Cameroun a principalement subi une triple influence : le protectorat allemand de 1884 à 1916, puis le mandat et la tutelle francobritannique, jusqu’aux indépendances en 1960-1961. 1.2.1 L’héritage allemand L’héritage allemand consiste principalement en l’instauration de la Commission foncière en 1896, notamment pour combattre la spéculation foncière et assurer le contrôle des ressources foncières des indigènes, tradition qui sera perpétuée par l’institution des diverses commissions foncières actuelles et la mise en place du Grundbuch, ou livre foncier en allemand, en vue d’assurer la publicité des droits réels immobiliers. On trouve des traces de cet important legs, dans les dispositions de l’article 2 de l’ordonnance n° 74/1 du 6 juillet 1974 en vertu desquelles font notamment l’objet du droit de propriété privé, « les terres consignées au Grundbuch ». On pourrait également établir un parallèle entre la pratique de la prénotation judiciaire ou inscription conservatoire des droits réels immobiliers, et celle du contredit en droit allemand. En effet, pour assurer, à titre provisoire, la protection du véritable titulaire du droit, la loi Allemande prévoit l’inscription d’un contredit à l’exactitude du livre foncier. Cette inscription intervient soit sur la base de l’approbation donnée par l’intéressé, soit lorsque cette approbation ne peut être obtenue, à la suite d’une ordonnance provisoire du tribunal. Le titulaire légitime du droit non inscrit ou inexactement inscrit, a la faculté d’obtenir cette ordonnance selon une procédure simplifiée et accélérée, en faisant simplement valoir son droit d’obtenir une rectification du livre foncier de façon plausible. Il suffit, à cet égard, que l’existence du droit invoqué soit rendue vraisemblable, par exemple par une déclaration faite sous serment. Le droit n’a pas à être prouvé. L’inscription du contredit n’empêche pas toute inscription ultérieure, mais elle exclut une acquisition de bonne foi au cas où le titulaire apparent du droit en disposerait. 1.2.2 La touche britannique La présence britannique au Cameroun a été principalement marquée, au plan de la gestion foncière, par la vassalisation des souverains locaux, qui exerçaient néanmoins au plan local un réel pouvoir d’administration foncière dans le cadre de l’indirect rule, notamment en tant que juges de premier ressort de tous les litiges fonciers avant la saisine des juridictions de droit moderne, par le Gouverneur de la République Fé- LE RÉGIME FONCIER ET DOMANIAL AU CAMEROUN 339 dérale du Nigéria et la dualité des statuts et des régimes fonciers. Avec l’avènement de l’unification en 1972, les pouvoirs desdits souverains locaux seront transférés à l’Administration qui va les exercer désormais dans le cadre des commissions foncières présidées par les autorités administratives. Concernant la dualité des statuts fonciers, sous administration coloniale anglaise, la législation foncière distingue à partir de 1927 deux catégories de terres. La première comprend les terres exennemies (Freehold Lands) constituées des vastes plantations allemandes anciennement dites ‘vacantes et sans maître’, donc les terres de l’État. La deuxième englobe toutes les terres coutumières Native Lands occupées par les autochtones. Il s’agit essentiellement de portions de terre stériles et dispersées.12 Les différents textes en vigueur organisaient une tenure foncière articulée autour de deux principaux piliers que sont notamment le régime du right of occupancy dédié aux aborigènes et celui de l’autorisation of occupancy, sanctionné par un certificate of occupancy, destiné aux étrangers.13 Ce certificate of occupancy sera éligible à la transformation en titre foncier, dans le cadre d’un délai de dix ans pour les terrains en zone urbaine et 15 pour les terrains en zones rurales, après l’avènement de l’ordonnance n° 74/1 du 6 juillet 1974 fixant le régime foncier. 1.2.3 Le système français Le système colonial français, quant à lui, a été principalement caractérisé, notamment en marge de la poursuite de la domanialisation des terres, par l’instauration, à la faveur de deux décrets successifs du 21 juillet 1932, d’une part, d’un régime de la constatation des droits fonciers indigènes, sanctionné par la délivrance d’un livret foncier qui bénéficiera par la suite du régime de la transformation en titre foncier suite à l’avènement de l’ordonnance n° 74/1 susmentionnée ; d’autre part, du régime foncier de l’immatriculation, inspiré de l’Act Torrens, d’origine australienne. Le régime foncier de l’immatriculation, tant par voie directe que par voie de concession, actuellement pratiqué au Cameroun, est profondément tributaire de ce texte. 1.3 La période postcoloniale Quant à la période post coloniale, celle-ci est principalement caractérisée par un processus de camerounisation du régime foncier et domanial notamment sanctionné par les textes de loi suivants : la loi n° 59/47 du 17 juin 1959 portant organisation doma- ____________________ 12 Tjouen (1981:30). 13 Lire à ce propos, Ngwasiri Nforti (1980). Jean-Marie Vianney BENDEGUE 340 niale et foncière ; le décret-loi n° 63/2 du 9 janvier 1963 fixant le régime foncier et domanial au Cameroun oriental ; la loi n° 66/LF/4 du 10 juin 1966 réglementant la procédure d’expropriation pour cause d’utilité publique dans l’État fédéré du Cameroun oriental ; les ordonnances de 1974 fixant le régime foncier et domanial. Il s’agit en l’occurrence de trois ordonnance que sont : l’ordonnance n° 74/1 du 6 juillet 1974 fixant le régime foncier ; l’ordonnance n° 74/2 du 6 juillet 1974 fixant le régime domanial ; l’ordonnance n° 74/3 du 6 juillet 1974 fixant le régime des expropriations et des indemnisations. Ces ordonnances seront complétées le 27 avril 1976 par trois décrets numéros 76/165, 76/166 et 76/167 fixant respectivement les conditions d’obtention du titre foncier, les modalités de gestion du domaine national et les modalités de gestion du domaine privé de l’État. La dernière ordonnance citée sera ultérieurement modifiée, par la loi n° 85/09 du 4 juillet 1985 relative à l’expropriation pour cause d’utilité publique et aux modalités d’indemnisation, dont les modalités d’application sont fixées par les dispositions du décret n° 87/1872 du 16 décembre 1987. 2 La substance des régimes En vertu des ordonnances susmentionnées et des textes pris pour leur application, la gouvernance foncière au Cameroun est tributaire des statuts des terrains qui relèvent de trois principales catégories que sont les terrains du domaine public, les terrains du domaine privé et les terrains du domaine national. 2.1 Les statuts des terrains Les terrains du domaine privé font partie de la propriété privée et/ou font l’objet d’un titre foncier. Les terrains du domaine public sont par nature ou par destination destinés au public ou à l’usage du public. Les terrains du domaine national ne font partie ni de l’une ni de l’autre catégorie de terrain. En effet par domaine national, il faut entendre les terrains qui appartiennent à la nation et qui sont en conséquence le lieu d’expression de tous les droits et de toutes les prétentions légitimes de toutes les catégories d’acteurs, que ce soit l’État, les collectivités coutumières, les personnes physiques et morales. Le Cameroun fait ainsi partie, notamment avec le Niger, le Sénégal, le Togo et certains autres États post coloniaux, des pays qui ont opté dans les années 60 et 70 pour l’institution d’